Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, 25560-25561 [2019-11428]

Download as PDF 25560 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 106 / Monday, June 3, 2019 / Notices discovery of the collection history. An osteological examination conducted by the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology in 2016 showed that the human remains, which consist of a partial skull, belonged to an infant aged approximately three months. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Gila Wilderness region of New Mexico, located in the southwest part of the state, is home to the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument. This region was originally settled by the Mogollon culture, who abandoned the area for good ca. 1150. Contemporary Pueblo people in the southwest who claim descent from the Mogollon culture have continued the distinctive Mimbres pottery tradition created by the Mimbres Mogollon branch/subgroup of the Mogollon culture. After the Mogollon culture largely abandoned the Gila Wilderness region, the Apache people lived there, A.D. 1200–1600. Since the skull fragment was in too poor condition for its age to be determined, it may date from either the Mogollon period of occupation (200–1150), or the later Apache occupation (1200–1600). The human remains have been determined to be ‘‘Native American’’ based on their having been collected from a cave burial site in the Gila Wilderness region and their identification as an ‘‘Indian Skull’’ in the original accession record. jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center Officials of the Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Invited Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Nancy Dunn, Museum Manager, Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center, 505 West Richardson Avenue, Artesia, NM 88210, telephone (575) 748–2390, email artesiamuseum@artesianm.gov, by July 3, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:26 May 31, 2019 Jkt 247001 of control of the human remains to The Invited Tribes may proceed. The Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center is responsible for notifying The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: May 2, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–11427 Filed 5–31–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027843; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of San Diego, San Diego, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of San Diego, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the University of San Diego. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the University of San Diego at the address in this notice by July 3, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Derrick R. Cartwright, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110–8001, telephone (619) 260–7632, email dcartwright@sandiego.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, that meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items Between the 1950s and the 1990s, 13 cultural items were collected from sites in San Diego County, CA, possibly from Kitchen Creek, Vallecitos, or Hancock Ranch (there are no exact provenience records for these objects). These objects were part of a 1994 donation from the estate of Dorothy Zama May of La Jolla, CA, who was an avid enthusiast of American Indian cultures and traditions of the Southwest United States. The May family traveled throughout the Southwest U.S. and Southern California collecting American Indian art and other objects. The 13 objects of cultural patrimony are one set of bone whistle fragments; two stone pendants; one miniature stone pestle; one stone slab with pictograph; two stone figures; five ceramic pipes; and one stone pipe or sucking tube. San Diego County is recognized as the aboriginal area of the people of the Kumeyaay Nation and all 13 bands of the Kumeyaay Nation were invited to consult. During consultations with representatives of the Jamul Indian Village of California of the Kumeyaay Nation, tribal members recognized these objects as having been important to their village members, and spoke of how they were used both in the past and present. They related stories of learning about objects similar to these from tribal members. These thirteen objects are likely culturally significant to all of the bands of the Kumeyaay Nation. Determinations Made by the University of San Diego Officials of the University of San Diego have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the 13 cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the objects of cultural patrimony and the Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian Reservation, California; Capitan E:\FR\FM\03JNN1.SGM 03JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 106 / Monday, June 3, 2019 / Notices Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California (Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, California; Viejas (Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Viejas Reservation, California); Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, California; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (previously listed as the Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation, California; Jamul Indian Village of California; La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian Reservation, California; Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation, California; Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, California; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California; and the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation; hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Dr. Derrick R. Cartwright, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110–8001, telephone (619) 260– 7632, email dcartwright@sandiego.edu, by July 3, 2019. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the objects of cultural patrimony to The Tribes may proceed. The University of San Diego is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: May 2, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–11428 Filed 5–31–19; 8:45 am] jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with NOTICES BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701–TA–621 and 731– TA–1447 (Preliminary)] Ceramic Tile From China Determinations On the basis of the record 1 developed in the subject investigations, the United States International Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) determines, pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’), that there is a reasonable indication that an industry in the United States is materially injured by reason of imports of ceramic tile from China, provided for in subheadings 6907.21.10, 6907.21.20, 6907.21.30, 6907.21.40, 6907.21.90, 6907.22.10, 6907.22.20, 6907.22.30, 6907.22.40, 6907.22.90, 6907.23.10, 6907.23.20, 6907.23.30, 6907.23.40, 6907.23.90, 6907.30.10, 6907.30.20, 6907.30.30, 6907.30.40, 6907.30.90, 6907.40.10, 6907.40.20, 6907.40.30, 6907.40.40, and 6907.40.90 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, that are alleged to be sold in the United States at less than fair value (‘‘LTFV’’) and to be subsidized by the government of China.2 Commencement of Final Phase Investigations Pursuant to section 207.18 of the Commission’s rules, the Commission also gives notice of the commencement of the final phase of its investigations. The Commission will issue a final phase notice of scheduling, which will be published in the Federal Register as provided in section 207.21 of the Commission’s rules, upon notice from the U.S. Department of Commerce (‘‘Commerce’’) of affirmative preliminary determinations in the investigations under sections 703(b) or 733(b) of the Act, or, if the preliminary determinations are negative, upon notice of affirmative final determinations in those investigations under sections 705(a) or 735(a) of the Act. Parties that filed entries of appearance in the preliminary phase of the investigations need not enter a separate appearance for the final phase of the investigations. Industrial users, and, if the merchandise under investigation is sold at the retail level, representative consumer organizations have the right to appear as parties in Commission antidumping and countervailing duty investigations. The Secretary will prepare a public service 1 The record is defined in sec. 207.2(f) of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 207.2(f)). 2 84 FR 20093 and 84 FR 20101 (May 8, 2019). VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:26 May 31, 2019 Jkt 247001 PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 25561 list containing the names and addresses of all persons, or their representatives, who are parties to the investigations. Background On April 10, 2019, the Coalition for Fair Trade in Ceramic Tile filed a petition with the Commission and Commerce, alleging that an industry in the United States is materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of imports of ceramic tile from China sold in the United States at LTFV and subsidized by the government of China. Accordingly, effective April 10, 2019, the Commission, pursuant to sections 703(a) and 733(a) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 1671b(a) and 1673b(a)), instituted countervailing duty investigation No. 701–TA–621 and antidumping duty investigation No. 731–TA–1447 (Preliminary). Notice of the institution of the Commission’s investigations and of a public conference to be held in connection therewith was given by posting copies of the notice in the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of April 16, 2019 (84 FR 15637). The conference was held in Washington, DC, on May 1, 2019, and all persons who requested the opportunity were permitted to appear in person or by counsel. The Commission made these determinations pursuant to sections 703(a) and 733(a) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 1671b(a) and 1673b(a)). It completed and filed its determinations in these investigations on May 28, 2019. The views of the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4898, June 2019, entitled Ceramic Tile from China: Investigation Nos. 701–TA–621 and 731–TA–1447 (Preliminary). By order of the Commission. Issued: May 29, 2019. Lisa Barton, Secretary to the Commission. [FR Doc. 2019–11462 Filed 5–31–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731–TA–991 (Third Review)] Silicon Metal From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted a review SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\03JNN1.SGM 03JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 106 (Monday, June 3, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 25560-25561]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-11428]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0027843; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of San 
Diego, San Diego, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The University of San Diego, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has 
determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the 
definition of objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items 
should submit a written request to the University of San Diego. If no 
additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural 
items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian 
organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the University of San Diego at 
the address in this notice by July 3, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Derrick R. Cartwright, University of San Diego, 5998 
Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110-8001, telephone (619) 260-7632, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, that meet the 
definition of objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    Between the 1950s and the 1990s, 13 cultural items were collected 
from sites in San Diego County, CA, possibly from Kitchen Creek, 
Vallecitos, or Hancock Ranch (there are no exact provenience records 
for these objects). These objects were part of a 1994 donation from the 
estate of Dorothy Zama May of La Jolla, CA, who was an avid enthusiast 
of American Indian cultures and traditions of the Southwest United 
States. The May family traveled throughout the Southwest U.S. and 
Southern California collecting American Indian art and other objects. 
The 13 objects of cultural patrimony are one set of bone whistle 
fragments; two stone pendants; one miniature stone pestle; one stone 
slab with pictograph; two stone figures; five ceramic pipes; and one 
stone pipe or sucking tube.
    San Diego County is recognized as the aboriginal area of the people 
of the Kumeyaay Nation and all 13 bands of the Kumeyaay Nation were 
invited to consult. During consultations with representatives of the 
Jamul Indian Village of California of the Kumeyaay Nation, tribal 
members recognized these objects as having been important to their 
village members, and spoke of how they were used both in the past and 
present. They related stories of learning about objects similar to 
these from tribal members. These thirteen objects are likely culturally 
significant to all of the bands of the Kumeyaay Nation.

Determinations Made by the University of San Diego

    Officials of the University of San Diego have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the 13 cultural items 
described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural 
importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, 
rather than property owned by an individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the objects 
of cultural patrimony and the Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of 
the Campo Indian Reservation, California; Capitan

[[Page 25561]]

Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California (Barona Group of 
Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, 
California; Viejas (Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission 
Indians of the Viejas Reservation, California); Ewiiaapaayp Band of 
Kumeyaay Indians, California; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California 
(previously listed as the Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians 
of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission 
Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation, California; Jamul Indian 
Village of California; La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the 
La Posta Indian Reservation, California; Manzanita Band of Diegueno 
Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation, California; Mesa Grande 
Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, 
California; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California; 
and the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation; hereafter referred to as 
``The Tribes.''

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Dr. Derrick R. Cartwright, University of San 
Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110-8001, telephone (619) 260-
7632, email [email protected], by July 3, 2019. After that date, 
if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of 
the objects of cultural patrimony to The Tribes may proceed.
    The University of San Diego is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: May 2, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-11428 Filed 5-31-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P