Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL, 11813-11814 [2019-05995]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 60 / Thursday, March 28, 2019 / Notices • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Helen Robbins, The Field Museum, 1400 S Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, telephone (312) 665–7317, email hrobbins@fieldmuseum.org, by April 29, 2019. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed. The Field Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: February 25, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–06003 Filed 3–27–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Consultation [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027384; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Alabama Museums has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the University of Alabama Museums. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or amozie on DSK9F9SC42PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:57 Mar 27, 2019 Jkt 247001 Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Alabama Museums at the address in this notice by April 29, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, University of Alabama Museums, 121 Smith Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, telephone (205) 348–7550, email bbomar@ua.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL. The human remains were removed from site 1Ce308, Cherokee County, AL, and site 1Tu52, Tuscaloosa County, AL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Alabama Museums professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains In 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from Site 1Ce308, Polecat Ford, in Cherokee County, AL. After deep plowing exposed burials, the site was leased to a group of looters. Their excavations encountered a number of burials which included Protohistoric, Barnette phase, aboriginal artifacts along with items of sixteenth century PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 11813 European manufacture. Two archeologists subsequently worked to locate and document as much cultural material as possible, and made a surface collection at the site. In 1981, the human remains they recovered were donated to the University of Alabama. The human remains include fragments of human bone from the surface or with no provenience, and include the following individuals: Miscellaneous 1A (HRID 4673.1) from the surface, a 25–35 year old female; Miscellaneous 1B (HRID 4673.2) from the surface, a 25–35 year old of indeterminate sex; Miscellaneous 1C (HRID 4673.3) from the surface, an individual of indeterminate sex at least 18 years old; and Miscellaneous 2 (HRID 4674), unprovenienced, a male 20–30 years old. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The mortuary practices exhibited at this site are consistent with known aboriginal practices. The Protohistoric component at Site 1Ce308 is marked by pottery of the sand tempered Lamar ceramic series. The Lamar ceramics, the artifacts of European manufacture, and other artifacts such as Citico style shell gorgets are consistent with a sixteenth century date. The Protohistoric Barnette phase is considered to be directly ancestral to the eighteenth century Coosa-Abhika Creek towns. In 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from site 1Tu52, the Haney site, in Tuscaloosa County, AL. Site 1Tu52 was originally discovered in 1931, when the landowner plowed up a burial containing five glass beads. In 1933, he brought this find to the attention of the Alabama Museum of Natural History, now within the University of Alabama Museums. The Alabama Museum of Natural History conducted excavations at the site in 1936. These excavations encountered four burials, all within a relatively small, 2 meter by 5 meter area. The human remains were very poorly preserved, and only human remains from Burial 1 are present in the collection. The human remains have been at the University of Alabama since 1936. Two individuals are represented within Burial 1. Burial 1A (HRID 4716.1) is a 12–16 year old of unknown sex. Burial 1B (HRID 4716.2) is a 3–5 year old. One associated funerary object, an occurrence of glass beads, is missing from the collection. Trade goods associated with each burial may be dated to the late eighteenth century. That date is corroborated by both the 1936 excavations and a subsequent E:\FR\FM\28MRN1.SGM 28MRN1 11814 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 60 / Thursday, March 28, 2019 / Notices reinvestigation by a University of Alabama student site for a 2011 M.A. thesis. The historic Native American ceramics from both investigations are primarily Creek related: Chattahoochee Brushed, Oakmulgee Fields Incised, and sherds of the shell tempered McKee Island series. It should be noted, however, that one sherd of Chickachae Combed, a Choctaw type, was also found. Determinations Made by the University of Alabama Museums Officials of the University of Alabama Museums have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of six individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, University of Alabama Museums, 121 Smith Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, telephone (205) 348–7550, email bbomar@ua.edu, by April 29, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Muscogee (Creek) Nation may proceed. The University of Alabama Museums is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: February 25, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–05995 Filed 3–27–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P amozie on DSK9F9SC42PROD with NOTICES National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027388; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fowler Museum at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA National Park Service, Interior. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:57 Mar 27, 2019 Jkt 247001 Notice. The Fowler Museum at University of California (UCLA) in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Fowler Museum at UCLA. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Fowler Museum at UCLA at the address in this notice by April 29, 2019. ADDRESSES: Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095–1549, telephone (310) 825–1864, email wteeter@ arts.ucla.edu. SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History and Description of the Cultural Items DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AGENCY: ACTION: In March 1960, 25 cultural items were removed from the banks of Pismo Creek (CA–SLO–832) in San Luis Obispo County, CA. Collections from the site derive from salvage operations led by M.B. McKusick before the complete destruction of a cemetery due to construction activities on privately owned land. No human remains were collected. Unassociated funerary objects were identified as being removed from PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the cemetery on the knoll. The collections have been curated at UCLA since 1960. The site has been dated to A.D. 340 +/¥80 years. The 25 unassociated funerary objects are four bowl fragments, two metate fragments, two pestle fragments, 12 flaked stone tools, two flakes, one finishing stone, and two bi-pitted anvils. Through consultation, the Fowler Museum has determined that the Pismo Creek site lies within the traditional territory of the Chumash. This determination is consistent with ethnographic and historic documentation. The unassociated funerary objects in this notice are consistent with others that are attributable to groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash people. The material culture of the earlier groups living in the geographical area encompassing the Pismo Creek site is characterized by archeologists as having passed through various stages over the past 10,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same populations, and do not represent population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the early pre-contact period until historic times. Native consultants explicitly state that population mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the continuity of the shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, shared group identity may reasonably be traced between the earlier group at the Pismo Creek site and present-day Chumash people. Determinations Made by the Fowler Museum at University of California Los Angeles Officials of the Fowler Museum at University of California Los Angeles have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 25 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. E:\FR\FM\28MRN1.SGM 28MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 60 (Thursday, March 28, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 11813-11814]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-05995]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0027384; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Alabama Museums, 
Tuscaloosa, AL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Alabama Museums has completed an inventory 
of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian 
Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains should submit a written request to the University 
of Alabama Museums. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer 
of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian 
Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may 
proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the 
University of Alabama Museums at the address in this notice by April 
29, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, University of Alabama 
Museums, 121 Smith Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, telephone (205) 348-
7550, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL. The 
human remains were removed from site 1Ce308, Cherokee County, AL, and 
site 1Tu52, Tuscaloosa County, AL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and funerary objects. The National Park Service 
is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Alabama Museums professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously 
listed as the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Cherokee Nation; 
Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The 
Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) 
Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma 
(hereafter referred to as ``The Consulted Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were removed from Site 1Ce308, Polecat Ford, in Cherokee County, AL. 
After deep plowing exposed burials, the site was leased to a group of 
looters. Their excavations encountered a number of burials which 
included Protohistoric, Barnette phase, aboriginal artifacts along with 
items of sixteenth century European manufacture. Two archeologists 
subsequently worked to locate and document as much cultural material as 
possible, and made a surface collection at the site. In 1981, the human 
remains they recovered were donated to the University of Alabama. The 
human remains include fragments of human bone from the surface or with 
no provenience, and include the following individuals: Miscellaneous 1A 
(HRID 4673.1) from the surface, a 25-35 year old female; Miscellaneous 
1B (HRID 4673.2) from the surface, a 25-35 year old of indeterminate 
sex; Miscellaneous 1C (HRID 4673.3) from the surface, an individual of 
indeterminate sex at least 18 years old; and Miscellaneous 2 (HRID 
4674), unprovenienced, a male 20-30 years old. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The mortuary practices exhibited at this site are consistent with 
known aboriginal practices. The Protohistoric component at Site 1Ce308 
is marked by pottery of the sand tempered Lamar ceramic series. The 
Lamar ceramics, the artifacts of European manufacture, and other 
artifacts such as Citico style shell gorgets are consistent with a 
sixteenth century date. The Protohistoric Barnette phase is considered 
to be directly ancestral to the eighteenth century Coosa-Abhika Creek 
towns.
    In 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from site 1Tu52, the Haney site, in Tuscaloosa County, AL. 
Site 1Tu52 was originally discovered in 1931, when the landowner plowed 
up a burial containing five glass beads. In 1933, he brought this find 
to the attention of the Alabama Museum of Natural History, now within 
the University of Alabama Museums. The Alabama Museum of Natural 
History conducted excavations at the site in 1936. These excavations 
encountered four burials, all within a relatively small, 2 meter by 5 
meter area. The human remains were very poorly preserved, and only 
human remains from Burial 1 are present in the collection. The human 
remains have been at the University of Alabama since 1936. Two 
individuals are represented within Burial 1. Burial 1A (HRID 4716.1) is 
a 12-16 year old of unknown sex. Burial 1B (HRID 4716.2) is a 3-5 year 
old. One associated funerary object, an occurrence of glass beads, is 
missing from the collection.
    Trade goods associated with each burial may be dated to the late 
eighteenth century. That date is corroborated by both the 1936 
excavations and a subsequent

[[Page 11814]]

reinvestigation by a University of Alabama student site for a 2011 M.A. 
thesis. The historic Native American ceramics from both investigations 
are primarily Creek related: Chattahoochee Brushed, Oakmulgee Fields 
Incised, and sherds of the shell tempered McKee Island series. It 
should be noted, however, that one sherd of Chickachae Combed, a 
Choctaw type, was also found.

Determinations Made by the University of Alabama Museums

    Officials of the University of Alabama Museums have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of six individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
William Bomar, Executive Director, University of Alabama Museums, 121 
Smith Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, telephone (205) 348-7550, email 
[email protected], by April 29, 2019. After that date, if no additional 
requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains 
to The Muscogee (Creek) Nation may proceed.
    The University of Alabama Museums is responsible for notifying The 
Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 25, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-05995 Filed 3-27-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P