Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, Salt Lake City, UT; Museum of New Mexico, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Santa Fe, NM; and Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Tempe, AZ, 2912-2914 [2019-01618]

Download as PDF 2912 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 27 / Friday, February 8, 2019 / Notices This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Item On January 30, 2018, one cultural item was seized at the Port of Entry in Nogales, AZ. The object seized is a deer head. The object has been identified by the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona as a Yaqui ceremonial deer head. Determinations Made by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Officials of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the object of cultural patrimony and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim the cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Jeff Moore, Wildlife Inspector, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 4405, Rio Rico, AZ 85648, telephone (520) 287– 4625, email jeffery_moore@fws.gov, by March 11, 2019. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the object of cultural patrimony to the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona may proceed. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible for notifying the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: December 17, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–01612 Filed 2–7–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:18 Feb 07, 2019 Jkt 247001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027114; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, Salt Lake City, UT; Museum of New Mexico, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Santa Fe, NM; and Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Tempe, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region (Reclamation); Museum of New Mexico, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Museum of Indian Arts and Culture); and Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change (ASU) have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Reclamation. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Reclamation at the address in this notice by March 11, 2019. ADDRESSES: Nancy Coulam, U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, 125 South State Street, Room 8100, Salt Lake City, UT 84138, telephone (801) 524–3684, email ncoulam@usbr.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00106 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Salt Lake City, UT. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from 22 archeological sites in the Navajo Reservoir District in Rio Arriba County, NM; San Juan County, NM; and Archuleta County, CO from 1956 to 1963 by archeologists from the Museum of New Mexico and School for Advanced Research (then known as the School of American Research) under contract with the National Park Service. Additional excavations were conducted at one of the sites in Archuleta County, CO, during 1987 by Complete Archaeological Service Associates under contract with Reclamation. This notice includes cultural items dating from the Los Pinos Phase (A.D. 1–400), Sambrito Phase (A.D. 400–700), Rosa Phase (A.D. 750–850), Piedra Phase (A.D. 800–1000), and Arboles Phase (A.D. 950–1050). This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Reclamation, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and ASU professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (previously listed as the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah); and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from LA 3430, in San Juan County, NM. No known individuals E:\FR\FM\08FEN1.SGM 08FEN1 amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 27 / Friday, February 8, 2019 / Notices were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from LA 3434 (ASU 3483), San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ASU 4048, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from LA 4053, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary objects are three worked bone tools, two elk bones, and one shell beads from a bracelet. In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from LA 4054 (ASU 4056), San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, 58 individuals were removed from LA 4086, the Sanchez Site, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The 11 associated funerary objects are four pottery vessels, two worked bones, one groundstone, one antler, one adobe plug, one pot rest, and one lot of corn cobs. In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from LA 4088, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The 12 associated funerary objects are five pottery vessels, two pipes, one shell necklace, one projectile point, one stone, one lot of sherds, and one lot of faunal remains. In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from LA 4103, the Railroad Site, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a pottery vessel. In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from LA 4120, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 71 individuals were removed from LA 4131, Sandoval Village, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The 76 associated funerary objects are 29 pottery vessels, 12 stones, nine lots of sherds, six worked bones, six faunal remains, four crystals, two chipped VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:18 Feb 07, 2019 Jkt 247001 stone tools, one adobe, one antler, one groundstone, one lot of debitage, one lot of corn cob, one mollusk cast, one worked stone, and one pipe fragment. In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from LA 4148, Archuleta County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from LA 4151, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is one pottery vessel. From 1962–1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were removed from LA 4169, the Oven Site, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals were identified. The 39 associated funerary objects are 10 faunal remains, eight pottery vessels, six stones, four sherds, three worked bones, two chipped stone tools, one ground stone, one lot of corn cobs, one lot of shells, one bead, one shell bracelet, and one mat fragment. In 1987, additional human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from LA 4169, the Oven Site. No known individuals were identified. The 44 associated funerary objects are 11 faunal remains, 10 worked bones, eight pottery vessels, four lots of sherds, three shells, two stones, two chipped stone tools, two groundstone, one clay ball, and one basket fragment. From 1960–1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 142 individuals were removed from LA 4195, Sambrito Village, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. The 88 associated funerary objects are 38 pottery vessels, 12 stones, 11 lots of sherds, seven worked bones, six shells, five beads, four faunal remains, one chipped stone tool, one crystal, one corn cob, one bracelet, and one basket fragment. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed from LA 4198, the Mascarenas Site, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary objects are six pottery vessels, and one chipped stone tool. In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from LA 4242, Rio Arriba County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from LA 4247, Rio Arriba County, NM. No known individuals PO 00000 Frm 00107 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 2913 were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. From 1961–1962, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from LA 4363, the Uells Site, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. The four associated funerary objects are two beads, one pottery vessel, and one sherd. In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, 52 individuals were removed from LA 4380, Bancos Village, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary objects are five pottery vessels, one adobe pot stopper, and one clay object. In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 individuals were removed from LA 4384, the Cemetery Site, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. The 35 associated funerary objects are 14 pottery vessels, seven gaming pieces, six worked bones, three stones, two chipped stone tools, two faunal remains, and one lot of shells. In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual was removed from ASU 4385, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from LA 4406, the Candelaria Site, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Osteological analysis indicates the individuals are Native American. No known individuals or lineal descendants have been identified. The evidence shows that the individuals are culturally affiliated with the Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation Officials of the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation has determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 398 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 331 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human E:\FR\FM\08FEN1.SGM 08FEN1 2914 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 27 / Friday, February 8, 2019 / Notices remains and associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Nancy Coulam, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, 125 South State Street, Room 8100, Salt Lake City, UT 84138 telephone, (801) 524–3684, email ncoulam@usbr.gov, by March 11, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico may proceed. The U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: December 4, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Program Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–01618 Filed 2–7–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P History and Description of the Cultural Item(s) DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027194; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of an unassociated funerary object. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the Burke Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:18 Feb 07, 2019 Jkt 247001 Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Burke Museum at the address in this notice by March 11, 2019. ADDRESSES: Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849 Ext 2, email plape@uw.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, that meets the definition of an unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. DATES: In 1946, one cultural item was removed from site 45–SJ–21, Guss Island, in San Juan County, WA, during a survey by B. Lane and F. Barnett. Lane and Barnett were accompanied by Arden King, who directed a University of Washington field school on San Juan Island from 1946–1947. The cultural item was accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1951 (Burke Accn. #3649) along with other archeological material from the field school. The one unassociated funerary object is a broken hammerstone. Guss Island, located in Garrison Bay on San Juan Island, is within the aboriginal territory of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation. Information provided during consultation indicates that it was used as a burial island, which corresponds with archeological evidence of Native American canoe burials on Guss Island. Lummi oral tradition and anthropological data clearly associate the Lummi with San Juan Island, including Guss Island (Suttles 1951, 1990). The archeological record shows continuous habitation from approximately 2000 years ago through the mid-19th century by Northern Straits peoples who were PO 00000 Frm 00108 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 ancestral to the Lummi Tribe. Oral tradition, archeological evidence and ethnographic accounts all support a cultural affiliation between the unassociated funerary object from Guss Island and the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation. Determinations Made by the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum Officials of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the one cultural item described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary object and the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849 Ext 2, email plape@uw.edu, by March 11, 2019. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary object to the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation may proceed. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation that this notice has been published. Dated: December 17, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–01627 Filed 2–7–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027164; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Pueblo Grande Museum, Phoenix, AZ AGENCY: E:\FR\FM\08FEN1.SGM National Park Service, Interior. 08FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 27 (Friday, February 8, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 2912-2914]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-01618]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0027114; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Interior, 
Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, Salt Lake City, UT; 
Museum of New Mexico, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Santa Fe, NM; 
and Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social 
Change, Tempe, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Upper Colorado Region (Reclamation); Museum of New Mexico, Museum of 
Indian Arts and Culture (Museum of Indian Arts and Culture); and 
Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change 
(ASU) have completed an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary 
objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. 
Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request to Reclamation. If no 
additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, 
Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Reclamation at the address in this notice by 
March 11, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Nancy Coulam, U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of 
Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, 125 South State Street, Room 8100, 
Salt Lake City, UT 84138, telephone (801) 524-3684, email 
ncoulam@usbr.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of 
Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Salt Lake City, UT. The human remains 
and associated funerary objects were removed from 22 archeological 
sites in the Navajo Reservoir District in Rio Arriba County, NM; San 
Juan County, NM; and Archuleta County, CO from 1956 to 1963 by 
archeologists from the Museum of New Mexico and School for Advanced 
Research (then known as the School of American Research) under contract 
with the National Park Service. Additional excavations were conducted 
at one of the sites in Archuleta County, CO, during 1987 by Complete 
Archaeological Service Associates under contract with Reclamation. This 
notice includes cultural items dating from the Los Pinos Phase (A.D. 1-
400), Sambrito Phase (A.D. 400-700), Rosa Phase (A.D. 750-850), Piedra 
Phase (A.D. 800-1000), and Arboles Phase (A.D. 950-1050).
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Reclamation, 
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and ASU professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo 
Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico 
(previously listed as the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern 
Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as 
the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah); and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico 
(hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from LA 3430, in San Juan County, NM. No known individuals

[[Page 2913]]

were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from LA 3434 (ASU 3483), San Juan County, NM. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from ASU 4048, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from LA 4053, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals 
were identified. The six associated funerary objects are three worked 
bone tools, two elk bones, and one shell beads from a bracelet.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from LA 4054 (ASU 4056), San Juan County, NM. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, 58 individuals 
were removed from LA 4086, the Sanchez Site, Archuleta County, CO. No 
known individuals were identified. The 11 associated funerary objects 
are four pottery vessels, two worked bones, one groundstone, one 
antler, one adobe plug, one pot rest, and one lot of corn cobs.
    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from LA 4088, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals 
were identified. The 12 associated funerary objects are five pottery 
vessels, two pipes, one shell necklace, one projectile point, one 
stone, one lot of sherds, and one lot of faunal remains.
    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from LA 4103, the Railroad Site, Archuleta County, CO. No 
known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object 
is a pottery vessel.
    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from LA 4120, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 71 individuals 
were removed from LA 4131, Sandoval Village, Archuleta County, CO. No 
known individuals were identified. The 76 associated funerary objects 
are 29 pottery vessels, 12 stones, nine lots of sherds, six worked 
bones, six faunal remains, four crystals, two chipped stone tools, one 
adobe, one antler, one groundstone, one lot of debitage, one lot of 
corn cob, one mollusk cast, one worked stone, and one pipe fragment.
    In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals 
were removed from LA 4148, Archuleta County, NM. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from LA 4151, Archuleta County, CO. No known individuals 
were identified. The one associated funerary object is one pottery 
vessel.
    From 1962-1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 
individuals were removed from LA 4169, the Oven Site, Archuleta County, 
CO. No known individuals were identified. The 39 associated funerary 
objects are 10 faunal remains, eight pottery vessels, six stones, four 
sherds, three worked bones, two chipped stone tools, one ground stone, 
one lot of corn cobs, one lot of shells, one bead, one shell bracelet, 
and one mat fragment.
    In 1987, additional human remains representing, at minimum, eight 
individuals were removed from LA 4169, the Oven Site. No known 
individuals were identified. The 44 associated funerary objects are 11 
faunal remains, 10 worked bones, eight pottery vessels, four lots of 
sherds, three shells, two stones, two chipped stone tools, two 
groundstone, one clay ball, and one basket fragment.
    From 1960-1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 142 
individuals were removed from LA 4195, Sambrito Village, San Juan 
County, NM. No known individuals were identified. The 88 associated 
funerary objects are 38 pottery vessels, 12 stones, 11 lots of sherds, 
seven worked bones, six shells, five beads, four faunal remains, one 
chipped stone tool, one crystal, one corn cob, one bracelet, and one 
basket fragment.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals 
were removed from LA 4198, the Mascarenas Site, San Juan County, NM. No 
known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary 
objects are six pottery vessels, and one chipped stone tool.
    In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from LA 4242, Rio Arriba County, NM. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from LA 4247, Rio Arriba County, NM. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    From 1961-1962, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from LA 4363, the Uells Site, San Juan County, 
NM. No known individuals were identified. The four associated funerary 
objects are two beads, one pottery vessel, and one sherd.
    In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, 52 individuals 
were removed from LA 4380, Bancos Village, San Juan County, NM. No 
known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary 
objects are five pottery vessels, one adobe pot stopper, and one clay 
object.
    In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 individuals 
were removed from LA 4384, the Cemetery Site, San Juan County, NM. No 
known individuals were identified. The 35 associated funerary objects 
are 14 pottery vessels, seven gaming pieces, six worked bones, three 
stones, two chipped stone tools, two faunal remains, and one lot of 
shells.
    In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual was 
removed from ASU 4385, San Juan County, NM. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were removed from LA 4406, the Candelaria Site, San Juan County, NM. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Osteological analysis indicates the individuals are Native 
American. No known individuals or lineal descendants have been 
identified. The evidence shows that the individuals are culturally 
affiliated with the Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico.

Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of 
Reclamation

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation 
has determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 398 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 331 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human

[[Page 2914]]

remains and associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Jemez, New 
Mexico.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Nancy Coulam, U.S. Department of the 
Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, 125 South State 
Street, Room 8100, Salt Lake City, UT 84138 telephone, (801) 524-3684, 
email ncoulam@usbr.gov, by March 11, 2019. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Jemez, 
New Mexico may proceed.
    The U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation is 
responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: December 4, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Program Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-01618 Filed 2-7-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P