Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment, 2052-2056 [2019-01123]

Download as PDF 2052 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations Board calculated the adjusted penalties for its CMPs, rounding the penalties to the nearest dollar.5 Administrative Procedure Act The 2015 Act states that agencies shall make the annual adjustment ‘‘notwithstanding section 553 of title 5, United States Code.’’ Therefore, this rule is not subject to the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (the ‘‘APA’’), 5 U.S.C. 553, requiring notice, public participation, and a deferred effective date. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq., requires a regulatory flexibility analysis only for rules for which an agency is required to publish a general notice of proposed rulemaking. Because the 2015 Act states that agencies’ annual adjustments are to be made notwithstanding section 553 of title 5 of the United States Code—the APA section requiring notice of proposed rulemaking—the Board is not publishing a notice of proposed rulemaking. Therefore, the Regulatory Flexibility Act does not apply. Paperwork Reduction Act There is no collection of information required by this final rule that would be subject to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 263 Administrative practice and procedure, Claims, Crime, Equal access to justice, Lawyers, Penalties. Authority and Issuance For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Board amends 12 CFR part 263 to read as follows: PART 263—RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS 1. The authority citation for part 263 continues to read as follows: ■ amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES Authority: 5 U.S.C. 504, 554–557; 12 U.S.C. 248, 324, 334, 347a, 504, 505, 1464, 1467, 1467a, 1817(j), 1818, 1820(k), 1829, 1831o, 1831p–1, 1832(c), 1847(b), 1847(d), 1884, 1972(2)(F), 3105, 3108, 3110, 3349, 3907, 3909(d), 4717; 15 U.S.C. 21, 78l(i), 78o–4, 78o–5, 78u–2; 1639e(k); 28 U.S.C. to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Dec. 14, 2018). 5 Under the 2015 Act and implementing OMB guidance, agencies are not required to make an adjustment to a CMP if, during the 12 months preceding the required adjustment, such penalty increased due to a law other than the 2015 Act by an amount greater than the amount of the required adjustment. No other laws have adjusted the CMPs within the Board’s jurisdiction during the preceding 12 months. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:19 Feb 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 2461 note; 31 U.S.C. 5321; and 42 U.S.C. 4012a. 2. Section 263.65 is revised to read as follows: ■ § 263.65 Civil money penalty inflation adjustments. (a) Inflation adjustments. In accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, which further amended the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, the Board has set forth in paragraph (b) of this section the adjusted maximum amounts for each civil money penalty provided by law within the Board’s jurisdiction. The authorizing statutes contain the complete provisions under which the Board may seek a civil money penalty. The adjusted civil money penalties apply only to penalties assessed on or after February 6, 2019, whose associated violations occurred on or after November 2, 2015. (b) Maximum civil money penalties. The maximum (or, in the cases of 12 U.S.C. 334 and 1832(c), fixed) civil money penalties as set forth in the referenced statutory sections are set forth in the table in this paragraph (b). Adjusted civil money penalty Statute 12 U.S.C. 324. Inadvertently late or misleading reports, inter alia ............................. Other late or misleading reports, inter alia ........ Knowingly or reckless false or misleading reports, inter alia ........... 12 U.S.C. 334 ....................... 12 U.S.C. 374a ..................... 12 U.S.C. 504. First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 505. First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 1464(v)(4) ............ 12 U.S.C. 1464(v)(5) ............ 12 U.S.C. 1464(v)(6) ............ 12 U.S.C. 1467a(i)(2) ........... 12 U.S.C. 1467a(i)(3) ........... 12 U.S.C. 1467a(r). First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(16). First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 1818(i)(2). First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 1820(k)(6)(A)(ii) ... PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Statute Adjusted civil money penalty 12 U.S.C. 1832(c) ................. 12 U.S.C. 1847(b) ................ 12 U.S.C. 1847(d). First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 1884 ..................... 12 U.S.C. 1972(2)(F). First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 3110(a) ................ 12 U.S.C. 3110(c). First Tier ........................ Second Tier ................... Third Tier ....................... 12 U.S.C. 3909(d) ................ 15 U.S.C. 78u–2(b)(1). For a natural person ...... For any other person ..... 15 U.S.C. 78u–2(b)(2). For a natural person ...... For any other person ..... 15 U.S.C. 78u–2(b)(3). For a natural person ...... For any other person ..... 15 U.S.C. 1639e(k)(1) .......... 15 U.S.C. 1639e(k)(2) .......... 42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)(5) ........... 32,924 50,334 4,027 40,269 2,013,399 292 10,067 50,334 2,013,399 46,013 3,682 36,809 1,840,491 2,505 9,472 94,713 94,713 473,566 189,427 947,130 11,563 23,125 2,187 By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, acting through the Secretary of the Board under delegated authority, January 29, 2019. Ann Misback, Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2019–01068 Filed 2–5–19; 8:45 am] $4,027 BILLING CODE 6210–01–P 40,269 NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 2,013,399 292 292 12 CFR Part 747 10,067 50,334 2,013,399 Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment 10,067 50,334 2,013,399 4,027 40,269 2,013,399 50,334 50,334 4,027 340,269 2,013,399 10,067 50,334 32,013,399 10,067 50,334 2,013,399 331,174 RIN 3133–AE92 National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The NCUA Board (Board) is amending its regulations to adjust the maximum amount of each civil monetary penalty (CMP) within its jurisdiction to account for inflation. This action, including the amount of the adjustments, is required under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 and the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015. DATES: This final rule is effective February 6, 2019. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\06FER1.SGM 06FER1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Marvin Shaw, Staff Attorney, at 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, or telephone: (703) 518–6553. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Legal Background II. Calculation of Adjustments III. Regulatory Procedures I. Legal Background A. Statutory Requirements and OMB Guidance The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 1 (DCIA) amended the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 2 (FCPIA Act) to require every federal agency to enact regulations that adjust each CMP provided by law under its jurisdiction by the rate of inflation at least once every four years. In November 2015, Congress further amended the CMP inflation requirements in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015,3 which contains the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (the 2015 amendments).4 This legislation provided for an initial ‘‘catch-up’’ adjustment of CMPs in 2016, followed by annual adjustments. The catch-up adjustment reset CMP maximum amounts by setting aside the inflation adjustments that agencies made in prior years and instead calculated inflation with reference to the year when each CMP was enacted or last modified by Congress. Agencies were required to publish their catch-up adjustments in an interim final rule by July 1, 2016 and make them effective by August 1, 2016.5 The NCUA complied with these requirements in a June 2016 interim final rule, followed by an October 2016 final rule to confirm the adjustments as final.6 amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES The 2015 amendments also specified how agencies must conduct annual inflation adjustments after the 2016 catch-up adjustment. Following the catch-up adjustment, agencies must make the required adjustments and publish them in the Federal Register by 1 Public Law 104–134, Sec. 31001(s), 110 Stat. 1321–373 (Apr. 26, 1996). The law is codified at 28 U.S.C. 2461 note. 2 Public Law 101–410, 104 Stat. 890 (Oct. 5, 1990), codified at 28 U.S.C. 2461 note. 3 Public Law 114–74, 129 Stat. 584 (Nov. 2, 2015). 4 129 Stat. 599. 5 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 2, 2015). 6 81 FR 40152 (June 21, 2016); 81 FR 78028 (Nov. 7, 2016). VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:15 Feb 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 January 15 each year.7 For 2017, the NCUA issued an interim final rule on January 6, 2017,8 followed by a final rule issued on June 23, 2017.9 For 2018, the NCUA issued a final rule to satisfy the agency’s requirement for the 2018 annual adjustments.10 This document satisfies the agency’s requirement for the 2019 annual adjustment. The law provides that the adjustments shall be made notwithstanding the section of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) that requires prior notice and public comment for agency rulemaking.11 The 2015 amendments also specify that each CMP maximum must be increased by the percentage by which the consumer price index for urban consumers (CPI–U) 12 for October of the year immediately preceding the year the adjustment is made exceeds the CPI–U for October of the prior year.13 For example, for the adjustment to be made in 2019, an agency must compare the October 2017 and 2018 CPI–U figures. The 2015 amendments also provide that agencies may forgo the required annual adjustments in certain circumstances. Specifically, in a subsection titled ‘‘Other Adjustments Made,’’ the statute provides that an agency is not required to make an annual adjustment to a CMP if it has been increased by an amount greater than the contemplated annual adjustment in the preceding 12 months.14 When these criteria are met, the agency has discretion not to make the adjustments otherwise required by the statute. In addition, the 2015 amendments directed the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to issue guidance to agencies on implementing the inflation adjustments.15 OMB is required to issue its guidance each December and, with respect to the 2019 annual adjustment, did so on December 14, 2018.16 This 7 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 2, 2015). 8 82 FR 7640 (Jan. 23, 2017). 9 82 FR 29710 (June 30, 2017). 10 83 FR 2029 (Jan.16, 2018). 11 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 2, 2015). 12 This index is published by the Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and is available at its website: http://www.bls.gov/cpi/. 13 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(1)(2)(B), 129 Stat. 584, 600 (Nov. 2, 2015). 14 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 600 (Nov. 2, 2015). 15 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(4), 129 Stat. 584, 601 (Nov. 2, 2015). 16 OMB, Implementation of Penalty Inflation Adjustments for 2019, Pursuant to the Federal Civil PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 2053 OMB guidance for the 2019 adjustments includes an inflationary multiplier (1.02522) to apply to each current CMP maximum amount to determine the adjusted maximum. The guidance also addresses rulemaking procedures and agency reporting and oversight requirements for CMPs.17 B. Application to the 2019 Adjustments This section applies the statutory requirements and OMB’s guidance to the NCUA’s CMPs, and sets forth the Board’s calculation of the 2019 adjustments. As explained above, the 2015 amendments require the NCUA to adjust the maximum amounts of its CMPs by the percentage by which the October 2018 CPI–U (252.885) exceeds the October 2017 CPI–U (246.663). The percentage change is 2.522. This percentage increase can be expressed as an inflation multiplier (the quotient of the October 2018 figure divided by the October 2017 figure). Accordingly, each CMP maximum amount should be multiplied by 1.02522 to determine the adjusted maximum amount. OMB’s guidance identifies the same multiplier. The Board has considered the exception in the 2015 amendments for adjustments made in the preceding 12 months, discussed above, and has determined that it does not apply. All of the adjustments calculated below are equal to or greater than the adjustments made in January 2018 for each CMP. Accordingly, the exception for greater adjustments in the preceding 12 months does not apply. Thus, the Board lacks discretion to decline to make the adjustments calculated below. The table below presents the adjustment calculations. The current maximums are found at 12 CFR 747.1001, as adjusted in January 2018. This amount is multiplied by the inflation multiplier to calculate the new maximum in the far right column. Only these adjusted maximum amounts, and not the calculations, will be codified at 12 CFR 747.1001 under this final rule. The adjusted amounts were applicable January 15, 2019, and can be applied to violations that occurred on or after November 2, 2015, the date the 2015 amendments were enacted.18 Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Dec. 14, 2018), available at https:// www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ m_19_04.pdf. 17 Id. 18 Public Law 114–74, 129 Stat. 600 (Nov. 2, 2015), codified at 28 U.S.C. 2461 note. E:\FR\FM\06FER1.SGM 06FER1 2054 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations TABLE—CALCULATION OF MAXIMUM CMP ADJUSTMENTS Description/tier 19 Current maximum ($) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3) .......... Inadvertent failure to submit a report or the inadvertent submission of a false or misleading report. Non-inadvertent failure to submit a report or the non-inadvertent submission of a false or misleading report. Failure to submit a report or the submission of a false or misleading report done knowingly or with reckless disregard. Tier 1 CMP for inadvertent failure to submit certified statement of insured shares and charges due to NCUSIF, or inadvertent submission of false or misleading statement. Tier 2 CMP for non-inadvertent failure to submit certified statement or submission of false or misleading statement. Tier 3 CMP for failure to submit a certified statement or the submission of a false or misleading statement done knowingly or with reckless disregard. Non-compliance with insurance logo requirements. Non-compliance with NCUA security requirements. Tier 1 CMP for violations of law, regulation, and other orders or agreements. Tier 2 CMP for violations of law, regulation, and other orders or agreements and for recklessly engaging in unsafe or unsound practices or breaches of fiduciary duty. Tier 3 CMP for knowingly committing the violations under Tier 1 or 2 (natural person). Tier 3 (same) (CU) ........................................... 3,928 ........................... 1.02522 4,027. 39.278 ......................... 1.02522 40,269. Lesser of 1,963,870 or 1% of total CU assets. 3,591 ........................... 1.02522 1.02522 Lesser of 2,013,399 or 1% of total CU assets. 3,682. 35,904 ......................... 1.02522 36,809. Lesser of 1,795,216 or 1% of total CU assets. 1.02522 Lesser of 1,840,491 or 1% of total CU assets. 122 .............................. 1.02522 125. 285 .............................. 1.02522 292. 9,819 ........................... 1.02522 10,067. 49,096 ......................... 1.02522 50,334. 1,963,870 .................... 1.02522 2,013,399. Lesser of 1,963,870 or 1% of total CU assets. 323,027 ....................... 1.02522 1.02522 Lesser of 2,013,399 or 1% of total CU assets. 331,174. 11,279 ......................... 1.02522 11,563. 22,556 ......................... 2,133 ........................... 1.02522 1.02522 23,125. 2,187. 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3) .......... 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3) .......... 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(A) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(B) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(C) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1785(a)(3) .......... 12 U.S.C. 1785(e)(3) .......... 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(B) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(C) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(C) ..... 12 U.S.C. 1786(w)(5)(A)(ii) 15 U.S.C. 1639e(k) ............. 15 U.S.C. 1639e(k) ............. 42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)(5) ......... Non-compliance with senior examiner postemployment restrictions. Non-compliance with appraisal independence standards (first violation). Subsequent violations of the same ................. Non-compliance with flood insurance requirements. III. Regulatory Procedures A. Final Rule Under the APA In the 2015 amendments to the FCPIA Act, Congress provided that agencies shall make the required inflation adjustments in 2017 and subsequent years notwithstanding 5 U.S.C. 553,20 which requires agencies to follow notice-and-comment procedures in rulemaking and to make rules effective no sooner than 30 days after publication in the Federal Register. The 2015 amendments provide a clear exception to these requirements.21 In addition, the Board finds that notice-and-comment amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES Adjusted Maximum ($) (current maximum × multiplier, rounded to nearest dollar) Citation 19 The table uses condensed descriptions of CMP tiers. Refer to the U.S. Code citations for complete descriptions. 20 Public Law 114–74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 2, 2015). 21 See 5 U.S.C. 559; Asiana Airlines v. Fed. Aviation Admin., 134 F.3d 393, 396–99 (D.C. Cir. 1998). VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:15 Feb 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 procedures would be impracticable and unnecessary under the APA because of the largely ministerial and technical nature of the rule, which affords agencies limited discretion in promulgating the rule, and the statutory deadline for making the adjustments.22 In these circumstances, the Board finds good cause to issue a final rule without issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking or soliciting public comments. The Board also finds good cause to make the final rule effective upon publication because of the statutory deadline. Accordingly, this final rule is issued without prior notice and comment and will become effective immediately upon publication. 22 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(3)(B); see Mid-Tex Elec. Co-op., Inc. v. Fed. Energy Regulatory Comm’n, 822 F.2d 1123, (D.C. Cir. 1987). PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Multiplier B. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act requires the Board to prepare an analysis to describe any significant economic impact a regulation may have on a substantial number of small entities.23 For purposes of this analysis, the Board considers small credit unions to be those having under $100 million in assets.24 This final rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small credit unions because it only affects the maximum amounts of CMPs that may be assessed in individual cases, which are not numerous and generally do not involve assessments at the maximum level. In addition, several of the CMPs 23 5 U.S.C. 603(a). Ruling and Policy Statement 15–1, 80 FR 57512 (Sept. 24, 2015). 24 Interpretive E:\FR\FM\06FER1.SGM 06FER1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations are limited to a percentage of a credit union’s assets. Finally, in assessing CMPs, the Board generally must consider a party’s financial resources.25 Because this final rule will affect few, if any, small credit unions, the Board certifies that the final rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. C. Paperwork Reduction Act The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) applies to rulemakings in which an agency creates a new paperwork burden on regulated entities or modifies an existing burden.26 For purposes of the PRA, a paperwork burden may take the form of either a reporting or a recordkeeping requirement, both referred to as information collections. This final rule adjusts the maximum amounts of certain CMPs that the Board may assess against individuals, entities, or credit unions but does not require any reporting or recordkeeping. Therefore, this final rule will not create new paperwork burdens or modify any existing paperwork burdens. U.S. Code citation CMP description (1) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3) ...... Inadvertent failure to submit a report or the inadvertent submission of a false or misleading report. Non-inadvertent failure to submit a report or the non-inadvertent submission of a false or misleading report. Failure to submit a report or the submission of a false or misleading report done knowingly or with reckless disregard. Tier 1 CMP for inadvertent failure to submit certified statement of insured shares and charges due to NCUSIF, or inadvertent submission of false or misleading statement. Tier 2 CMP for non-inadvertent failure to submit certified statement or submission of false or misleading statement. Tier 3 CMP for failure to submit a certified statement or the submission of a false or misleading statement done knowingly or with reckless disregard. Non-compliance with insurance logo requirements ........ Non-compliance with NCUA security requirements ........ Tier 1 CMP for violations of law, regulation, and other orders or agreements. (6) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(C) (7) 12 U.S.C. 1785(a)(3) ...... (8) 12 U.S.C. 1785(e)(3) ...... (9) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A) 25 12 26 44 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(G)(i). U.S.C. 3507(d); 5 CFR part 1320. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:19 Feb 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 By the National Credit Union Administration Board on January 4, 2019. Gerard S. Poliquin, Secretary of the Board. For the reasons stated above, the NCUA Board amends 12 CFR part 747 as follows: PART 747—ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS, ADJUDICATIVE HEARINGS, RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1766, 1782, 1784, 1785, 1786, 1787, 1790a, 1790d; 15 U.S.C. 1639e; 42 U.S.C. 4012a; Public Law 101–410; Public Law 104–134; Public Law 109–351; Public Law 114–74. The Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 28 (SBREFA) provides generally for congressional review of agency rules. A reporting requirement is triggered in instances where the Board issues a final rule as defined by Section 551 of the APA.29 The Board has submitted this final rule to OMB for it to determine whether it is a ‘‘major rule’’ within the meaning of the relevant sections of (5) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(B) Credit unions, Civil monetary penalties. The Board has determined that this final rule will not affect family wellbeing within the meaning of Section 654 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 1999.27 Executive Order 13132 encourages independent regulatory agencies to consider the impact of their actions on state and local interests. In adherence to fundamental federalism principles, the NCUA, an independent regulatory agency as defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5), voluntarily complies with the executive order. This final rule adjusts the maximum amounts of certain CMPs that the Board may assess against (4) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(A) List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 747 ■ D. Executive Order 13132 (3) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3) ...... SBREFA, but the Board does not believe the rule is major. E. Assessment of Federal Regulations and Policies on Families F. Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (2) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3) ...... amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES individuals, entities, and federally insured credit unions, including statechartered credit unions. However, the final rule does not create any new authority or alter the underlying statutory authorities that enable the Board to assess CMPs. Accordingly, this final rule will not have a substantial direct effect on the states, on the connection between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. The Board has determined that this final rule does not constitute a policy that has federalism implications for purposes of the executive order. 2055 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 2. Revise § 747.1001 to read as follows: ■ § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil monetary penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) The NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101– 410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended (28 U.S.C. 2461 note)), to adjust the maximum amount of each civil monetary penalty within its jurisdiction by the rate of inflation. The following chart displays those adjusted amounts, as calculated pursuant to the statute: New maximum amount $4,027. $40,269. $2,013,399 or 1 percent of the total assets of the credit union, whichever is less. $3,682. $36,809. $1,840,491 or 1 percent of the total assets of the credit union, whichever is less. $125. $292. $10,067. 27 Public Law 105–277, 112 Stat. 2681 (Oct. 21, 1998). PO 00000 1. The authority for part 747 continues to read as follows: Sfmt 4700 28 Public Law 104–121, 110 Stat. 857 (Mar. 29, 1996). 29 5 U.S.C. 551. E:\FR\FM\06FER1.SGM 06FER1 2056 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations U.S. Code citation CMP description (10) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A) Tier 2 CMP for violations of law, regulation, and other orders or agreements and for recklessly engaging in unsafe or unsound practices or breaches of fiduciary duty. Tier 3 CMP for knowingly committing the violations under Tier 1 or 2 (natural person). Tier 3 CMP for knowingly committing the violations under Tier 1 or 2 (insured credit union). Non-compliance with senior examiner post-employment restrictions. Non-compliance with appraisal independence requirements. Non-compliance with flood insurance requirements ....... (11) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A) (12) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A) (13) 12 U.S.C. 1786(w)(5)(ii) (14) 15 U.S.C. 1639e(k) ...... (15) 42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)(5) ... (b) The adjusted amounts displayed in paragraph (a) of this section apply to civil monetary penalties that are assessed after the date the increase takes effect, including those whose associated violation or violations pre-dated the increase and occurred after November 2, 2015. [FR Doc. 2019–01123 Filed 2–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7535–01–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 19 [FRL–9988–90–OAR–OECA] Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is promulgating this final rule to adjust the level of the maximum (or minimum) statutory civil monetary penalty amounts under the statutes EPA administers. This action is mandated by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended through the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (‘‘the 2015 Act’’). The 2015 Act prescribes a formula for annually adjusting the statutory maximum (or minimum) amount of civil penalties to reflect inflation, maintain the deterrent effect of statutory civil penalties, and promote compliance with the law. The rule does not necessarily revise the penalty amounts that EPA chooses to seek pursuant to its civil penalty policies in a particular case. EPA’s civil penalty policies, which guide enforcement personnel on how to exercise EPA’s statutory penalty authorities, take into account a number of fact-specific considerations, e.g., the seriousness of the violation, the amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:19 Feb 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 $50,334. $2,013,399. $2,013,399 or 1 percent of the total assets of the credit union, whichever is less. $331,174. First violation: $11,563 Subsequent violations: $23,125. $2,187. violator’s good faith efforts to comply, any economic benefit gained by the violator as a result of its noncompliance, and a violator’s ability to pay. DATES: This final rule is effective February 6, 2019, and applicable beginning January 15, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: David Smith-Watts, Office of Civil Enforcement, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, Mail Code 2241A, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460, telephone number: (202) 564–4083; smithwatts.david@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment Rule SUMMARY: New maximum amount Since 1990, federal agencies have been required to issue regulations adjusting for inflation the statutory civil penalties 1 that can be imposed under the laws administered by that agency. The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (DCIA), required agencies to review their statutory civil penalties every 4 years, and to adjust the statutory civil penalty amounts for inflation if the increase met the DCIA’s adjustment methodology. In accordance with the DCIA, EPA reviewed and, as appropriate, adjusted the civil penalty levels under each of the statutes the agency implements in 1996 (61 FR 69360), 2004 (69 FR 7121), 2008 (73 FR 75340), and 2013 (78 FR 66643). The 2015 Act 2 required each federal agency to adjust the level of statutory 1 The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, Public Law 101–410, 28 U.S.C. 2461 note, defines ‘‘civil monetary penalty’’ as ‘‘any penalty, fine, or other sanction that—(A)(i) is for a specific monetary amount as provided by Federal law; or (ii) has a maximum amount provided for by Federal law; and (B) is assessed or enforced by an agency pursuant to Federal law; and (C) is assessed or enforced pursuant to an administrative proceeding or a civil action in the Federal courts.’’ 2 The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Section 701 of Pub. PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 civil penalties under the laws implemented by that agency with an initial ‘‘catch-up’’ adjustment through an interim final rulemaking. The 2015 Act also required federal agencies, beginning on January 15, 2017, to make subsequent annual adjustments for inflation. Section 4 of the 2015 Act requires each federal agency to publish these annual adjustments by January 15 of each year. The purpose of the 2015 Act is to maintain the deterrent effect of civil penalties by translating originally enacted statutory civil penalty amounts to today’s dollars and rounding statutory civil penalties to the nearest dollar. As required by the 2015 Act, EPA issued a catch-up rule on July 1, 2016, which was effective August 1, 2016 (81 FR 43091). EPA made its first annual adjustment on January 12, 2017, which was effective on January 15, 2017 (82 FR 3633). EPA made its second annual adjustment on January 10, 2018, which was effective on January 15, 2018 (83 FR 1190). Today’s rule implements the third annual adjustment mandated by the 2015 Act. The 2015 Act describes the method for calculating the adjustments. Each statutory maximum and minimum 3 civil monetary penalty is multiplied by the cost-of-living adjustment, which is L. 114–74) was signed into law on Nov. 2, 2015, and further amended the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990. 3 Under Section 3(2)(A) of the 2015 Act, ‘‘civil monetary penalty’’ means ‘‘a specific monetary amount as provided by Federal law’’; or ‘‘has a maximum amount provided for by Federal law.’’ EPA-administered statutes generally refer to statutory maximum penalties, with the following exceptions: Section 311(b)(7)(D) of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1321(b)(7)(D), refers to a minimum penalty of ‘‘not less than $100,000 . . .’’; Section 104B(d)(1) of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act, 33 U.S.C. 1414b(d)(1), refers to an exact penalty of $600 ‘‘[f]or each dry ton (or equivalent) of sewage sludge or industrial waste dumped or transported by the person in violation of this subsection in calendar year 1992 . . .’’; and Section 325(d)(1) of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, 42 U.S.C. 11045(d)(1), refers to an exact civil penalty of $25,000 for each frivolous trade secret claim. E:\FR\FM\06FER1.SGM 06FER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 25 (Wednesday, February 6, 2019)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 2052-2056]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-01123]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION

12 CFR Part 747

RIN 3133-AE92


Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment

AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The NCUA Board (Board) is amending its regulations to adjust 
the maximum amount of each civil monetary penalty (CMP) within its 
jurisdiction to account for inflation. This action, including the 
amount of the adjustments, is required under the Federal Civil 
Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt 
Collection Improvement Act of 1996 and the Federal Civil Penalties 
Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015.

DATES: This final rule is effective February 6, 2019.

[[Page 2053]]


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Marvin Shaw, Staff Attorney, at 1775 
Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, or telephone: (703) 518-6553.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Legal Background
II. Calculation of Adjustments
III. Regulatory Procedures

I. Legal Background

A. Statutory Requirements and OMB Guidance

    The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 \1\ (DCIA) amended the 
Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 \2\ (FCPIA 
Act) to require every federal agency to enact regulations that adjust 
each CMP provided by law under its jurisdiction by the rate of 
inflation at least once every four years.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Public Law 104-134, Sec. 31001(s), 110 Stat. 1321-373 (Apr. 
26, 1996). The law is codified at 28 U.S.C. 2461 note.
    \2\ Public Law 101-410, 104 Stat. 890 (Oct. 5, 1990), codified 
at 28 U.S.C. 2461 note.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In November 2015, Congress further amended the CMP inflation 
requirements in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015,\3\ which contains 
the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act 
of 2015 (the 2015 amendments).\4\ This legislation provided for an 
initial ``catch-up'' adjustment of CMPs in 2016, followed by annual 
adjustments. The catch-up adjustment reset CMP maximum amounts by 
setting aside the inflation adjustments that agencies made in prior 
years and instead calculated inflation with reference to the year when 
each CMP was enacted or last modified by Congress. Agencies were 
required to publish their catch-up adjustments in an interim final rule 
by July 1, 2016 and make them effective by August 1, 2016.\5\ The NCUA 
complied with these requirements in a June 2016 interim final rule, 
followed by an October 2016 final rule to confirm the adjustments as 
final.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ Public Law 114-74, 129 Stat. 584 (Nov. 2, 2015).
    \4\ 129 Stat. 599.
    \5\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 
2, 2015).
    \6\ 81 FR 40152 (June 21, 2016); 81 FR 78028 (Nov. 7, 2016).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The 2015 amendments also specified how agencies must conduct annual 
inflation adjustments after the 2016 catch-up adjustment. Following the 
catch-up adjustment, agencies must make the required adjustments and 
publish them in the Federal Register by January 15 each year.\7\ For 
2017, the NCUA issued an interim final rule on January 6, 2017,\8\ 
followed by a final rule issued on June 23, 2017.\9\ For 2018, the NCUA 
issued a final rule to satisfy the agency's requirement for the 2018 
annual adjustments.\10\ This document satisfies the agency's 
requirement for the 2019 annual adjustment.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 
2, 2015).
    \8\ 82 FR 7640 (Jan. 23, 2017).
    \9\ 82 FR 29710 (June 30, 2017).
    \10\ 83 FR 2029 (Jan.16, 2018).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The law provides that the adjustments shall be made notwithstanding 
the section of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) that requires 
prior notice and public comment for agency rulemaking.\11\ The 2015 
amendments also specify that each CMP maximum must be increased by the 
percentage by which the consumer price index for urban consumers (CPI-
U) \12\ for October of the year immediately preceding the year the 
adjustment is made exceeds the CPI-U for October of the prior year.\13\ 
For example, for the adjustment to be made in 2019, an agency must 
compare the October 2017 and 2018 CPI-U figures.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \11\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 
2, 2015).
    \12\ This index is published by the Department of Labor, Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, and is available at its website: http://www.bls.gov/cpi/.
    \13\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(1)(2)(B), 129 Stat. 584, 600 
(Nov. 2, 2015).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The 2015 amendments also provide that agencies may forgo the 
required annual adjustments in certain circumstances. Specifically, in 
a subsection titled ``Other Adjustments Made,'' the statute provides 
that an agency is not required to make an annual adjustment to a CMP if 
it has been increased by an amount greater than the contemplated annual 
adjustment in the preceding 12 months.\14\ When these criteria are met, 
the agency has discretion not to make the adjustments otherwise 
required by the statute.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \14\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 600 (Nov. 
2, 2015).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the 2015 amendments directed the Office of Management 
and Budget (OMB) to issue guidance to agencies on implementing the 
inflation adjustments.\15\ OMB is required to issue its guidance each 
December and, with respect to the 2019 annual adjustment, did so on 
December 14, 2018.\16\ This OMB guidance for the 2019 adjustments 
includes an inflationary multiplier (1.02522) to apply to each current 
CMP maximum amount to determine the adjusted maximum. The guidance also 
addresses rulemaking procedures and agency reporting and oversight 
requirements for CMPs.\17\
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    \15\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(4), 129 Stat. 584, 601 (Nov. 
2, 2015).
    \16\ OMB, Implementation of Penalty Inflation Adjustments for 
2019, Pursuant to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment 
Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Dec. 14, 2018), available at https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/m_19_04.pdf.
    \17\ Id.
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B. Application to the 2019 Adjustments

    This section applies the statutory requirements and OMB's guidance 
to the NCUA's CMPs, and sets forth the Board's calculation of the 2019 
adjustments.
    As explained above, the 2015 amendments require the NCUA to adjust 
the maximum amounts of its CMPs by the percentage by which the October 
2018 CPI-U (252.885) exceeds the October 2017 CPI-U (246.663). The 
percentage change is 2.522. This percentage increase can be expressed 
as an inflation multiplier (the quotient of the October 2018 figure 
divided by the October 2017 figure). Accordingly, each CMP maximum 
amount should be multiplied by 1.02522 to determine the adjusted 
maximum amount. OMB's guidance identifies the same multiplier.
    The Board has considered the exception in the 2015 amendments for 
adjustments made in the preceding 12 months, discussed above, and has 
determined that it does not apply. All of the adjustments calculated 
below are equal to or greater than the adjustments made in January 2018 
for each CMP. Accordingly, the exception for greater adjustments in the 
preceding 12 months does not apply. Thus, the Board lacks discretion to 
decline to make the adjustments calculated below.
    The table below presents the adjustment calculations. The current 
maximums are found at 12 CFR 747.1001, as adjusted in January 2018. 
This amount is multiplied by the inflation multiplier to calculate the 
new maximum in the far right column. Only these adjusted maximum 
amounts, and not the calculations, will be codified at 12 CFR 747.1001 
under this final rule. The adjusted amounts were applicable January 15, 
2019, and can be applied to violations that occurred on or after 
November 2, 2015, the date the 2015 amendments were enacted.\18\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \18\ Public Law 114-74, 129 Stat. 600 (Nov. 2, 2015), codified 
at 28 U.S.C. 2461 note.

[[Page 2054]]



                                  Table--Calculation of Maximum CMP Adjustments
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                               Adjusted Maximum
                                                                                                 ($) (current
                                                            Current maximum                        maximum x
            Citation              Description/tier \19\           ($)           Multiplier        multiplier,
                                                                                              rounded to nearest
                                                                                                    dollar)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)...........  Inadvertent failure to   3,928.............         1.02522  4,027.
                                  submit a report or the
                                  inadvertent submission
                                  of a false or
                                  misleading report.
12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)...........  Non-inadvertent failure  39.278............         1.02522  40,269.
                                  to submit a report or
                                  the non-inadvertent
                                  submission of a false
                                  or misleading report.
12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)...........  Failure to submit a      Lesser of                  1.02522  Lesser of
                                  report or the            1,963,870 or 1%                     2,013,399 or 1%
                                  submission of a false    of total CU                         of total CU
                                  or misleading report     assets.                             assets.
                                  done knowingly or with
                                  reckless disregard.
12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(A)........  Tier 1 CMP for           3,591.............         1.02522  3,682.
                                  inadvertent failure to
                                  submit certified
                                  statement of insured
                                  shares and charges due
                                  to NCUSIF, or
                                  inadvertent submission
                                  of false or misleading
                                  statement.
12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(B)........  Tier 2 CMP for non-      35,904............         1.02522  36,809.
                                  inadvertent failure to
                                  submit certified
                                  statement or
                                  submission of false or
                                  misleading statement.
12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(C)........  Tier 3 CMP for failure   Lesser of                  1.02522  Lesser of
                                  to submit a certified    1,795,216 or 1%                    1,840,491 or 1% of
                                  statement or the         of total CU                         total CU assets.
                                  submission of a false    assets.
                                  or misleading
                                  statement done
                                  knowingly or with
                                  reckless disregard.
12 U.S.C. 1785(a)(3)...........  Non-compliance with      122...............         1.02522  125.
                                  insurance logo
                                  requirements.
12 U.S.C. 1785(e)(3)...........  Non-compliance with      285...............         1.02522  292.
                                  NCUA security
                                  requirements.
12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A)........  Tier 1 CMP for           9,819.............         1.02522  10,067.
                                  violations of law,
                                  regulation, and other
                                  orders or agreements.
12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(B)........  Tier 2 CMP for           49,096............         1.02522  50,334.
                                  violations of law,
                                  regulation, and other
                                  orders or agreements
                                  and for recklessly
                                  engaging in unsafe or
                                  unsound practices or
                                  breaches of fiduciary
                                  duty.
12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(C)........  Tier 3 CMP for           1,963,870.........         1.02522  2,013,399.
                                  knowingly committing
                                  the violations under
                                  Tier 1 or 2 (natural
                                  person).
12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(C)........  Tier 3 (same) (CU).....  Lesser of                  1.02522  Lesser of
                                                           1,963,870 or 1%                     2,013,399 or 1%
                                                           of total CU                         of total CU
                                                           assets.                             assets.
12 U.S.C. 1786(w)(5)(A)(ii)....  Non-compliance with      323,027...........         1.02522  331,174.
                                  senior examiner post-
                                  employment
                                  restrictions.
15 U.S.C. 1639e(k).............  Non-compliance with      11,279............         1.02522  11,563.
                                  appraisal independence
                                  standards (first
                                  violation).
15 U.S.C. 1639e(k).............  Subsequent violations    22,556............         1.02522  23,125.
                                  of the same.
42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)(5)..........  Non-compliance with      2,133.............         1.02522  2,187.
                                  flood insurance
                                  requirements.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

III. Regulatory Procedures
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \19\ The table uses condensed descriptions of CMP tiers. Refer 
to the U.S. Code citations for complete descriptions.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Final Rule Under the APA

    In the 2015 amendments to the FCPIA Act, Congress provided that 
agencies shall make the required inflation adjustments in 2017 and 
subsequent years notwithstanding 5 U.S.C. 553,\20\ which requires 
agencies to follow notice-and-comment procedures in rulemaking and to 
make rules effective no sooner than 30 days after publication in the 
Federal Register. The 2015 amendments provide a clear exception to 
these requirements.\21\ In addition, the Board finds that notice-and-
comment procedures would be impracticable and unnecessary under the APA 
because of the largely ministerial and technical nature of the rule, 
which affords agencies limited discretion in promulgating the rule, and 
the statutory deadline for making the adjustments.\22\ In these 
circumstances, the Board finds good cause to issue a final rule without 
issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking or soliciting public comments. 
The Board also finds good cause to make the final rule effective upon 
publication because of the statutory deadline. Accordingly, this final 
rule is issued without prior notice and comment and will become 
effective immediately upon publication.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \20\ Public Law 114-74, Sec. 701(b)(1), 129 Stat. 584, 599 (Nov. 
2, 2015).
    \21\ See 5 U.S.C. 559; Asiana Airlines v. Fed. Aviation Admin., 
134 F.3d 393, 396-99 (D.C. Cir. 1998).
    \22\ 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(3)(B); see Mid-Tex Elec. Co-op., Inc. v. 
Fed. Energy Regulatory Comm'n, 822 F.2d 1123, (D.C. Cir. 1987).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act requires the Board to prepare an 
analysis to describe any significant economic impact a regulation may 
have on a substantial number of small entities.\23\ For purposes of 
this analysis, the Board considers small credit unions to be those 
having under $100 million in assets.\24\ This final rule will not have 
a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small credit 
unions because it only affects the maximum amounts of CMPs that may be 
assessed in individual cases, which are not numerous and generally do 
not involve assessments at the maximum level. In addition, several of 
the CMPs

[[Page 2055]]

are limited to a percentage of a credit union's assets. Finally, in 
assessing CMPs, the Board generally must consider a party's financial 
resources.\25\ Because this final rule will affect few, if any, small 
credit unions, the Board certifies that the final rule will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \23\ 5 U.S.C. 603(a).
    \24\ Interpretive Ruling and Policy Statement 15-1, 80 FR 57512 
(Sept. 24, 2015).
    \25\ 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(G)(i).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

C. Paperwork Reduction Act

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) applies to rulemakings in 
which an agency creates a new paperwork burden on regulated entities or 
modifies an existing burden.\26\ For purposes of the PRA, a paperwork 
burden may take the form of either a reporting or a recordkeeping 
requirement, both referred to as information collections. This final 
rule adjusts the maximum amounts of certain CMPs that the Board may 
assess against individuals, entities, or credit unions but does not 
require any reporting or recordkeeping. Therefore, this final rule will 
not create new paperwork burdens or modify any existing paperwork 
burdens.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \26\ 44 U.S.C. 3507(d); 5 CFR part 1320.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

D. Executive Order 13132

    Executive Order 13132 encourages independent regulatory agencies to 
consider the impact of their actions on state and local interests. In 
adherence to fundamental federalism principles, the NCUA, an 
independent regulatory agency as defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5), 
voluntarily complies with the executive order. This final rule adjusts 
the maximum amounts of certain CMPs that the Board may assess against 
individuals, entities, and federally insured credit unions, including 
state-chartered credit unions. However, the final rule does not create 
any new authority or alter the underlying statutory authorities that 
enable the Board to assess CMPs. Accordingly, this final rule will not 
have a substantial direct effect on the states, on the connection 
between the national government and the states, or on the distribution 
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. 
The Board has determined that this final rule does not constitute a 
policy that has federalism implications for purposes of the executive 
order.

E. Assessment of Federal Regulations and Policies on Families

    The Board has determined that this final rule will not affect 
family well-being within the meaning of Section 654 of the Treasury and 
General Government Appropriations Act, 1999.\27\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \27\ Public Law 105-277, 112 Stat. 2681 (Oct. 21, 1998).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

F. Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act

    The Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 \28\ 
(SBREFA) provides generally for congressional review of agency rules. A 
reporting requirement is triggered in instances where the Board issues 
a final rule as defined by Section 551 of the APA.\29\ The Board has 
submitted this final rule to OMB for it to determine whether it is a 
``major rule'' within the meaning of the relevant sections of SBREFA, 
but the Board does not believe the rule is major.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \28\ Public Law 104-121, 110 Stat. 857 (Mar. 29, 1996).
    \29\ 5 U.S.C. 551.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 747

    Credit unions, Civil monetary penalties.

    By the National Credit Union Administration Board on January 4, 
2019.
Gerard S. Poliquin,
Secretary of the Board.

    For the reasons stated above, the NCUA Board amends 12 CFR part 747 
as follows:

PART 747--ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS, ADJUDICATIVE HEARINGS, RULES OF 
PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS

0
1. The authority for part 747 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1766, 1782, 1784, 1785, 1786, 1787, 1790a, 
1790d; 15 U.S.C. 1639e; 42 U.S.C. 4012a; Public Law 101-410; Public 
Law 104-134; Public Law 109-351; Public Law 114-74.

0
2. Revise Sec.  747.1001 to read as follows:


Sec.  747.1001   Adjustment of civil monetary penalties by the rate of 
inflation.

    (a) The NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation 
Adjustment Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended (28 
U.S.C. 2461 note)), to adjust the maximum amount of each civil monetary 
penalty within its jurisdiction by the rate of inflation. The following 
chart displays those adjusted amounts, as calculated pursuant to the 
statute:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
     U.S. Code citation          CMP description     New maximum amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
(1) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)....  Inadvertent failure   $4,027.
                               to submit a report
                               or the inadvertent
                               submission of a
                               false or misleading
                               report.
(2) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)....  Non-inadvertent       $40,269.
                               failure to submit a
                               report or the non-
                               inadvertent
                               submission of a
                               false or misleading
                               report.
(3) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)....  Failure to submit a   $2,013,399 or 1
                               report or the         percent of the
                               submission of a       total assets of the
                               false or misleading   credit union,
                               report done           whichever is less.
                               knowingly or with
                               reckless disregard.
(4) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(A).  Tier 1 CMP for        $3,682.
                               inadvertent failure
                               to submit certified
                               statement of
                               insured shares and
                               charges due to
                               NCUSIF, or
                               inadvertent
                               submission of false
                               or misleading
                               statement.
(5) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(B).  Tier 2 CMP for non-   $36,809.
                               inadvertent failure
                               to submit certified
                               statement or
                               submission of false
                               or misleading
                               statement.
(6) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(C).  Tier 3 CMP for        $1,840,491 or 1
                               failure to submit a   percent of the
                               certified statement   total assets of the
                               or the submission     credit union,
                               of a false or         whichever is less.
                               misleading
                               statement done
                               knowingly or with
                               reckless disregard.
(7) 12 U.S.C. 1785(a)(3)....  Non-compliance with   $125.
                               insurance logo
                               requirements.
(8) 12 U.S.C. 1785(e)(3)....  Non-compliance with   $292.
                               NCUA security
                               requirements.
(9) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A).  Tier 1 CMP for        $10,067.
                               violations of law,
                               regulation, and
                               other orders or
                               agreements.

[[Page 2056]]

 
(10) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A)  Tier 2 CMP for        $50,334.
                               violations of law,
                               regulation, and
                               other orders or
                               agreements and for
                               recklessly engaging
                               in unsafe or
                               unsound practices
                               or breaches of
                               fiduciary duty.
(11) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A)  Tier 3 CMP for        $2,013,399.
                               knowingly
                               committing the
                               violations under
                               Tier 1 or 2
                               (natural person).
(12) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A)  Tier 3 CMP for        $2,013,399 or 1
                               knowingly             percent of the
                               committing the        total assets of the
                               violations under      credit union,
                               Tier 1 or 2           whichever is less.
                               (insured credit
                               union).
(13) 12 U.S.C.                Non-compliance with   $331,174.
 1786(w)(5)(ii).               senior examiner
                               post-employment
                               restrictions.
(14) 15 U.S.C. 1639e(k).....  Non-compliance with   First violation:
                               appraisal             $11,563 Subsequent
                               independence          violations:
                               requirements.         $23,125.
(15) 42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)(5)..  Non-compliance with   $2,187.
                               flood insurance
                               requirements.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (b) The adjusted amounts displayed in paragraph (a) of this section 
apply to civil monetary penalties that are assessed after the date the 
increase takes effect, including those whose associated violation or 
violations pre-dated the increase and occurred after November 2, 2015.

[FR Doc. 2019-01123 Filed 2-5-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 7535-01-P