Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN, 1489-1491 [2019-00836]

Download as PDF amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 23 / Monday, February 4, 2019 / Notices minimum, 35 individuals were removed from Port Moller Hot Springs Village archeological site (XPM–00001) near Port Moller on the Alaska Peninsula partially within the boundary of the Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge, AK. Professional archeological excavations were carried out at the site as early as 1928 and most recently in 2014. Excavations were carried out at the site in 1960 by Chester S. Chard of the University of Wisconsin and Sosuke Sugihara of Meiji University in Japan. Large-scale excavation occurred at the site multiple times throughout the 1970s and 1980s by Hiroaki Okada, an archeologist at Hokkaido University in Japan. At an unknown time, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from the Port Moller area by an unknown individual. These human remains are also housed with the 35 individuals from the Port Moller Hot Springs Village archeological excavations. In the years since being collected, different portions of these human remains have been held at various institutions and locations. Between 2015 and 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service consolidated all 39 sets of human remains from the Port Moller Hot Springs Village Site and Port Moller vicinity at the University of Alaska Museum of the North. These human remains, which consist of cranial and post-cranial elements, belong to fourteen juveniles of unknown sex (Burials PM–1, PM–3, PM–5, PM–6, 72– 1, 72 Isolate Remains–2, 82–1, 82–4, 82– 5, 82–6, 84–1, 84 Isolate Remains–3, Box 5a–2, Box 5a–3), three adult females (Burials PM–2, PM–7, 84–2), seven adult males (Burials PM–4, 72–2, 72–3, 72–4, 82–2, 82–3, 82–7), nine adults of unknown sex (Burial 72–4a, 72 Isolate Remains–1, 74–1, 82–2a, 82–2b, 84 Isolate Remains–1, 84 Isolate Remains– 2, Box 5a–1, Individual 5), and six individuals of unknown sex and unknown age (Burials 74–2, 74–3, 74–4, 82–1a, 82–6a, Individual 4). No known individuals were identified. The 217 associated funerary objects are: one bead, six red ochre samples, 127 animal bones, one triangular shale point, seven chipped-stone artifacts, four hammerstones/abraders, three pieces of worked bone or ivory, two bone pins, one carved ornament, one decorated pin, one whale bone adze, one leister prong, two stone points, two slab stones, one sword-like bone stick, three ivory pendants, eight buttons, five metal objects, one lot of beads and buttons, one length of braided hair, one lot of cloth and leather fragments, 30 leather VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:21 Feb 01, 2019 Jkt 247001 fragments, one soil sample, and seven pieces of pottery. The occupation of the Port Moller Hot Springs Village site has been divided into three phases: (1) Around 600 years BP, (2) around 1500 years BP, and (3) around 3000–3500 years BP. The 24 individuals removed from the site in 1960, 1972, 1974, and 1984 have been associated with the later period of occupation, or from approximately 600– 1500 years BP. The 11 individuals removed from the site in 1982 are associated with a radiocarbon date from the oldest occupation at the site. Of the four individuals removed from the Port Moller area, three are associated with artifacts indicating a protohistoric or historic age, and one cannot be associated with a date. The Port Moller region is strategically located at the junction of four important cultural areas: the Aglemiut Eskimo to the northeast, Aleut to the west, the Koniaq Eskimo on Kodiak Island, and the Eskimo of the southwestern interior region of Alaska to the east. Cultural affiliation between the prehistoric populations in the area of the Hot Springs Village site can only be determined through analyses of archeological and human remains, as very little oral history information is known concerning the use of the Port Moller area prior to 1900. Based on the archeological evidence, it is believed that the site is well within the Aleut area of influence, but some archeologists believe that due to the site’s strategic location, the culture represented here likely received ideas from several different directions. The burial contexts of the human remains are consistent with those observed for pre-contact Aleut populations; namely, the custom of burying the dead inside compartments of semi-subterranean houses. The physical traits of the human remains have been determined by some as exhibiting a close affinity to the Alaska Eskimo, while others conclude that they represent Paleo-Aleuts. A biological relationship between these human remains and the inhabitants of the Nelson Lagoon area is supported by an ancient DNA study published in 2010. Determinations Made by the Alaska Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the University of Alaska Museum of the North Officials of the Alaska Region, USFWS, and the University of Alaska Museum of the North have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 39 PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1489 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 217 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Native Village of Nelson Lagoon. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Edward DeCleva, Regional Historic Preservation Officer/ Archaeologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Region, 1011 East Tudor Road, MS–235, Anchorage, AK 99013, telephone (907) 786–3399, email edward_decleva@fws.gov, and Dr. Joshua D. Reuther, Curator of Archaeology, University of Alaska Museum of the North, 907 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775, telephone (907) 474–6945, email jreuther@alaska.edu, by March 6, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Native Village of Nelson Lagoon may proceed. The Alaska Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the University of Alaska Museum of the North is responsible for notifying The Consulting Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: December 11, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–00837 Filed 2–1–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027112; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: E:\FR\FM\04FEN1.SGM 04FEN1 1490 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 23 / Monday, February 4, 2019 / Notices The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to TVA at the address in this notice by March 6, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632–7458, email tomaher@tva.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of TVA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from archeological sites 40HW44 and 40HW45, Hawkins County, Tennessee. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 SUMMARY: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:21 Feb 01, 2019 Jkt 247001 Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma; hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains From June 23 to August 19, 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 13 individuals were removed from site 40HW44 in Hawkins County, Tennessee, by the Office of Archaeological Research at the University of Alabama (OAR). TVA acquired this site on April 25, 1975 for the Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant project. TVA canceled the planned construction in the 1980s, and subsequently transferred this land to the Industrial Development Board of Hawkins County. This village site was explored using controlled surface collection, trenches, and five randomly placed 1x1 meter excavation units. Sixty-three features (pits, post molds and burials) were excavated. Five radiocarbon dates place the primary occupation during the Early Woodland (1000–300 B.C.) period. The human remains are primarily adult males. No known individuals were identified. The 132 associated funerary objects include two animal bone fragments; one animal tooth pendant; one antler handle; two beaver incisors; one bone bullroarer; one bone pin; 23 pieces of chert debitage; 69 drilled bear canines; one Ebenezer PP/ K; one greenstone celt; 17 Greenville Cluster PP/K; one piece of ground limestone; one ground steatite object; one piece of ground sandstone; one hammerstone; one limestone celt; three Long Branch Fabric Marked sherds; two chert preforms; one piece of red ochre; and two soapstone pendants. From September 20 to November 15, 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from site 40HW45 in Hawkins County, Tennessee, by OAR. TVA acquired this site on April 25, 1975 for the Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant project. TVA canceled the planned construction in the 1980s, and subsequently transferred this land to the Industrial Development Board of Hawkins County. The site was explored using controlled surface collection, an eight meter long stratigraphic trench, and five randomly placed 2x2 meter PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 excavation units. One hundred-twentyfour features, primarily pits of varying sizes, were excavated. Human burial units 1, 2 and 6 are from the Long Branch phase (600–400 B.C.) and burial units 4 and 7 from the Phipps phase (700–600 B.C.) of the Early Woodland period. The human remains are primarily adult females. No known individuals were identified. The eight associated funerary objects include five Ebenezer PP/K; two Greenville Cluster PP/K; and one Nolichucky PP/K. Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority Officials of Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on their presence in prehistoric archeological sites and osteological analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 18 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 140 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the culturally unidentifiable human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, E:\FR\FM\04FEN1.SGM 04FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 23 / Monday, February 4, 2019 / Notices 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632–7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by March 6, 2019]. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma may proceed. The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: December 4, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–00836 Filed 2–1–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. TA–131–045 and TPA– 105–006] U.S.-UK Trade Agreement: Advice on the Probable Economic Effect of Providing Duty-free Treatment for Currently Dutiable Imports United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Cancellation of hearing. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server (https:// www.usitc.gov). The public record for these investigations may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On December 7, 2018, the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) instituted the above referenced investigations (83 FR 64154, December 13, 2018) and scheduled a public hearing for January 31, 2019. However, due to the lapse in appropriation (December 22, 2018 to January 25, 2019), the USITC was unable to receive or accept requests to appear at the hearing or prehearing briefs from potential witnesses. As a result, the USITC has cancelled the January 31, 2019 hearing. The USITC anticipates rescheduling the hearing, which will be announced in a forthcoming Federal Register notice. By order of the Commission. Issued: January 30, 2019. Lisa Barton, Secretary to the Commission. [FR Doc. 2019–00866 Filed 2–1–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P AGENCY: The Commission has cancelled the hearing scheduled for January 31, 2019 due to the lapse of appropriation between December 22, 2018 and January 25, 2019 and the inability to receive or accept requests to appear or prehearing briefs. DATES: January 29, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Project Leader David Guberman (202– 708–1396 or david.guberman@usitc.gov) or Deputy Project Leader Amanda Lawrence (202–205–3185 or amanda.lawrence@usitc.gov) for information specific to these investigations. For information on the legal aspects of these investigations, contact William Gearhart of the Commission’s Office of the General Counsel (202–205–3091 or william.gearhart@usitc.gov). The media should contact Margaret O’Laughlin, Office of External Relations (202–205– 1819 or margaret.olaughlin@usitc.gov). Hearing-impaired persons can obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on 202– 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. SUMMARY: amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:21 Feb 01, 2019 Jkt 247001 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives [Docket No. ATF 2018R–04] Granting of Relief; Federal Firearms Privileges Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), Department of Justice. ACTION: Notice of granting restoration of Federal firearms privileges. AGENCY: Xisico USA, Inc. (Xisico), has been granted relief from the disabilities imposed by Federal laws by the Director of ATF with respect to the acquisition, receipt, transfer, shipment, transportation, or possession of firearms. SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Denise Brown, Enforcement Programs and Services; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Department of Justice; 99 New York Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20226; telephone (202) 648–7070. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Attorney General is responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Gun Control Act of 1968 (GCA), title 18, United States Code (U.S.C.), chapter 44. PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1491 He has delegated that responsibility to the Director of ATF, subject to the direction of the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General. 28 CFR 0.130(a). ATF has promulgated regulations that implement the provisions of the GCA in 27 CFR part 478. Section 922(g) of the GCA prohibits certain persons from shipping or transporting any firearm in interstate or foreign commerce, or receiving any firearm which has been shipped or transported in interstate or foreign commerce, or possessing any firearm in or affecting commerce. These prohibitions apply to any person who— (1) Has been convicted in any court of a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year; (2) Is a fugitive from justice; (3) Is an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance; (4) Has been adjudicated as a mental defective or committed to a mental institution; (5) Is an alien illegally or unlawfully in the United States; or with certain exceptions, aliens admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa; (6) Has been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions; (7) Having been a citizen of the United States, has renounced U.S. citizenship; (8) Is subject to a court order that restrains the person from harassing, stalking, or threatening an intimate partner or child of such intimate partner; or (9) Has been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence. The term ‘‘person’’ is defined in section 921(a)(1) as including ‘‘any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society, or joint stock company.’’ Section 925(c) of the GCA provides that a person who is prohibited from possessing, shipping, transporting, or receiving firearms or ammunition may make application to the Attorney General to remove the firearms disability imposed under section 922(g) ‘‘if it is established to his satisfaction that the circumstances regarding the disability, and the applicant’s record and reputation, are such that the applicant will not be likely to act in a manner dangerous to public safety and that the granting of the relief would not be contrary to the public interest.’’ The Attorney General has delegated the authority to grant relief from firearms disabilities to the Director of ATF. E:\FR\FM\04FEN1.SGM 04FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 23 (Monday, February 4, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 1489-1491]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-00836]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0027112; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, 
Knoxville, TN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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[[Page 1490]]

SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any 
present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. 
Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to TVA at the address in this notice by March 6, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, 
Knoxville TN 37902-1401, telephone (865) 632-7458, email 
tomaher@tva.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of TVA. The human remains 
and associated funerary objects were removed from archeological sites 
40HW44 and 40HW45, Hawkins County, Tennessee.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; 
Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the Alabama-
Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of 
Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks 
(previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The 
Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) 
Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and the United Keetoowah Band 
of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma; hereafter referred to as ``The 
Consulted Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    From June 23 to August 19, 1976, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 13 individuals were removed from site 40HW44 in Hawkins 
County, Tennessee, by the Office of Archaeological Research at the 
University of Alabama (OAR). TVA acquired this site on April 25, 1975 
for the Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant project. TVA canceled the 
planned construction in the 1980s, and subsequently transferred this 
land to the Industrial Development Board of Hawkins County. This 
village site was explored using controlled surface collection, 
trenches, and five randomly placed 1x1 meter excavation units. Sixty-
three features (pits, post molds and burials) were excavated. Five 
radiocarbon dates place the primary occupation during the Early 
Woodland (1000-300 B.C.) period.
    The human remains are primarily adult males. No known individuals 
were identified. The 132 associated funerary objects include two animal 
bone fragments; one animal tooth pendant; one antler handle; two beaver 
incisors; one bone bullroarer; one bone pin; 23 pieces of chert 
debitage; 69 drilled bear canines; one Ebenezer PP/K; one greenstone 
celt; 17 Greenville Cluster PP/K; one piece of ground limestone; one 
ground steatite object; one piece of ground sandstone; one hammerstone; 
one limestone celt; three Long Branch Fabric Marked sherds; two chert 
preforms; one piece of red ochre; and two soapstone pendants.
    From September 20 to November 15, 1976, human remains representing, 
at minimum, five individuals were removed from site 40HW45 in Hawkins 
County, Tennessee, by OAR. TVA acquired this site on April 25, 1975 for 
the Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant project. TVA canceled the planned 
construction in the 1980s, and subsequently transferred this land to 
the Industrial Development Board of Hawkins County. The site was 
explored using controlled surface collection, an eight meter long 
stratigraphic trench, and five randomly placed 2x2 meter excavation 
units. One hundred-twenty-four features, primarily pits of varying 
sizes, were excavated. Human burial units 1, 2 and 6 are from the Long 
Branch phase (600-400 B.C.) and burial units 4 and 7 from the Phipps 
phase (700-600 B.C.) of the Early Woodland period.
    The human remains are primarily adult females. No known individuals 
were identified. The eight associated funerary objects include five 
Ebenezer PP/K; two Greenville Cluster PP/K; and one Nolichucky PP/K.

Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority

    Officials of Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on their presence in 
prehistoric archeological sites and osteological analysis.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 18 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 140 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian Tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of 
Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in 
Oklahoma.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
culturally unidentifiable human remains and associated funerary objects 
may be to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and 
the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
Thomas O. Maher, TVA,

[[Page 1491]]

400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902-1401, telephone 
(865) 632-7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by March 6, 2019]. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United 
Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma may proceed.
    The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The 
Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 4, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-00836 Filed 2-1-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P