Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology, Knoxville, TN, 65722-65724 [2018-27648]

Download as PDF 65722 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2018 / Notices TVA purchased the land encompassing this site on June 12, 1968. Site 1FR594 is a mortuary stone mound that was primarily used during the Middle Woodland Lick Creek phase (A.D. 1–300). Its ‘‘donut shape’’ is the result of looting. When excavators systematically disassembled this stone mound, they found human remains interspersed among the stone slabs. Some burials appear to have been primary inhumations topped by stone, while others appeared to contain human remains that had been cremated or defleshed elsewhere and then placed among the stones. The excavators did not note any prehistoric habitation adjacent to this stone mound. The human remains represent infants, juveniles and adults. Most of the remains were too fragmentary to determine sex. There are no associated funerary objects. Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Officials of Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent are Native American, based on their presence in prehistoric archeological sites and osteological analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 407 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 176 funerary objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. • The Treaty of September 20, 1816, indicates that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Chickasaw Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. The Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in VerDate Sep<11>2014 00:00 Dec 21, 2018 Jkt 247001 Oklahoma have declined to accept transfer of control of the human remains. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(4), TVA has decided to transfer control of the funerary objects associated with the culturally unidentifiable human remains to The Chickasaw Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632–7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by January 22, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Chickasaw Nation may proceed. The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: November 28, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–27708 Filed 12–20–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027071; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology (UTK), has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to UTK. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00101 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to UTK at the address in this notice by January 22, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Robert Hinde, University of Tennessee, Office of the Provost, 527 Andy Holt Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996–0152, telephone (865) 974–2445, email rhinde@utk.edu and vpaa@utk.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology, Knoxville, TN. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Bedford County, Lincoln County, and Stewart County TN. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by UTK professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains Circa 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from 40BD1, the Garrett site in Bedford County, TN, under the auspices of the Tennessee Archaeological Society and the Middle Tennessee State University Archaeology Club. At an unknown date, likely between 1969 and 1976, the human remains were transferred to UTK. The project was described as a salvage excavation by avocational archaeologists E:\FR\FM\21DEN1.SGM 21DEN1 amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2018 / Notices before highway construction began in 1969. Burial 01 is a possible female, middle age adult (35–50 years). Burial 01A is a possible male, middle to old age adult (35–50+ years). Burial 1 is an infant, sex unknown, approximately 9 to 12 months old. Burial 02 is a female, middle age adult (30–50 years). Burial 2 is an adult individual, sex indeterminate. Burial 3 is a probable female, middle age (35–50?). Burial 4 is a probable female, age 45–49 years old. Burial 4A is an infant, sex unknown, 36–40 weeks. Burial F4 is a middle age adult, sex indeterminate. No known individuals were identified. The 4779 associated funerary objects include: 2114 chert waste flakes, 27 bifacially worked tools or tool fragments, one core fragment, two gravers, one projectile point base, one piece of ochre, 130 pieces of burned clay, one ceramic sherd, 1981 faunal bones and teeth (of which 53 show evidence of polishing), 518 fragments of gastropod and mussel shell, two pieces of charcoal and one bag of sediment. The projectile point base is identified as a Morrow Mountain Straight Base type, which dates to the Middle Archaic Period (circa 5200 to 5000 B.C.). According to an unpublished report on this site (McMahan 1976), the presence of a large quantity of chipped and ground stone tools date this site to the Middle Archaic Period (∼5200 to 4000 B.C.). Upon reading this report, it is clear that additional lithic artifacts (potentially funerary objects) were never transferred to UTK. Between 1968 and 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from 40BD48, the Garrett site in Bedford County, TN, under the auspices of the Rutherford Chapter of the Tennessee Archaeological Society. At an unknown date post 1970, the human remains were transferred to UTK. Burial 1 is an infant, sex unknown, approximately 38 weeks old. No known individuals were identified. The 88 associated funerary objects are all small fragments of faunal bone. The site is thought to date to the Early Archaic and Woodland periods based on analysis of projectile points found at the site (which were never transferred to UTK). Circa 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from 40LN10, possibly also known as the Mulberry site, in Lincoln County, TN. The human remains were removed by the landowner when he was digging to create a pond. Members of the Tennessee Archaeological Society (TAS), Coffee-Franklin County Chapter, recorded the site in 1971, noting that the VerDate Sep<11>2014 00:00 Dec 21, 2018 Jkt 247001 northern portion of the site had been destroyed. At an unknown date post 1971, the human remains were transferred to UTK. One individual is an adult female, age 45 to 50 years. The other individual is an adult, possibly a young adult (20–35 years?), possibly female. No known individuals were identified. The 1295 associated funerary objects include: 630 lithic waste flakes, 132 pieces of shatter, 46 bifacially worked tools or tool fragments, 11 scrapers, 47 projectile point fragments, 27 pieces of limestone, 38 nonculturally modified rocks, two pieces of burned limestone, 15 fossils, three pieces of sandstone, five pieces of ochre, 123 pieces of burned clay, 159 ceramic sherds, 28 faunal bones, two faunal teeth, four pieces of burned wood charcoal, five burnt nut shell pieces, two possible seeds, two pieces of charcoal and 14 bags of sediment. The projectile points and knives include stemmed and notched types, such as New Market, Frazier, Elora, Buzzard Roost Creek, Hardin, Kirk, Pickwick, Little Bear, and Hopewell and indicate a temporal affiliation for this site ranging from the Early Archaic throughout the Woodland time periods. One projectile point appears to be a Plainview type, and may represent a Transitional Paleo Period point. Upon reading the TAS report, it is clear that additional lithic artifacts (potentially funerary objects) were found but were never transferred to UTK. At an unknown date, likely post 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual, were removed from 40LNxx, the Danny Good site in Lincoln County, TN. At an unknown date, likely post 1965, this individual was transferred to UTK. A note accompanying the human remains (source and date unknown) states that Danny Good encountered a skeletal individual while plowing his field, and this individual was excavated by Jerry Dickey of Lynchburg, TN, a member of the Tennessee Archaeological Society. This skeletal individual is an adult male, age 35 to 39. No known individuals were identified. The 108 associated funerary objects include: 14 waste flakes, 28 bifacially worked tools including a preform, graver, and drill fragment, 24 fragmentary projectile points, 33 ceramic vessel sherds, seven faunal bones, and two pieces of shell. The projectile points include Ledbetter, Elk River, Mulberry Creek, Eva, Maples, Rice, Kirk, King, and Benton types, which range in age from the Early Archaic and into the Woodland time periods, roughly from B.C. 8,000 to A.D. 900 (Justice 1987). The 33 ceramic PO 00000 Frm 00102 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65723 vessel sherds are all limestone tempered; 31 are plain or have a cordmarked surface treatment. One check stamped sherd and one complicated stamped sherd are also present. Check stamping appears in the McFarland phase in the early Middle Woodland Period in this region, 200 B.C. to A.D. 200 (Faulkner 2002:189, 199). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from an unknown site in Stewart County, TN. In 1972, John Dowd sent these individuals to UTK. One is a middle aged adult, probable female. The other is a young adult of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In July of 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from 40SW47, the Allen site in Stewart County, TN. Both burials were poorly preserved and the few remains that were recovered were sent in 1962 to Dr. E. Carl Sensenig, Chair of the Department of Anatomy at University of Alabama Medical Center, for analysis, but no report has been found with his findings (Morse 1963:48–52). These skeletal remains were missing until 1997 when they were located at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and subsequently returned to UTK. Burial 1 is an adult, possibly male. Burial 2 is a subadult, age 13 to 16, of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 19 associated funerary objects include: One chert biface fragment, one chert core fragment, one chert drill fragment, one flint blade or knife, one granite nutting stone or bipolar anvil, seven chert projectile points, two chert uniface scrapers, four chert unutilized flakes (one primary; one secondary; two tertiary/thinning), and one chert flake or angular shatter. The flint blade or knife is potentially a Benton knife, which dates to the Middle Archaic period (6000 to 4000 B.C.E.). The seven projectile points all date to the Early Archaic period: One is a Kirk Corner Notched (7500 to 6900 B.C.E.); one is a Kirk cluster (7500 to 6000 B.C.E.); three are Kirk Serrated and two are Kirk Stemmed (both 6900 to 6000 B.C.E.). The Allen site (40SW47) is situated on a high knoll overlooking the Cumberland River. It was recorded by UTK in 1959. In 1962, UTK directed archeological excavations at the Allen site. Artifacts and associated documents from the Allen site were originally labeled as 62SW47, with ‘‘62’’ designating the area or unit of the site that was excavated. Until 2017, 40SW47 E:\FR\FM\21DEN1.SGM 21DEN1 65724 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2018 / Notices was considered to be one of several sites excavated by UTK as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Lake Barkley Project, with funds provided by the National Park Service under the River Basins Archaeological Salvage Program. On 19 July 2017, the USACE Nashville District published a Notice of Inventory Completion (82 FR 33156) for all sites investigated in Tennessee during the Lake Barkley project. While preparing this notice, the USACE determined that 40SW47 lay outside the project right-of-way and on private property and they concluded that UTK’s investigation of the Allen site was independent from the Lake Barkley project. Consequently, the USACE relinquished the materials recovered from the Allen site to UTK. amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Determinations Made by the University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology Officials of the University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on their archeological context and an osteological analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 17 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 6,289 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. VerDate Sep<11>2014 00:00 Dec 21, 2018 Jkt 247001 Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Robert Hinde, University of Tennessee, Office of the Provost, 527 Andy Holt Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996–0152, telephone (865) 974–2445, email rhinde@utk.edu and vpaa@ utk.edu, by January 22, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma may proceed. UTK is responsible for notifying the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: November 28, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–27648 Filed 12–20–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0027077; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00103 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at the address in this notice by January 22, 2019. DATES: Patricia Capone, Museum Curator and Director of Research and Repatriation, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496–3702, email pcapone@ fas.harvard.edu. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains were removed from DeSoto County, MS. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains Sometime prior to 1887, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the mound at the Lake Cormorant Site (22Ds501), in DeSoto County, MS, by F. H. Bierbower. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology purchased these human remains from Mr. Bierbower in 1887. No known individuals were identified. E:\FR\FM\21DEN1.SGM 21DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 245 (Friday, December 21, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65722-65724]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-27648]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0027071; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Tennessee, 
Department of Anthropology, Knoxville, TN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology (UTK), 
has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural 
affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects 
and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. 
Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to UTK. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to UTK at the address in this notice by January 22, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Robert Hinde, University of Tennessee, Office of the 
Provost, 527 Andy Holt Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996-0152, telephone (865) 
974-2445, email rhinde@utk.edu and vpaa@utk.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the University of 
Tennessee, Department of Anthropology, Knoxville, TN. The human remains 
and associated funerary objects were removed from Bedford County, 
Lincoln County, and Stewart County TN.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by UTK 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cherokee 
Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and 
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.

History and Description of the Remains

    Circa 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were removed from 40BD1, the Garrett site in Bedford 
County, TN, under the auspices of the Tennessee Archaeological Society 
and the Middle Tennessee State University Archaeology Club. At an 
unknown date, likely between 1969 and 1976, the human remains were 
transferred to UTK. The project was described as a salvage excavation 
by avocational archaeologists

[[Page 65723]]

before highway construction began in 1969. Burial 01 is a possible 
female, middle age adult (35-50 years). Burial 01A is a possible male, 
middle to old age adult (35-50+ years). Burial 1 is an infant, sex 
unknown, approximately 9 to 12 months old. Burial 02 is a female, 
middle age adult (30-50 years). Burial 2 is an adult individual, sex 
indeterminate. Burial 3 is a probable female, middle age (35-50?). 
Burial 4 is a probable female, age 45-49 years old. Burial 4A is an 
infant, sex unknown, 36-40 weeks. Burial F4 is a middle age adult, sex 
indeterminate. No known individuals were identified. The 4779 
associated funerary objects include: 2114 chert waste flakes, 27 
bifacially worked tools or tool fragments, one core fragment, two 
gravers, one projectile point base, one piece of ochre, 130 pieces of 
burned clay, one ceramic sherd, 1981 faunal bones and teeth (of which 
53 show evidence of polishing), 518 fragments of gastropod and mussel 
shell, two pieces of charcoal and one bag of sediment. The projectile 
point base is identified as a Morrow Mountain Straight Base type, which 
dates to the Middle Archaic Period (circa 5200 to 5000 B.C.). According 
to an unpublished report on this site (McMahan 1976), the presence of a 
large quantity of chipped and ground stone tools date this site to the 
Middle Archaic Period (~5200 to 4000 B.C.). Upon reading this report, 
it is clear that additional lithic artifacts (potentially funerary 
objects) were never transferred to UTK.
    Between 1968 and 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from 40BD48, the Garrett site in Bedford 
County, TN, under the auspices of the Rutherford Chapter of the 
Tennessee Archaeological Society. At an unknown date post 1970, the 
human remains were transferred to UTK. Burial 1 is an infant, sex 
unknown, approximately 38 weeks old. No known individuals were 
identified. The 88 associated funerary objects are all small fragments 
of faunal bone. The site is thought to date to the Early Archaic and 
Woodland periods based on analysis of projectile points found at the 
site (which were never transferred to UTK).
    Circa 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from 40LN10, possibly also known as the Mulberry site, in 
Lincoln County, TN. The human remains were removed by the landowner 
when he was digging to create a pond. Members of the Tennessee 
Archaeological Society (TAS), Coffee-Franklin County Chapter, recorded 
the site in 1971, noting that the northern portion of the site had been 
destroyed. At an unknown date post 1971, the human remains were 
transferred to UTK. One individual is an adult female, age 45 to 50 
years. The other individual is an adult, possibly a young adult (20-35 
years?), possibly female. No known individuals were identified. The 
1295 associated funerary objects include: 630 lithic waste flakes, 132 
pieces of shatter, 46 bifacially worked tools or tool fragments, 11 
scrapers, 47 projectile point fragments, 27 pieces of limestone, 38 
non-culturally modified rocks, two pieces of burned limestone, 15 
fossils, three pieces of sandstone, five pieces of ochre, 123 pieces of 
burned clay, 159 ceramic sherds, 28 faunal bones, two faunal teeth, 
four pieces of burned wood charcoal, five burnt nut shell pieces, two 
possible seeds, two pieces of charcoal and 14 bags of sediment. The 
projectile points and knives include stemmed and notched types, such as 
New Market, Frazier, Elora, Buzzard Roost Creek, Hardin, Kirk, 
Pickwick, Little Bear, and Hopewell and indicate a temporal affiliation 
for this site ranging from the Early Archaic throughout the Woodland 
time periods. One projectile point appears to be a Plainview type, and 
may represent a Transitional Paleo Period point. Upon reading the TAS 
report, it is clear that additional lithic artifacts (potentially 
funerary objects) were found but were never transferred to UTK.
    At an unknown date, likely post 1965, human remains representing, 
at minimum, one individual, were removed from 40LNxx, the Danny Good 
site in Lincoln County, TN. At an unknown date, likely post 1965, this 
individual was transferred to UTK. A note accompanying the human 
remains (source and date unknown) states that Danny Good encountered a 
skeletal individual while plowing his field, and this individual was 
excavated by Jerry Dickey of Lynchburg, TN, a member of the Tennessee 
Archaeological Society. This skeletal individual is an adult male, age 
35 to 39. No known individuals were identified. The 108 associated 
funerary objects include: 14 waste flakes, 28 bifacially worked tools 
including a preform, graver, and drill fragment, 24 fragmentary 
projectile points, 33 ceramic vessel sherds, seven faunal bones, and 
two pieces of shell. The projectile points include Ledbetter, Elk 
River, Mulberry Creek, Eva, Maples, Rice, Kirk, King, and Benton types, 
which range in age from the Early Archaic and into the Woodland time 
periods, roughly from B.C. 8,000 to A.D. 900 (Justice 1987). The 33 
ceramic vessel sherds are all limestone tempered; 31 are plain or have 
a cordmarked surface treatment. One check stamped sherd and one 
complicated stamped sherd are also present. Check stamping appears in 
the McFarland phase in the early Middle Woodland Period in this region, 
200 B.C. to A.D. 200 (Faulkner 2002:189, 199).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from an unknown site in Stewart County, TN. In 
1972, John Dowd sent these individuals to UTK. One is a middle aged 
adult, probable female. The other is a young adult of indeterminate 
sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In July of 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from 40SW47, the Allen site in Stewart County, 
TN. Both burials were poorly preserved and the few remains that were 
recovered were sent in 1962 to Dr. E. Carl Sensenig, Chair of the 
Department of Anatomy at University of Alabama Medical Center, for 
analysis, but no report has been found with his findings (Morse 
1963:48-52). These skeletal remains were missing until 1997 when they 
were located at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and 
subsequently returned to UTK. Burial 1 is an adult, possibly male. 
Burial 2 is a subadult, age 13 to 16, of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The 19 associated funerary objects 
include: One chert biface fragment, one chert core fragment, one chert 
drill fragment, one flint blade or knife, one granite nutting stone or 
bipolar anvil, seven chert projectile points, two chert uniface 
scrapers, four chert unutilized flakes (one primary; one secondary; two 
tertiary/thinning), and one chert flake or angular shatter. The flint 
blade or knife is potentially a Benton knife, which dates to the Middle 
Archaic period (6000 to 4000 B.C.E.). The seven projectile points all 
date to the Early Archaic period: One is a Kirk Corner Notched (7500 to 
6900 B.C.E.); one is a Kirk cluster (7500 to 6000 B.C.E.); three are 
Kirk Serrated and two are Kirk Stemmed (both 6900 to 6000 B.C.E.).
    The Allen site (40SW47) is situated on a high knoll overlooking the 
Cumberland River. It was recorded by UTK in 1959. In 1962, UTK directed 
archeological excavations at the Allen site. Artifacts and associated 
documents from the Allen site were originally labeled as 62SW47, with 
``62'' designating the area or unit of the site that was excavated. 
Until 2017, 40SW47

[[Page 65724]]

was considered to be one of several sites excavated by UTK as part of 
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' (USACE) Lake Barkley Project, with 
funds provided by the National Park Service under the River Basins 
Archaeological Salvage Program. On 19 July 2017, the USACE Nashville 
District published a Notice of Inventory Completion (82 FR 33156) for 
all sites investigated in Tennessee during the Lake Barkley project. 
While preparing this notice, the USACE determined that 40SW47 lay 
outside the project right-of-way and on private property and they 
concluded that UTK's investigation of the Allen site was independent 
from the Lake Barkley project. Consequently, the USACE relinquished the 
materials recovered from the Allen site to UTK.

Determinations Made by the University of Tennessee, Department of 
Anthropology

    Officials of the University of Tennessee, Department of 
Anthropology have determined that:

     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains 
described in this notice are Native American based on their 
archeological context and an osteological analysis.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains 
described in this notice represent the physical remains of 17 
individuals of Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 6,289 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later 
as part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and any 
present-day Indian Tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band 
of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah 
Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, 
indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains 
and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land 
of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The 
Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians 
in Oklahoma.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Cherokee 
Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and 
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
Robert Hinde, University of Tennessee, Office of the Provost, 527 Andy 
Holt Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996-0152, telephone (865) 974-2445, email 
rhinde@utk.edu and vpaa@utk.edu, by January 22, 2019. After that date, 
if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of 
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Cherokee 
Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and 
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma may proceed.
    UTK is responsible for notifying the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band 
of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and United Keetoowah Band of 
Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 28, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2018-27648 Filed 12-20-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P