Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama, 60551-60554 [2018-25699]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 227 / Monday, November 26, 2018 / Notices described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 we are requesting comments on this collection from all interested individuals and organizations. The purpose of this Notice is to allow 30 days for public comment. DATES: Submit comments directly to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) up to December 26, 2018. ADDRESSES: Direct comments to the Department of State Desk Officer in the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). You may submit comments by the following methods: • Email: oira_submission@ omb.eop.gov. You must include the DS form number, information collection title, and the OMB control number in the subject line of your message. • Fax: 202–395–5806. Attention: Desk Officer for Department of State. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Direct requests for additional information regarding the collection listed in this notice, including requests for copies of the proposed collection instrument and supporting documents, to PRA_BurdenComments@state.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: • Title of Information Collection: Special Immigrant Visa Supervisor Locator. • OMB Control Number: 1405–0144. • Type of Request: Revision of a Currently Approved Collection. • Originating Office: CA/VO/L/R. • Form Number: DS–158. • Respondents: Special Immigrant Visa Applicants. • Estimated Number of Respondents: 150. • Estimated Number of Responses: 150. • Average Time per Response: 1 hour. • Total Estimated Burden Time: 150 hours. • Frequency: Once per application. • Obligation to Respond: Required to Obtain or Retain a Benefit. We are soliciting public comments to permit the Department to: • Evaluate whether the proposed information collection is necessary for the proper functions of the Department. • Evaluate the accuracy of our estimate of the time and cost burden for this proposed collection, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used. • Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected. • Minimize the reporting burden on those who are to respond, including the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:28 Nov 23, 2018 Jkt 247001 60551 use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Please note that comments submitted in response to this Notice are public record. Before including any detailed personal information, you should be aware that your comments as submitted, including your personal information, will be available for public review. OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Abstract of Proposed Collection AGENCY: Department of State uses Form DS– 158 (Special Immigrant Visa Supervisor Locator) in order to assist applicants for special immigrant visas (SIV) under section 602(b) of the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111–8), in attempting to locate an applicant’s prior Department of Defense (DoD) supervisor. The information requested on the form is limited to that necessary to locate the supervisor through DoD and Veteran’s Affairs, and if the location is successful will assist the applicant in the SIV application process. Methodology Applicants are required to complete the DS–158 and to submit their package to the appropriate email address. Edward J. Ramotowski, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Department of State. [FR Doc. 2018–25616 Filed 11–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4710–06–P STATE JUSTICE INSTITUTE SJI Board of Directors Meeting, Notice State Justice Institute. Notice of meeting. AGENCY: ACTION: The SJI Board of Directors will be meeting on Monday, December 10, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at SJI Headquarters in Reston, Virginia. The purpose of this meeting is to consider grant applications for the 1st quarter of FY 2019, and other business. All portions of this meeting are open to the public. ADDRESSES: State Justice Institute Headquarters, 11951 Freedom Drive, Suite 1020, Reston, Virginia, 20190. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jonathan Mattiello, Executive Director, State Justice Institute, 11951 Freedom Drive, Suite 1020, Reston, VA 20190, 571–313–8843, contact@sji.gov. SUMMARY: Jonathan D. Mattiello, Executive Director. [FR Doc. 2018–25657 Filed 11–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P PO 00000 Frm 00161 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice. In accordance with the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia and Panama. The level of a country’s trade surplus in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products for which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA–DR); (iv) the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru TPA); (v) the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (Colombia TPA); and (vi) the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement (Panama TPA). DATES: This notice is applicable on January 1, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dylan Daniels, Office of Agricultural Affairs at 202–395–6095 or Dylan.T.Daniels@ustr.eop.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Chile FTA Section 201 of the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789), implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Chile FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of Chile’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, E:\FR\FM\26NON1.SGM 26NON1 60552 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 227 / Monday, November 26, 2018 / Notices 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile’s imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of Chile’s trade surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in any calendar year (CY) (beginning in CY 2015) in an amount equal to the quantity of goods equal to the amount of Chile’s trade surplus in subdivision (a) of the Note. During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Chile’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 407,137 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Servicio Nacional de Aduana. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Chile’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9911.17.05 in CY 2019. II. Morocco FTA Section 201 of the United StatesMorocco Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651), implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Morocco FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of Morocco’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco’s trade surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14. Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:28 Nov 23, 2018 Jkt 247001 sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Morocco’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Morocco’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year. During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Morocco’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 743,760 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Morocco’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Notes 12(b) and 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2019. III. CAFTA–DR Section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109–53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 (71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 (72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 (73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 (75 FR 34311), implemented the CAFTA–DR on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the CAFTA–DR. Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of each CAFTA–DR country’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each CAFTA–DR country’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.12, PO 00000 Frm 00162 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA–DR are not included in the calculation of that country’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of each CAFTA–DR country entered under subheading 9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that country and that calendar year. A. Costa Rica During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Costa Rica’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 127,312 metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Costa Rica’s trade surplus is 127,312 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2019 is 13,860 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Costa Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 13,860 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Costa Rica’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that Note for Costa Rica for CY 2019). B. Dominican Republic During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, the Dominican Republic’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 6,254 metric tons according to data published by the National Direction of Customs (DGA). Based on this data, USTR has determined that the Dominican Republic’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019. C. El Salvador During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, El Salvador’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 427,977 metric tons E:\FR\FM\26NON1.SGM 26NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 227 / Monday, November 26, 2018 / Notices according to data published by the Central Bank of El Salvador. Based on this data, USTR has determined that El Salvador’s trade surplus is 427,977 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for CY 2019 is 35,360 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 35,360 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that Note for El Salvador for CY 2019). D. Guatemala During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Guatemala’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 1,431,282 metric tons according to data published by the Asociacion de Azucareros de Guatemala (ASAZGUA). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Guatemala’s trade surplus is 1,431,282 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2019 is 48,880 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 48,880 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Guatemala’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that Note for Guatemala for CY 2019). E. Honduras During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Honduras’ exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 122,527 metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of Honduras. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Honduras’ trade surplus is 122,527 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 2019 is 10,080 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 10,080 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Honduras’ trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that Note for Honduras for CY 2019). VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:28 Nov 23, 2018 Jkt 247001 F. Nicaragua During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Nicaragua’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 304,145 metric tons according to data published by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Development, Industry, and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Nicaragua’s trade surplus is 304,145 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Nicaragua for CY 2019 is 27,720 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 27,720 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Nicaragua’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Nicaragua for CY 2019). IV. Peru TPA Section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110–138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 4105), implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Peru TPA. Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of Peru’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Peru’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Peru TPA and Peru’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Peru’s trade surplus. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year. During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Peru’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 485,884 metric tons according to data published by the Superintendencia Nacional de PO 00000 Frm 00163 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 60553 Administracion Tributaria (SUNAT). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Peru’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States dutyfree under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2019. V. Colombia TPA Section 201 of the United StatesColombia Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112–42; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 29519) implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Colombia TPA. Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of Colombia’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Colombia’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Colombia TPA and Colombia’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia’s trade surplus. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year. During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Colombia’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 436,478 metric tons according to data published by Global Trade Atlas (GTA) and the Colombian Directorate of National Taxes and Customs (DIAN). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Colombia’s trade surplus is 436,478 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Colombia for CY 2019 is 55,250 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2019 is 55,250 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that Note for Colombia for CY 2019). E:\FR\FM\26NON1.SGM 26NON1 60554 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 227 / Monday, November 26, 2018 / Notices VI. Panama TPA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Section 201 of the United StatesPanama Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112–43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505), implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA. Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of Panama’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Panama’s trade surplus. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year. During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, Panama’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 12,853 metric tons according to data published by the National Institute of Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Panama’s trade surplus is 12,853 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Panama for CY 2019 is 540 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Panama that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17 in CY 2019 is 540 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Panama’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that Note for Panama for CY 2019). Federal Aviation Administration Robert Lighthizer, United States Trade Representative. [FR Doc. 2018–25699 Filed 11–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3290–F9–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:28 Nov 23, 2018 Jkt 247001 Notice of Intent of Waiver With Respect to Land; Indianapolis International Airport, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The FAA is considering a proposal to change 131.227 acres of airport land from aeronautical use to non-aeronautical use and to authorize the sale of airport property located at Indianapolis International Airport, Indianapolis, Indiana. The aforementioned land is not needed for aeronautical use. The 131.227 acres is located along High School Road between Sam Jones Expressway to the south and the CSX railroad to the north. The land formerly served as parking areas for Indianapolis International Airport. The proposed use of the property is to be used for corporate development. DATES: Comments must be received on or before December 26, 2018. ADDRESSES: Documents are available for review by appointment at the FAA Chicago Airports District Office, Melanie Myers, Program Manager, 2300 East Devon Avenue, Des Plaines, Illinois, 60018. Telephone: (847) 294– 7525/Fax: (847) 294–7046 and Eric Anderson, Director of Properties, Indianapolis Airport Authority, 7800 Col. H. Weir Cook Memorial Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 Telephone: (317) 487–5135. Written comments on the Sponsor’s request must be delivered or mailed to: Melanie Myers, Program Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Chicago Airports District Office, 2300 East Devon Avenue, Des Plaines, Illinois, 60018. Telephone: (847) 294– 7525/Fax: (847) 294–7046. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melanie Myers, Program Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Chicago Airports District Office, 2300 East Devon Avenue, Des Plaines, Illinois, 60018. Telephone: (847) 294– 7525/Fax: (847) 294–7046. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with section 47107(h) of Title 49, United States Code, this notice is required to be published in the Federal Register 30 days before modifying the land-use assurance that requires the property to be used for an aeronautical purpose. The land consists of 176 original airport acquired parcels. The parcels were acquired under grants 8–18–0038– SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00164 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 01, 8–18–0038–02, 6–18–0038–06 and local funding. There are no impacts to the airport by allowing the Indianapolis Airport Authority to dispose of the property. The land is not needed for future aeronautical development. The disposition of proceeds from the sale of the airport property will be in accordance with FAA’s Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue, published in the Federal Register on February 16, 1999 (64 FR 7696). This notice announces that the FAA is considering the release of the subject airport property at the Indianapolis International Airport, Indianapolis, Indiana from federal land covenants, subject to a reservation for continuing right of flight as well as restrictions on the released property as required in FAA Order 5190.6B section 22.16. Approval does not constitute a commitment by the FAA to financially assist in the disposal of the subject airport property nor a determination of eligibility for grant-in-aid funding from the FAA. Land Description West Main Parcel Part of the Northeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 15 North, Range 2 East located in Marion County, Indiana, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner (IAA Monument 24–E) of the Northeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 15 North, Range 2 East; thence South 00 degrees 02 minutes 00 seconds West (all bearings are based on the Indiana State Plane Coordinate system, East Zone (NAD83) along the east line of said Northeast Quarter a distance of 1967.84 feet; thence South 58 degrees 11 minutes 49 seconds West 129.48 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 58 degrees 11 minutes 49 seconds West 644.13 feet; thence North 31 degrees 08 minutes 51 seconds West 590.73 feet; thence North 44 degrees 25 minutes 44 seconds East 1,140.00 feet; thence South 07 degrees 01 minutes 40 seconds East 225.00 feet; thence South 19 degrees 46 minutes 32 seconds East 215.00 feet; thence South 00 degrees 02 minutes 00 seconds West 377.54 feet; thence South 45 degrees 02 minutes 00 seconds West 63.64 feet; thence South 00 degrees 02 minutes 00 seconds West 132.07 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 14.724 acres, more or less. East Main Parcel Part of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24 and part of the Southwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 15 E:\FR\FM\26NON1.SGM 26NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 227 (Monday, November 26, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 60551-60554]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-25699]


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OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE


Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods 
and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, 
Colombia, and Panama

AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade 
Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the 
trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia and Panama. 
The level of a country's trade surplus in these goods relates to the 
quantity of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products for 
which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) 
the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the 
United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the 
Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement 
(CAFTA-DR); (iv) the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru 
TPA); (v) the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement 
(Colombia TPA); and (vi) the United States-Panama Trade Promotion 
Agreement (Panama TPA).

DATES: This notice is applicable on January 1, 2019.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dylan Daniels, Office of Agricultural 
Affairs at 202-395-6095 or [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Chile FTA

    Section 201 of the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement 
Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and 
Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789), 
implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Chile FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of Chile's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System 
(HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99,

[[Page 60552]]

1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, 
and 2106.90, except that Chile's imports of goods classified under HS 
subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff 
treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of 
Chile's trade surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 
413) reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in any calendar 
year (CY) (beginning in CY 2015) in an amount equal to the quantity of 
goods equal to the amount of Chile's trade surplus in subdivision (a) 
of the Note. During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is 
available, Chile's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods 
by 407,137 metric tons according to data published by its customs 
authority, the Servicio Nacional de Aduana. Based on this data, USTR 
has determined that Chile's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in 
accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, 
goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free 
under subheading 9911.17.05 in CY 2019.

II. Morocco FTA

    Section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement 
Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and 
Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651), 
implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Morocco 
FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of Morocco's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 
1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that 
Morocco's imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 
and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the 
Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco's trade 
surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) 
reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Morocco's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that Note for that calendar year.
    Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which 
Morocco's trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that 
Note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Morocco's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 743,760 
metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the 
Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR has determined that 
Morocco's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. 
Notes 12(b) and 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of 
Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under 
subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2019.

III. CAFTA-DR

    Section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States 
Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109-53; 19 U.S.C. 
4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 2006 (71 FR 
10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 2006 (71 FR 
16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 2006 (71 FR 
16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 (71 FR 
38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 (72 FR 
10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 (73 FR 
79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 (75 FR 
34311), implemented the CAFTA-DR on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
CAFTA-DR.
    Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of each CAFTA-DR 
country's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS 
subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 
1702.60, except that each CAFTA-DR country's exports to the United 
States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under 
HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff 
treatment under the CAFTA-DR are not included in the calculation of 
that country's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides 
duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products of each CAFTA-DR country entered under subheading 
9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country's trade 
surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that country 
and that calendar year.

A. Costa Rica

    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Costa Rica's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 127,312 
metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs 
Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that Costa Rica's trade surplus is 127,312 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2019 is 13,860 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Costa Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 13,860 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Costa Rica's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that Note for Costa Rica for CY 2019).

B. Dominican Republic

    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
the Dominican Republic's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those 
goods by 6,254 metric tons according to data published by the National 
Direction of Customs (DGA). Based on this data, USTR has determined 
that the Dominican Republic's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in 
accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 
98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to enter the 
United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019.

C. El Salvador

    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
El Salvador's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 427,977 
metric tons

[[Page 60553]]

according to data published by the Central Bank of El Salvador. Based 
on this data, USTR has determined that El Salvador's trade surplus is 
427,977 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 
25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for CY 
2019 is 35,360 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, 
the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered 
duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 35,360 metric tons 
(i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador's trade surplus and 
the specific quantity set out in that Note for El Salvador for CY 
2019).

D. Guatemala

    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Guatemala's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 
1,431,282 metric tons according to data published by the Asociacion de 
Azucareros de Guatemala (ASAZGUA). Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that Guatemala's trade surplus is 1,431,282 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2019 is 48,880 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 48,880 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Guatemala's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that Note for Guatemala for CY 2019).

E. Honduras

    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Honduras' exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 122,527 
metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of 
Honduras. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Honduras' trade 
surplus is 122,527 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. 
Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 
2019 is 10,080 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, 
the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-
free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 10,080 metric tons 
(i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Honduras' trade surplus and the 
specific quantity set out in that Note for Honduras for CY 2019).

F. Nicaragua

    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Nicaragua's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 304,145 
metric tons according to data published by the Nicaraguan Ministry of 
Development, Industry, and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that Nicaragua's trade surplus is 304,145 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for Nicaragua for CY 2019 is 27,720 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY 2019 is 27,720 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Nicaragua's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that note for Nicaragua for CY 2019).

IV. Peru TPA

    Section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement 
Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110-138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and 
Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 4105), 
implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Peru TPA.
    Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of Peru's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 
1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, 
except that Peru's imports of U.S. goods classified under HS 
subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the 
Peru TPA and Peru's exports to the United States of goods classified 
under HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 
are not included in the calculation of Peru's trade surplus.
    Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 
9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru's trade surplus or 
the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Peru's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 485,884 
metric tons according to data published by the Superintendencia 
Nacional de Administracion Tributaria (SUNAT). Based on this data, USTR 
has determined that Peru's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in 
accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, 
goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free 
under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2019.

V. Colombia TPA

    Section 201 of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement 
Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-42; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and 
Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 29519) 
implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Colombia TPA.
    Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of Colombia's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 
1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, 
except that Colombia's imports of U.S. goods classified under 
subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the 
Colombia TPA and Colombia's exports to the United States of goods 
classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 
1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia's trade 
surplus.
    Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-
free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under 
subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia's 
trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that 
calendar year.
    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Colombia's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 436,478 
metric tons according to data published by Global Trade Atlas (GTA) and 
the Colombian Directorate of National Taxes and Customs (DIAN). Based 
on this data, USTR has determined that Colombia's trade surplus is 
436,478 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 
32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Colombia for CY 2019 
is 55,250 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the 
aggregate quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free 
under subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2019 is 55,250 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Colombia's trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that Note for Colombia for CY 2019).

[[Page 60554]]

VI. Panama TPA

    Section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement 
Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note) and 
Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505), 
implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA.
    Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of Panama's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 
1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, 
except that Panama's imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 
1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Panama TPA and 
Panama's exports to the United States of goods classified under 
subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not 
included in the calculation of Panama's trade surplus.
    Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 
9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama's trade surplus 
or the specific quantity set out in that Note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2017, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Panama's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 12,853 
metric tons according to data published by the National Institute of 
Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. 
Based on this data, USTR has determined that Panama's trade surplus is 
12,853 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 35(c) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Panama for CY 2019 is 540 metric 
tons. Therefore, in accordance with that Note, the aggregate quantity 
of goods of Panama that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.09.17 in CY 2019 is 540 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the 
lesser of Panama's trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in 
that Note for Panama for CY 2019).

Robert Lighthizer,
United States Trade Representative.
[FR Doc. 2018-25699 Filed 11-23-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3290-F9-P