Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 52532-52535 [2018-22598]

Download as PDF 52532 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026499; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ AGENCY: ACTION: National Park Service, Interior. Notice. The Arizona State Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Arizona State Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. SUMMARY: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Arizona State Museum at the address in this notice by November 16, 2018. DATES: John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626– 2950, email jmcclell@email.arizona.edu. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 History and Description of the Cultural Items On an unknown date prior to 2008, one cultural item was removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ AA Alice Carpenter, reportedly located in Oracle, Pinal County, AZ. The item was collected by unknown individuals. This cultural item was received and accessioned by the Arizona State Museum (ASM) in 2008. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic bowl. The bag in which this cultural item was found notes that this object was from a cremation cache. The human remains once associated with this object were not received by ASM. Based on ceramic typology, this object was likely produced during the Classic Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, between A.D. 1150–1300. In 1934, one cultural item was removed by a private citizen from an unrecorded site, designated AZ AA:1:—, located north of the Casa Grande area in Pinal County, AZ. This cultural item was received by ASM at an unknown date and later assigned an accession number. The one unassociated funerary object is a textile fragment. The human remains once associated with this object are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on the style of the textile fragment, this object is consistent with a Hohokam cultural affiliation, and was likely produced during the Hohokam Classic period, A.D. 1200–1450. On an unspecified date, one cultural item was removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ AA:11:—, located southeast of the Casa Grande area, in either Pinal or Pima County, AZ. This cultural item was reportedly associated with burials that were exposed by erosion of a river bank. It was removed by an unknown individual and received by ASM on an unknown date. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic jar, identified as Gila Plain of the Tucson Variety. The human remains once associated with this object are not present and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. On the basis of ceramic typology, this object was likely produced around A.D. 450–1450, during the Hohokam cultural sequence. In 1930, seven cultural items were removed from site AZ AA:3:17(ASM) located near the Tom Mix Wash in the Salt-Gila Basin, in Pinal County, AZ. The legally authorized excavations were conducted by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. Gila Pueblo Foundation collections were transferred to ASM in December 1950 when the Gila Pueblo PO 00000 Frm 00157 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Foundation closed. The seven unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl, one mano, one polishing stone, one shell fragment, one stone cylinder, and two tabular stone knives. The human remains once associated with these objects are not present and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. The cultural items likely date to the Hohokam Classic period, A.D. 1150– 1450, based on ceramics and architectural features reported at the site. On an unknown date during or prior to 1942, one cultural item was removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ AA:6:—, located in the Sawtooth Mountains, in Pinal County, AZ. This object was donated to ASM by Mrs. Paul Stein in 1942. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic jar, described as a cremation urn. The human remains once associated with this object are not present and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. The ceramic jar is identified as Gila Plain, an identification consistent with a Hohokam affiliation. Gila Plain was produced between A.D. 200 and 1450, which encompasses the Hohokam sequence. In 1965, one cultural item was removed by an unknown individual from site, AZ BB:2:10(ASM) located on Arizona State Trust land east of the San Pedro River in Pinal County, AZ. This collection was donated by Alice Carpenter to ASM in 1965. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic figurine. The item was recorded as having been found near an unspecified burial. The human remains once associated with this object are not present and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Site AZ BB:2:10(ASM) is described as having two compounds, two platform mounds, a trash mound, and a linear rock alignment. The site likely dates to the Hohokam Classic period, A.D. 1200–1450, based on architecture and ceramic typology. Based on analysis of the material culture observed at this site, this site is culturally affiliated with Salado and Hohokam groups. Between 1977 and 1979 two cultural items were removed from site AZ BB:2:19(ASM), located on private land on the east bank of the San Pedro River in Pinal County, AZ. The site was excavated during the Ash Terrace Field School conducted by the Arizona College of Technology, under the direction of Michael Bartlett. In 1995, the collection was received by ASM. The two unassociated funerary objects E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1 daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices are one ceramic sherd and one fragment of chipped stone. The objects were found in a box containing human remains from more than one burial, and the burial with which they were once associated cannot be determined. This site consists of at least four two-room, noncontiguous structures surrounding a possible plaza area. The site likely dates to A.D. 1250–1450 based on ceramic typology. Based on analysis of material culture observed at the site, this site can be affiliated with the Salado and Hohokam cultural groups. On an unknown date during or prior to 1952, four cultural objects were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ BB:9:—power plant, located near the Santa Cruz River in Pima County, AZ. The items were removed during landscaping activities and were reportedly associated with a cremation. This collection was donated to ASM by C. G. Carrasco in 1952. The four unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl, one ceramic bowl fragment, and two ceramic jars. The human remains once associated with these objects are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, this site likely dates to the Classic period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, A.D. 1150–1300. On an unknown date during or prior to 1965, two cultural objects were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ BB:9:—Tucson Site 1, located in Pima County, AZ. The items were uncovered during street construction. Before they could be brought to ASM, the items, which reportedly contained human remains, were stolen. Later, the items were returned, but the human remains were no longer present. The items were received by ASM in 1965. The two unassociated funerary objects are two ceramic jars. Based on ceramic analysis, this site dates to the Hohokam cultural sequence, A.D. 450–1450. On an unknown date during or prior to 1955, one cultural item was removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ CC:2:—Univ Farm, located near Safford in Graham County, AZ. This cultural item was donated to ASM in 1955 by Mr. Chapman of the University of Arizona Experimental Farm. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic jar. The jar reportedly contained cremated human remains. The human remains once associated with this object are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, this object likely dates to A.D. 500–1400 and is associated with the Mogollon culture. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 At an unknown date during or prior to 1960, two cultural items were removed from site AZ DD:4:1(ASM), located in Pima County, AZ. The items were reportedly cremation vessels that had been exposed by erosion. These cultural objects were donated to ASM in 1960 by Sharon Medema. The two unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl and one ceramic jar. The human remains once associated with these objects are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, these objects date to A.D. 650–1150, and are associated with the Trincheras cultural group. A later survey of this site recorded a large artifact scatter consisting of sherds and stone fragments. No features or mounds were observed. At an unknown date during or prior to 1967, three cultural items were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ DD:8:—Guest Site, located in a wash near the Santa Cruz River in Santa Cruz County, AZ. The cultural items were collected by Marguerite Guest. She donated the collection to ASM in 1967. The three unassociated funerary objects are ceramic jars. The items were recorded as having been found in the vicinity of cremations, but it is not possible to attribute them to specific burials. Based on ceramic analysis, this site likely dates to the Sedentary Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, A.D. 950– 1150. In 1965, 28 cultural items were removed from site AZ DD:8:12(ASM), located on private land in Santa Cruz County, AZ. The items were collected as part of an archeological salvage excavation carried out prior to the construction of Interstate Highway 19 by the ASM Highway Salvage Project, under the direction of James V. Sciscenti. This collection was received by ASM in 1965. The 28 unassociated funerary objects are: One bone awl, four ceramic bowls, one ceramic jar, one ceramic sherd, two spindle whorls, one fragment of daub, two manos, eight polishing stones, one lot of shell and stone beads, one lot of shell beads, two shell bracelets, three stone projectile points, and one stone projectile point fragment. The human remains once associated with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Site AZ DD:8:12(ASM) is a large, multi-component village site with Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic period Hohokam components (A.D. 850–1450), followed by a Protohistoric period Upper Pima component (A.D. 1550–ca 1700). These dates and cultural PO 00000 Frm 00158 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52533 affiliations are based on the material culture observed at this site. With the exception of one burial, which may date from the Classic Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, A.D. 1150–1450, all the burials excavated by the 1965 ASM salvage project are attributed to the Upper Pima component, A.D. 1550–ca 1700. Therefore, these unassociated funerary objects likely also date to this period. Around 1929, one cultural item was removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ EE:—Sonoita Creek, located near Patagonia in Pima County, AZ. This cultural item was collected by the Arizona State Highway Department and was received by ASM sometime after 1929. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic bowl. The human remains once associated with this item are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, this unassociated funerary object dates to A.D. 450–1450, which encompasses the Hohokam cultural sequence. In 1916, two cultural items were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ EE:1:—Continental Plantation, located south of Tucson in Santa Cruz County, AZ. These cultural items were donated to ASM by Professor Stanley F. Morse during or after 1916. The two unassociated funerary objects are ceramic jars. The objects were reportedly once associated with human cremations. The human remains once associated with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, these unassociated funerary objects date to A.D. 450–1450, which encompasses the Hohokam cultural sequence. In the years 1954–1957, two cultural items were removed from site AZ EE:2:10(ASM), located in the Empire Valley in Pima County, AZ. The site was originally explored in 1954 and 1955 by the University of Arizona, under the direction of Emil W. Haury, and was excavated in 1957 by the University of Arizona, under the direction of Frank Eddy. These objects were received by ASM in 1958. The two unassociated funerary objects are ceramic jars. The human remains once associated with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. This site contains one pit house and two trash zone deposits, layered one on top of the other. Based on ceramic evidence, these unassociated funerary objects date to A.D. 950–1150, during the Sedentary Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence. E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1 daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES 52534 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices In 1978, 107 cultural items were removed from site AZ EE:9:67(ASM), located on land owned by St. Andrew’s Church on Nogales Wash in Santa Cruz County, AZ. These objects were removed by construction workers and archeologists from ASM while a sewer line was being constructed. These objects were received by ASM during or after 1978. The 107 unassociated funerary objects are: Five fragments of animal bone, three bone hair pin fragments, one bone awl, 65 ceramic sherds, 32 fragments of chipped stone, and one ground stone fragment. The human remains associated with these objects are either missing or were not collected. This site consists of a dense sherd and lithic scatter; three pit houses were also noted. Based on ceramic evidence observed at this site, these unassociated funerary objects date to A.D. 950–1300, during the Sedentary and Classic Periods of the Hohokam cultural sequence. In 1928, 17 cultural items were removed from site AZ EE:9:68(ASM), located on City of Nogales property in Santa Cruz County, AZ. The items were likely removed during a University of Arizona expedition and received by the Arizona State Museum in the same year. The 17 unassociated funerary items are: Four ceramic bowls, 12 ceramic jars, and one ceramic plate. In 1969, 124 cultural items were removed from the same site AZ EE:9:68(ASM) during the construction of Interstate Highway 19. The emergency salvage excavations were conducted by ASM under the direction of Laurens Hammack. This collection was received by ASM in 1976. The 124 unassociated funerary objects are: One incised bone fragment, two ceramic jars, and 121 ceramic sherds. The human remains associated with these objects are either missing or were not collected. Because this site was excavated during emergency salvage excavations, few details regarding archeological context are known. Based on ceramic evidence, these objects likely date to A.D. 850– 950, during the Colonial Period, and are culturally affiliated with Hohokam and Trincheras cultural groups. In 1962, 12 cultural items were removed from site AZ FF:3:8(ASM), located on private land in the Turkey Creek drainage in Cochise County, AZ. This collection was brought to ASM in 1963. The 12 unassociated funerary objects are: One bone artifact, two bone awls, one ceramic bowl fragment, one ceramic disk, one crystal, three lots of shell beads, one turquoise fragment, one turquoise pendant, and one turquoise tessera. The human remains once associated with these items are not VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Site AZ FF:3:8(ASM) is a small, adobe-walled Mogollon village composed of two room blocks enclosing a plaza. Based on ceramic typology, these objects likely date to A.D. 1250– 1325, and are affiliated with Mogollon cultural groups. In 1893, one cultural item was removed by an unknown individual from an unrecorded site, designated AZ San Pedro River, located in Pinal, Pima, or Cochise County, AZ. The cultural item reportedly contained cremated human remains when it was discovered. The item was received by ASM at an unknown date. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic jar. The human remains once associated with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic typology, this object likely dates to A.D. 450–1450, which encompasses the Hohokam cultural sequence. In 1959, three cultural items were removed from site AZ Z:2:1(ASM), located in the Gila Bend area of Maricopa County, AZ. Collections from this site were removed over the course of archeological excavations carried out by ASM for the Painted Rocks Reservoir Project, under the direction of William W. Wasley and Alfred E. Johnson. These collections were received by ASM in 1959. The three unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic jar, one shell, and one stone bowl. The human remains once associated with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. This site is a large Hohokam settlement occupied during the Colonial and Sedentary periods, consisting of a house mound or platform mound, several trash mounds, 2 ball courts, and a prehistoric canal. Based on site dates, these objects date to A.D. 750–1150. Archeologists describe the earliest settlements in southern Arizona as belonging to the Late Archaic/Early Agricultural horizon. Recent archeological investigations have added support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam cultural tradition arose from the earlier horizon, based on continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, irrigation technologies, subsistence patterns, and material culture. Archeologists have had difficulty dating the beginning of the Hohokam period because the appearance of its distinctive cultural traits, including ceramic technologies and mortuary patterns, was a gradual process spanning several hundred years. PO 00000 Frm 00159 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 This observation adds further support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam tradition evolved in place from earlier Late Archaic traditions. Linguistic evidence furthermore suggests that the Hohokam tradition was multiethnic in nature. Cultural continuity between these prehistoric occupants of Southern Arizona and present-day O’odham peoples is supported by continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, basketry, textiles, ceramic technology, and ritual practices. Archeologists have also recognized the presence of people associated with the Mogollon tradition in southeastern Arizona. Their presence there is thought to represent a migration of people from the mountainous region to the north, where the Mogollon archeological culture was originally defined. Material culture characteristics of Mogollon traditions include a temporal progression from earlier pit houses to later masonry pueblos, villages organized in room blocks of contiguous dwellings associated with plazas, rectangular kivas, polished and paintdecorated ceramics, painted and unpainted corrugated ceramics, red and brown ceramics, inhumation burials, cradleboard cranial deformation, grooved stone axes, and bone artifacts. In southeastern Arizona, there is evidence for both Hohokam and Mogollon traditions, but it is unclear whether this represents separate occupations of different people who interacted and exchanged material culture, or cohabitation and a blending of identities. Oral traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona support cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in southern Arizona. Oral traditions that are documented for the Hopi Tribe also support cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in the region. Several Hopi clans and religious societies are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south and likely identified with the Hohokam tradition. Oral traditions and archeological evidence also support affiliation of Hopi clans with the Mogollon archeological sites. Oral traditions of medicine societies and kiva groups of the Zuni Tribe recount migration from distant portions E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices of the Southwest to present day Zuni, and supports affiliation with Mogollon, Hohokam, and Late Archaic traditions. Historical linguistic analysis also suggests interaction between ancestral Zuni and Uto-Aztecan speakers during the late Hohokam period. Determinations Made by the Arizona State Museum daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the request to John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626–2950, email jmcclell@email.arizona.edu, by November 16, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. [FR Doc. 2018–22598 Filed 10–16–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026596; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Princeton University, Princeton, NJ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: Officials of the Arizona State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 323 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ Dated: September 14, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACTION: Princeton University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Princeton University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Princeton University at the address in this notice by November 16, 2018. ADDRESSES: Bryan R. Just, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ 08544, telephone (609) 258–8805, email bjust@princeton.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed 30 miles north of Nogales, Santa Cruz County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00160 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52535 remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Princeton University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and the Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona, hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown site about 30 miles north of Nogales, Pima (now Santa Cruz) County, AZ. The human remains are cremated and in fragmentary form. They were found with a wooden cross placed on top, suggesting the burial took place after the Spanish Invasion. The human remains were unearthed along with six other ollas of varied shapes, whose present whereabouts are unknown. The human remains were donated to Princeton University by John I. Ginn in 1892. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a ‘‘cremation’’ olla. Determinations Made by Princeton University Officials of Princeton University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on the nature of the burial as a cremation in a ceramic jar. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 201 (Wednesday, October 17, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52532-52535]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-22598]



[[Page 52532]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0026499; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State 
Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Arizona State Museum, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the 
cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of 
unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of 
any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written 
request to the Arizona State Museum. If no additional claimants come 
forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal 
descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the Arizona State Museum at the 
address in this notice by November 16, 2018.

ADDRESSES: John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, 
Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, 
telephone (520) 626-2950, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 
that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 
U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    On an unknown date prior to 2008, one cultural item was removed 
from an unrecorded site, designated AZ AA Alice Carpenter, reportedly 
located in Oracle, Pinal County, AZ. The item was collected by unknown 
individuals. This cultural item was received and accessioned by the 
Arizona State Museum (ASM) in 2008. The one unassociated funerary 
object is a ceramic bowl. The bag in which this cultural item was found 
notes that this object was from a cremation cache. The human remains 
once associated with this object were not received by ASM. Based on 
ceramic typology, this object was likely produced during the Classic 
Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, between A.D. 1150-1300.
    In 1934, one cultural item was removed by a private citizen from an 
unrecorded site, designated AZ AA:1:--, located north of the Casa 
Grande area in Pinal County, AZ. This cultural item was received by ASM 
at an unknown date and later assigned an accession number. The one 
unassociated funerary object is a textile fragment. The human remains 
once associated with this object are not present, and there are no 
records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on the 
style of the textile fragment, this object is consistent with a Hohokam 
cultural affiliation, and was likely produced during the Hohokam 
Classic period, A.D. 1200-1450.
    On an unspecified date, one cultural item was removed from an 
unrecorded site, designated AZ AA:11:--, located southeast of the Casa 
Grande area, in either Pinal or Pima County, AZ. This cultural item was 
reportedly associated with burials that were exposed by erosion of a 
river bank. It was removed by an unknown individual and received by ASM 
on an unknown date. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic 
jar, identified as Gila Plain of the Tucson Variety. The human remains 
once associated with this object are not present and there are no 
records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. On the basis of 
ceramic typology, this object was likely produced around A.D. 450-1450, 
during the Hohokam cultural sequence.
    In 1930, seven cultural items were removed from site AZ 
AA:3:17(ASM) located near the Tom Mix Wash in the Salt-Gila Basin, in 
Pinal County, AZ. The legally authorized excavations were conducted by 
the Gila Pueblo Foundation. Gila Pueblo Foundation collections were 
transferred to ASM in December 1950 when the Gila Pueblo Foundation 
closed. The seven unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl, 
one mano, one polishing stone, one shell fragment, one stone cylinder, 
and two tabular stone knives. The human remains once associated with 
these objects are not present and there are no records indicating that 
they were ever received by ASM. The cultural items likely date to the 
Hohokam Classic period, A.D. 1150-1450, based on ceramics and 
architectural features reported at the site.
    On an unknown date during or prior to 1942, one cultural item was 
removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ AA:6:--, located in the 
Sawtooth Mountains, in Pinal County, AZ. This object was donated to ASM 
by Mrs. Paul Stein in 1942. The one unassociated funerary object is a 
ceramic jar, described as a cremation urn. The human remains once 
associated with this object are not present and there are no records 
indicating that they were ever received by ASM. The ceramic jar is 
identified as Gila Plain, an identification consistent with a Hohokam 
affiliation. Gila Plain was produced between A.D. 200 and 1450, which 
encompasses the Hohokam sequence.
    In 1965, one cultural item was removed by an unknown individual 
from site, AZ BB:2:10(ASM) located on Arizona State Trust land east of 
the San Pedro River in Pinal County, AZ. This collection was donated by 
Alice Carpenter to ASM in 1965. The one unassociated funerary object is 
a ceramic figurine. The item was recorded as having been found near an 
unspecified burial. The human remains once associated with this object 
are not present and there are no records indicating that they were ever 
received by ASM. Site AZ BB:2:10(ASM) is described as having two 
compounds, two platform mounds, a trash mound, and a linear rock 
alignment. The site likely dates to the Hohokam Classic period, A.D. 
1200-1450, based on architecture and ceramic typology. Based on 
analysis of the material culture observed at this site, this site is 
culturally affiliated with Salado and Hohokam groups.
    Between 1977 and 1979 two cultural items were removed from site AZ 
BB:2:19(ASM), located on private land on the east bank of the San Pedro 
River in Pinal County, AZ. The site was excavated during the Ash 
Terrace Field School conducted by the Arizona College of Technology, 
under the direction of Michael Bartlett. In 1995, the collection was 
received by ASM. The two unassociated funerary objects

[[Page 52533]]

are one ceramic sherd and one fragment of chipped stone. The objects 
were found in a box containing human remains from more than one burial, 
and the burial with which they were once associated cannot be 
determined. This site consists of at least four two-room, noncontiguous 
structures surrounding a possible plaza area. The site likely dates to 
A.D. 1250-1450 based on ceramic typology. Based on analysis of material 
culture observed at the site, this site can be affiliated with the 
Salado and Hohokam cultural groups.
    On an unknown date during or prior to 1952, four cultural objects 
were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ BB:9:--power plant, 
located near the Santa Cruz River in Pima County, AZ. The items were 
removed during landscaping activities and were reportedly associated 
with a cremation. This collection was donated to ASM by C. G. Carrasco 
in 1952. The four unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl, 
one ceramic bowl fragment, and two ceramic jars. The human remains once 
associated with these objects are not present, and there are no records 
indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic 
analysis, this site likely dates to the Classic period of the Hohokam 
cultural sequence, A.D. 1150-1300.
    On an unknown date during or prior to 1965, two cultural objects 
were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ BB:9:--Tucson Site 
1, located in Pima County, AZ. The items were uncovered during street 
construction. Before they could be brought to ASM, the items, which 
reportedly contained human remains, were stolen. Later, the items were 
returned, but the human remains were no longer present. The items were 
received by ASM in 1965. The two unassociated funerary objects are two 
ceramic jars. Based on ceramic analysis, this site dates to the Hohokam 
cultural sequence, A.D. 450-1450.
    On an unknown date during or prior to 1955, one cultural item was 
removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ CC:2:--Univ Farm, 
located near Safford in Graham County, AZ. This cultural item was 
donated to ASM in 1955 by Mr. Chapman of the University of Arizona 
Experimental Farm. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic 
jar. The jar reportedly contained cremated human remains. The human 
remains once associated with this object are not present, and there are 
no records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on 
ceramic analysis, this object likely dates to A.D. 500-1400 and is 
associated with the Mogollon culture.
    At an unknown date during or prior to 1960, two cultural items were 
removed from site AZ DD:4:1(ASM), located in Pima County, AZ. The items 
were reportedly cremation vessels that had been exposed by erosion. 
These cultural objects were donated to ASM in 1960 by Sharon Medema. 
The two unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl and one 
ceramic jar. The human remains once associated with these objects are 
not present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever 
received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, these objects date to A.D. 
650-1150, and are associated with the Trincheras cultural group. A 
later survey of this site recorded a large artifact scatter consisting 
of sherds and stone fragments. No features or mounds were observed.
    At an unknown date during or prior to 1967, three cultural items 
were removed from an unrecorded site, designated AZ DD:8:--Guest Site, 
located in a wash near the Santa Cruz River in Santa Cruz County, AZ. 
The cultural items were collected by Marguerite Guest. She donated the 
collection to ASM in 1967. The three unassociated funerary objects are 
ceramic jars. The items were recorded as having been found in the 
vicinity of cremations, but it is not possible to attribute them to 
specific burials. Based on ceramic analysis, this site likely dates to 
the Sedentary Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, A.D. 950-1150.
    In 1965, 28 cultural items were removed from site AZ DD:8:12(ASM), 
located on private land in Santa Cruz County, AZ. The items were 
collected as part of an archeological salvage excavation carried out 
prior to the construction of Interstate Highway 19 by the ASM Highway 
Salvage Project, under the direction of James V. Sciscenti. This 
collection was received by ASM in 1965. The 28 unassociated funerary 
objects are: One bone awl, four ceramic bowls, one ceramic jar, one 
ceramic sherd, two spindle whorls, one fragment of daub, two manos, 
eight polishing stones, one lot of shell and stone beads, one lot of 
shell beads, two shell bracelets, three stone projectile points, and 
one stone projectile point fragment. The human remains once associated 
with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating 
that they were ever received by ASM. Site AZ DD:8:12(ASM) is a large, 
multi-component village site with Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic 
period Hohokam components (A.D. 850-1450), followed by a Protohistoric 
period Upper Pima component (A.D. 1550-ca 1700). These dates and 
cultural affiliations are based on the material culture observed at 
this site. With the exception of one burial, which may date from the 
Classic Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence, A.D. 1150-1450, all 
the burials excavated by the 1965 ASM salvage project are attributed to 
the Upper Pima component, A.D. 1550-ca 1700. Therefore, these 
unassociated funerary objects likely also date to this period.
    Around 1929, one cultural item was removed from an unrecorded site, 
designated AZ EE:--Sonoita Creek, located near Patagonia in Pima 
County, AZ. This cultural item was collected by the Arizona State 
Highway Department and was received by ASM sometime after 1929. The one 
unassociated funerary object is a ceramic bowl. The human remains once 
associated with this item are not present, and there are no records 
indicating that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic 
analysis, this unassociated funerary object dates to A.D. 450-1450, 
which encompasses the Hohokam cultural sequence.
    In 1916, two cultural items were removed from an unrecorded site, 
designated AZ EE:1:--Continental Plantation, located south of Tucson in 
Santa Cruz County, AZ. These cultural items were donated to ASM by 
Professor Stanley F. Morse during or after 1916. The two unassociated 
funerary objects are ceramic jars. The objects were reportedly once 
associated with human cremations. The human remains once associated 
with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating 
that they were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic analysis, these 
unassociated funerary objects date to A.D. 450-1450, which encompasses 
the Hohokam cultural sequence.
    In the years 1954-1957, two cultural items were removed from site 
AZ EE:2:10(ASM), located in the Empire Valley in Pima County, AZ. The 
site was originally explored in 1954 and 1955 by the University of 
Arizona, under the direction of Emil W. Haury, and was excavated in 
1957 by the University of Arizona, under the direction of Frank Eddy. 
These objects were received by ASM in 1958. The two unassociated 
funerary objects are ceramic jars. The human remains once associated 
with these items are not present, and there are no records indicating 
that they were ever received by ASM. This site contains one pit house 
and two trash zone deposits, layered one on top of the other. Based on 
ceramic evidence, these unassociated funerary objects date to A.D. 950-
1150, during the Sedentary Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence.

[[Page 52534]]

    In 1978, 107 cultural items were removed from site AZ EE:9:67(ASM), 
located on land owned by St. Andrew's Church on Nogales Wash in Santa 
Cruz County, AZ. These objects were removed by construction workers and 
archeologists from ASM while a sewer line was being constructed. These 
objects were received by ASM during or after 1978. The 107 unassociated 
funerary objects are: Five fragments of animal bone, three bone hair 
pin fragments, one bone awl, 65 ceramic sherds, 32 fragments of chipped 
stone, and one ground stone fragment. The human remains associated with 
these objects are either missing or were not collected. This site 
consists of a dense sherd and lithic scatter; three pit houses were 
also noted. Based on ceramic evidence observed at this site, these 
unassociated funerary objects date to A.D. 950-1300, during the 
Sedentary and Classic Periods of the Hohokam cultural sequence.
    In 1928, 17 cultural items were removed from site AZ EE:9:68(ASM), 
located on City of Nogales property in Santa Cruz County, AZ. The items 
were likely removed during a University of Arizona expedition and 
received by the Arizona State Museum in the same year. The 17 
unassociated funerary items are: Four ceramic bowls, 12 ceramic jars, 
and one ceramic plate.
    In 1969, 124 cultural items were removed from the same site AZ 
EE:9:68(ASM) during the construction of Interstate Highway 19. The 
emergency salvage excavations were conducted by ASM under the direction 
of Laurens Hammack. This collection was received by ASM in 1976. The 
124 unassociated funerary objects are: One incised bone fragment, two 
ceramic jars, and 121 ceramic sherds. The human remains associated with 
these objects are either missing or were not collected. Because this 
site was excavated during emergency salvage excavations, few details 
regarding archeological context are known. Based on ceramic evidence, 
these objects likely date to A.D. 850-950, during the Colonial Period, 
and are culturally affiliated with Hohokam and Trincheras cultural 
groups.
    In 1962, 12 cultural items were removed from site AZ FF:3:8(ASM), 
located on private land in the Turkey Creek drainage in Cochise County, 
AZ. This collection was brought to ASM in 1963. The 12 unassociated 
funerary objects are: One bone artifact, two bone awls, one ceramic 
bowl fragment, one ceramic disk, one crystal, three lots of shell 
beads, one turquoise fragment, one turquoise pendant, and one turquoise 
tessera. The human remains once associated with these items are not 
present, and there are no records indicating that they were ever 
received by ASM. Site AZ FF:3:8(ASM) is a small, adobe-walled Mogollon 
village composed of two room blocks enclosing a plaza. Based on ceramic 
typology, these objects likely date to A.D. 1250-1325, and are 
affiliated with Mogollon cultural groups.
    In 1893, one cultural item was removed by an unknown individual 
from an unrecorded site, designated AZ San Pedro River, located in 
Pinal, Pima, or Cochise County, AZ. The cultural item reportedly 
contained cremated human remains when it was discovered. The item was 
received by ASM at an unknown date. The one unassociated funerary 
object is a ceramic jar. The human remains once associated with these 
items are not present, and there are no records indicating that they 
were ever received by ASM. Based on ceramic typology, this object 
likely dates to A.D. 450-1450, which encompasses the Hohokam cultural 
sequence.
    In 1959, three cultural items were removed from site AZ Z:2:1(ASM), 
located in the Gila Bend area of Maricopa County, AZ. Collections from 
this site were removed over the course of archeological excavations 
carried out by ASM for the Painted Rocks Reservoir Project, under the 
direction of William W. Wasley and Alfred E. Johnson. These collections 
were received by ASM in 1959. The three unassociated funerary objects 
are one ceramic jar, one shell, and one stone bowl. The human remains 
once associated with these items are not present, and there are no 
records indicating that they were ever received by ASM. This site is a 
large Hohokam settlement occupied during the Colonial and Sedentary 
periods, consisting of a house mound or platform mound, several trash 
mounds, 2 ball courts, and a prehistoric canal. Based on site dates, 
these objects date to A.D. 750-1150.
    Archeologists describe the earliest settlements in southern Arizona 
as belonging to the Late Archaic/Early Agricultural horizon. Recent 
archeological investigations have added support to the hypothesis that 
the Hohokam cultural tradition arose from the earlier horizon, based on 
continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, 
irrigation technologies, subsistence patterns, and material culture. 
Archeologists have had difficulty dating the beginning of the Hohokam 
period because the appearance of its distinctive cultural traits, 
including ceramic technologies and mortuary patterns, was a gradual 
process spanning several hundred years. This observation adds further 
support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam tradition evolved in place 
from earlier Late Archaic traditions. Linguistic evidence furthermore 
suggests that the Hohokam tradition was multiethnic in nature. Cultural 
continuity between these prehistoric occupants of Southern Arizona and 
present-day O'odham peoples is supported by continuities in settlement 
pattern, architectural technologies, basketry, textiles, ceramic 
technology, and ritual practices.
    Archeologists have also recognized the presence of people 
associated with the Mogollon tradition in southeastern Arizona. Their 
presence there is thought to represent a migration of people from the 
mountainous region to the north, where the Mogollon archeological 
culture was originally defined. Material culture characteristics of 
Mogollon traditions include a temporal progression from earlier pit 
houses to later masonry pueblos, villages organized in room blocks of 
contiguous dwellings associated with plazas, rectangular kivas, 
polished and paint-decorated ceramics, painted and unpainted corrugated 
ceramics, red and brown ceramics, inhumation burials, cradleboard 
cranial deformation, grooved stone axes, and bone artifacts. In 
southeastern Arizona, there is evidence for both Hohokam and Mogollon 
traditions, but it is unclear whether this represents separate 
occupations of different people who interacted and exchanged material 
culture, or cohabitation and a blending of identities.
    Oral traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin Indian 
Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the 
Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River 
Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; 
and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona support cultural affiliation 
with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in 
southern Arizona.
    Oral traditions that are documented for the Hopi Tribe also support 
cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and 
Hohokam sites in the region. Several Hopi clans and religious societies 
are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south and likely 
identified with the Hohokam tradition. Oral traditions and 
archeological evidence also support affiliation of Hopi clans with the 
Mogollon archeological sites.
    Oral traditions of medicine societies and kiva groups of the Zuni 
Tribe recount migration from distant portions

[[Page 52535]]

of the Southwest to present day Zuni, and supports affiliation with 
Mogollon, Hohokam, and Late Archaic traditions. Historical linguistic 
analysis also suggests interaction between ancestral Zuni and Uto-
Aztecan speakers during the late Hohokam period.

Determinations Made by the Arizona State Museum

    Officials of the Arizona State Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 323 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Ak-Chin Indian Community 
(previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak 
Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the 
Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt 
River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, 
Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes.''

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these cultural items should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to John 
McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, 
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626-2950, 
email [email protected], by November 16, 2018. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed.
    The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 14, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2018-22598 Filed 10-16-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P