Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Parks and Trails, Phoenix, AZ, and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 52539-52541 [2018-22596]

Download as PDF daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices wooden staff, and three lots of wooden sticks. Based on the artifacts associated with these remains and the geographic location of discovery, these human remains likely date to A.D. 500–1450, which encompasses the Hohokam cultural sequence. Archeologists describe the earliest settlements in Southern Arizona as belonging to the Late Archaic/Early Agricultural horizon. Recent archeological investigations have added support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam cultural tradition arose from the earlier horizon, based on continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, irrigation technologies, subsistence patterns, and material culture. Archeologists have had difficulty dating the beginning of the Hohokam period because the appearance of its distinctive cultural traits, including ceramic technologies and mortuary patterns, was a gradual process spanning several hundred years. This observation adds further support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam tradition evolved in place from earlier Late Archaic traditions. Linguistic evidence furthermore suggests that the Hohokam tradition was multiethnic in nature. Cultural continuity between these prehistoric occupants of Southern Arizona and present-day O’odham peoples is supported by continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, basketry, textiles, ceramic technology, and ritual practices. Archeologists have also recognized the presence of people associated with the Mogollon tradition in southeastern Arizona. It is thought that their presence represents a migration of people from the mountainous region to the north, where the Mogollon archeological culture was originally defined. Material culture characteristics of Mogollon traditions include a temporal progression from earlier pit houses to later masonry pueblos, villages organized in room blocks of contiguous dwellings associated with plazas, rectangular kivas, polished and paintdecorated ceramics, painted and unpainted corrugated ceramics, red and brown ceramics, inhumation burials, cradleboard cranial deformation, grooved stone axes, and bone artifacts. In southeastern Arizona, there is evidence for both Hohokam and Mogollon traditions, but it is unclear whether this represents separate occupations of different people who interacted and exchanged material culture, or cohabitation and a blending of identities. Oral traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona support cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in southern Arizona. Oral traditions that are documented for the Hopi Tribe also support cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in the region. Several Hopi clans and religious societies are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south and likely identified with the Hohokam tradition. Oral traditions and archeological evidence also support affiliation of Hopi clans with the Mogollon archeological sites. Oral traditions of medicine societies and kiva groups of the Zuni Tribe recount migration from distant portions of the Southwest to present day Zuni, and support affiliation with Mogollon, Hohokam, and Late Archaic traditions. Historical linguistic analysis also suggests interaction between ancestral Zuni and Uto-Aztecan speakers during the late Hohokam period. Determinations Made by the Arizona State Museum Officials of Arizona State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 49 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Claire S. Barker, Repatriation Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626–0320, email csbarker@email.arizona.edu, by PO 00000 Frm 00164 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52539 November 16, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: September 14, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–22600 Filed 10–16–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026497; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Parks and Trails, Phoenix, AZ, and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Arizona State Parks and Trails and the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Arizona State Museum at the address in this notice by November 16, 2018. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1 52540 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626– 2950, email jmcclell@email.arizona.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Arizona State Parks and Trails (ASPT), Phoenix, AZ, and in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum (ASM), University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Santa Cruz and Yuma Counties, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. ADDRESSES: daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the ASM professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site AZ EE:9:91(ASM), located in Patagonia Lake State Park, Santa Cruz County, Arizona. The human remains were collected during a survey project directed by Kurt Dongoske and a testing project conducted by the Cultural Resource Management Division of the ASM under the direction of John Czaplicki. The human remains were brought to ASM and an accession number was assigned in 1990. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 This site is described as a Hohokam village. Based on material culture, the site likely dates to A.D. 950–1300, during the Sedentary and early Classic Periods of the Hohokam cultural sequence. At an unknown date prior to 1948, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unrecorded location, AZ X:8:— Wellton vicinity, on land south of Wellton in Yuma County, AZ. The human remains, contained in a ceramic jar, were collected by John Draper. In 1948, Mr. Draper donated the human remains and jar to the Yuma Territorial Prison Museum, which later came under the control of ASPT. In December 2000, ASP transferred the collection to ASM. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a ceramic jar. The human remains and jar may have been removed from a cave, but there is no more specific information regarding the location or archeological context. The ceramic vessel is classified as Gila Plain, Gila Variety and is characteristic of ceramics produced by Hohokam people residing along the middle Gila River between Florence and Gila Bend, Arizona. The vessel likely dates to A.D. 950–1150, during the Sedentary Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence. Archeologists describe the earliest settlements in southern Arizona as belonging to the Late Archaic/Early Agricultural horizon. Recent archeological investigations have added support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam cultural tradition arose from the earlier horizon, based on continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, irrigation technologies, subsistence patterns, and material culture. It has been difficult for archeologists to date the beginning of the Hohokam period because the appearance of its distinctive cultural traits, including ceramic technologies and mortuary patterns, was a gradual process spanning several hundred years. This observation adds further support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam tradition evolved in place from earlier Late Archaic traditions. Linguistic evidence furthermore suggests that the Hohokam tradition was multiethnic in nature. Cultural continuity between these prehistoric occupants of Southern Arizona and present-day O’odham peoples is supported by continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, basketry, textiles, ceramic technology, and ritual practices. Oral traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian PO 00000 Frm 00165 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona, support cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in southern Arizona. Oral traditions that are documented for the Hopi Tribe also support cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in the region. Several Hopi clans and religious societies are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south and likely identified with the Hohokam tradition. Oral traditions of medicine societies and kiva groups of the Zuni Tribe recount migration from distant portions of the Southwest to present day Zuni, and support affiliation with Hohokam and Late Archaic traditions. Historical linguistic analysis also suggests interaction between ancestral Zuni and Uto-Aztecan speakers during the late Hohokam period. Determinations Made by Arizona State Parks and Trails (ASPT) and the Arizona State Museum (ASM) Officials of ASPT and ASM have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 201 / Wednesday, October 17, 2018 / Notices funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626–2950, email jmcclell@ email.arizona.edu, by November 16, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The ASM is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: September 14, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–22596 Filed 10–16–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026509; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: The Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on September 10, 2014. This notice corrects the number of associated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona at the address in this notice by November 16, 2018. daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Oct 16, 2018 Jkt 247001 Claire S. Barker, Repatriation Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626–0320, email csbarker@email.arizona.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the correction of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Site AZ AA:12:46(ASM), Pima County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the number of associated funerary objects published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (79 FR 53754–53759, September 10, 2014). The number of associated funerary objects increased due to a search through uncatalogued object collections. Transfer of control of the items in this correction notice has not occurred. ADDRESSES: Correction In the Federal Register (79 FR 53755, September 10, 2014), column 2, paragraph 2, sentence 7 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 4,189 associated funerary objects are 38 animal bones, one lot of beads (unknown material), four bone artifacts, three bone awls, 40 bone awl fragments, two bone whistles, 35 lots of botanical material, 24 ceramic bowls, 36 ceramic bowl fragments, two ceramic disks, 13 ceramic jars, 34 ceramic jar fragments, one ceramic ladle, 16 ceramic pitchers, two ceramic scoops, 3,488 ceramic sherds, one ceramic sherd artifact, one ceramic vessel, eight lots of charcoal, 88 chipped stones, one piece of chipped stone debris, three chipped stone flakes, one chipped stone knife, one chipped stone scraper, one chipped stone tool, four clay fragments, one crystal, one daub fragment, three ground stones, three ground stone axes, two hand stones, two metallic cylinders, 13 mineral fragments, one lot of organic material, two pebbles, two lots of plant fiber matting, four pollen samples, three shells, 19 lots of shell and stone beads, 18 shell artifacts, 23 shell artifact fragments, 49 lots of shell beads, four shell bracelets, nine shell bracelet fragments, 33 lots of shell fragments, one shell fossil, five shell pendants, one shell PO 00000 Frm 00166 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52541 pendant fragment, two soil samples, seven stones, two stone balls, three lots of stone beads, three stone cylinders, one stone disk, one stone pendant, 83 stone projectile points, two stone projectile point fragments, four lots of textile cord, seven lots of textile fragments, one turquoise tessera, and 26 wood fragments. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53759, September 10, 2014), column 1, paragraph 1, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 9,676 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Claire S. Barker, Repatriation Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626–0320, email csbarker@email.arizona.edu, by November 16, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed. The Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona is responsible for notifying the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. E:\FR\FM\17OCN1.SGM 17OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 201 (Wednesday, October 17, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52539-52541]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-22596]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0026497; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Parks and Trails, 
Phoenix, AZ, and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, 
AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Arizona State Parks and Trails and the Arizona State 
Museum, University of Arizona, have completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives 
of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in 
this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human 
remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request 
to the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. If no additional 
requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, 
or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Arizona State Museum at the address in 
this notice by November 16, 2018.

[[Page 52540]]


ADDRESSES: John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, 
Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, 
telephone (520) 626-2950, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Arizona State 
Parks and Trails (ASPT), Phoenix, AZ, and in the physical custody of 
the Arizona State Museum (ASM), University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Santa 
Cruz and Yuma Counties, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the ASM 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak-Chin 
Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of 
the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Cocopah Tribe of 
Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pascua Yaqui Tribe of 
Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California 
& Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe 
of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, hereafter referred to as ``The 
Consulted Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from site AZ EE:9:91(ASM), located in Patagonia Lake State 
Park, Santa Cruz County, Arizona. The human remains were collected 
during a survey project directed by Kurt Dongoske and a testing project 
conducted by the Cultural Resource Management Division of the ASM under 
the direction of John Czaplicki. The human remains were brought to ASM 
and an accession number was assigned in 1990. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. This site is 
described as a Hohokam village. Based on material culture, the site 
likely dates to A.D. 950-1300, during the Sedentary and early Classic 
Periods of the Hohokam cultural sequence.
    At an unknown date prior to 1948, human remains representing, at 
minimum, one individual were removed from an unrecorded location, AZ 
X:8:--Wellton vicinity, on land south of Wellton in Yuma County, AZ. 
The human remains, contained in a ceramic jar, were collected by John 
Draper. In 1948, Mr. Draper donated the human remains and jar to the 
Yuma Territorial Prison Museum, which later came under the control of 
ASPT. In December 2000, ASP transferred the collection to ASM. No known 
individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
ceramic jar. The human remains and jar may have been removed from a 
cave, but there is no more specific information regarding the location 
or archeological context. The ceramic vessel is classified as Gila 
Plain, Gila Variety and is characteristic of ceramics produced by 
Hohokam people residing along the middle Gila River between Florence 
and Gila Bend, Arizona. The vessel likely dates to A.D. 950-1150, 
during the Sedentary Period of the Hohokam cultural sequence.
    Archeologists describe the earliest settlements in southern Arizona 
as belonging to the Late Archaic/Early Agricultural horizon. Recent 
archeological investigations have added support to the hypothesis that 
the Hohokam cultural tradition arose from the earlier horizon, based on 
continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, 
irrigation technologies, subsistence patterns, and material culture. It 
has been difficult for archeologists to date the beginning of the 
Hohokam period because the appearance of its distinctive cultural 
traits, including ceramic technologies and mortuary patterns, was a 
gradual process spanning several hundred years. This observation adds 
further support to the hypothesis that the Hohokam tradition evolved in 
place from earlier Late Archaic traditions. Linguistic evidence 
furthermore suggests that the Hohokam tradition was multiethnic in 
nature. Cultural continuity between these prehistoric occupants of 
Southern Arizona and present-day O'odham peoples is supported by 
continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, 
basketry, textiles, ceramic technology, and ritual practices. Oral 
traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin Indian Community 
(previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak 
Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the 
Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian 
Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono 
O'odham Nation of Arizona, support cultural affiliation with Late 
Archaic/Early Agricultural period and Hohokam sites in southern 
Arizona.
    Oral traditions that are documented for the Hopi Tribe also support 
cultural affiliation with Late Archaic/Early Agricultural period and 
Hohokam sites in the region. Several Hopi clans and religious societies 
are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south and likely 
identified with the Hohokam tradition.
    Oral traditions of medicine societies and kiva groups of the Zuni 
Tribe recount migration from distant portions of the Southwest to 
present day Zuni, and support affiliation with Hohokam and Late Archaic 
traditions. Historical linguistic analysis also suggests interaction 
between ancestral Zuni and Uto-Aztecan speakers during the late Hohokam 
period.

Determinations Made by Arizona State Parks and Trails (ASPT) and the 
Arizona State Museum (ASM)

    Officials of ASPT and ASM have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described 
in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak-Chin 
Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of 
the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, hereafter referred to as 
``The Tribes.''

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated

[[Page 52541]]

funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 
210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, 
telephone (520) 626-2950, email [email protected], by November 
16, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come 
forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed.
    The ASM is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: September 14, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2018-22596 Filed 10-16-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P