Air Plan Approval; Indiana; Negative Declarations for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration and Sewage Sludge Incineration Units for Designated Facilities and Pollutants, 49897-49899 [2018-21468]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 192 / Wednesday, October 3, 2018 / Proposed Rules daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with PROPOSALS would have maximum DV of 83.6 ppb.9 We used a value of 85 ppb to determine whether a particular ozone receptor should be identified as having air quality problems that may trigger transport obligations in upwind states with regard to the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS (76 FR 48208, 48236). The 2014 modeling results show that the Allegan County, Michigan monitor which Texas was linked to in the 2012 modeling was no longer projected to have air quality problems sufficient to trigger transport obligations with regard to the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. Thus, Texas was no longer projected to interfere with maintenance of the 1997 ozone NAAQS at the Allegan County receptor in 2014. However, the 2014 modeling results continued to project that the East Baton Parish receptor would have problems maintaining the 1997 ozone NAAQS. As discussed above, in response to the remand of Texas’s CSAPR phase 2 ozone season budget by the D.C. Circuit in EME Homer City II, EPA reviewed the 2017 air quality modeling conducted for the CSAPR Update. EPA concluded that, even in the absence of Texas’s CSAPR budget, both the Baton Rouge and Allegan receptors would have average and maximum DVs below the level of the 1997 ozone NAAQS for the downwind receptors of concern to which Texas was linked in the original CSAPR rulemaking with respect the 1997 ozone NAAQS. Accordingly, EPA found that Texas emissions would no longer contribute significantly to nonattainment in, or interfere with maintenance by, any other state with respect to the 1997 ozone NAAQS at either receptor or in any other state. (81 FR 74525–26). This conclusion is based on EPA’s most recent modeling analysis and is supported by the fact that the Baton Rouge area has monitored attainment of the 1997 ozone standard since 2008. III. Proposed Action We are proposing to approve the portions of the April 4, 2008 and May 1, 2008 Texas SIP submittals as they pertain to the requirements of CAA section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I) with respect to the 1997 ozone NAAQS. We propose to find that the conclusion in the state’s SIP submittals is consistent with EPA’s conclusion regarding the Texas’s good neighbor obligation, that emissions from Texas will not significantly contribute 9 See projected 2014 base case average and maximum DVs for these monitors at pages B–14 and B–16 of the June 2011 Air Quality Modeling Final Rule Technical Support Document for CSAPR, Document ID No. EPA–HQ–OAR–2009–0491–4140, available in regulations.gov. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:23 Oct 02, 2018 Jkt 247001 to nonattainment or interfere with maintenance of the 1997 ozone NAAQS in any other state. IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under the CAA, the Administrator is required to approve a SIP submission that complies with the provisions of the Act and applicable Federal regulations. 42 U.S.C. 7410(k); 40 CFR 52.02(a). Thus, in reviewing SIP submissions, the EPA’s role is to approve state choices, provided that they meet the criteria of the CAA. Accordingly, this action merely proposes to approve state law as meeting Federal requirements and does not impose additional requirements beyond those imposed by state law. For that reason, this action: • Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Orders 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and 13563 (76 FR 3821, January 21, 2011); • Is not an Executive Order 13771 (82 FR 9339, February 2, 2017) regulatory action because SIP approvals are exempted under Executive Order 12866; • Does not impose an information collection burden under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.); • Is certified as not having a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.); • Does not contain any unfunded mandate or significantly or uniquely affect small governments, as described in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–4); • Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); • Is not an economically significant regulatory action based on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997); • Is not a significant regulatory action subject to Executive Order 13211 (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001); • Is not subject to requirements of section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272 note) because application of those requirements would be inconsistent with the CAA; and • Does not provide EPA with the discretionary authority to address, as appropriate, disproportionate human health or environmental effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 49897 In addition, the SIP is not approved to apply on any Indian reservation land or in any other area where EPA or an Indian tribe has demonstrated that a tribe has jurisdiction. In those areas of Indian country, the proposed rule does not have tribal implications and will not impose substantial direct costs on tribal governments or preempt tribal law as specified by Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Ozone. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. Dated: September 26, 2018. Anne Idsal, Regional Administrator, Region 6. [FR Doc. 2018–21448 Filed 10–2–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 [EPA–R05–OAR–2018–0600; FRL–9984– 56—Region 5] Air Plan Approval; Indiana; Negative Declarations for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration and Sewage Sludge Incineration Units for Designated Facilities and Pollutants Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. AGENCY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is notifying the public that we have received from Indiana requests for withdrawals of the previously approved state plans and notification of negative declarations for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration (CISWI) units and Sewage Sludge Incineration (SSI) units. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) submitted its CISWI withdrawal and negative declaration by letter dated July 31, 2017 and its SSI withdrawal and negative declaration by letter dated July 31, 2017. IDEM notified EPA in its negative declaration letters that there are no CISWI or SSI units subject to the requirements of the Clean Air Act (Act) currently operating in Indiana. DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 2, 2018. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA–R05– OAR–2018–0600, at https:// www.regulations.gov or via email to cain.alexis@epa.gov. For comments SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\03OCP1.SGM 03OCP1 49898 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 192 / Wednesday, October 3, 2018 / Proposed Rules submitted at Regulations.gov, follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Once submitted, comments cannot be edited or removed from Regulations.gov. For either manner of submission, EPA may publish any comment received to its public docket. Do not submit electronically any information you consider to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Multimedia submissions (audio, video, etc.) must be accompanied by a written comment. The written comment is considered the official comment and should include discussion of all points you wish to make. EPA will generally not consider comments or comment contents located outside of the primary submission (i.e. on the web, cloud, or other file sharing system). For additional submission methods, please contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. For the full EPA public comment policy, information about CBI or multimedia submissions, and general guidance on making effective comments, please visit https://www2.epa.gov/dockets/ commenting-epa-dockets. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Margaret Sieffert, Environmental Engineer, Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, 77 West Jackson Boulevard (AT–18J), Chicago, Illinois 60604, (312) 353–1151, sieffert.margaret@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Throughout this document whenever ‘‘we,’’ ‘‘us,’’ or ‘‘our’’ is used, we mean EPA. This supplementary information section is arranged as follows: I. Background A. Sections 111 and 129 of the Act B. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units C. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units II. Negative Declarations and EPA Analysis A. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units B. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units III. Proposed EPA Action IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with PROPOSALS I. Background A. Sections 111 and 129 of the Act Sections 111 and 129 of the Act set forth EPA’s statutory authority for regulating, among other types of emission sources, new and existing solid waste incineration units. Section 111(b) directs EPA to publish and periodically revise a list of categories of stationary sources which cause or significantly contribute to air pollution, and to establish new source performance standards (NSPS) within VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:23 Oct 02, 2018 Jkt 247001 these categories. Section 111(d) grants EPA statutory authority to require states to submit implementation plans for establishing performance standards applicable to existing sources belonging to those categories established in section 111(b). Under Section 111(d), the state submits plans to control certain pollutants (designated pollutants) at existing facilities (designated facilities) which have been established under section 111(b). EPA has promulgated emission guidelines (EGs) for designated facilities, which are used by states to formulate their state plan. 40 CFR 60.21(a) and (b). Section 129(b) of the Act is specific to solid waste combustion, and requires EPA to establish performance standards pursuant to section 111 of the Act for each category of solid waste incineration units, which includes the categories addressed in today’s action. The regulations at 40 CFR part 60, subpart B, contain general provisions applicable to the adoption and submittal of state plans for the control of designated pollutants from designated facilities under section 111(d) of the Act, including those pollutants and facilities designated pursuant to section 129 of the Act. Further, 40 CFR part 62, subpart A, provides the procedural framework in which EPA will approve or disapprove such plans submitted by a state. If a state fails to submit a satisfactory plan, the Act provides EPA with the authority to prescribe a plan for regulating the designated pollutants at the designated facilities. The EPA prescribed plan, also known as a Federal plan, is used to regulate designated facilities when there is no EPA approved state-specific plan. Further, if there are no designated facilities within a state’s jurisdiction, the state may submit to EPA a letter of certification to that effect (referred to as a ‘‘negative declaration’’) in lieu of a state plan to satisfy the state’s obligation. 40 CFR 60.23(b) and 62.06. The negative declaration exempts the state from the requirement to submit a state plan for the designated pollutants and facilities. Therefore, if a state submits a negative declaration for a category of solid waste incineration units, the state is not required to submit a state plan for that source category. B. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units On December 1, 2000, EPA promulgated a NSPS for new CISWI units, 40 CFR part 60, subpart CCCC, and EGs for existing CISWI units, 40 CFR part 60, subpart DDDD. 65 FR 75338. On March 21, 2011 (76 FR PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 15704), EPA, after a ‘‘voluntarily remand’’ of the 2000 CISWI standards and EGs, promulgated a final CISWI NSPS and EGs.1 Correspondingly, on the same date, EPA promulgated a final rule under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to identify which non-hazardous secondary materials, when used as fuels or ingredients in combustion units, are ‘‘solid wastes.’’ 76 FR 15456; see 40 CFR part 241, Solid Wastes Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion Units (also known as the ‘‘Non-Hazardous Secondary Material Rule’’). The identification of solid waste in the NonHazardous Secondary Material Rule is used to determine whether a combustion unit is required to meet the emissions standards for solid waste incineration units issued under sections 111 and 129 of the Act, or meet the emissions standards for commercial, industrial, and institutional boilers issued under section 112 of the Act. EPA subsequently promulgated amendments to both rules on February 7, 2013: Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units: Reconsideration and Final Amendments; Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Waste; Final Rule. 78 FR 9112. Reconsideration of certain aspects of the final CISWI rule resulted in minor amendments. 81 FR 40956 (June 23, 2016). Pursuant to sections 111(d) and 129 of the Act and 40 CFR part 60, subpart B, states were required to revise their state plans for existing CISWI units to comply with the amended regulations. A CISWI unit is defined in 40 CFR 60.2875 as any distinct operating unit of any commercial or industrial facility that combusts, or has combusted in the preceding 6 months, any solid waste, as that term is defined in the NonHazardous Secondary Material Rule. A state plan must address all existing CISWI units that commenced construction on or before June 4, 2010, or for which modification or reconstruction was commenced on or before August 7, 2013, with limited exceptions as provided in section 40 CFR 60.2555. 40 CFR 60.2550. However, as discussed above, if there are no existing designated facilities in a state, the state may submit a negative declaration in lieu of a state plan. EPA will provide public notice of receipt of a state’s negative declaration with respect to that solid waste incineration unit category. 40 CFR 60.2530. If any 1 For more information on the history to this rule, including the remand, see 67 FR 70640 (November 25, 2002). E:\FR\FM\03OCP1.SGM 03OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 192 / Wednesday, October 3, 2018 / Proposed Rules unit of a solid waste incineration category is subsequently identified in a state for which a negative declaration had been submitted, the Federal plan implementing the EGs for that source category would apply to that unit. In the case of a CISWI unit, subpart DDDD would automatically apply to that CISWI unit until a state plan is approved. 40 CFR 60.2530. C. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units EPA promulgated an NSPS and EGs for SSIs on March 21, 2011. 76 FR 15404. The NSPS and EGs are codified at 40 CFR part 60, subparts LLLL and MMMM, respectively. Thus, states were required to submit plans for existing SSIs, pursuant to sections 111(d) and 129 of the Act and 40 CFR part 60, subpart B. A SSI unit is defined in 40 CFR 60.5250 as any device that combusts sewage sludge for the purpose of reducing the volume of the sewage sludge by removing combustible matter. The designated facilities to which the EGs applied to are existing SSI units that commenced construction on or before October 14, 2010 or for which a modification was commenced on or before September 21, 2011 primarily to comply with this rule. 76 FR 15371. II. Negative Declarations and EPA Analysis daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with PROPOSALS A. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units IDEM submitted a CISWI state plan on December 20, 2002. EPA approved the state plan and it became effective on August 11, 2003. 68 FR 35181. On July 31, 2017, IDEM submitted its CISWI negative declaration, in which it certified that there are no longer any CISWI units currently operating in Indiana.2 B. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units IDEM submitted a SSI state plan on February 27, 2013. EPA approved the state plan and it became effective on August 12, 2013. 78 FR 34918. On July 31, 2017, IDEM submitted its SSI withdrawal and negative declaration, in which it certified that there are no longer any existing SSI units currently operating in Indiana. Previously, IDEM listed Belmont Advanced Wastewater Treatment Facility as having an existing SSI. After modifications at the Belmont facility, however, the SSI unit became subject to the NSPS under 40 CFR part 2 Previously, an incinerator located at Covance Laboratories, Inc. was listed by Indiana as subject to the CISWI. In a letter dated June 18, 2018, however, EPA determined that Covance’s incinerator was not a ‘‘CISWI unit’’ under the regulations. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:23 Oct 02, 2018 Jkt 247001 60 subpart LLLL. Because there are no existing sources subject to the 2013 state plan, IDEM is requesting to withdraw the 2013 state plan and replace it with a negative declaration. III. Proposed EPA Action EPA is proposing to amend 40 CFR part 62 to reflect IDEM’s withdrawals and negative declarations for both CISWI and SSI facilities. EPA received the CISWI and SSI negative declarations and withdrawal requests by letters dated July 31, 2017. IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews A. General Requirements This action is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under the terms of Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and therefore is not subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Orders 12866 and 13563 (76 FR 3821, January 21, 2011). For this reason, this action is also not subject to Executive Order 13211, ‘‘Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use’’ (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This action is not an Executive Order 13771 (82 FR 9339, February 2, 2017) regulatory action because this action is not significant under E.O. 12866. This action merely approves state law as meeting Federal requirements and merely notifies the public of EPA’s receipt of negative declarations from an air pollution control agency without any existing CISWI or SSI units in its state. This action imposes no requirements beyond those imposed by the state. Accordingly, the Administrator certifies that this rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). Because this rule pertains to pre-existing requirements under state law and does not impose any additional enforceable duty beyond that required by state law, it does not contain any unfunded mandate or significantly or uniquely affect small governments, as described in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–4). This rule is not approved to apply on any Indian reservation land or in any other area where EPA or an Indian tribe has demonstrated that a tribe has jurisdiction. In those areas of Indian country, the rule does not have tribal implications and will not impose substantial direct costs on tribal governments or preempt tribal law as specified by Executive Order 13175 (65 PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 9990 49899 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). This action also does not have Federalism implications because it does not have substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999). This action merely provides notice of receipt of negative declarations, and does not alter the relationship or the distribution of power and responsibilities established in the Act. This rule also is not subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997), because it just notifying the public regarding receipt of the negative declarations. In reviewing state plan submissions, EPA’s role is to approve state choices, provided that they meet the criteria of the Act. With regard to negative declarations for designated facilities received by EPA from states, EPA’s role is to notify the public of the receipt of such negative declarations and revise 40 CFR part 62 accordingly. In this context, in the absence of a prior existing requirement for the state to use voluntary consensus standards (VCS), EPA has no authority to disapprove a state plan submission or negative declaration for failure to use VCS. It would thus be inconsistent with applicable law for EPA, when it reviews a state plan or negative declaration submission, to use VCS in place of a state plan or negative declaration submission that otherwise satisfies the provisions of the Act. Thus, the requirements of section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272 note) do not apply. This rule does not impose an information collection burden under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 62 Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, Air pollution control, Commercial and industrial solid waste incinerators, Intergovernmental relations, Sewage sludge incineration units, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Dated: September 13, 2018. Cathy Stepp, Regional Administrator, Region 5. [FR Doc. 2018–21468 Filed 10–2–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P E:\FR\FM\03OCP1.SGM 03OCP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 192 (Wednesday, October 3, 2018)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 49897-49899]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-21468]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 62

[EPA-R05-OAR-2018-0600; FRL-9984-56--Region 5]


Air Plan Approval; Indiana; Negative Declarations for Commercial 
and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration and Sewage Sludge Incineration 
Units for Designated Facilities and Pollutants

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Proposed rule.

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SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is notifying the 
public that we have received from Indiana requests for withdrawals of 
the previously approved state plans and notification of negative 
declarations for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration 
(CISWI) units and Sewage Sludge Incineration (SSI) units. The Indiana 
Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) submitted its CISWI 
withdrawal and negative declaration by letter dated July 31, 2017 and 
its SSI withdrawal and negative declaration by letter dated July 31, 
2017. IDEM notified EPA in its negative declaration letters that there 
are no CISWI or SSI units subject to the requirements of the Clean Air 
Act (Act) currently operating in Indiana.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 2, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-R05-
OAR-2018-0600, at https://www.regulations.gov or via email to 
[email protected]. For comments

[[Page 49898]]

submitted at Regulations.gov, follow the online instructions for 
submitting comments. Once submitted, comments cannot be edited or 
removed from Regulations.gov. For either manner of submission, EPA may 
publish any comment received to its public docket. Do not submit 
electronically any information you consider to be Confidential Business 
Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted 
by statute. Multimedia submissions (audio, video, etc.) must be 
accompanied by a written comment. The written comment is considered the 
official comment and should include discussion of all points you wish 
to make. EPA will generally not consider comments or comment contents 
located outside of the primary submission (i.e. on the web, cloud, or 
other file sharing system). For additional submission methods, please 
contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT 
section. For the full EPA public comment policy, information about CBI 
or multimedia submissions, and general guidance on making effective 
comments, please visit https://www2.epa.gov/dockets/commenting-epa-dockets.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Margaret Sieffert, Environmental 
Engineer, Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, 77 West Jackson 
Boulevard (AT-18J), Chicago, Illinois 60604, (312) 353-1151, 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Throughout this document whenever ``we,'' 
``us,'' or ``our'' is used, we mean EPA. This supplementary information 
section is arranged as follows:

I. Background
    A. Sections 111 and 129 of the Act
    B. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units
    C. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units
II. Negative Declarations and EPA Analysis
    A. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units
    B. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units
III. Proposed EPA Action
IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

I. Background

A. Sections 111 and 129 of the Act

    Sections 111 and 129 of the Act set forth EPA's statutory authority 
for regulating, among other types of emission sources, new and existing 
solid waste incineration units. Section 111(b) directs EPA to publish 
and periodically revise a list of categories of stationary sources 
which cause or significantly contribute to air pollution, and to 
establish new source performance standards (NSPS) within these 
categories. Section 111(d) grants EPA statutory authority to require 
states to submit implementation plans for establishing performance 
standards applicable to existing sources belonging to those categories 
established in section 111(b).
    Under Section 111(d), the state submits plans to control certain 
pollutants (designated pollutants) at existing facilities (designated 
facilities) which have been established under section 111(b). EPA has 
promulgated emission guidelines (EGs) for designated facilities, which 
are used by states to formulate their state plan. 40 CFR 60.21(a) and 
(b). Section 129(b) of the Act is specific to solid waste combustion, 
and requires EPA to establish performance standards pursuant to section 
111 of the Act for each category of solid waste incineration units, 
which includes the categories addressed in today's action.
    The regulations at 40 CFR part 60, subpart B, contain general 
provisions applicable to the adoption and submittal of state plans for 
the control of designated pollutants from designated facilities under 
section 111(d) of the Act, including those pollutants and facilities 
designated pursuant to section 129 of the Act. Further, 40 CFR part 62, 
subpart A, provides the procedural framework in which EPA will approve 
or disapprove such plans submitted by a state. If a state fails to 
submit a satisfactory plan, the Act provides EPA with the authority to 
prescribe a plan for regulating the designated pollutants at the 
designated facilities. The EPA prescribed plan, also known as a Federal 
plan, is used to regulate designated facilities when there is no EPA 
approved state-specific plan. Further, if there are no designated 
facilities within a state's jurisdiction, the state may submit to EPA a 
letter of certification to that effect (referred to as a ``negative 
declaration'') in lieu of a state plan to satisfy the state's 
obligation. 40 CFR 60.23(b) and 62.06. The negative declaration exempts 
the state from the requirement to submit a state plan for the 
designated pollutants and facilities. Therefore, if a state submits a 
negative declaration for a category of solid waste incineration units, 
the state is not required to submit a state plan for that source 
category.

B. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units

    On December 1, 2000, EPA promulgated a NSPS for new CISWI units, 40 
CFR part 60, subpart CCCC, and EGs for existing CISWI units, 40 CFR 
part 60, subpart DDDD. 65 FR 75338. On March 21, 2011 (76 FR 15704), 
EPA, after a ``voluntarily remand'' of the 2000 CISWI standards and 
EGs, promulgated a final CISWI NSPS and EGs.\1\ Correspondingly, on the 
same date, EPA promulgated a final rule under the Resource Conservation 
and Recovery Act (RCRA) to identify which non-hazardous secondary 
materials, when used as fuels or ingredients in combustion units, are 
``solid wastes.'' 76 FR 15456; see 40 CFR part 241, Solid Wastes Used 
as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion Units (also known as the ``Non-
Hazardous Secondary Material Rule''). The identification of solid waste 
in the Non-Hazardous Secondary Material Rule is used to determine 
whether a combustion unit is required to meet the emissions standards 
for solid waste incineration units issued under sections 111 and 129 of 
the Act, or meet the emissions standards for commercial, industrial, 
and institutional boilers issued under section 112 of the Act. EPA 
subsequently promulgated amendments to both rules on February 7, 2013: 
Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units: 
Reconsideration and Final Amendments; Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials 
That Are Solid Waste; Final Rule. 78 FR 9112. Reconsideration of 
certain aspects of the final CISWI rule resulted in minor amendments. 
81 FR 40956 (June 23, 2016). Pursuant to sections 111(d) and 129 of the 
Act and 40 CFR part 60, subpart B, states were required to revise their 
state plans for existing CISWI units to comply with the amended 
regulations.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ For more information on the history to this rule, including 
the remand, see 67 FR 70640 (November 25, 2002).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A CISWI unit is defined in 40 CFR 60.2875 as any distinct operating 
unit of any commercial or industrial facility that combusts, or has 
combusted in the preceding 6 months, any solid waste, as that term is 
defined in the Non-Hazardous Secondary Material Rule. A state plan must 
address all existing CISWI units that commenced construction on or 
before June 4, 2010, or for which modification or reconstruction was 
commenced on or before August 7, 2013, with limited exceptions as 
provided in section 40 CFR 60.2555. 40 CFR 60.2550.
    However, as discussed above, if there are no existing designated 
facilities in a state, the state may submit a negative declaration in 
lieu of a state plan. EPA will provide public notice of receipt of a 
state's negative declaration with respect to that solid waste 
incineration unit category. 40 CFR 60.2530. If any

[[Page 49899]]

unit of a solid waste incineration category is subsequently identified 
in a state for which a negative declaration had been submitted, the 
Federal plan implementing the EGs for that source category would apply 
to that unit. In the case of a CISWI unit, subpart DDDD would 
automatically apply to that CISWI unit until a state plan is approved. 
40 CFR 60.2530.

C. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units

    EPA promulgated an NSPS and EGs for SSIs on March 21, 2011. 76 FR 
15404. The NSPS and EGs are codified at 40 CFR part 60, subparts LLLL 
and MMMM, respectively. Thus, states were required to submit plans for 
existing SSIs, pursuant to sections 111(d) and 129 of the Act and 40 
CFR part 60, subpart B.
    A SSI unit is defined in 40 CFR 60.5250 as any device that combusts 
sewage sludge for the purpose of reducing the volume of the sewage 
sludge by removing combustible matter. The designated facilities to 
which the EGs applied to are existing SSI units that commenced 
construction on or before October 14, 2010 or for which a modification 
was commenced on or before September 21, 2011 primarily to comply with 
this rule. 76 FR 15371.

II. Negative Declarations and EPA Analysis

A. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units

    IDEM submitted a CISWI state plan on December 20, 2002. EPA 
approved the state plan and it became effective on August 11, 2003. 68 
FR 35181. On July 31, 2017, IDEM submitted its CISWI negative 
declaration, in which it certified that there are no longer any CISWI 
units currently operating in Indiana.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ Previously, an incinerator located at Covance Laboratories, 
Inc. was listed by Indiana as subject to the CISWI. In a letter 
dated June 18, 2018, however, EPA determined that Covance's 
incinerator was not a ``CISWI unit'' under the regulations.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. Sewage Sludge Incineration Units

    IDEM submitted a SSI state plan on February 27, 2013. EPA approved 
the state plan and it became effective on August 12, 2013. 78 FR 34918. 
On July 31, 2017, IDEM submitted its SSI withdrawal and negative 
declaration, in which it certified that there are no longer any 
existing SSI units currently operating in Indiana. Previously, IDEM 
listed Belmont Advanced Wastewater Treatment Facility as having an 
existing SSI. After modifications at the Belmont facility, however, the 
SSI unit became subject to the NSPS under 40 CFR part 60 subpart LLLL. 
Because there are no existing sources subject to the 2013 state plan, 
IDEM is requesting to withdraw the 2013 state plan and replace it with 
a negative declaration.

III. Proposed EPA Action

    EPA is proposing to amend 40 CFR part 62 to reflect IDEM's 
withdrawals and negative declarations for both CISWI and SSI 
facilities. EPA received the CISWI and SSI negative declarations and 
withdrawal requests by letters dated July 31, 2017.

IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

A. General Requirements

    This action is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under the 
terms of Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and 
therefore is not subject to review by the Office of Management and 
Budget under Executive Orders 12866 and 13563 (76 FR 3821, January 21, 
2011). For this reason, this action is also not subject to Executive 
Order 13211, ``Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect 
Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This 
action is not an Executive Order 13771 (82 FR 9339, February 2, 2017) 
regulatory action because this action is not significant under E.O. 
12866. This action merely approves state law as meeting Federal 
requirements and merely notifies the public of EPA's receipt of 
negative declarations from an air pollution control agency without any 
existing CISWI or SSI units in its state. This action imposes no 
requirements beyond those imposed by the state. Accordingly, the 
Administrator certifies that this rule will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). Because this rule 
pertains to pre-existing requirements under state law and does not 
impose any additional enforceable duty beyond that required by state 
law, it does not contain any unfunded mandate or significantly or 
uniquely affect small governments, as described in the Unfunded 
Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-4). This rule is not approved 
to apply on any Indian reservation land or in any other area where EPA 
or an Indian tribe has demonstrated that a tribe has jurisdiction. In 
those areas of Indian country, the rule does not have tribal 
implications and will not impose substantial direct costs on tribal 
governments or preempt tribal law as specified by Executive Order 13175 
(65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). This action also does not have 
Federalism implications because it does not have substantial direct 
effects on the states, on the relationship between the national 
government and the states, or on the distribution of power and 
responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified 
in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999). This action 
merely provides notice of receipt of negative declarations, and does 
not alter the relationship or the distribution of power and 
responsibilities established in the Act. This rule also is not subject 
to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997), because it just 
notifying the public regarding receipt of the negative declarations.
    In reviewing state plan submissions, EPA's role is to approve state 
choices, provided that they meet the criteria of the Act. With regard 
to negative declarations for designated facilities received by EPA from 
states, EPA's role is to notify the public of the receipt of such 
negative declarations and revise 40 CFR part 62 accordingly. In this 
context, in the absence of a prior existing requirement for the state 
to use voluntary consensus standards (VCS), EPA has no authority to 
disapprove a state plan submission or negative declaration for failure 
to use VCS. It would thus be inconsistent with applicable law for EPA, 
when it reviews a state plan or negative declaration submission, to use 
VCS in place of a state plan or negative declaration submission that 
otherwise satisfies the provisions of the Act. Thus, the requirements 
of section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement 
Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272 note) do not apply. This rule does not 
impose an information collection burden under the provisions of the 
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.).

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 62

    Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, 
Air pollution control, Commercial and industrial solid waste 
incinerators, Intergovernmental relations, Sewage sludge incineration 
units, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Dated: September 13, 2018.
Cathy Stepp,
Regional Administrator, Region 5.
[FR Doc. 2018-21468 Filed 10-2-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 6560-50-P