Notice of Intent To Request Revision and Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection, 42863-42864 [2018-18316]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 165 / Friday, August 24, 2018 / Notices comments during opportunities for public comment during the planning process are eligible to file an objection. Regulations at 36 CFR 219.62 define substantive formal comments as: daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Written comments submitted to, or oral comments recorded by, the responsible official or his designee during an opportunity for public participation provided during the planning process, and attributed to the individual or entity providing them. Comments are considered substantive when they are within the scope of the proposal, are specific to the proposal, have a direct relationship to the proposal, and include supporting reasons for the responsible official to consider. How To File an Objection The Forest Service will accept mailed, emailed, faxed, and hand-delivered objections concerning the Revised Land Management Plan and associated FEIS for 60 calendar days following the date of the publication of the legal notice of this objection period in the newspaper of record, El Nuevo Dia. It is the responsibility of the objector to ensure that the Reviewing Officer receives the objection in a timely manner. The regulations prohibit extending the length of the objection filing period. Objections must be submitted to the Reviewing Officer, who will be the Regional Forester for the Southern Region, at the address shown in the ADDRESSES section of this notice. Objections or objection content specific to the identification of species of conservation concern will be forwarded to Glenn Casamassa, Associate Deputy Chief, delegated Reviewing Officer for the Chief of the Forest Service. An objection must include the following (36 CFR 219.54(c)): (1) The objector’s name and address along with a telephone number or email address, if available. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to an objection, the Forest Service will attempt to verify the identity of the objector to confirm objection eligibility; (2) Signature or other verification of authorship upon request (a scanned signature for electronic mail may be filed with the objection); (3) Identification of the lead objector, when multiple names are listed on an objection. The Forest Service will communicate to all parties to an objection through the lead objector. Verification of the identity of the lead objector must also be provided if requested; (4) The name of the plan revision being objected to, and the name and title of the Responsible Official; (5) A statement of the issues and/or parts of the plan revision to which the objection applies; VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:17 Aug 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 (6) A concise statement explaining the objection and suggesting how the proposed plan decision may be improved. If the objector believes that the plan revision is inconsistent with law, regulation, or policy, an explanation should be included; (7) A statement that demonstrates the link between the objector’s prior substantive formal comments and the content of the objection, unless the objection concerns an issue that arose after the opportunities for formal comment; and (8) All documents referenced in the objection (a bibliography is not sufficient), except that the following need not be provided: a. All or any part of a Federal law or regulation, b. Forest Service Directive System documents and land management plans or other published Forest Service documents, c. Documents referenced by the Forest Service in the planning documentation related to the proposal subject to objection, and d. Formal comments previously provided to the Forest Service by the objector during the plan revision comment period. Responsible Official The responsible official for the revision of the Land Management Plan for El Yunque National Forest is Sharon Wallace, Forest Supervisor, El Yunque National Forest, HC 01 Box 13490, Rio Grande, PR 00745. Dated: July 9, 2018. Chris French, Associate Deputy Chief, National Forest System. [FR Doc. 2018–18353 Filed 8–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3411–15–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE National Agricultural Statistics Service Notice of Intent To Request Revision and Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice announces the intent of the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) to request revision and extension of a currently approved information collection to comply with a mandate in the 2014 Farm Bill. (. . . the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 42863 Secretary of Agriculture should recognize the threat feral swine pose to the domestic swine population and the entire agriculture industry . . .). DATES: Comments on this notice must be received by October 23, 2018 to be assured of consideration. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by docket number 0535–0256, by any of the following methods: • Email: ombofficer@nass.usda.gov. Include docket number above in the subject line of the message. • Efax: (855) 838–6382. • Mail: Mail any paper, disk, or CD– ROM submissions to: David Hancock, NASS Clearance Officer, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 5336 South Building, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250– 2024. • Hand Delivery/Courier: Hand deliver to: David Hancock, NASS Clearance Officer, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 5336 South Building, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250–2024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kevin L. Barnes, Associate Administrator, National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, (202) 720–2707. Copies of this information collection and related instructions can be obtained without charge from David Hancock, NASS— OMB Clearance Officer, at (202) 690– 2388 or at ombofficer@nass.usda.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Feral Swine Survey. OMB Control Number: 0535–0256. Type of Request: Intent to Seek Approval to Revise and Extend an Information Collection for three Years. Abstract: On Feb 3, 1999, Executive Order 13112 was signed, establishing the National Invasive Species Council. This Executive Order requires that a Council of Departments dealing with invasive species be created. This Order was enhanced by Executive Order 13751 which was signed on Dec. 5, 2016. Currently there are 16 Departments and Agencies on the Council. https:// www.doi.gov/invasivespecies/aboutnisc. On April 2, 2014 the USDA kicked off a national effort to reduce the devastating damage caused by feral swine. In 2015, the benchmark survey was conducted in 11 States (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas) to measure the amount of damage feral hogs caused to specific crops in these states. The target population within these states consisted of farm operations who have historically produced one or E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1 daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES 42864 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 165 / Friday, August 24, 2018 / Notices more of the following crops: corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, peanuts, or sorghum (Texas only). The results of this benchmark survey shows that in the 11 surveyed States, there was damage to an estimated $190 million in crops for the six target crops. The published findings from this benchmark survey can be found at http:// www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/ pii/S0261219416301557. In 2017, this survey was conducted in the following 13 States: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, to measure the damage to livestock that is associated with the presence of feral swine. These States were chosen because they had high feral swine densities and a significant presence of cattle, hogs, sheep and/or goats. The findings from this survey are scheduled to be submitted for publication around the end of September 2018. In 2019, the survey will be conducted in 12 States: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas. The operators in 11 of the States will be selected from operations that recently produced hay/haylage, tree nuts, melons, sugar cane, sweet potatoes, or cotton. In California, operators will be selected from operations that produced hay/haylage, tree nuts, grapes, sod, carrots, lettuce, or strawberries. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Wildlife Services’ (WS) National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) is the only Federal research organization devoted exclusively to resolving conflicts between people and wildlife through the development of effective, selective, and socially responsible methods, tools, and techniques. As increased urbanization leads to a loss of traditional wildlife habitat, the potential for conflicts between people and wildlife increases. Such conflicts can take many forms, including property and natural resource damage, human health and safety concerns, and disease transmission among wildlife, livestock, and humans. Free-ranging populations of feral swine exist in at least 35 states, and the nationwide population is estimated at approximately 5 million animals. Feral swine damage pastures, agricultural crops, lawns, landscaping, and natural areas due to feeding, rooting, wallowing, grazing, and trampling activities. Feral swine are reservoirs of many diseases and act as a host to parasites that can VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:17 Aug 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 negatively impact agricultural animals, especially swine. Authority: These data will be collected under the authority of 7 U.S.C. 2204(a). The eradication of feral swine is authorized by the Animal Health Protection Act (Title 7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) and the 2014 Farmbill. The $20 million program aims to help states deal with a rapidly expanding population of invasive feral swine. Individually identifiable data collected under this authority are governed by Section 1770 of the Food Security Act of 1985, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 2276, which requires USDA to afford strict confidentiality to nonaggregated data provided by respondents. This Notice is submitted in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 Public Law 104– 13 (44 U.S.C. 3501, et seq.) and Office of Management and Budget regulations at 5 CFR part 1320. NASS also complies with OMB Implementation Guidance, ‘‘Implementation Guidance for Title V of the E-Government Act, Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (CIPSEA),’’ Federal Register, Vol. 72, No. 115, June 15, 2007, p. 33362. Estimate of Burden: Reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 45 minutes per response. This was determined by our Survey Methodologists, who compared the length and difficulty of the questions with similar surveys. They also took into account the projected number of farmers who will skip some sections of the questionnaire due to the presence or absence of damage due to feral swine. Burden is based on an estimated minimum response rate of 80%. On similar types of surveys and through the use of a mail questionnaire and telephone follow-up to nonrespondents NASS has been able to contact and collect some data from approximately 80% of the target sample. After removing the out of business operations and those with no items of interest we hope to have at least a 65 to 70% usable response rate. NASS will be utilizing several pieces of publicity and informational materials to encourage respondents to participate in this important survey. NASS will conduct the survey initially by mail with phone follow-up for non-response. Respondents: Farm Operators. Estimated Annual Number of Respondents: 15,000. Estimated Total Annual Burden on Respondents: 11,600 hours. Comments: Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, technological or other forms of information technology collection methods. All responses to this notice will become a matter of public record and be summarized in the request for OMB approval. Signed at Washington, DC, August 8, 2018. Kevin L. Barnes, Associate Administrator. [FR Doc. 2018–18316 Filed 8–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–20–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service [Docket No. NRCS–2018–0005] Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ACTION: Notice of availability of proposed changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices (NHCP) for public review and comment. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given of the intention of NRCS to issue a series of revised conservation practice standards in the NHCP. These standards include Combustion System Improvement (Code 372), Dust Control on Unpaved Roads and Surfaces (Code 373), Integrated Pest Management (Code 595), Nutrient Management (Code 590), Pesticide Mitigation (Code 594), Subsurface Drain (Code 606), Waste Facility Closure (Code 360), and Wildlife Habitat Planting (Code 420). NRCS State Conservationists who choose to adopt these practices in their States will incorporate them into Section IV of their respective electronic Field Office Technical Guide. These practices may be used in conservation systems that treat highly erodible land (HEL) or on land determined to be a SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 165 (Friday, August 24, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 42863-42864]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-18316]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

National Agricultural Statistics Service


Notice of Intent To Request Revision and Extension of a Currently 
Approved Information Collection

AGENCY: National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this 
notice announces the intent of the National Agricultural Statistics 
Service (NASS) to request revision and extension of a currently 
approved information collection to comply with a mandate in the 2014 
Farm Bill. (. . . the Secretary of Agriculture should recognize the 
threat feral swine pose to the domestic swine population and the entire 
agriculture industry . . .).

DATES: Comments on this notice must be received by October 23, 2018 to 
be assured of consideration.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by docket number 0535-
0256, by any of the following methods:
     Email: [email protected]. Include docket number 
above in the subject line of the message.
     Efax: (855) 838-6382.
     Mail: Mail any paper, disk, or CD-ROM submissions to: 
David Hancock, NASS Clearance Officer, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Room 5336 South Building, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 
20250-2024.
     Hand Delivery/Courier: Hand deliver to: David Hancock, 
NASS Clearance Officer, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 5336 South 
Building, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250-2024.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kevin L. Barnes, Associate 
Administrator, National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, (202) 720-2707. Copies of this information 
collection and related instructions can be obtained without charge from 
David Hancock, NASS--OMB Clearance Officer, at (202) 690-2388 or at 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 
    Title: Feral Swine Survey.
    OMB Control Number: 0535-0256.
    Type of Request: Intent to Seek Approval to Revise and Extend an 
Information Collection for three Years.
    Abstract: On Feb 3, 1999, Executive Order 13112 was signed, 
establishing the National Invasive Species Council. This Executive 
Order requires that a Council of Departments dealing with invasive 
species be created. This Order was enhanced by Executive Order 13751 
which was signed on Dec. 5, 2016. Currently there are 16 Departments 
and Agencies on the Council. https://www.doi.gov/invasivespecies/about-nisc.
    On April 2, 2014 the USDA kicked off a national effort to reduce 
the devastating damage caused by feral swine. In 2015, the benchmark 
survey was conducted in 11 States (Alabama, Arkansas, California, 
Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, and Texas) to measure the amount of damage feral hogs 
caused to specific crops in these states. The target population within 
these states consisted of farm operations who have historically 
produced one or

[[Page 42864]]

more of the following crops: corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, peanuts, or 
sorghum (Texas only). The results of this benchmark survey shows that 
in the 11 surveyed States, there was damage to an estimated $190 
million in crops for the six target crops. The published findings from 
this benchmark survey can be found at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261219416301557.
    In 2017, this survey was conducted in the following 13 States: 
Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, 
Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, 
Tennessee, and Texas, to measure the damage to livestock that is 
associated with the presence of feral swine. These States were chosen 
because they had high feral swine densities and a significant presence 
of cattle, hogs, sheep and/or goats. The findings from this survey are 
scheduled to be submitted for publication around the end of September 
2018.
    In 2019, the survey will be conducted in 12 States: Alabama, 
Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas. The 
operators in 11 of the States will be selected from operations that 
recently produced hay/haylage, tree nuts, melons, sugar cane, sweet 
potatoes, or cotton. In California, operators will be selected from 
operations that produced hay/haylage, tree nuts, grapes, sod, carrots, 
lettuce, or strawberries.
    The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Wildlife 
Services' (WS) National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) is the only 
Federal research organization devoted exclusively to resolving 
conflicts between people and wildlife through the development of 
effective, selective, and socially responsible methods, tools, and 
techniques. As increased urbanization leads to a loss of traditional 
wildlife habitat, the potential for conflicts between people and 
wildlife increases. Such conflicts can take many forms, including 
property and natural resource damage, human health and safety concerns, 
and disease transmission among wildlife, livestock, and humans.
    Free-ranging populations of feral swine exist in at least 35 
states, and the nationwide population is estimated at approximately 5 
million animals. Feral swine damage pastures, agricultural crops, 
lawns, landscaping, and natural areas due to feeding, rooting, 
wallowing, grazing, and trampling activities. Feral swine are 
reservoirs of many diseases and act as a host to parasites that can 
negatively impact agricultural animals, especially swine.
    Authority: These data will be collected under the authority of 7 
U.S.C. 2204(a). The eradication of feral swine is authorized by the 
Animal Health Protection Act (Title 7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) and the 2014 
Farmbill. The $20 million program aims to help states deal with a 
rapidly expanding population of invasive feral swine.
    Individually identifiable data collected under this authority are 
governed by Section 1770 of the Food Security Act of 1985, as amended, 
7 U.S.C. 2276, which requires USDA to afford strict confidentiality to 
non-aggregated data provided by respondents. This Notice is submitted 
in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 Public Law 104-
13 (44 U.S.C. 3501, et seq.) and Office of Management and Budget 
regulations at 5 CFR part 1320.
    NASS also complies with OMB Implementation Guidance, 
``Implementation Guidance for Title V of the E-Government Act, 
Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 
2002 (CIPSEA),'' Federal Register, Vol. 72, No. 115, June 15, 2007, p. 
33362.
    Estimate of Burden: Reporting burden for this collection of 
information is estimated to average 45 minutes per response. This was 
determined by our Survey Methodologists, who compared the length and 
difficulty of the questions with similar surveys. They also took into 
account the projected number of farmers who will skip some sections of 
the questionnaire due to the presence or absence of damage due to feral 
swine. Burden is based on an estimated minimum response rate of 80%. On 
similar types of surveys and through the use of a mail questionnaire 
and telephone follow-up to non-respondents NASS has been able to 
contact and collect some data from approximately 80% of the target 
sample. After removing the out of business operations and those with no 
items of interest we hope to have at least a 65 to 70% usable response 
rate.
    NASS will be utilizing several pieces of publicity and 
informational materials to encourage respondents to participate in this 
important survey. NASS will conduct the survey initially by mail with 
phone follow-up for non-response.
    Respondents: Farm Operators.
    Estimated Annual Number of Respondents: 15,000.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden on Respondents: 11,600 hours.
    Comments: Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed 
collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of 
the functions of the agency, including whether the information will 
have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of 
the burden of the proposed collection of information including the 
validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance 
the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; 
and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate 
automated, electronic, mechanical, technological or other forms of 
information technology collection methods.
    All responses to this notice will become a matter of public record 
and be summarized in the request for OMB approval.

    Signed at Washington, DC, August 8, 2018.
Kevin L. Barnes,
Associate Administrator.
[FR Doc. 2018-18316 Filed 8-23-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3410-20-P