The Fiscal Year 2017 Multistate Conservation Grant Program Award List, 42674-42676 [2018-18235]

Download as PDF 42674 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 164 / Thursday, August 23, 2018 / Notices The virtual meeting will include electronic discourse and evaluation of grant applications reviewed by SAMHSA’s Initial Review Groups, and involve an examination of confidential financial and business information as well as personal information concerning the applicants. Therefore, the meeting will be closed to the public as determined by the SAMHSA Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use in accordance with Title 5 U.S.C 552b(c)(4) and (6) and Title 5 U.S.C. App. 2, 10(d). Meeting information and a roster of Council members may be obtained by accessing the SAMHSA Committee website at https://www.samhsa.gov/ about-us/advisory-councils/csatnational-advisory-council or by contacting the CSAT National Advisory Council Designated Federal Officer; Tracy Goss (see contact information below). Council Name: SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment National Advisory Council. Date/Time/Type: September 7, 2018/ CLOSED. Place: SAMHSA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, Maryland 20857. Contact: Tracy Goss, Designated Federal Officer, CSAT National Advisory Council, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, Maryland 20857 (mail), Telephone: (240) 276–0759, Fax: (240) 276–2252, Email: tracy.goss@ samhsa.hhs.gov. Summer King, Statistician, SAMHSA. [FR Doc. 2018–18259 Filed 8–22–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG–2018–0706] Cook Inlet Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council (CIRCAC) Recertification Coast Guard, DHS. Notice of recertification. AGENCY: ACTION: This notice informs the public that the Coast Guard has recertified the Cook Inlet Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council (CIRCAC) as an alternative voluntary advisory group for Cook Inlet, Alaska. This certification allows the CIRCAC to monitor the activities of terminal facilities and crude oil tankers under an alternative composition, other than prescribed, Cook Inlet Program established by statue. DATES: This recertification is effective for the period from September 1, 2018 through August 31, 2019. daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:43 Aug 22, 2018 Jkt 244001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: LCDR Jonathan Dale, Seventeenth Coast Guard District (dpi), by phone at (907) 463–2812, email at jonathan.dale@ uscg.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background and Purpose As part of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, Congress passed the Oil Terminal and Oil Tanker Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Act of 1990 (the Act), 33 U.S.C. 2732, to foster a long-term partnership among industry, government, and local communities in overseeing compliance with environmental concerns in the operation of crude oil terminals and oil tankers. The President has delegated his authority under 33 U.S.C. 2732(o) respecting certification of advisory councils, or groups, subject to the Act to the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. Section 8(g) of Executive Order 12777, (56 FR 54757, October 22, 1991), as amended by section 34 of Executive Order 13286 (68 FR 10619, March 5, 2003). The Secretary redelegated that authority to the Commandant of the USCG. Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1, paragraph 80 of section II. The Commandant redelegated that authority to the Chief, Office of Marine Safety, Security and Environmental Protection (G–M) on March 19, 1992 (letter #5402). The Assistant Commandant for Marine Safety and Environmental Protection (G–M), redelegated recertification authority for advisory councils, or groups, to the Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District on February 26, 1999 (letter #16450). On July 7, 1993, the USCG published a policy statement, ‘‘Alternative Voluntary Advisory Groups, Prince William Sound and Cook Inlet’’ (58 FR 36504), to clarify the factors considered in making the determination as to whether advisory councils, or groups, should be certified in accordance with the Act. On September 16, 2002, the USCG published a policy statement, 67 FR 58440, which changed the recertification procedures such that applicants are required to provide the USCG with comprehensive information every three years (triennially). For each of the two years between the triennial application procedures, applicants submit a letter requesting recertification that includes a description of any substantive changes to the information provided at the previous triennial recertification. Further, public comment is only solicited during the triennial comprehensive review. PO 00000 Frm 00039 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Recertification By letter dated August 2, 2018, the Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, certified that the CIRCAC qualifies as an alternative voluntary advisory group under 33 U.S.C. 2732(o). This recertification terminates on August 31, 2019. Dated: August 2, 2018. Matthew T. Bell, Jr., Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard, Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. [FR Doc. 2018–18234 Filed 8–22–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–HQ–WSFR–2018–N088; 91400–5110– 0000; 91400–9410–0000] The Fiscal Year 2017 Multistate Conservation Grant Program Award List Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of priority list and publication of grant awards into the Federal Register. AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 priority list of grant awards for the wildlife and sport fish conservation projects from the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (Association). As required by the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Programs Improvement Act of 2000, the Association submits a list of projects to us each year to consider for funding under the Multistate Conservation Grant Program. We have reviewed the list and recommended all for award to the Director. The Director approved the list of projects for award and we have awarded all projects from the list. ADDRESSES: John C. Stremple, Multistate Conservation Grants Program Coordinator; Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 5275 Leesburg Pike; MS: WSFR; Falls Church, VA 22041– 3808. SUMMARY: John C. Stremple, (703) 358–2156 (phone) or John_Stremple@fws.gov (email). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Fish and Wildlife Programs Improvement and National Wildlife Refuge System Centennial Act of 2000 (Improvement Act, Pub. L. 106–408) amended the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 669 et seq.) and the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 42675 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 164 / Thursday, August 23, 2018 / Notices Act (16 U.S.C. 777 et seq.) and established the Multistate Conservation Grant Program. The Improvement Act authorizes us to award grants of up to $3 million annually from funds available under each of the restoration acts, for a total of up to $6 million annually. Projects can be funded from both funds, depending on the project activities. We may award grants to projects from a list of priority projects recommended to us by the Association. The Service Director, exercising the authority of the Secretary of the Interior, need not fund all projects on the list, but all projects funded must be on the list. The Improvement Act provides that funding for Multistate grants is available in the year it is appropriated and for the following year. Total funding available for new FY 2017 Multistate Conservation grants was $2,522,000. This total was made up of funding that was carried over from FY 2016, added to the funding that was previously sequestered, and subtracted committed funds ($3,261,027) for FY 2017. Those committed funds were directed into the three components of the 2016 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation (parts A and B). Grantees under this program may use funds for sport fisheries and wildlife management and research projects, boating access development, hunter safety and education, aquatic education, fish and wildlife habitat improvements, and other purposes consistent with the enabling legislation. To be eligible for funding, a project must benefit fish and/or wildlife conservation for at least 26 States, a majority of the States in any one Service Region, or one of the regional associations of State fish and wildlife agencies. We may award grants to a State, a group of States, or one or more nongovernmental organizations. For the purpose of carrying out the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, we may award grants to the Service, if requested by the Association, or to a State or a group of States. Also, the Association requires all project proposals to address its National Conservation Needs, which the Association announces annually at the same time it requests proposals. Further, applicants must provide certification that no activities conducted under a Multistate Conservation Grant will promote or encourage opposition to regulated hunting or trapping of wildlife, or to regulated angling or taking of fish. The Association committees and interested nongovernmental organizations that represent conservation organizations, sportsmen’s and women’s organizations, and industries that support or promote fishing, hunting, trapping, recreational shooting, bowhunting, or archery review and rank eligible project proposals. The Association’s National Grants Committee recommends a final list of priority projects to the directors of the State fish and wildlife agencies for their approval by majority vote. By statute, the Association then transmits the final approved list to the Service for funding under the Multistate Conservation Grant program by October 1 of the fiscal year. For FY 2017, the Association sent us a list of 17 new projects, plus the three previously approved components of the 2016 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation that they recommended for funding. The Director approved all projects on this list and all have been awarded. The list follows: MULTISTATE CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM [FY 2017 Projects] ID Title Submitter 1 ................. State Fish & Wildlife Agency Technical Workgroup for the 2016 National Survey. State Fish and Wildlife Agency Coordination and Communication ......... Coordination of Farm Bill Implementation ................................................ Multistate Conservation Grant Program Coordination ............................. Management Assistance Team and the National Conservation Leadership Institute. State Fish & Wildlife Agency Director Travel-Enabling Coordination and Planning of National Level Conservation Initiatives. Increasing Awareness and Knowledge of Fish and Wildlife Management Through Legal Education that Instructs on the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation and the Public Trust. Preserve State Agencies’ Authority to Manage Wildlife Resources and Promote Their Interest in the Implementation of International Treaties. Implementation of the National Hunting & Shooting Sports Action Plan Telling the State Story to Ensure Fish and Wildlife Agency Relevancy .. Coordination of the Industry, Federal, and State Agency Coalition ........ 2017 National WSFR—Federal Aid Coordinators Meeting ...................... Applying Wildlife Governance Principles to Enhance Leadership and Relevance of State Wildlife Agencies. 2017—Raising Awareness of the WSFR Program and Improving Industry Relations To Ensure the Long-term Stability of the Program. Advancing the Objectives of the National Fish Habitat Action Plan through Regional and Collaborative Science and Priority Setting. Quantifying and Communicating the Economic Significance of Hunting and Shooting Sports. Quantifying and Communicating the Economic Significance of Sportfishing. Coordination of the 2016 National Survey Efforts (part A) ...................... National Level Results for the 2016 Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation (Part A). 2016 Fifty State Surveys Related to Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation (Part B). AFWA .................................. 2 3 4 5 ................. ................. ................. ................. 6 ................. 7 ................. 8 ................. 9 ................. 10 ............... 11 ............... 12 ............... 13 ............... 14 ............... 15 ............... 16 ............... daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES 17 ............... NS .............. NS .............. NS .............. PR funding 1 $51,040 $102,080 .................................. .................................. .................................. .................................. 80,241 76,510 42,000 270,376.63 80,241 76,510 42,000 270,376.63 160,482 153,020 84,000 540,753.26 AFWA .................................. 50,000 50,000 100,000 AFWA .................................. 50,000 50,000 100,000 AFWA .................................. 33,600 33,600 67,200 CAHSS ................................ AFWA .................................. AFWA .................................. WMI ..................................... WMI ..................................... 171,000 42,600 77,130 94,874 49,680 0 42,600 77,130 94,874 49,680 171,000 85,200 154,260 189,748 99,360 WMI ..................................... 86,864.50 86,864.50 173,729 AFWA/NFHB ....................... 0 143,711.87 143,711.87 NSSF ................................... 98,000 0 98,000 ASA ..................................... 0 99,200 99,200 FWS ..................................... FWS/U.S. Census Bureau .. 131,560 884,824 131,560 884,824 263,120 1,769,648 Rockville Intitute (Westat) ... 614,129.50 614,129.50 1,228,259 2,904,429.63 2,878,341.50 5,782,771.13 AFWA AFWA AFWA AFWA Funding: Pitman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration funds. Funding: Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration funds. AFWA: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. 2 DJ 19:43 Aug 22, 2018 Jkt 244001 PO 00000 Frm 00040 Fmt 4703 Total 2017 grant $51,040 1 PR VerDate Sep<11>2014 DJ funding 2 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 42676 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 164 / Thursday, August 23, 2018 / Notices ATA: Archery Trade Association. ASA: American Sportfishing Association. CAHSS: Council to Advance Hunting and the Shooting Sports. NFHB: National Fish Habitat Board. NS: 2016 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife- Associated Recreation. NSSF: National Shooting Sports Foundation. WMI: Wildlife Management Institute. Dated: June 22, 2018. James W. Kurth, Deputy Director for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Exercising the Authority of the Director for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2018–18235 Filed 8–22–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026149; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Brooklyn Museum has completed an inventory of associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Brooklyn Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Brooklyn Museum at the address in this notice by September 24, 2018. ADDRESSES: Nancy Rosoff, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator, Arts of the Americas, Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238, telephone (718) 501–6283, email nancy.rosoff@brooklynmuseum.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:43 Aug 22, 2018 Jkt 244001 Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of associated funerary objects under the control of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY. The associated funerary objects were removed from Canyon del Muerto, Apache County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the associated funerary objects was made by the Brooklyn Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Associated Funerary Objects The associated funerary objects and the mummified remains of a man were removed from an unidentified site within Canyon del Muerto in Apache County, AZ, by Charles L. Day at an unknown date prior to April 1903. In April 1903, Brooklyn Museum curator Stewart Culin purchased the associated funerary objects and human remains from Day. Culin’s catalog cards indicate that the associated funerary objects were found with the human remains. In 1907, the human remains were transferred to the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains can be found in the Field Museum of Natural History’s culturally unidentifiable inventory. The two associated funerary objects are one fragmented arrow shaft and one bow with cord. The arrow fragments and bow are Ancestral Puebloan and date to the Pueblo I–III Periods (700–1300 C.E.). This determination was made by Susan Kennedy Zeller, former Associate PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Curator of Native American Art, on August 8, 1996, on the basis of parallel materials found within the archeological literature. Canyon del Muerto is located within the Western Ancestral Puebloan cultural area. Archeologically, this cultural area is characterized by a temporal shift from subterranean pit houses to above-ground masonry rooms surrounding plazas, rectangular kivas, and a wide variety of regionally distinct painted ceramics. Other archeological sites within Canyon del Muerto indicate sustained Ancestral Puebloan occupation from the late Basketmaker II through the Pueblo III Periods. After the start of the Pueblo III Period, around 1300 C.E., the archeological evidence suggests that much of the population living within Canyon del Muerto moved to other settlements. The associated funerary objects were examined during consultations by representatives from The Tribes during 1996 and 1997, as part of the Brooklyn Museum’s 1996 NAGPRA Grant. The Colorado River Tribes of the Colorado River Reservation, Arizona and California are composed of four distinct tribes: the Mohave, Chemehuevi, Hopi, and Navajo. Evidence for a cultural affiliation between the Ancestral Puebloan occupants of Canyon del Muerto and the Colorado River Tribes of the Colorado River Reservation, Arizona and California includes similarities in material culture and architectural design, as well as archeological data and oral tradition. Canyon del Muerto lies within traditional Hopi territory, and Hopi oral tradition speaks of clan migrations through the Canyon de Chelly region, of which Canyon del Muerto is a part. Evidence for cultural affiliation between the Ancestral Puebloan occupants of Canyon del Muerto and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona includes similarities in material culture and architectural design, as well as archeological data, geographic proximity, and oral tradition. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona considers all of Arizona to either lie within traditional Hopi territory or to be a territory through which Hopi clans migrated. Evidence for cultural affiliation between the Ancestral Puebloan occupants of Canyon del Muerto and the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah, includes expert opinion and E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 164 (Thursday, August 23, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 42674-42676]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-18235]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-HQ-WSFR-2018-N088; 91400-5110-0000; 91400-9410-0000]


The Fiscal Year 2017 Multistate Conservation Grant Program Award 
List

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of receipt of priority list and publication of grant 
awards into the Federal Register.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the Fiscal 
Year (FY) 2017 priority list of grant awards for the wildlife and sport 
fish conservation projects from the Association of Fish and Wildlife 
Agencies (Association). As required by the Wildlife and Sport Fish 
Restoration Programs Improvement Act of 2000, the Association submits a 
list of projects to us each year to consider for funding under the 
Multistate Conservation Grant Program. We have reviewed the list and 
recommended all for award to the Director. The Director approved the 
list of projects for award and we have awarded all projects from the 
list.

ADDRESSES: John C. Stremple, Multistate Conservation Grants Program 
Coordinator; Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program; U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service; 5275 Leesburg Pike; MS: WSFR; Falls Church, VA 22041-
3808.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John C. Stremple, (703) 358-2156 
(phone) or [email protected] (email).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Fish and Wildlife Programs Improvement 
and National Wildlife Refuge System Centennial Act of 2000 (Improvement 
Act, Pub. L. 106-408) amended the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife 
Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 669 et seq.) and the Dingell-Johnson Sport 
Fish Restoration

[[Page 42675]]

Act (16 U.S.C. 777 et seq.) and established the Multistate Conservation 
Grant Program. The Improvement Act authorizes us to award grants of up 
to $3 million annually from funds available under each of the 
restoration acts, for a total of up to $6 million annually. Projects 
can be funded from both funds, depending on the project activities. We 
may award grants to projects from a list of priority projects 
recommended to us by the Association. The Service Director, exercising 
the authority of the Secretary of the Interior, need not fund all 
projects on the list, but all projects funded must be on the list.
    The Improvement Act provides that funding for Multistate grants is 
available in the year it is appropriated and for the following year. 
Total funding available for new FY 2017 Multistate Conservation grants 
was $2,522,000. This total was made up of funding that was carried over 
from FY 2016, added to the funding that was previously sequestered, and 
subtracted committed funds ($3,261,027) for FY 2017. Those committed 
funds were directed into the three components of the 2016 National 
Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation (parts A 
and B).
    Grantees under this program may use funds for sport fisheries and 
wildlife management and research projects, boating access development, 
hunter safety and education, aquatic education, fish and wildlife 
habitat improvements, and other purposes consistent with the enabling 
legislation.
    To be eligible for funding, a project must benefit fish and/or 
wildlife conservation for at least 26 States, a majority of the States 
in any one Service Region, or one of the regional associations of State 
fish and wildlife agencies. We may award grants to a State, a group of 
States, or one or more nongovernmental organizations. For the purpose 
of carrying out the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-
Associated Recreation, we may award grants to the Service, if requested 
by the Association, or to a State or a group of States. Also, the 
Association requires all project proposals to address its National 
Conservation Needs, which the Association announces annually at the 
same time it requests proposals. Further, applicants must provide 
certification that no activities conducted under a Multistate 
Conservation Grant will promote or encourage opposition to regulated 
hunting or trapping of wildlife, or to regulated angling or taking of 
fish.
    The Association committees and interested nongovernmental 
organizations that represent conservation organizations, sportsmen's 
and women's organizations, and industries that support or promote 
fishing, hunting, trapping, recreational shooting, bowhunting, or 
archery review and rank eligible project proposals. The Association's 
National Grants Committee recommends a final list of priority projects 
to the directors of the State fish and wildlife agencies for their 
approval by majority vote. By statute, the Association then transmits 
the final approved list to the Service for funding under the Multistate 
Conservation Grant program by October 1 of the fiscal year. For FY 
2017, the Association sent us a list of 17 new projects, plus the three 
previously approved components of the 2016 National Survey of Fishing, 
Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation that they recommended for 
funding. The Director approved all projects on this list and all have 
been awarded. The list follows:

                                      Multistate Conservation Grant Program
                                               [FY 2017 Projects]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                         PR funding    DJ funding    Total 2017
         ID                     Title                  Submitter             \1\           \2\          grant
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1..................  State Fish & Wildlife       AFWA.................       $51,040       $51,040      $102,080
                      Agency Technical
                      Workgroup for the 2016
                      National Survey.
2..................  State Fish and Wildlife     AFWA.................        80,241        80,241       160,482
                      Agency Coordination and
                      Communication.
3..................  Coordination of Farm Bill   AFWA.................        76,510        76,510       153,020
                      Implementation.
4..................  Multistate Conservation     AFWA.................        42,000        42,000        84,000
                      Grant Program
                      Coordination.
5..................  Management Assistance Team  AFWA.................    270,376.63    270,376.63    540,753.26
                      and the National
                      Conservation Leadership
                      Institute.
6..................  State Fish & Wildlife       AFWA.................        50,000        50,000       100,000
                      Agency Director Travel-
                      Enabling Coordination and
                      Planning of National
                      Level Conservation
                      Initiatives.
7..................  Increasing Awareness and    AFWA.................        50,000        50,000       100,000
                      Knowledge of Fish and
                      Wildlife Management
                      Through Legal Education
                      that Instructs on the
                      North American Model of
                      Wildlife Conservation and
                      the Public Trust.
8..................  Preserve State Agencies'    AFWA.................        33,600        33,600        67,200
                      Authority to Manage
                      Wildlife Resources and
                      Promote Their Interest in
                      the Implementation of
                      International Treaties.
9..................  Implementation of the       CAHSS................       171,000             0       171,000
                      National Hunting &
                      Shooting Sports Action
                      Plan.
10.................  Telling the State Story to  AFWA.................        42,600        42,600        85,200
                      Ensure Fish and Wildlife
                      Agency Relevancy.
11.................  Coordination of the         AFWA.................        77,130        77,130       154,260
                      Industry, Federal, and
                      State Agency Coalition.
12.................  2017 National WSFR--        WMI..................        94,874        94,874       189,748
                      Federal Aid Coordinators
                      Meeting.
13.................  Applying Wildlife           WMI..................        49,680        49,680        99,360
                      Governance Principles to
                      Enhance Leadership and
                      Relevance of State
                      Wildlife Agencies.
14.................  2017--Raising Awareness of  WMI..................     86,864.50     86,864.50       173,729
                      the WSFR Program and
                      Improving Industry
                      Relations To Ensure the
                      Long-term Stability of
                      the Program.
15.................  Advancing the Objectives    AFWA/NFHB............             0    143,711.87    143,711.87
                      of the National Fish
                      Habitat Action Plan
                      through Regional and
                      Collaborative Science and
                      Priority Setting.
16.................  Quantifying and             NSSF.................        98,000             0        98,000
                      Communicating the
                      Economic Significance of
                      Hunting and Shooting
                      Sports.
17.................  Quantifying and             ASA..................             0        99,200        99,200
                      Communicating the
                      Economic Significance of
                      Sportfishing.
NS.................  Coordination of the 2016    FWS..................       131,560       131,560       263,120
                      National Survey Efforts
                      (part A).
NS.................  National Level Results for  FWS/U.S. Census             884,824       884,824     1,769,648
                      the 2016 Survey of          Bureau.
                      Fishing, Hunting, and
                      Wildlife-Associated
                      Recreation (Part A).
NS.................  2016 Fifty State Surveys    Rockville Intitute       614,129.50    614,129.50     1,228,259
                      Related to Fishing,         (Westat).
                      Hunting, and Wildlife-
                      Associated Recreation
                      (Part B).
                                                                       -----------------------------------------
                                                                        2,904,429.63  2,878,341.50  5,782,771.13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ PR Funding: Pitman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration funds.
\2\ DJ Funding: Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration funds.
AFWA: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

[[Page 42676]]

 
ATA: Archery Trade Association.
ASA: American Sportfishing Association.
CAHSS: Council to Advance Hunting and the Shooting Sports.
NFHB: National Fish Habitat Board.
NS: 2016 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife- Associated Recreation.
NSSF: National Shooting Sports Foundation.
WMI: Wildlife Management Institute.


    Dated: June 22, 2018.
James W. Kurth,
Deputy Director for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Exercising the 
Authority of the Director for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2018-18235 Filed 8-22-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4333-15-P