Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO, 42684-42686 [2018-18202]

Download as PDF 42684 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 164 / Thursday, August 23, 2018 / Notices daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES (INDOT), as well as Indiana State Archaeologist Dr. Rick Jones. FHWA notified the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma by letter dated July 26, 2010, and the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Shawnee Tribe by letter dated November 16, 2010. In co-operation between the FHWA, INDOT, and archeologists from IPFW, the human remains were temporarily housed at IPFW while initial consultation proceeded with the tribes listed in this notice and INDOT. On December 5, 2013, the human remains were transferred from IPFW to the ISMHS. Upon consultation with the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, the human remains were inventoried and an osteological analysis by staff at IPFW was conducted. Staff identified the human remains as belonging to a single individual, approximately 18–24 months of age at death. Analyses also indicated no apparent pathologies apparent or evidence of pre- or perimortem skeletal trauma. Given the incomplete nature of the human remains (only a portion of the upper body is present) as well as the age of the individual, sex or stature could not be determined. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a pipe made of green stone that appears to mimic the bowls found on 18th century metal tomahawk pipes. The pipe bowl is shaped like the more common kaolin clay pipes and is similar to examples recovered from the Wea village near Ouiatenon. Determinations Made by the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites Officials of the ISMHS have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on analysis of the physical remains and the archeological context. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:43 Aug 22, 2018 Jkt 244001 and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas). • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Match-ebe-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas). • Other authoritative governmental sources identify the removal location of the human remains as the aboriginal land of Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Shawnee Tribe; and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of PO 00000 Frm 00049 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Shawnee Tribe Nation of Oklahoma; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska (hereafter, ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Michele Greenan, Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites Corporation, 650 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, IN 46214, telephone (317) 473–0836, email mgreenan@indianamuseum.org, by September 24, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The ISMHS is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 17, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–18198 Filed 8–22–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026061; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: History Colorado, formerly Colorado Historical Society, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to History Colorado. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 164 / Thursday, August 23, 2018 / Notices daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to History Colorado at the address in this notice by September 24, 2018. ADDRESSES: Sheila Goff, NAGPRA Liaison, History Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866–4531, email sheila.goff@ state.co.us. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of History Colorado, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from La Plata County and Montezuma County, CO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by History Colorado professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, Oklahoma (previously listed as the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma); Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (previously listed as the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah); Ysleta del Sur VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:43 Aug 22, 2018 Jkt 244001 Pueblo (previously listed as the Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas); and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. The Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek Reservation, South Dakota; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico were invited to consult, but did not participate. Hereafter, all tribes listed above are referred to as ‘‘The Consulted and Invited Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from private property in La Plata County, CO, by a private citizen. In the 1960s, the human remains were given to another family member, who mailed them to the Office of the State Archeologist in June 2017. The La Plata County Coroner ruled out a forensic interest in the human remains. The human remains are identified as Office of Archeology and Historic Preservation (OAHP) Case Number 324. Osteological analysis by Dr. Christine Pink of Metropolitan State University of Denver—Human Identification Laboratory indicates that the human remains are likely of Native American ancestry and archeological. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. About forty years ago, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from private property in Montezuma County, CO, by a private citizen. In October 2017, she turned them over to the Mesa County Coroner, who, with the Montezuma County Coroner, ruled out a forensic interest. In December 2017, the human remains were transferred to the Office of the State Archeologist (OSAC), where they are identified as Office of Archeology and Historic Preservation (OAHP) Case Number 327. Osteological analysis by Dr. Christine Pink of Metropolitan State University of Denver—Human Identification Laboratory indicates that the human remains are likely of Native American ancestry and archeological. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. History Colorado, in partnership with the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs, Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the PO 00000 Frm 00050 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 42685 Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah), conducted tribal consultations among the tribes with ancestral ties to the State of Colorado to develop the process for disposition of culturally unidentifiable Native American human remains and associated funerary objects originating from inadvertent discoveries on Colorado State and private lands. That consultation led to the drafting of the ‘‘Process for Consultation, Transfer, and Reburial of Culturally Unidentifiable Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects Originating From Inadvertent Discoveries on Colorado State and Private Lands’’ (2008, unpublished, on file with the Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation). The tribes consulted on the human remains in this notice are those who have expressed their wishes to be notified of discoveries in the Southwest Consultation Region as established by the ‘‘Process.’’ The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. On November 3–4, 2006, the ‘‘Process’’ was presented to the Review Committee for consideration. A January 8, 2007, letter on behalf of the Review Committee from the Designated Federal Officer transmitted the provisional authorization to proceed with the ‘‘Process’’ upon receipt of formal responses from the Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico, and the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma, subject to forthcoming conditions imposed by the Secretary of the Interior. On May 15–16, 2008, the responses from the Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico, and the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma were submitted to the Review Committee. On September 23, 2008, the Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks, as the designee for the Secretary of the Interior, authorized the disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains according to the ‘‘Process’’ and NAGPRA, contingent on the publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that requirement. 43 CFR 10.11 was promulgated on March 15, 2010, to provide a process for the disposition of culturally unidentifiable Native American human remains recovered from tribal or aboriginal lands as established by the final judgment of the Indian Claims Commission or U.S. Court of Claims, a E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 42686 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 164 / Thursday, August 23, 2018 / Notices treaty, Act of Congress, or Executive Order, or other authoritative governmental sources. As there is no evidence indicating that the human remains reported in this notice originated from tribal or aboriginal lands, they are eligible for disposition under the ‘‘Process.’’ DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0026073; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Determinations Made by History Colorado Officials of History Colorado have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on osteological evidence. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of four individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(2)(ii), the disposition of the human remains may be to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah). daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Sheila Goff, NAGPRA Liaison, History Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866–4531, email sheila.goff@ state.co.us, by September 24, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah) may proceed. History Colorado is responsible for notifying The Consulted and Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 17, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–18202 Filed 8–22–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:43 Aug 22, 2018 Jkt 244001 Notice of Inventory Completion: Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Florida Department of State has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Florida Department of State. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Florida Department of State at the address in this notice by September 24, 2018. ADDRESSES: Kathryn Miyar, Florida Department of State, Mission San Luis Collections, 2100 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304, telephone (850) 245–6301, email kathryn.miyar@ dos.myflorida.com. SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. The human remains were removed from an unknown location. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the remains was made by the Florida Department of State professional staff in consultation with representatives of AlabamaCoushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Kialegee Tribal Town; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)); The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town. Two non-federally recognized Indian groups, the Florida Tribe of Eastern Creek Indians and the Original Miccosukee Simanolee Nation of Aboriginal People were also consulted. History and Description of the Remains A braided lock of hair belonging to Osceola, an advisor to the principal chief of the Seminole and leader of Seminole resistance during the Second Seminole War (89M.041.004), in the collection of the Florida Department of State, was donated by one of the descendants of Dr. Frederick Weedon. Weedon, who was a medical doctor under contract to the Army, treated Osceola during his captivity at Ft. Marion and later at Ft. Moultrie (1837– 1838). Before he died, Osceola had given a few personal effects to Dr. Weedon, but the braided lock of hair is presumed to have been taken after death. Osceola’s postcranial remains were buried at Ft. Moultrie in 1838; however, his head was retained by Dr. Weedon. It is believed that, later, the head was housed at the Surgical and Pathological Museum in New York City, and was lost in the fire that destroyed the museum in 1866. A lock of Osceola’s hair remained with the Weedon family from 1838 until its donation to the Florida Department of State in 1989. Taking a lock of a descendant’s hair for a keepsake was a popular western custom in the 1800s. The hair is in a braided plait that is 53⁄4″ long, and consists of approximately seven strands of hair. Presumably, it had been plaited by a Weedon family member sometime after its acquisition. Determinations Made by the Florida Department of State Officials of the Florida Department of State have determined that: E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 164 (Thursday, August 23, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 42684-42686]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-18202]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0026061; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Formerly 
Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: History Colorado, formerly Colorado Historical Society, has 
completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request to History Colorado. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian

[[Page 42685]]

organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to History Colorado 
at the address in this notice by September 24, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Sheila Goff, NAGPRA Liaison, History Colorado, 1200 
Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866-4531, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of History Colorado, Denver, CO. The human remains were 
removed from La Plata County and Montezuma County, CO.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service 
is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by History 
Colorado professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne and 
Arapaho Tribes, Oklahoma (previously listed as the Cheyenne-Arapaho 
Tribes of Oklahoma); Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of 
the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Ohkay Owingeh, New 
Mexico (previously listed as the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Jemez, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Southern 
Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute 
Mountain Ute Tribe (previously listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the 
Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah); Ysleta del Sur 
Pueblo (previously listed as the Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas); and 
Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    The Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow 
Creek Reservation, South Dakota; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the 
Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Tesuque, New 
Mexico were invited to consult, but did not participate. Hereafter, all 
tribes listed above are referred to as ``The Consulted and Invited 
Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from private property in La Plata County, CO, 
by a private citizen. In the 1960s, the human remains were given to 
another family member, who mailed them to the Office of the State 
Archeologist in June 2017. The La Plata County Coroner ruled out a 
forensic interest in the human remains. The human remains are 
identified as Office of Archeology and Historic Preservation (OAHP) 
Case Number 324. Osteological analysis by Dr. Christine Pink of 
Metropolitan State University of Denver--Human Identification 
Laboratory indicates that the human remains are likely of Native 
American ancestry and archeological. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    About forty years ago, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from private property in Montezuma County, CO, 
by a private citizen. In October 2017, she turned them over to the Mesa 
County Coroner, who, with the Montezuma County Coroner, ruled out a 
forensic interest. In December 2017, the human remains were transferred 
to the Office of the State Archeologist (OSAC), where they are 
identified as Office of Archeology and Historic Preservation (OAHP) 
Case Number 327. Osteological analysis by Dr. Christine Pink of 
Metropolitan State University of Denver--Human Identification 
Laboratory indicates that the human remains are likely of Native 
American ancestry and archeological. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    History Colorado, in partnership with the Colorado Commission of 
Indian Affairs, Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute 
Reservation, Colorado, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously 
listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, 
Colorado, New Mexico & Utah), conducted tribal consultations among the 
tribes with ancestral ties to the State of Colorado to develop the 
process for disposition of culturally unidentifiable Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects originating from 
inadvertent discoveries on Colorado State and private lands. That 
consultation led to the drafting of the ``Process for Consultation, 
Transfer, and Reburial of Culturally Unidentifiable Native American 
Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects Originating From 
Inadvertent Discoveries on Colorado State and Private Lands'' (2008, 
unpublished, on file with the Colorado Office of Archaeology and 
Historic Preservation). The tribes consulted on the human remains in 
this notice are those who have expressed their wishes to be notified of 
discoveries in the Southwest Consultation Region as established by the 
``Process.''
    The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review 
Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific 
actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. On 
November 3-4, 2006, the ``Process'' was presented to the Review 
Committee for consideration. A January 8, 2007, letter on behalf of the 
Review Committee from the Designated Federal Officer transmitted the 
provisional authorization to proceed with the ``Process'' upon receipt 
of formal responses from the Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico, and 
the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma, subject to forthcoming conditions 
imposed by the Secretary of the Interior. On May 15-16, 2008, the 
responses from the Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico, and the Kiowa 
Indian Tribe of Oklahoma were submitted to the Review Committee. On 
September 23, 2008, the Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and 
Parks, as the designee for the Secretary of the Interior, authorized 
the disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains according to 
the ``Process'' and NAGPRA, contingent on the publication of a Notice 
of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills 
that requirement.
    43 CFR 10.11 was promulgated on March 15, 2010, to provide a 
process for the disposition of culturally unidentifiable Native 
American human remains recovered from tribal or aboriginal lands as 
established by the final judgment of the Indian Claims Commission or 
U.S. Court of Claims, a

[[Page 42686]]

treaty, Act of Congress, or Executive Order, or other authoritative 
governmental sources. As there is no evidence indicating that the human 
remains reported in this notice originated from tribal or aboriginal 
lands, they are eligible for disposition under the ``Process.''

Determinations Made by History Colorado

    Officials of History Colorado have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on osteological evidence.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of four individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(2)(ii), the disposition of the 
human remains may be to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern 
Ute Reservation, Colorado, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously 
listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, 
Colorado, New Mexico & Utah).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains should submit a written request with information 
in support of the request to Sheila Goff, NAGPRA Liaison, History 
Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866-4531, 
email [email protected], by September 24, 2018. After that date, 
if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of 
the human remains to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute 
Reservation, Colorado, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (previously 
listed as the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, 
Colorado, New Mexico & Utah) may proceed.
    History Colorado is responsible for notifying The Consulted and 
Invited Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 17, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2018-18202 Filed 8-22-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P