Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited Helicopters, 42232-42234 [2018-17902]

Download as PDF 42232 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 162 / Tuesday, August 21, 2018 / Proposed Rules (g) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Safety Management Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, may approve AMOCs for this AD. Send your proposal to: David Hatfield, Aviation Safety Engineer, Safety Management Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222–5110; email 9-ASWFTW-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov. (2) For operations conducted under a 14 CFR part 119 operating certificate or under 14 CFR part 91, subpart K, we suggest that you notify your principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office or certificate holding district office before operating any aircraft complying with this AD through an AMOC. (h) Additional Information The subject of this AD is addressed in European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD No. 2017–0025, dated February 14, 2017. You may view the EASA AD on the internet at http://www.regulations.gov in the AD Docket. (i) Subject Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: Cabin/Equipment Furnishings. Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on August 6, 2018. Lance T. Gant, Director, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2018–17903 Filed 8–20–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2018–0740; Product Identifier 2016–SW–045–AD] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited Helicopters Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). AGENCY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (Bell) Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, 206L–4, and 407 helicopters. This proposed AD would require inspecting and cleaning the oil supply restrictor (restrictor) to the freewheel assembly. This proposed AD is prompted by reports of a blocked oil line restrictor in the freewheel lubrication system. The proposed actions are intended to address an unsafe condition on these products. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with PROPOSALS SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:34 Aug 20, 2018 Jkt 244001 We must receive comments on this proposed AD by October 22, 2018. ADDRESSES: You may send comments by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Docket: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for sending your comments electronically. • Fax: 202–493–2251. • Mail: Send comments to the U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590–0001. • Hand Delivery: Deliver to the ‘‘Mail’’ address between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. DATES: Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2018– 0740; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this proposed AD, the Transport Canada AD, the economic evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street address for Docket Operations (telephone 800–647–5527) is in the ADDRESSES section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. For service information identified in this proposed rule, contact Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l’Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4; telephone (450) 437–2862 or (800) 363–8023; fax (450) 433–0272; or at http://www.bellcustomer.com/files/. You may review the referenced service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Hatfield, Aviation Safety Engineer, Safety Management Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222–5110; email david.hatfield@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited We invite you to participate in this rulemaking by submitting written comments, data, or views. We also invite comments relating to the economic, environmental, energy, or federalism impacts that might result from adopting the proposals in this document. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 proposal, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. To ensure the docket does not contain duplicate comments, commenters should send only one copy of written comments, or if comments are filed electronically, commenters should submit only one time. We will file in the docket all comments that we receive, as well as a report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel concerning this proposed rulemaking. Before acting on this proposal, we will consider all comments we receive on or before the closing date for comments. We will consider comments filed after the comment period has closed if it is possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. We may change this proposal in light of the comments we receive. Discussion Transport Canada, which is the aviation authority for Canada, has issued Canadian AD No. CF–2016–13, dated May 16, 2016 (AD No. CF–2016– 13), to correct an unsafe condition for Bell Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, 206L–4, and 407 helicopters. Transport Canada advises that they have received two reports of torsional overload failure of the main rotor mast caused by a blocked oil line restrictor in the freewheel lubrication system. Transport Canada states the restrictor may become contaminated during maintenance, causing blockage. Transport Canada further states that a blocked restrictor could cause the freewheel assembly to malfunction and result in failure of the main rotor mast and loss of control of the helicopter. Additionally, the Canadian AD advises that although certain later versions of these helicopters are equipped with a filter in the freewheel lubrication system that is designed to trap contaminants and prevent blockage of the restrictor, installation of the filter does not guarantee the restrictor will remain free of contaminants. According to Transport Canada, one occurrence of restrictor blockage resulted from contaminants being introduced downstream from the filter, which subsequently caused failure of the freewheel assembly. For these reasons, AD No. CF–2016–13 requires inspecting and cleaning the restrictors and filters to reduce the risk of freewheel failure. FAA’s Determination These helicopters have been approved by the aviation authority of Canada and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to our bilateral agreement with Canada, Transport E:\FR\FM\21AUP1.SGM 21AUP1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 162 / Tuesday, August 21, 2018 / Proposed Rules Canada, its technical representative, has notified us of the unsafe condition described in its AD. We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all known relevant information and determined that an unsafe condition is likely to exist or develop on other products of the same type design. Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51 We reviewed Bell Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) 206–14–132 for Model 206A/B and TH–67 helicopters; ASB 206L–14–174 for Model 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, and 206L–4 helicopters; and ASB 407–14–106 for Model 407 helicopters. Each ASB is Revision A and dated February 9, 2016. This service information specifies removing, cleaning, inspecting, and reinstalling certain freewheel assembly components. ASB 206–14–132 and ASB 206L–14–174 also describe procedures for replacing the reducer with a filter if not already installed. This service information is reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it through their normal course of business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section. Proposed AD Requirements For all affected models, this AD would require, within 100 hours timein-service, inspecting and cleaning the freewheel oil supply system. If there is blockage in the restrictor, disassembling and inspecting the freewheel assembly for condition and wear would be required before further flight. Additionally, for Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, and 206L–4 helicopters, this proposed AD would require replacing the reducer with a filter, part number 50–075–1. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with PROPOSALS Costs of Compliance We estimate that this proposed AD would affect 2,227 helicopters of U.S. Registry. We estimate that operators may incur the following costs in order to comply with this proposed AD. At an average labor rate of $85 per hour, inspecting and cleaning the freewheel oil supply system would require about 1 work-hour, for a cost per helicopter of $85 and $189,295 for the U.S. fleet, per inspection cycle. If required, inspecting the freewheel assembly would require about 1 workhour, for a cost per helicopter of $85. If required, replacing a restrictor with a filter would require about 1 work-hour and required parts would cost $125, for a cost per helicopter of $210. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:34 Aug 20, 2018 Jkt 244001 Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. ‘‘Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,’’ describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in ‘‘Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings We determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed, I certify this proposed regulation: 1. Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; 2. Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent that it justifies making a regulatory distinction; and 4. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared an economic evaluation of the estimated costs to comply with this proposed AD and placed it in the AD docket. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. The Proposed Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 42233 PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): ■ Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (Bell): Docket No. FAA–2018–0740; Product Identifier 2016–SW–045–AD. (a) Applicability This AD applies to Bell Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, 206L–4, and 407 helicopters, certificated in any category. (b) Unsafe Condition This AD defines the unsafe condition as a blocked oil line restrictor. This condition could cause failure of the freewheel assembly, which could result in failure of the main rotor mast and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. (c) Comments Due Date We must receive comments by October 22, 2018. (d) Compliance You are responsible for performing each action required by this AD within the specified compliance time unless it has already been accomplished prior to that time. (e) Required Actions Within 100 hours time-in-service: (1) For all helicopters: (i) Inspect the oil line restrictor for blockage. If there is any blockage in the restrictor, before further flight, inspect the freewheel assembly clutch, inner shaft, outer shaft, forward seal, cap, and bearings for wear, corrosion, nicks, scratches, and cracks; the splines for wear, cracks, chipped teeth, and broken teeth; the housing for flaking; and for free rotation and engagement of the clutch and bearing. If there is any damage that exceeds allowable limits or if the clutch or bearing does not engage or freely rotate, before further flight, repair or replace the freewheel assembly. (ii) Clean, inspect, and flush each removed fitting, restrictor, tube, hose, and filter with dry cleaning solvent. Do not approve for return to service until each restrictor is free from contamination. (2) For Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, and 206L–4 helicopters with a reducer, replace the reducer with a filter part number 50–075–1. (f) Special Flight Permits Special flight permits are prohibited. (g) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Safety Management Group, FAA, may approve AMOCs for this AD. Send your proposal to: David Hatfield, Aviation Safety Engineer, Safety Management Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, E:\FR\FM\21AUP1.SGM 21AUP1 42234 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 162 / Tuesday, August 21, 2018 / Proposed Rules 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222–5110; email 9ASW-FTW-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov. (2) For operations conducted under a 14 CFR part 119 operating certificate or under 14 CFR part 91, subpart K, we suggest that you notify your principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office or certificate holding district office before operating any aircraft complying with this AD through an AMOC. (h) Additional Information The subject of this AD is addressed in Transport Canada AD No. CF–2016–13, dated May 16, 2016. You may view the Transport Canada AD on the internet at http:// www.regulations.gov in the AD Docket. (i) Subject Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: 6300, Main Rotor Drive System. Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on August 10, 2018. Lance T. Gant, Director, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2018–17902 Filed 8–20–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 311 [Docket ID: DOD–2018–OS–0055] Privacy Act of 1974; Implementation Office of the Secretary of Defense, DoD. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: The Office of the Secretary of Defense proposes to exempt some records maintained in DMDC 18 DoD, ‘‘Synchronized Predeployment and Operational Tracker Enterprise Suite (SPOT–ES) Records,’’ from subsection (d) of the Privacy Act. A system of records notice for this system has been published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. DATES: In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(1), (2) and (3), the public is given a 30-day period in which to comment. Therefore, please submit any comments by September 20, 2018. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by docket number and title, by any of the following methods: • Federal Rulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Department of Defense, Office of the Chief Management Officer, Directorate for Oversight and Compliance, 4800 Mark Center Drive, sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with PROPOSALS SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:34 Aug 20, 2018 Jkt 244001 Mailbox #24, Suite 08D09, Alexandria, VA 22350–1700. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name and docket number for this Federal Register document. The general policy for comments and other submissions from members of the public is to make these submissions available for public viewing on the internet at http:// www.regulations.gov as they are received without change, including any personal identifiers or contact information. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Luz D. Ortiz, Chief, Records, Privacy and Declassification Division (RPDD), 1155 Defense Pentagon, Washington, DC 20311–1155, or by phone at (571) 372– 0478. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This proposed modification to 32 CFR part 311 adds a new Privacy Act exemption rule for the Synchronized Redeployment and Operational Tracker Enterprise Suite (SPOT–ES), which is used at installations to manage, track, account for, monitor, and report on contracts, companies, and contractor employees supporting contingency operations, humanitarian assistance operations, peace operations, disaster relief operations, military exercises, events, and other activities that require contractor support. Contract scope, installations, and/or activities requiring contractor support as documented in SPOT–ES may be classified under Executive Order (E.O.) 13526, ‘‘Classified National Security Information.’’ Information classified under E.O. 13526, as implemented by DoD Manual (DoDM) 5200.01 Volume 1, and DoD Instruction (DoDI) 5200.01, may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1). Granting unfettered access to information that is properly classified pursuant to those authorities may cause damage to the national security. Regulatory Procedures Executive Order 12866, ‘‘Regulatory Planning and Review’’ and Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review’’ Executive Orders 12866 and 13563 direct agencies to assess all costs and benefits of available regulatory alternatives and, if regulation is necessary, to select regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety effects, distribute impacts, and equity). Executive Order 13563 also emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, of reducing costs, of harmonizing rules, and of promoting PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 flexibility. This rule is not a significant regulatory action under E.O. 12866. Executive Order 13771, ‘‘Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs’’ This proposed rule is not a deregulatory action but a modification to an existing rule. 2 U.S.C. Ch. 25, ‘‘Unfunded Mandates Reform Act’’ This proposed rule is not subject to the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) (2 U.S.C. 1532) because it does not contain a federal mandate that may result in the expenditure by state, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100M or more in any one year. Public Law 96–354, ‘‘Regulatory Flexibility Act’’ (5 U.S.C. Chapter 6) It has been certified that this rule does not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities because it is concerned only with the administration of Privacy Act systems of records within DoD. A Regulatory Flexibility Analysis is not required. Public Law 96–511, ‘‘Paperwork Reduction Act’’ (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35) It has been determined that this rule does not impose additional information collection requirements on the public under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). Executive Order 13132, ‘‘Federalism’’ Executive Order 13132 establishes certain requirements that an agency must meet when it promulgates a proposed rule (and subsequent final rule) that imposes substantial direct requirement costs on State and local governments, preempts State law, or otherwise has Federalism implications. This proposed rule will not have a substantial effect on State and local governments. List of Subjects in 32 CFR Part 311 Privacy. Accordingly, 32 CFR part 311 is proposed to be amended as follows: PART 311—[AMENDED] 1. The authority citation for 32 CFR part 311 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a. 2. Section 311.8 is amended by adding paragraph (c)(28) to read as follows: ■ § 311.8 * Procedures for exemptions. * * (c) * * * E:\FR\FM\21AUP1.SGM 21AUP1 * *

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 162 (Tuesday, August 21, 2018)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 42232-42234]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-17902]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2018-0740; Product Identifier 2016-SW-045-AD]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited 
Helicopters

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for 
Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (Bell) Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 
206L-1, 206L-3, 206L-4, and 407 helicopters. This proposed AD would 
require inspecting and cleaning the oil supply restrictor (restrictor) 
to the freewheel assembly. This proposed AD is prompted by reports of a 
blocked oil line restrictor in the freewheel lubrication system. The 
proposed actions are intended to address an unsafe condition on these 
products.

DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by October 22, 
2018.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Docket: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for sending your 
comments electronically.
     Fax: 202-493-2251.
     Mail: Send comments to the U.S. Department of 
Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, 
Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590-0001.
     Hand Delivery: Deliver to the ``Mail'' address between 9 
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket on the internet at http://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA-2018-
0740; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains 
this proposed AD, the Transport Canada AD, the economic evaluation, any 
comments received, and other information. The street address for Docket 
Operations (telephone 800-647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES section. 
Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt.
    For service information identified in this proposed rule, contact 
Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, 
Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4; telephone (450) 437-2862 or (800) 363-8023; fax 
(450) 433-0272; or at http://www.bellcustomer.com/files/. You may 
review the referenced service information at the FAA, Office of the 
Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N-321, 
Fort Worth, TX 76177.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Hatfield, Aviation Safety 
Engineer, Safety Management Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, 
10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222-5110; 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

    We invite you to participate in this rulemaking by submitting 
written comments, data, or views. We also invite comments relating to 
the economic, environmental, energy, or federalism impacts that might 
result from adopting the proposals in this document. The most helpful 
comments reference a specific portion of the proposal, explain the 
reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. To 
ensure the docket does not contain duplicate comments, commenters 
should send only one copy of written comments, or if comments are filed 
electronically, commenters should submit only one time.
    We will file in the docket all comments that we receive, as well as 
a report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel 
concerning this proposed rulemaking. Before acting on this proposal, we 
will consider all comments we receive on or before the closing date for 
comments. We will consider comments filed after the comment period has 
closed if it is possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. 
We may change this proposal in light of the comments we receive.

Discussion

    Transport Canada, which is the aviation authority for Canada, has 
issued Canadian AD No. CF-2016-13, dated May 16, 2016 (AD No. CF-2016-
13), to correct an unsafe condition for Bell Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 
206L-1, 206L-3, 206L-4, and 407 helicopters. Transport Canada advises 
that they have received two reports of torsional overload failure of 
the main rotor mast caused by a blocked oil line restrictor in the 
freewheel lubrication system. Transport Canada states the restrictor 
may become contaminated during maintenance, causing blockage. Transport 
Canada further states that a blocked restrictor could cause the 
freewheel assembly to malfunction and result in failure of the main 
rotor mast and loss of control of the helicopter.
    Additionally, the Canadian AD advises that although certain later 
versions of these helicopters are equipped with a filter in the 
freewheel lubrication system that is designed to trap contaminants and 
prevent blockage of the restrictor, installation of the filter does not 
guarantee the restrictor will remain free of contaminants. According to 
Transport Canada, one occurrence of restrictor blockage resulted from 
contaminants being introduced downstream from the filter, which 
subsequently caused failure of the freewheel assembly. For these 
reasons, AD No. CF-2016-13 requires inspecting and cleaning the 
restrictors and filters to reduce the risk of freewheel failure.

FAA's Determination

    These helicopters have been approved by the aviation authority of 
Canada and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to 
our bilateral agreement with Canada, Transport

[[Page 42233]]

Canada, its technical representative, has notified us of the unsafe 
condition described in its AD. We are proposing this AD because we 
evaluated all known relevant information and determined that an unsafe 
condition is likely to exist or develop on other products of the same 
type design.

Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51

    We reviewed Bell Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) 206-14-132 for Model 
206A/B and TH-67 helicopters; ASB 206L-14-174 for Model 206L, 206L-1, 
206L-3, and 206L-4 helicopters; and ASB 407-14-106 for Model 407 
helicopters. Each ASB is Revision A and dated February 9, 2016. This 
service information specifies removing, cleaning, inspecting, and 
reinstalling certain freewheel assembly components. ASB 206-14-132 and 
ASB 206L-14-174 also describe procedures for replacing the reducer with 
a filter if not already installed.
    This service information is reasonably available because the 
interested parties have access to it through their normal course of 
business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section.

Proposed AD Requirements

    For all affected models, this AD would require, within 100 hours 
time-in-service, inspecting and cleaning the freewheel oil supply 
system. If there is blockage in the restrictor, disassembling and 
inspecting the freewheel assembly for condition and wear would be 
required before further flight. Additionally, for Model 206A, 206B, 
206L, 206L-1, 206L-3, and 206L-4 helicopters, this proposed AD would 
require replacing the reducer with a filter, part number 50-075-1.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that this proposed AD would affect 2,227 helicopters of 
U.S. Registry. We estimate that operators may incur the following costs 
in order to comply with this proposed AD. At an average labor rate of 
$85 per hour, inspecting and cleaning the freewheel oil supply system 
would require about 1 work-hour, for a cost per helicopter of $85 and 
$189,295 for the U.S. fleet, per inspection cycle.
    If required, inspecting the freewheel assembly would require about 
1 work-hour, for a cost per helicopter of $85.
    If required, replacing a restrictor with a filter would require 
about 1 work-hour and required parts would cost $125, for a cost per 
helicopter of $210.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. ``Subtitle VII: Aviation 
Programs,'' describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's 
authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
``Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    We determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not 
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship 
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution 
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed, I certify this proposed regulation:
    1. Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive Order 
12866;
    2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies 
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979);
    3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent that 
it justifies making a regulatory distinction; and
    4. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared an economic evaluation of the estimated costs to comply 
with this proposed AD and placed it in the AD docket.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

The Proposed Amendment

    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13   [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive (AD):

Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (Bell): Docket No. FAA-2018-
0740; Product Identifier 2016-SW-045-AD.

(a) Applicability

    This AD applies to Bell Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L-1, 206L-3, 
206L-4, and 407 helicopters, certificated in any category.

(b) Unsafe Condition

    This AD defines the unsafe condition as a blocked oil line 
restrictor. This condition could cause failure of the freewheel 
assembly, which could result in failure of the main rotor mast and 
subsequent loss of control of the helicopter.

(c) Comments Due Date

    We must receive comments by October 22, 2018.

(d) Compliance

    You are responsible for performing each action required by this 
AD within the specified compliance time unless it has already been 
accomplished prior to that time.

(e) Required Actions

    Within 100 hours time-in-service:
    (1) For all helicopters:
    (i) Inspect the oil line restrictor for blockage. If there is 
any blockage in the restrictor, before further flight, inspect the 
freewheel assembly clutch, inner shaft, outer shaft, forward seal, 
cap, and bearings for wear, corrosion, nicks, scratches, and cracks; 
the splines for wear, cracks, chipped teeth, and broken teeth; the 
housing for flaking; and for free rotation and engagement of the 
clutch and bearing. If there is any damage that exceeds allowable 
limits or if the clutch or bearing does not engage or freely rotate, 
before further flight, repair or replace the freewheel assembly.
    (ii) Clean, inspect, and flush each removed fitting, restrictor, 
tube, hose, and filter with dry cleaning solvent. Do not approve for 
return to service until each restrictor is free from contamination.
    (2) For Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L-1, 206L-3, and 206L-4 
helicopters with a reducer, replace the reducer with a filter part 
number 50-075-1.

(f) Special Flight Permits

    Special flight permits are prohibited.

(g) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (1) The Manager, Safety Management Group, FAA, may approve AMOCs 
for this AD. Send your proposal to: David Hatfield, Aviation Safety 
Engineer, Safety Management Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, 
FAA,

[[Page 42234]]

10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222-
5110; email [email protected].
    (2) For operations conducted under a 14 CFR part 119 operating 
certificate or under 14 CFR part 91, subpart K, we suggest that you 
notify your principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, 
the manager of the local flight standards district office or 
certificate holding district office before operating any aircraft 
complying with this AD through an AMOC.

(h) Additional Information

    The subject of this AD is addressed in Transport Canada AD No. 
CF-2016-13, dated May 16, 2016. You may view the Transport Canada AD 
on the internet at http://www.regulations.gov in the AD Docket.

(i) Subject

    Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: 6300, Main Rotor 
Drive System.

    Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on August 10, 2018.
Lance T. Gant,
Director, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 2018-17902 Filed 8-20-18; 8:45 am]
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