Notice of Inventory Completion: Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 39118-39120 [2018-16924]

Download as PDF 39118 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 153 / Wednesday, August 8, 2018 / Notices objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Binghamton University at the address in this notice by September 7, 2018. ADDRESSES: Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902–6000, telephone (607) 777– 4786, email nversagg@binghamton.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Chenango County, NY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Binghamton University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES History and Description of the Remains Sometime before 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from an unknown site in Chenango County, NY, possibly the Bates Site. An unknown individual donated the human remains to the Greene Middle School in the Town of Greene, Chenango County, NY in 1975. According to the teacher VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:37 Aug 07, 2018 Jkt 244001 interviewed, the human remains came from an area that is near (or overlaps) the previously recorded Bates site, a Late Woodland settlement. The Greene Middle School gave the human remains to Binghamton University. No known individuals were identified. There are no associated funerary objects. A bioarchaeologist and archaeologist from Binghamton University determined that the human remains were Native American. Archeological information from the Bates site includes Canandaigua Phase (Sackett Corded) pottery and radiocarbon dates that cluster around A.D. 1190. Haudenosaunee oral tradition states that, as The People of the Long House, they are affiliated culturally, spiritually, biologically, and personally to the ancestors located within their traditional aboriginal territories. This connection is also based upon cultural practices, language, and the philosophy of respect for those ancestors that have passed. This evidence supports a relationship of shared group identity which can reasonably be traced between the Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; and Tuscarora Nation and the human remains removed from Chenango County, as this location is within the traditional aboriginal territory of the Oneida, Onondaga, and Tuscarora Nations. Determinations Made by the Binghamton University Officials of the Binghamton University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; and Tuscarora Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the request to Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902–6000, telephone (607) 777– 4786, email nversagg@binghamton.edu, by September 7, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; and Tuscarora Nation may proceed. The Binghamton University is responsible for notifying the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation that this notice has been published. Dated: July 9, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–16922 Filed 8–7–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0025953; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Binghamton University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\08AUN1.SGM 08AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 153 / Wednesday, August 8, 2018 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Binghamton University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Binghamton University at the address in this notice by September 7, 2018. ADDRESSES: Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902–6000, telephone (607) 777– 478, email nversagg@binghamton.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Thomas Lucky Site (SUBi-888), Town of Ashland, Chemung County, NY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Binghamton University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:37 Aug 07, 2018 Jkt 244001 York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation. History and Description of the Remains In 1994–1995, following consultation with a chief from the Onondaga Nation, human remains representing two individuals were removed from the Thomas Lucky site in Town of Elmira, Chemung County, NY, by the Binghamton University field school. One associated funerary object, a broken white bone bead, was found with the human remains. A bioarcheologist and archeologist from Binghamton University determined that the human remains were Native American. No known individuals were identified. Archeological information shows that two longhouses were present at the site, one with AMS dates extending from A.D. 1300 to 1450 and one with dates extending into the A.D. 1600s. Pottery at the site supports this continuous span of land use. This region was home to Delaware communities during the eighteenth century, and both the Delaware and Seneca engaged in Revolutionary War battles fought nearby as part of the Sullivan-Clinton campaign. Haudenosaunee oral tradition states that, as The People of the Long House, they are affiliated culturally, spiritually, biologically, and personally to the ancestors located within their traditional aboriginal territories. This connection is also based upon cultural practices, language, and the philosophy of respect for those ancestors that have passed. This evidence supports a relationship of shared group identity which can reasonably be traced between the Cayuga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; and Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York and the human remains removed from the Thomas Luckey site, as this location is within the traditional aboriginal territory of the Cayuga Nation; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); and Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York). Similarly, the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma and Delaware Tribe of Indians recognize that they have a territorial connection to, and cultural PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 39119 affiliation with, sites located in Chemung County in New York. Determinations Made by the Binghamton University Officials of the Binghamton University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); and Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902–6000, telephone (607) 777– 478, email nversagg@binghamton.edu, by September 7, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); and Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York) may proceed. The Binghamton University is responsible for notifying the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga E:\FR\FM\08AUN1.SGM 08AUN1 39120 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 153 / Wednesday, August 8, 2018 / Notices Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation that this notice has been published. Dated: July 9, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–16924 Filed 8–7–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0025950; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Binghamton University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Binghamton University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Binghamton University at sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:37 Aug 07, 2018 Jkt 244001 the address in this notice by September 7, 2018. ADDRESSES: Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902–6000, telephone (607) 777– 478, email nversagg@binghamton.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Comfort Site, Town of Chenango, Broome County, NY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Binghamton University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation. History and Description of the Remains In 1971, human remains representing a minimum of nine individuals were removed from the Comfort site in the Town of Chenango, Broome County, NY. The site was excavated by professional and avocational archeologists during construction of a rest area associated with I–81. No known individuals were identified. The 143 associated funerary objects include: 22 pieces of shell, one cord-marked PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 unidentified body sherd, one plain unidentified body sherd, seven pieces of shell, one chert knife, seven chert waste flakes, one retouched chert flake, one Sackett corded rim sherd, four bear teeth, 20 pieces of shell, one chert waste flake, one chert chunk, 21 shell beads, one crinoid fossil bead, three copper cones, one incised rim sherd, one piece of shell, one shell bead, one piece of wood, three chert waste flakes, one chert flake, one clay pipe bowl fragment, one bone awl, two hammerstones, one chert chunk, two chert waste flakes, one retouched/ utilized flake, three eroded pottery sherds, two pieces of unworked bird bone, 22 pieces of shell, one worked animal bone, and seven pieces of animal bone. A bioarcheologist and archeologist from Binghamton University determined that the human remains were Native American. No known individuals were identified. Archaological information includes a radiocarbon date obtained from charred plant material from one burial which produced a date of A.D. 1130, plus or minus 150 years. Additional archeological information from the pottery showed that the dates could range from A.D. 1070–1400 and recent radiometric dating of material from nonburial features indicates a date range of A.D. 1250 through A.D. 1400. Historically, the Comfort site was part of the eighteenth century string of villages known as Otsiningo, an Oneida and Onondaga community that later accepted Native American refugees. Haudenosaunee oral tradition states that, as The People of the Long House, they are affiliated culturally, spiritually, biologically, and personally to the ancestors located within their traditional aboriginal territories. This connection is also based upon cultural practices, language, and the philosophy of respect for those ancestors that have passed. This evidence supports a relationship of shared group identity which can reasonably be traced between the Oneida, Onondaga, and Tuscarora Nations and the human remains and associated funerary objects, removed from the Comfort site as this location is within the traditional aboriginal territory of the Oneida, Onondaga, and Tuscarora Nations. Similarly, the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma and the Delaware Tribe of Indians recognize that they have a territorial connection to, and cultural affiliation with, sites located in Broome County, New York. E:\FR\FM\08AUN1.SGM 08AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 153 (Wednesday, August 8, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 39118-39120]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-16924]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0025953; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Binghamton University, State 
University of New York, Binghamton, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Binghamton University has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives 
of any

[[Page 39119]]

Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
Binghamton University. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian 
organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Binghamton University at the address in 
this notice by September 7, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton 
University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000, telephone (607) 
777-478, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Binghamton 
University, Binghamton, NY. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Thomas Lucky Site (SUBi-888), Town of 
Ashland, Chemung County, NY.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
Binghamton University professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; 
Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation (previously listed as the 
Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); Oneida Indian Nation (previously 
listed as the Oneida Nation of New York); Onondaga Nation; Saint Regis 
Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians 
of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca 
Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the 
Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Stockbridge Munsee Community, 
Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda 
Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1994-1995, following consultation with a chief from the Onondaga 
Nation, human remains representing two individuals were removed from 
the Thomas Lucky site in Town of Elmira, Chemung County, NY, by the 
Binghamton University field school. One associated funerary object, a 
broken white bone bead, was found with the human remains.
    A bioarcheologist and archeologist from Binghamton University 
determined that the human remains were Native American. No known 
individuals were identified. Archeological information shows that two 
longhouses were present at the site, one with AMS dates extending from 
A.D. 1300 to 1450 and one with dates extending into the A.D. 1600s. 
Pottery at the site supports this continuous span of land use. This 
region was home to Delaware communities during the eighteenth century, 
and both the Delaware and Seneca engaged in Revolutionary War battles 
fought nearby as part of the Sullivan-Clinton campaign.
    Haudenosaunee oral tradition states that, as The People of the Long 
House, they are affiliated culturally, spiritually, biologically, and 
personally to the ancestors located within their traditional aboriginal 
territories. This connection is also based upon cultural practices, 
language, and the philosophy of respect for those ancestors that have 
passed. This evidence supports a relationship of shared group identity 
which can reasonably be traced between the Cayuga Nation of New York; 
Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; and 
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York and the human remains 
removed from the Thomas Luckey site, as this location is within the 
traditional aboriginal territory of the Cayuga Nation; Seneca Nation of 
Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-
Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of 
Oklahoma); and Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the 
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York). Similarly, the Delaware 
Nation, Oklahoma and Delaware Tribe of Indians recognize that they have 
a territorial connection to, and cultural affiliation with, sites 
located in Chemung County in New York.

Determinations Made by the Binghamton University

    Officials of the Binghamton University have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described 
in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and Cayuga 
Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Seneca 
Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); 
Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of 
Oklahoma); and Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the 
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology 
Facility, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-
6000, telephone (607) 777-478, email [email protected], by 
September 7, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware 
Tribe of Indians; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the 
Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as 
the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); and Tonawanda Band of Seneca 
(previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York) 
may proceed.
    The Binghamton University is responsible for notifying the Cayuga 
Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida 
Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin); 
Oneida Indian Nation (previously listed as the Oneida Nation of New 
York); Onondaga

[[Page 39120]]

Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis 
Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians 
(previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga 
Nation (previously listed as the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); 
Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca 
(previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New 
York); and Tuscarora Nation that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 9, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2018-16924 Filed 8-7-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P