Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York City, NY, 39126-39127 [2018-16920]

Download as PDF sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 39126 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 153 / Wednesday, August 8, 2018 / Notices Kumeyaay burial practices, all objects excavated from this sites are associated funerary objects. No known individuals were identified. The 44 associated funerary objects are: One decorated ceramic sherd, one undecorated ceramic sherd, one lot of undecorated ceramic sherds, one biface, seven stone choppers, one crescentic fragment, 13 stone scrapers, three lots of unworked flakes, two manos, one mortar, one heating stone, one arrow shaft straightener, one olivella shell bead, one shell pendant, five lots of unmodified shell, two soil samples, one battered stone, and one lot of unmodified faunal bone. At an unknown date prior to 1949, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were donated to the San Diego Museum of Man by H.E. Ellery. Other than their association to W–146, no additional information exists about the date of collection or collector. Based on traditional Kumeyaay burial practices, all objects excavated from this site are associated funerary objects to this individual. No known individuals were identified. The 24 associated funerary objects are: One mixed lot of faunal bone and shell, two lots unmodified faunal bone, one lot of undecorated ceramics sherds, one chipped stone biface, one core tool, three scrapers, four lots of unworked flakes, two manos, one abrader, one ecofact, five unmodified shells, one soil sample, and one hammerstone. At an unknown date prior to 1949, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were donated to the San Diego Museum of Man by John Kelley. Mr. Kelley collected this burial following a heavy flood and landslide on his property in 1916, also known as W–148. Based on traditional Kumeyaay burial practices, all objects removed from this site are associated funerary objects to this individual. No known individuals were identified. The eight associated funerary objects are: one battered stone, one stone scraper, one unworked flake, one rim sherd, one unmodified faunal bone, one oyster shell, one lot miscellaneous shell, and one soil sample. In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were recovered by Malcom J. Rogers from CA–SDI–8797, CA–SDI–10671, CA– SDI–6132, and CA–10673 (W–116, W– 118, W–119, and W–129), a cluster of sites south of Agua Hedionda Lagoon. During consultation, it was determined that these site comprise one cemetery and that, based on traditional Kumeyaay burial practices, all objects excavated from these sites are associated funerary objects. No known individuals were VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:37 Aug 07, 2018 Jkt 244001 identified. The 149 associated funerary objects are: Three lots of ceramic sherds, five lots of unmodified faunal bone, one heating stone, five stone cores, 25 chipped stone core tools, two chipped stone bifaces, eight scrappers, three unworked flakes, 11 lots of unworked flakes, 39 utilized flakes, nine manos, one metate, six groundstones, six lots of ecofacts, six lots of shell, one unmodified shell, one olivella bead, four soil samples, six battered stones, one chopper, four hammerstones, one fire-affected rock, and one stone bead. In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered by Malcom J. Rogers from CA–SDI–6134 (W–121), a site south of Agua Hedionda Lagoon. During consultation, it was determined that this site is a cemetery and that, based on traditional Kumeyaay burial practices, all objects excavated from this site are associated funerary objects. No known individuals were identified. The 64 associated funerary objects are: One bone awl, seven lots unmodified faunal bone, one undecorated ceramic body sherd, one chipped stone biface fragment, one chipped stone core, 25 chipped stone scrapers, 10 lots of chipped stone unworked flakes, one chipped stone utilized flake, one mano, one hematite ‘‘charm stone’’, one steatite doughnut stone fragment, one sandstone grinding slab fragment, one modified wood piece, one ecofact, six lots of unmodified shell, two soil samples, and three battered stones. In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered by Malcom J. Rogers from W– 124, a site south of Agua Hedionda Lagoon. During consultation, it was determined that this site is a cemetery and that, based on traditional Kumeyaay burial practices, all objects excavated from this site are associated funerary objects. No known individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are: One lot of undecorated ceramic body sherds, one chipped stone flaking and battering fragment, 11 chipped stone scrapers, three lots of chipped stone unworked flakes, one lot unmodified shell, and three battered stones. The excavations at the above sites by Rogers and the other individuals were often conducted at the behest of the San Diego Museum of Man. These sites are all located within well-known and documented territories occupied by the Kumeyaay Nation. Based on archeological evidence, geographic location, ethnographic information, and oral history evidence, these remains have been identified as Native American. PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Determinations Made by the San Diego Museum of Man Officials of the San Diego Museum of Man have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 13 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 1,071 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Ben Garcia, Deputy Director, San Diego Museum of Man, 1350 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101, telephone (619) 239–2001 ext. 17, email bgarcia@museumofman.org, by September 7, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The San Diego Museum of Man is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: June 29, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–16921 Filed 8–7–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0025914; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York City, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\08AUN1.SGM 08AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 153 / Wednesday, August 8, 2018 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the NYU College of Dentistry. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the NYU College of Dentistry at the address in this notice by September 7, 2018. ADDRESSES: Dr. Louis Terracio, NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998–9717, email louis.terracio@ nyu.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the NYU College of Dentistry, New York City, NY. The human remains were removed from Shinnecock Hills, Suffolk County, Long Island, NY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Suffolk County, NY. In 1926, the town of Southampton donated the human remains, which consist of the cranial fragments of one adult, to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. They were accessioned into the collection of the Department of Physical Anthropology of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation that same year. In 1956, the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, NYU College of Dentistry. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of the human remains cannot be determined from the available information. Forensic examination revealed diagnostic features of an individual with Native American ancestry. Without any information about the site or age of the remains, no identifiable earlier group can be determined. Shinnecock Hills, which lies near the northeastern end of Long Island, is not included in any treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders that establish aboriginal land. The area is, however, within territory that was long recognized by the tribe, the town of Southampton, and the state of New York as Shinnecock land. In 1703, the Shinnecock and town of Southampton reached an agreement in which the Shinnecock held a 1,000 year lease of approximately 3,500 acres, including Shinnecock Hills. The area was subsequently referred to as the Shinnecock Reservation in various state and local documents. The Shinnecock renegotiated their lease in 1859 and relinquished the lands at Shinnecock Hills in exchange for fee title to the land at Shinnecock Neck. The current Shinnecock Reservation, which no longer includes Shinnecock Hills, was placed into trust after the tribe was federally recognized in 2010. The Department of Interior proposed finding on the Shinnecock petition for federal recognition identifies Shinnecock Hills as part of the pre-1859 Shinnecock Reservation. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the NYU College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Shinnecock Indian Nation; and Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. Determinations Made by the NYU College of Dentistry Officials of the NYU College of Dentistry have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on diagnostic cranial features observed during forensic examination. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity History and Description of the Remains At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown site in Shinnecock Hills, VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:37 Aug 07, 2018 Jkt 244001 PO 00000 Frm 00087 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 39127 cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe. • Authoritative governmental documents, including the Shinnecock Indian Nation’s federal recognition decision, state agreements, and local property records indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of the Shinnecock Indian Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains may be to the Shinnecock Indian Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Louis Terracio, NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998–9717, email louis.terracio@ nyu.edu, by September 7, 2018. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Shinnecock Indian Nation may proceed. The NYU College of Dentistry is responsible for notifying the Shinnecock Indian Nation that this notice has been published. Dated: June 29, 2018. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2018–16920 Filed 8–7–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration [Docket No. DEA–392] Importer of Controlled Substances Application: Clinical Supplies Management Holdings, Inc. ACTION: Notice of application. Registered bulk manufacturers of the affected basic classes, and applicants therefore, may file written comments on or objections to the issuance of the proposed registration on or before September 7, 2018. Such persons may also file a written request for a hearing on the application on or before September 7, 2018. ADDRESSES: Written comments should be sent to: Drug Enforcement Administration, Attention: DEA Federal Register Representative/DRW, 8701 Morrissette Drive, Springfield, Virginia 22152. All requests for hearing must be DATES: E:\FR\FM\08AUN1.SGM 08AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 153 (Wednesday, August 8, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 39126-39127]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-16920]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0025914; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of 
Dentistry, New York City, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry has 
completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the

[[Page 39127]]

appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request to the NYU College of Dentistry. If no additional requestors 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian 
Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may 
proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to the NYU College 
of Dentistry at the address in this notice by September 7, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Louis Terracio, NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th 
Street, New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998-9717, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the NYU College of Dentistry, New York City, NY. The 
human remains were removed from Shinnecock Hills, Suffolk County, Long 
Island, NY.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service 
is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the NYU 
College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of 
Indians; Shinnecock Indian Nation; and Stockbridge Munsee Community, 
Wisconsin.

History and Description of the Remains

    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from an unknown site in Shinnecock Hills, 
Suffolk County, NY. In 1926, the town of Southampton donated the human 
remains, which consist of the cranial fragments of one adult, to the 
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. They were accessioned 
into the collection of the Department of Physical Anthropology of the 
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation that same year. In 1956, 
the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, NYU 
College of Dentistry. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. The age of the human remains 
cannot be determined from the available information. Forensic 
examination revealed diagnostic features of an individual with Native 
American ancestry. Without any information about the site or age of the 
remains, no identifiable earlier group can be determined.
    Shinnecock Hills, which lies near the northeastern end of Long 
Island, is not included in any treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive 
Orders that establish aboriginal land. The area is, however, within 
territory that was long recognized by the tribe, the town of 
Southampton, and the state of New York as Shinnecock land. In 1703, the 
Shinnecock and town of Southampton reached an agreement in which the 
Shinnecock held a 1,000 year lease of approximately 3,500 acres, 
including Shinnecock Hills. The area was subsequently referred to as 
the Shinnecock Reservation in various state and local documents. The 
Shinnecock renegotiated their lease in 1859 and relinquished the lands 
at Shinnecock Hills in exchange for fee title to the land at Shinnecock 
Neck. The current Shinnecock Reservation, which no longer includes 
Shinnecock Hills, was placed into trust after the tribe was federally 
recognized in 2010. The Department of Interior proposed finding on the 
Shinnecock petition for federal recognition identifies Shinnecock Hills 
as part of the pre-1859 Shinnecock Reservation.

Determinations Made by the NYU College of Dentistry

    Officials of the NYU College of Dentistry have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on diagnostic cranial features 
observed during forensic examination.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe.
     Authoritative governmental documents, including the 
Shinnecock Indian Nation's federal recognition decision, state 
agreements, and local property records indicate that the land from 
which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal 
land of the Shinnecock Indian Nation.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains may be to the Shinnecock Indian Nation.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains should submit a written request with information 
in support of the request to Dr. Louis Terracio, NYU College of 
Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 
998-9717, email [email protected], by September 7, 2018. After 
that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains to the Shinnecock Indian Nation may 
proceed.
    The NYU College of Dentistry is responsible for notifying the 
Shinnecock Indian Nation that this notice has been published.

    Dated: June 29, 2018.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2018-16920 Filed 8-7-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P