Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Material From Libya, 31654-31659 [2018-14637]

Download as PDF 31654 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 131 / Monday, July 9, 2018 / Rules and Regulations Regulatory Notices and Analyses The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current, is non-controversial and unlikely to result in adverse or negative comments. It, therefore: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that only affects air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified that this rule, when promulgated, does not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. AGL WI E2 Mineral Point, WI [Amended] Iowa County Airport, WI (Lat. 42°53′13″ N, long. 90°14′12″ W) Within a 4.1-mile radius of Iowa County Airport. Environmental Review The FAA has determined that this action qualifies for categorical exclusion under the National Environmental Policy Act in accordance with FAA Order 1050.1F, ‘‘Environmental Impacts: Policies and Procedures,’’ paragraph 5–6.5.a. This airspace action is not expected to cause any potentially significant environmental impacts, and no extraordinary circumstances exist that warrant preparation of an environmental assessment. RIN 1515–AE38 Lists of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71 Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air). Adoption of the Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 71 as follows: PART 71—DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS 1. The authority citation for part 71 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959–1963 Comp., p. 389. § 71.1 [Amended] 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of FAA Order 7400.11B, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, dated August 3, 2017, and effective September 15, 2017, is amended as follows: sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with RULES ■ Paragraph 6002 Class E Airspace Designated as Surface Areas. * * * VerDate Sep<11>2014 * * 16:03 Jul 06, 2018 Jkt 244001 Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on June 28, 2018. Walter Tweedy, Acting Manager, Operations Support Group, ATO Central Service Center. [FR Doc. 2018–14529 Filed 7–6–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Part 12 [CBP Dec. 18–07] Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Material From Libya U.S. Customs and Border Protection; Department of Homeland Security; Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This document amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to continue the import restrictions on archaeological and ethnological material from Libya previously imposed on an emergency basis in a final rule published on December 5, 2017. These restrictions are being imposed pursuant to an agreement between the United States and Libya that has been entered into under the authority of the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act. The document also contains the Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological Material of Libya that describes the articles to which the restrictions apply. Accordingly, this document amends the CBP regulations by removing Libya from the listing of countries for which emergency actions imposed the import restrictions, and adding Libya to the list of countries for which an agreement has been entered into for imposing import restrictions. SUMMARY: DATES: Effective Date: July 9, 2018. For regulatory aspects, Lisa L. Burley, Chief, Cargo Security, Carriers and Restricted Merchandise Branch, Regulations and Rulings, Office of Trade, (202) 325– 0030, ot-otrrculturalproperty@ cbp.dhs.gov. For operational aspects, FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 William R. Scopa, Branch Chief, Partner Government Agency Branch, Trade Policy and Programs, Office of Trade, (202) 863–6554, William.R.Scopa@ cbp.dhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Pursuant to the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act, Pub. L. 97–446, 19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq. (hereinafter, ‘‘the Cultural Property Implementation Act’’ or ‘‘the Act’’), which implements the 1970 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property (hereinafter, ‘‘1970 UNESCO Convention’’ or ‘‘the Convention’’ (823 U.N.T.S. 231 (1972))), the United States may enter into international agreements with another State Party to the 1970 UNESCO Convention to impose import restrictions on eligible archaeological and ethnological material under procedures and requirements prescribed by the Act. In certain limited circumstances, the Cultural Property Implementation Act authorizes the imposition of restrictions on an emergency basis (19 U.S.C. 2603). The emergency restrictions are effective for no more than five years from the date of the State Party’s request and may be extended for three years where it is determined that the emergency condition continues to apply with respect to the covered material (19 U.S.C. 2603(c)(3)). These restrictions may also be continued pursuant to an agreement concluded within the meaning of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2603(c)(4)). Libya has been one of the countries whose archaeological and ethnological material has been afforded emergency protection. On December 5, 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a final rule, CBP Dec. 17–19, in the Federal Register (82 FR 57346) which amended CBP regulations in 19 CFR 12.104g(b) to reflect that archaeological material and ethnological material from Libya received import protection under the emergency protection provisions of the Act. Import restrictions are now being imposed on the same categories of archaeological and ethnological material from Libya as a result of a bilateral agreement entered into between the United States and Libya. This agreement was entered into on February 23, 2018, pursuant to the provisions of 19 U.S.C. 2602. Protection of the archaeological and ethnological material from Libya E:\FR\FM\09JYR1.SGM 09JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 131 / Monday, July 9, 2018 / Rules and Regulations previously reflected in § 12.104g(b) will be continued through the bilateral agreement without interruption. Accordingly, § 12.104g(a) of the CBP regulations is being amended to indicate that restrictions have been imposed pursuant to the agreement between the United States and Libya, and the emergency import restrictions on certain categories of archaeological and ethnological material from Libya are being removed from § 12.104g(b) as those restrictions are now encompassed in § 12.104g(a). In reaching the decision to recommend that negotiations for an agreement with Libya should be undertaken to continue the imposition of import restrictions on certain archaeological and ethnological material of Libya, the Acting Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, State Department, after consultation with and recommendations by the Cultural Property Advisory Committee, determined that the cultural heritage of Libya is in jeopardy from pillage of certain categories of archaeological and ethnological material, and that import restrictions should be imposed for a five-year period until February 23, 2023. Importation of such material continues to be restricted through that date unless the conditions set forth in 19 U.S.C. 2606 and 19 CFR 12.104c are met. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with RULES Designated List The bilateral agreement between Libya and the United States covers the material set forth below in a Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological Material of Libya. Importation of material on this list is restricted unless the material is accompanied by documentation certifying that the material left Libya legally and not in violation of the export laws of Libya. The Designated List covers archaeological material of Libya and Ottoman ethnological material of Libya (as defined in section 302 of the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 2601)), including, but not limited to, the following types of material. The archaeological material represents the following periods and cultures: Paleolithic, Neolithic, Punic, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic and Ottoman dating approximately 12,000 B.C. to 1750 A.D. The ethnological material represents categories of Ottoman objects derived from sites of Islamic cultural importance, made by a nonindustrial society (Ottoman Libya), and important to the knowledge of the history of Islamic Ottoman society in Libya from 1551 A.D. through 1911 A.D. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:03 Jul 06, 2018 Jkt 244001 The Designated List set forth below is representative only. Any dimensions are approximate. I. Archaeological Material A. Stone 1. Sculpture a. Architectural Elements—In marble, limestone, sandstone, and gypsum, in addition to porphyry and granite. From temples, forts, palaces, mosques, synagogues, churches, shrines, tombs, monuments, public buildings, and domestic dwellings, including doors, door frames, window fittings, columns, capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, pilasters, engaged columns, altars, mihrabs (prayer niches), screens, fountains, mosaics, inlays, and blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings. May be plain, molded, or carved. Often decorated with motifs and inscriptions. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D. b. Architectural and Nonarchitectural Relief Sculpture—In marble, limestone, sandstone, and other stone. Types include carved slabs with figural, vegetative, floral, geometric, or other decorative motifs, carved relief vases, stelae, and plaques, sometimes inscribed in Greek, Punic, Latin, or Arabic. Used for architectural decoration, funerary, votive, or commemorative monuments. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D. c. Monuments—In marble, limestone, and other kinds of stone. Types include votive statues, funerary and votive stelae, and bases and base revetments. These may be painted, carved with relief sculpture, decorated with moldings, and/or carry dedicatory or funerary inscriptions in Greek, Punic, Latin, or Arabic. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D. d. Statuary—Primarily in marble, but also in limestone and sandstone. Largeand small-scale, including deities, human, animal, and hybrid figures, as well as groups of figures in the round. Common types are large-scale and freestanding statuary from approximately 3 to 8 ft. in height, life-sized portrait or funerary busts (head and shoulders of an individual), waist-length female busts that are either faceless (aniconic) and/or veiled (head or face), and statuettes typically 1 to 3 ft. in height. Includes fragments of statues. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D. e. Sepulchers—In marble, limestone, and other kinds of stone. Types of burial containers include sarcophagi, caskets, and chest urns. May be plain or have figural, geometric, or floral motifs PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 31655 painted on them, be carved in relief, and/or have decorative moldings. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D. 2. Vessels and Containers—In marble and other stone. Vessels may belong to conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, lamps, and flasks, and also include smaller funerary urns. Funerary urns can be egg-shaped vases with button-topped covers and may have sculpted portraits, painted geometric motifs, inscriptions, scrolllike handles and/or be ribbed. 3. Furniture—In marble and other stone. Types include thrones, tables, and beds. May be funerary, but do not have to be. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 4. Inscriptions—Primarily in marble and limestone. Inscribed stone material date from the late 7th century B.C. to 5th century A.D. May include funerary stelae, votive plaques, tombstones, mosaic floors, and building plaques in Greek, Punic, Latin, or Arabic. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D. 5. Tools and Weapons—In flint, chert, obsidian, and other hard stones. Prehistoric and Protohistoric microliths (small stone tools). Chipped stone types include blades, borers, scrapers, sickles, cores, and arrow heads. Ground stone types include grinders (e.g., mortars, pestles, millstones, whetstones), choppers, axes, hammers, and mace heads. Approximate date: 12,000 B.C. to 1,400 B.C. 6. Jewelry, Seals, and Beads—In marble, limestone, and various semiprecious stones, including rock crystal, amethyst, jasper, agate, steatite, and carnelian. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 12th century A.D. B. Metal 1. Sculpture a. Statuary—Primarily in bronze, iron, silver, or gold, including fragments of statues. Large- and small-scale, including deities, human, and animal figures, as well as groups of figures in the round. Common types are largescale, free-standing statuary from approximately 3 to 8 ft. in height and life-size busts (head and shoulders of an individual) and statuettes typically 1 to 3 ft. in height. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 324 A.D. b. Reliefs—Relief sculpture, including plaques, appliques, stelae, and masks. Often in bronze. May include Greek, Punic, Latin, and Arabic inscriptions. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 324 A.D. c. Inscribed or Decorated Sheet—In bronze or lead. Engraved inscriptions, ‘‘curse tablets,’’ and thin metal sheets E:\FR\FM\09JYR1.SGM 09JYR1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with RULES 31656 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 131 / Monday, July 9, 2018 / Rules and Regulations with engraved or impressed designs often used as attachments to furniture. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 2. Vessels and Containers—In bronze, silver, and gold. These may belong to conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, strainers, cauldrons, and oil lamps, or may occur in the shape of an animal or part of an animal. Also include scroll and manuscript containers for manuscripts. All can portray deities, humans or animals, as well as floral motifs in relief. Islamic Period objects may be inscribed in Arabic. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 3. Jewelry and Other Items for Personal Adornment—In iron, bronze, silver, and gold. Metal can be inlaid (with items such as red coral, colored stones, and glass). Types include necklaces, chokers, pectorals, rings, beads, pendants, belts, belt buckles, earrings, diadems, straight pins and fibulae, bracelets, anklets, girdles, belts, mirrors, wreaths and crowns, make-up accessories and tools, metal strigils (scrapers), crosses, and lamp-holders. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 4. Seals—In lead, tin, copper, bronze, silver, and gold. Types include rings, amulets, and seals with shank. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 5. Tools—In copper, bronze and iron. Types include hooks, weights, axes, scrapers, trowels, keys and the tools of crafts persons such as carpenters, masons and metal smiths. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 6. Weapons and Armor—Body armor, including helmets, cuirasses, shin guards, and shields, and horse armor often decorated with elaborate engraved, embossed, or perforated designs. Both launching weapons (spears and javelins) and weapons for hand to hand combat (swords, daggers, etc.). Approximate date: 8th century B.C. to 4th century A.D. 7. Coins a. General—Examples of many of the coins found in ancient Libya may be found in: A. Burnett and others, Roman Provincial Coinage, multiple volumes (British Museum Press and the ` Bibliotheque Nationale de France, 1992–), R. S. Poole and others, Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, volumes 1–29 (British Museum Trustees 1873–1927) and H. Mattingly and others, Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, volumes 1–6 (British Museum Trustees 1923–62). For Byzantine coins, see Grierson, Philip, Byzantine Coins, VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:03 Jul 06, 2018 Jkt 244001 London, 1982. For publication of examples of coins circulating in archaeological sites, see La moneta di Cirene e della Cirenaica nel Mediterraneo. Problemi e Prospettive, Atti del V Congresso Internazionale di Numismatica e di Storia Monetaria, Padova, 17–19 marzo 2016, Padova 2016 (Numismatica Patavina, 13). b. Greek Bronze Coins—Struck by city-states of the Pentapolis, Carthage and the Ptolemaic kingdom that operated in territory of the Cyrenaica in eastern Libya. Approximate date: 4th century B.C. to late 1st century B.C. c. Greek Silver and Gold Coins—This category includes coins of the city-states of the Pentapolis in the Cyrenaica and the Ptolemaic Kingdom. Coins from the city-state of Cyrene often bear an image of the silphium plant. Such coins date from the late 6th century B.C. to late 1st century B.C. d. Roman Coins—In silver and bronze, struck at Roman and Roman provincial mints including Apollonia, Barca, Balagrae, Berenice, Cyrene, Ptolemais, Leptis Magna, Oea, and Sabratha. Approximate date: late 3rd century B.C. to 1st century A.D. e. Byzantine Coins—In bronze, silver, and gold by Byzantine emperors. Struck in Constantinople and other mints. From 4th century A.D. through 1396 A.D. f. Islamic Coins—In bronze, silver, and gold. Dinars with Arabic inscriptions inside a circle or square, may be surrounded with symbols. Struck at mints in Libya (Barqa) and adjacent regions. From 642 A.D. to 15th century A.D. g. Ottoman—Struck at mints in Istanbul and Libya’s neighboring regions. Approximate date: 1551 A.D. through 1750 A.D. C. Ceramic and Clay 1. Sculpture a. Architectural Elements—Baked clay (terracotta) elements used to decorate buildings. Elements include acroteria, antefixes, painted and relief plaques, revetments. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 30 B.C. b. Architectural Decorations— Including carved and molded brick, and tile wall ornaments and panels. c. Statuary—Large- and small-scale. Subject matter is varied and includes deities, human and animal figures, human body parts, and groups of figures in the round. May be brightly colored. These range from approximately 4 to 40 in. in height. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 3rd century A.D. d. Terracotta Figurines—Terracotta statues and statuettes, including deities, human, and animal figures, as well as PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 groups of figures in the round. Late 7th century B.C. to 3rd century A.D. 2. Vessels a. Neolithic Pottery—Handmade, often decorated with a lustrous burnish, decorated with applique´ and/or incision, sometimes with added paint. These come in a variety of shapes from simple bowls and vases to large storage jars. Approximate date: 10th millennium B.C. to 3rd millennium B.C. b. Greek Pottery—Includes both local and imported fine and coarse wares and amphorae. Also imported Attic Black Figure, Red Figure and White Ground Pottery—these are made in a specific set of shapes (e.g., amphorae, kraters, hydriae, oinochoi, kylikes) decorated with black painted figures on a clear clay ground (Black Figure), decorative elements in reserve with background fired black (Red Figure), and multicolored figures painted on a white ground (White Ground). Corinthian Pottery—Imported painted pottery made in Corinth in a specific range of shapes for perfume and unguents and for drinking or pouring liquids. The very characteristic painted and incised designs depict human and animal figural scenes, rows of animals, and floral decoration. Approximate date: 8th century B.C. to 6th century B.C. c. Punic and Roman Pottery— Includes fine and coarse wares, including terra sigillata and other red gloss wares, and cooking wares and mortaria, storage and shipping amphorae. d. Byzantine Pottery—Includes undecorated plain wares, lamps, utilitarian, tableware, serving and storage jars, amphorae, special shapes such as pilgrim flasks. Can be matte painted or glazed, including incised ‘‘sgraffitto’’ and stamped with elaborate polychrome decorations using floral, geometric, human, and animal motifs. Approximate date: 324 A.D. to 15th century A.D. e. Islamic and Ottoman Pottery— Includes plain or utilitarian wares as well as painted wares. f. Oil Lamps and Molds—Rounded bodies with a hole on the top and in the nozzle, handles or lugs and figural motifs (beading, rosette, silphium). Include glazed ceramic mosque lamps, which may have a straight or round bulbous body with flared top, and several branches. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 3. Objects of Daily Use—Including game pieces, loom weights, toys, and lamps. E:\FR\FM\09JYR1.SGM 09JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 131 / Monday, July 9, 2018 / Rules and Regulations D. Glass, Faience, and Semi-Precious Stone 1. Architectural Elements—Mosaics and glass windows. 2. Vessels—Shapes include small jars, bowls, animal shaped, goblet, spherical, candle holders, perfume jars (unguentaria), and mosque lamps. Those from prehistory and ancient history may be engraved and/or colorless or blue, green or orange, while those from the Islamic Period may include animal, floral, and/or geometric motifs. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 3. Beads—Globular and relief beads. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 4. Mosque Lamps—May have a straight or round bulbous body with flared top, and several branches. Approximate date: 642 A.D. to 1750 A.D. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with RULES E. Mosaic 1. Floor Mosaics—Including landscapes, scenes of deities, humans, or animals, and activities such as hunting and fishing. There may also be vegetative, floral, or geometric motifs and imitations of stone. Often have religious imagery. They are made from stone cut into small bits (tesserae) and laid into a plaster matrix. Approximate date: 5th century B.C. to 4th century A.D. 2. Wall and Ceiling Mosaics— Generally portray similar motifs as seen in floor mosaics. Similar technique to floor mosaics, but may include tesserae of both stone and glass. Approximate date: 5th century B.C. to 4th century A.D. F. Painting 1. Rock Art—Painted and incised drawings on natural rock surfaces. There may be human, animal, geometric and/or floral motifs. Include fragments. Approximate date: 12,000 B.C. to 100 A.D. 2. Wall Painting—With figurative (deities, humans, animals), floral, and/ or geometric motifs, as well as funerary scenes. These are painted on stone, mud plaster, lime plaster (wet—buon fresco—and dry—secco fresco), sometimes to imitate marble. May be on domestic or public walls as well as in tombs. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1551 A.D. G. Plaster—Stucco reliefs, plaques, stelae, and inlays or other architectural decoration in stucco. H. Textiles, Basketry, and Rope 1. Textiles—Linen cloth was used in Greco-Roman times for mummy wrapping, shrouds, garments, and sails. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:03 Jul 06, 2018 Jkt 244001 Islamic textiles in linen and wool, including garments and hangings. 2. Basketry—Plant fibers were used to make baskets and containers in a variety of shapes and sizes, as well as sandals and mats. 3. Rope—Rope and string were used for a great variety of purposes, including binding, lifting water for irrigation, fishing nets, measuring, and stringing beads for jewelry and garments. I. Bone, Ivory, Shell, and Other Organics 1. Small Statuary and Figurines— Subject matter includes human, animal, and hybrid figures, and parts thereof as well as groups of figures in the round. These range from approximately 4 to 40 in. in height. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 2. Reliefs, Plaques, Stelae, and Inlays—Carved and sculpted. May have figurative, floral and/or geometric motifs. 3. Personal Ornaments and Objects of Daily Use—In bone, ivory, and spondylus shell. Types include amulets, combs, pins, spoons, small containers, bracelets, buckles, and beads. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D. 4. Seals and Stamps—Small devices with at least one side engraved with a design for stamping or sealing; they can be discoid, cuboid, conoid, or in the shape of animals or fantastic creatures (e.g., a scarab). Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 2nd millennium B.C. 5. Luxury Objects—Ivory, bone, and shell were used either alone or as inlays in luxury objects including furniture, chests and boxes, writing and painting equipment, musical instruments, games, cosmetic containers, combs, jewelry, amulets, seals, and vessels made of ostrich egg shell. J. Wood—Items such as tablets (tabulae), sometimes pierced with holes on the borders and with text written in ink on one or both faces, typically small in size (4 to 12 in. in length), recording sales of property (such as slaves, animals, grain) and other legal documents such as testaments. Approximate date: late 2nd to 4th centuries A.D. II. Ottoman Ethnological Material A. Stone 1. Architectural Elements—The most common stones are marble, limestone, and sandstone. From sites such as forts, palaces, mosques, shrines, tombs, and monuments, including doors, door frames, window fittings, columns, capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, pilasters, engaged columns, altars, mihrabs (prayer niches), screens, PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 31657 fountains, mosaics, inlays, and blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings. Often decorated in relief with religious motifs. 2. Architectural and Nonarchitectural Relief Sculpture—In marble, limestone, and sandstone. Types include carved slabs with religious, figural, floral, or geometric motifs, as well as plaques and stelae, sometimes inscribed. 3. Statuary—Primarily in marble, but also in limestone and sandstone. Largeand small-scale, such as human (including historical portraits or busts) and animal figures. 4. Sepulchers—In marble, limestone, and other kinds of stone. Types of burial containers include sarcophagi, caskets, coffins, and chest urns. May be plain or have figural, geometric, or floral motifs painted on them, be carved in relief, and/or have decorative moldings. 5. Inscriptions, Memorial Stones, and Tombstones—Primarily in marble, most frequently engraved with Arabic script. 6. Vessels and Containers—Include stone lamps and containers such as those used in religious services, as well as smaller funerary urns. B. Metal 1. Architectural Elements—Primarily copper, brass, lead, and alloys. From sites such as forts, palaces, mosques, shrines, tombs, and monuments, including doors, door fixtures, other lathes, chandeliers, screens, and sheets to protect domes. 2. Architectural and Nonarchitectural Relief Sculpture— Primarily bronze and brass. Includes appliques, plaques, and stelae. Often with religious, figural, floral, or geometric motifs. May have inscriptions in Arabic. 3. Vessels and Containers—In brass, copper, silver, or gold, plain, engraved, or hammered. Types include jugs, pitchers, plates, cups, lamps, and containers used for religious services (like Qur’an boxes). Often engraved or otherwise decorated. 4. Jewelry and Personal Adornments—In a wide variety of metals such as iron, brass, copper, silver, and gold. Includes rings and ring seals, head ornaments, earrings, pendants, amulets, bracelets, talismans, and belt buckles. May be adorned with inlaid beads, gemstones, and leather. 5. Weapons and Armor—Often in iron or steel. Includes daggers, swords, saifs, scimitars, other blades, with or without sheaths, as well as spears, firearms, and cannons. Ottoman types may be inlaid with gemstones, embellished with silver or gold, or engraved with floral or geometric motifs and inscriptions. Grips or hilts may be made of metal, wood, or E:\FR\FM\09JYR1.SGM 09JYR1 31658 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 131 / Monday, July 9, 2018 / Rules and Regulations even semi-precious stones such as agate, and bound with leather. Armor consisting of small metal scales, originally sewn to a backing of cloth or leather, and augmented by helmets, body armor, shields, and horse armor. 6. Ceremonial Paraphernalia— Including boxes (such as Qur’an boxes), plaques, pendants, candelabra, stamp and seal rings. 7. Musical Instruments—In a wide variety of metals. Includes cymbals and trumpets. C. Ceramic and Clay 1. Architectural Decorations— Including carved and molded brick, and engraved and/or painted tile wall ornaments and panels, sometimes with Arabic script. May be from forts, palaces, mosques, shrines, tombs, or monuments. 2. Vessels and Containers—Includes glazed, molded, and painted ceramics. Types include boxes, plates, lamps, jars, and flasks. May be plain or decorated with floral or geometric patterns, or Arabic script, primarily using blue, green, brown, black, or yellow colors. D. Wood 1. Architectural Elements—From sites such as forts, palaces, mosques, shrines, tombs, monuments, and madrassas, including doors, door fixtures, panels, beams, balconies, stages, screens, ceilings, and tent posts. Types include doors, door frames, windows, window frames, walls, panels, beams, ceilings, and balconies. May be decorated with religious, geometric or floral motifs or Arabic script. 2. Architectural and Nonarchitectural Relief Sculpture—Carved and inlaid wood panels, rooms, beams, balconies, stages, panels, ceilings, and doors, frequently decorated with religious, floral, or geometric motifs. May have script in Arabic or other languages. 3. Qur’an Boxes—May be carved and inlaid, with decorations in religious, floral, or geometric motifs, or Arabic script. 4. Study Tablets—Arabic inscribed training boards for teaching the Qur’an. E. Bone and Ivory 1. Ceremonial Paraphernalia—Types include boxes, reliquaries (and their contents), plaques, pendants, candelabra, stamp and seal rings. 2. Inlays—For religious decorative and architectural elements. F. Glass—Vessels and containers in glass from mosques, shrines, tombs, and monuments, including glass and enamel mosque lamps and ritual vessels. G. Textiles—In linen, silk, and wool. Religious textiles and fragments from mosques, shrines, tombs, and monuments, including garments, hangings, prayer rugs, and shrine covers. subject to the provisions of Executive Order 12866 or Executive Order 13771 because it pertains to a foreign affairs function of the United States, as described above, and therefore is specifically exempted by section 3(d)(2) of Executive Order 12866 and section 4(a) of Executive Order 13771. H. Leather and Parchment 1. Books and Manuscripts—Either as sheets or bound volumes. Text is often written on vellum or other parchment (cattle, sheep, goat, or camel) and then gathered in leather bindings. Paper may also be used. Types include the Qur’an and other Islamic books and manuscripts, often written in brown ink, and then further embellished with colorful floral or geometric motifs. 2. Musical Instruments—Leather drums of various sizes (e.g., bendir drums used in Sufi rituals, wedding processions and Mal’uf performances). I. Painting and Drawing—Ottoman Period paintings may depict courtly themes (e.g., rulers, musicians, riders on horses) and city views, among other topics. Cultural property, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, Prohibited merchandise. Inapplicability of Notice and Delayed Effective Date This amendment involves a foreign affairs function of the United States and is, therefore, being made without notice or public procedure under 5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1). For the same reason, a delayed effective date is not required under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3). Regulatory Flexibility Act Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do not apply. Executive Orders 12866 and 13771 CBP has determined that this document is not a regulation or rule Signing Authority This regulation is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.1(a)(1), pertaining to the Secretary of the Treasury’s authority (or that of his/her delegate) to approve regulations related to customs revenue functions. List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 12 Amendment to CBP Regulations For the reasons set forth above, part 12 of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 12) is amended as set forth below: PART 12—SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE 1. The general authority citation for part 12 and the specific authority citation for § 12.104g continue to read as follows: ■ Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624; * * * * * * * § 12.104g Specific items or categories designated by agreements or emergency actions. * * * (a) * * * * Libya ................................. * * * * Archaeological and ethnological material from Libya .............................................. VerDate Sep<11>2014 * 16:03 Jul 06, 2018 * Jkt 244001 PO 00000 * Frm 00016 Fmt 4700 * * Decision No. * Sfmt 4700 * 2. In § 12.104g: a. The table in paragraph (a) is amended by adding the entry for Libya in appropriate alphabetical order; and ■ b. The table in paragraph (b) is amended by removing the entry for ‘‘Libya’’ in its entirety, but retaining the table headings. The addition reads as follows: Cultural property * * ■ ■ State party sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with RULES * Sections 12.104 through 12.104i also issued under 19 U.S.C. 2612; E:\FR\FM\09JYR1.SGM * CBP Dec. 18–07. * 09JYR1 * * Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 131 / Monday, July 9, 2018 / Rules and Regulations Kevin K. McAleenan, Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Approved: July 3, 2018. Timothy E. Skud, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. [FR Doc. 2018–14637 Filed 7–6–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG–2018–0639] Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Black Narrows and Lewis Creek Channel, Chincoteague Island, VA Coast Guard, DHS. Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation. AGENCY: ACTION: The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the SR 175 Bridge, which carries SR 175 across the Black Narrows and Lewis Creek Channel, mile 0.0, at Chincoteague Island, VA. The deviation is necessary to facilitate the 2018 Annual Pony Run and Auction. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed-tonavigation position. DATES: The deviation is effective from 6 a.m. on July 25, 2018, through 6 p.m. on July 26, 2018. ADDRESSES: The docket for this deviation, USCG–2018–0639 is available at http://www.regulations.gov. Type the docket number in the ‘‘SEARCH’’ box and click ‘‘SEARCH’’. Click on Open Docket Folder on the line associated with this deviation. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this temporary deviation, call or email Mr. Michael Thorogood, Bridge Administration Branch Fifth District, Coast Guard, telephone 757–398–6557, email Michael.R.Thorogood@uscg.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Virginia Department of Transportation, owner and operator of the SR 175 Bridge that carries SR 175 across the Black Narrows and Lewis Creek Channel, mile 0.0, at Chincoteague Island, VA, has requested a temporary deviation from the current operating regulations to ensure the safety of the participants and spectators associated with the 2018 Annual Pony Run and Auction on July 25, 2018, and July 26, 2018. This bridge is a single-span bascule drawbridge, with a vertical clearance of 15 feet above sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:03 Jul 06, 2018 Jkt 244001 mean high water in the closed position and unlimited vertical clearance in the open position. The current operating regulation is set out in 33 CFR 117.5. Under this temporary deviation, the bridge will be maintained in the closed-to-navigation position from 6 a.m. through 6 p.m. on July 25, 2018, and July 26, 2018. The Black Narrows and Lewis Creek Channel is used by a variety of vessels including recreational vessels. The Coast Guard has carefully coordinated the restrictions with waterway users in publishing this temporary deviation. Vessels able to pass through the bridge in the closed-to-navigation position may do so at anytime. The bridge will not be able to open for emergencies and there is no immediate alternative route for vessels unable to pass through the bridge in the closed position. The Coast Guard will also inform the users of the waterway through our Local and Broadcast Notices to Mariners of the change in operating schedule for the bridge so that vessel operators can arrange their transits to minimize any impact caused by the temporary deviation. In accordance with 33 CFR 117.35(e), the drawbridge must return to its regular operating schedule immediately at the end of the effective period of this temporary deviation. This deviation from the operating regulations is authorized under 33 CFR 117.35. Dated: July 2, 2018. Hal R. Pitts, Bridge Program Manager, Fifth Coast Guard District. [FR Doc. 2018–14616 Filed 7–6–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 51, 63, and 68 [WC Docket No. 17–84; FCC 18–74] Accelerating Wireline Broadband Deployment by Removing Barriers to Infrastructure Investment Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; announcement of effective date. AGENCY: In this document, a Second Report and Order takes a number of actions to accelerate the deployment of next-generation networks and services through removing barriers to infrastructure investment. The Second Report and Order takes further action to revise the discontinuance process, SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 31659 network change notification processes, and the customer notice process. It also forbears from applying discontinuance requirements for services with no customers and no reasonable requests for service during the preceding 30 days. DATES: This rule is effective August 8, 2018, except for the amendments to 47 CFR 51.333(g)(1)(i), (g)(1)(iii), and (g)(2), 63.71(f), (h), (k) introductory text, (k)(1) and (3), and (l), which contain information collection requirements that have not been approved by OMB. The Federal Communications Commission will publish a document in the Federal Register announcing the effective date. The amendments to 47 CFR 63.19(a) introductory text published at 81 FR 62656, Sept. 12, 2016, are effective August 8, 2018. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Wireline Competition Bureau, Competition Policy Division, Michele Berlove, at (202) 418–1477, michele.berlove@fcc.gov. For additional information concerning the Paperwork Reduction Act information collection requirements contained in this document, send an email to PRA@ fcc.gov or contact Nicole Ongele at (202) 418–2991. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a summary of the Commission’s Second Report and Order in WC Docket No. 17– 84, FCC 18–74, adopted June 7, 2018 and released June 8, 2018. The full text of this document is available for public inspection during regular business hours in the FCC Reference Information Center, Portals II, 445 12th Street SW, Room CY–A257, Washington, DC 20554. It is available on the Commission’s website at https://docs.fcc.gov/public/ attachments/FCC-18-74A1.pdf. Synopsis I. Introduction 1. Removing regulatory barriers causing unnecessary costs or delay when carriers seek to transition from legacy networks and services to broadband networks and services is an important piece of our work to encourage deployment of nextgeneration networks and to close the digital divide. In this Report and Order, we continue to act on our commitment by further reforming regulatory processes that unnecessarily stand in the way of this important transition that benefits the American public. 2. The actions we take today focus on further streamlining our processes by which carriers discontinue outdated services, eliminating unnecessary and burdensome or redundant requirements, and helping ensure that our network E:\FR\FM\09JYR1.SGM 09JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 131 (Monday, July 9, 2018)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 31654-31659]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-14637]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

19 CFR Part 12

[CBP Dec. 18-07]
RIN 1515-AE38


Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological 
Material From Libya

AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection; Department of Homeland 
Security; Department of the Treasury.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This document amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
(CBP) regulations to continue the import restrictions on archaeological 
and ethnological material from Libya previously imposed on an emergency 
basis in a final rule published on December 5, 2017. These restrictions 
are being imposed pursuant to an agreement between the United States 
and Libya that has been entered into under the authority of the 
Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act. The document also 
contains the Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological 
Material of Libya that describes the articles to which the restrictions 
apply. Accordingly, this document amends the CBP regulations by 
removing Libya from the listing of countries for which emergency 
actions imposed the import restrictions, and adding Libya to the list 
of countries for which an agreement has been entered into for imposing 
import restrictions.

DATES: Effective Date: July 9, 2018.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For regulatory aspects, Lisa L. 
Burley, Chief, Cargo Security, Carriers and Restricted Merchandise 
Branch, Regulations and Rulings, Office of Trade, (202) 325-0030, [email protected]. For operational aspects, William R. 
Scopa, Branch Chief, Partner Government Agency Branch, Trade Policy and 
Programs, Office of Trade, (202) 863-6554, [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    Pursuant to the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act, 
Pub. L. 97-446, 19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq. (hereinafter, ``the Cultural 
Property Implementation Act'' or ``the Act''), which implements the 
1970 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization 
(UNESCO) Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the 
Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property 
(hereinafter, ``1970 UNESCO Convention'' or ``the Convention'' (823 
U.N.T.S. 231 (1972))), the United States may enter into international 
agreements with another State Party to the 1970 UNESCO Convention to 
impose import restrictions on eligible archaeological and ethnological 
material under procedures and requirements prescribed by the Act. In 
certain limited circumstances, the Cultural Property Implementation Act 
authorizes the imposition of restrictions on an emergency basis (19 
U.S.C. 2603). The emergency restrictions are effective for no more than 
five years from the date of the State Party's request and may be 
extended for three years where it is determined that the emergency 
condition continues to apply with respect to the covered material (19 
U.S.C. 2603(c)(3)). These restrictions may also be continued pursuant 
to an agreement concluded within the meaning of the Act (19 U.S.C. 
2603(c)(4)).
    Libya has been one of the countries whose archaeological and 
ethnological material has been afforded emergency protection. On 
December 5, 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a 
final rule, CBP Dec. 17-19, in the Federal Register (82 FR 57346) which 
amended CBP regulations in 19 CFR 12.104g(b) to reflect that 
archaeological material and ethnological material from Libya received 
import protection under the emergency protection provisions of the Act.
    Import restrictions are now being imposed on the same categories of 
archaeological and ethnological material from Libya as a result of a 
bilateral agreement entered into between the United States and Libya. 
This agreement was entered into on February 23, 2018, pursuant to the 
provisions of 19 U.S.C. 2602. Protection of the archaeological and 
ethnological material from Libya

[[Page 31655]]

previously reflected in Sec.  12.104g(b) will be continued through the 
bilateral agreement without interruption. Accordingly, Sec.  12.104g(a) 
of the CBP regulations is being amended to indicate that restrictions 
have been imposed pursuant to the agreement between the United States 
and Libya, and the emergency import restrictions on certain categories 
of archaeological and ethnological material from Libya are being 
removed from Sec.  12.104g(b) as those restrictions are now encompassed 
in Sec.  12.104g(a).
    In reaching the decision to recommend that negotiations for an 
agreement with Libya should be undertaken to continue the imposition of 
import restrictions on certain archaeological and ethnological material 
of Libya, the Acting Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public 
Affairs, State Department, after consultation with and recommendations 
by the Cultural Property Advisory Committee, determined that the 
cultural heritage of Libya is in jeopardy from pillage of certain 
categories of archaeological and ethnological material, and that import 
restrictions should be imposed for a five-year period until February 
23, 2023. Importation of such material continues to be restricted 
through that date unless the conditions set forth in 19 U.S.C. 2606 and 
19 CFR 12.104c are met.

Designated List

    The bilateral agreement between Libya and the United States covers 
the material set forth below in a Designated List of Archaeological and 
Ethnological Material of Libya. Importation of material on this list is 
restricted unless the material is accompanied by documentation 
certifying that the material left Libya legally and not in violation of 
the export laws of Libya.
    The Designated List covers archaeological material of Libya and 
Ottoman ethnological material of Libya (as defined in section 302 of 
the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 
2601)), including, but not limited to, the following types of material. 
The archaeological material represents the following periods and 
cultures: Paleolithic, Neolithic, Punic, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, 
Islamic and Ottoman dating approximately 12,000 B.C. to 1750 A.D. The 
ethnological material represents categories of Ottoman objects derived 
from sites of Islamic cultural importance, made by a nonindustrial 
society (Ottoman Libya), and important to the knowledge of the history 
of Islamic Ottoman society in Libya from 1551 A.D. through 1911 A.D.
    The Designated List set forth below is representative only. Any 
dimensions are approximate.

I. Archaeological Material

A. Stone

    1. Sculpture
    a. Architectural Elements--In marble, limestone, sandstone, and 
gypsum, in addition to porphyry and granite. From temples, forts, 
palaces, mosques, synagogues, churches, shrines, tombs, monuments, 
public buildings, and domestic dwellings, including doors, door frames, 
window fittings, columns, capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, 
pilasters, engaged columns, altars, mihrabs (prayer niches), screens, 
fountains, mosaics, inlays, and blocks from walls, floors, and 
ceilings. May be plain, molded, or carved. Often decorated with motifs 
and inscriptions. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D.
    b. Architectural and Non-architectural Relief Sculpture--In marble, 
limestone, sandstone, and other stone. Types include carved slabs with 
figural, vegetative, floral, geometric, or other decorative motifs, 
carved relief vases, stelae, and plaques, sometimes inscribed in Greek, 
Punic, Latin, or Arabic. Used for architectural decoration, funerary, 
votive, or commemorative monuments. Approximate date: 1st millennium 
B.C. to 1750 A.D.
    c. Monuments--In marble, limestone, and other kinds of stone. Types 
include votive statues, funerary and votive stelae, and bases and base 
revetments. These may be painted, carved with relief sculpture, 
decorated with moldings, and/or carry dedicatory or funerary 
inscriptions in Greek, Punic, Latin, or Arabic. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D.
    d. Statuary--Primarily in marble, but also in limestone and 
sandstone. Large- and small-scale, including deities, human, animal, 
and hybrid figures, as well as groups of figures in the round. Common 
types are large-scale and free-standing statuary from approximately 3 
to 8 ft. in height, life-sized portrait or funerary busts (head and 
shoulders of an individual), waist-length female busts that are either 
faceless (aniconic) and/or veiled (head or face), and statuettes 
typically 1 to 3 ft. in height. Includes fragments of statues. 
Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D.
    e. Sepulchers--In marble, limestone, and other kinds of stone. 
Types of burial containers include sarcophagi, caskets, and chest urns. 
May be plain or have figural, geometric, or floral motifs painted on 
them, be carved in relief, and/or have decorative moldings. Approximate 
date: 1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D.
    2. Vessels and Containers--In marble and other stone. Vessels may 
belong to conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, lamps, 
and flasks, and also include smaller funerary urns. Funerary urns can 
be egg-shaped vases with button-topped covers and may have sculpted 
portraits, painted geometric motifs, inscriptions, scroll-like handles 
and/or be ribbed.
    3. Furniture--In marble and other stone. Types include thrones, 
tables, and beds. May be funerary, but do not have to be. Approximate 
date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    4. Inscriptions--Primarily in marble and limestone. Inscribed stone 
material date from the late 7th century B.C. to 5th century A.D. May 
include funerary stelae, votive plaques, tombstones, mosaic floors, and 
building plaques in Greek, Punic, Latin, or Arabic. Approximate date: 
1st millennium B.C. to 1750 A.D.
    5. Tools and Weapons--In flint, chert, obsidian, and other hard 
stones. Prehistoric and Protohistoric microliths (small stone tools). 
Chipped stone types include blades, borers, scrapers, sickles, cores, 
and arrow heads. Ground stone types include grinders (e.g., mortars, 
pestles, millstones, whetstones), choppers, axes, hammers, and mace 
heads. Approximate date: 12,000 B.C. to 1,400 B.C.
    6. Jewelry, Seals, and Beads--In marble, limestone, and various 
semi-precious stones, including rock crystal, amethyst, jasper, agate, 
steatite, and carnelian. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 12th 
century A.D.

B. Metal

    1. Sculpture
    a. Statuary--Primarily in bronze, iron, silver, or gold, including 
fragments of statues. Large- and small-scale, including deities, human, 
and animal figures, as well as groups of figures in the round. Common 
types are large-scale, free-standing statuary from approximately 3 to 8 
ft. in height and life-size busts (head and shoulders of an individual) 
and statuettes typically 1 to 3 ft. in height. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 324 A.D.
    b. Reliefs--Relief sculpture, including plaques, appliques, stelae, 
and masks. Often in bronze. May include Greek, Punic, Latin, and Arabic 
inscriptions. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 324 A.D.
    c. Inscribed or Decorated Sheet--In bronze or lead. Engraved 
inscriptions, ``curse tablets,'' and thin metal sheets

[[Page 31656]]

with engraved or impressed designs often used as attachments to 
furniture. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    2. Vessels and Containers--In bronze, silver, and gold. These may 
belong to conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, 
strainers, cauldrons, and oil lamps, or may occur in the shape of an 
animal or part of an animal. Also include scroll and manuscript 
containers for manuscripts. All can portray deities, humans or animals, 
as well as floral motifs in relief. Islamic Period objects may be 
inscribed in Arabic. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th 
century A.D.
    3. Jewelry and Other Items for Personal Adornment--In iron, bronze, 
silver, and gold. Metal can be inlaid (with items such as red coral, 
colored stones, and glass). Types include necklaces, chokers, 
pectorals, rings, beads, pendants, belts, belt buckles, earrings, 
diadems, straight pins and fibulae, bracelets, anklets, girdles, belts, 
mirrors, wreaths and crowns, make-up accessories and tools, metal 
strigils (scrapers), crosses, and lamp-holders. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    4. Seals--In lead, tin, copper, bronze, silver, and gold. Types 
include rings, amulets, and seals with shank. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    5. Tools--In copper, bronze and iron. Types include hooks, weights, 
axes, scrapers, trowels, keys and the tools of crafts persons such as 
carpenters, masons and metal smiths. Approximate date: 1st millennium 
B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    6. Weapons and Armor--Body armor, including helmets, cuirasses, 
shin guards, and shields, and horse armor often decorated with 
elaborate engraved, embossed, or perforated designs. Both launching 
weapons (spears and javelins) and weapons for hand to hand combat 
(swords, daggers, etc.). Approximate date: 8th century B.C. to 4th 
century A.D.
    7. Coins
    a. General--Examples of many of the coins found in ancient Libya 
may be found in: A. Burnett and others, Roman Provincial Coinage, 
multiple volumes (British Museum Press and the Biblioth[egrave]que 
Nationale de France, 1992-), R. S. Poole and others, Catalogue of Greek 
Coins in the British Museum, volumes 1-29 (British Museum Trustees 
1873-1927) and H. Mattingly and others, Coins of the Roman Empire in 
the British Museum, volumes 1-6 (British Museum Trustees 1923-62). For 
Byzantine coins, see Grierson, Philip, Byzantine Coins, London, 1982. 
For publication of examples of coins circulating in archaeological 
sites, see La moneta di Cirene e della Cirenaica nel Mediterraneo. 
Problemi e Prospettive, Atti del V Congresso Internazionale di 
Numismatica e di Storia Monetaria, Padova, 17-19 marzo 2016, Padova 
2016 (Numismatica Patavina, 13).
    b. Greek Bronze Coins--Struck by city-states of the Pentapolis, 
Carthage and the Ptolemaic kingdom that operated in territory of the 
Cyrenaica in eastern Libya. Approximate date: 4th century B.C. to late 
1st century B.C.
    c. Greek Silver and Gold Coins--This category includes coins of the 
city-states of the Pentapolis in the Cyrenaica and the Ptolemaic 
Kingdom. Coins from the city-state of Cyrene often bear an image of the 
silphium plant. Such coins date from the late 6th century B.C. to late 
1st century B.C.
    d. Roman Coins--In silver and bronze, struck at Roman and Roman 
provincial mints including Apollonia, Barca, Balagrae, Berenice, 
Cyrene, Ptolemais, Leptis Magna, Oea, and Sabratha. Approximate date: 
late 3rd century B.C. to 1st century A.D.
    e. Byzantine Coins--In bronze, silver, and gold by Byzantine 
emperors. Struck in Constantinople and other mints. From 4th century 
A.D. through 1396 A.D.
    f. Islamic Coins--In bronze, silver, and gold. Dinars with Arabic 
inscriptions inside a circle or square, may be surrounded with symbols. 
Struck at mints in Libya (Barqa) and adjacent regions. From 642 A.D. to 
15th century A.D.
    g. Ottoman--Struck at mints in Istanbul and Libya's neighboring 
regions. Approximate date: 1551 A.D. through 1750 A.D.

C. Ceramic and Clay

    1. Sculpture
    a. Architectural Elements--Baked clay (terracotta) elements used to 
decorate buildings. Elements include acroteria, antefixes, painted and 
relief plaques, revetments. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 30 
B.C.
    b. Architectural Decorations--Including carved and molded brick, 
and tile wall ornaments and panels.
    c. Statuary--Large- and small-scale. Subject matter is varied and 
includes deities, human and animal figures, human body parts, and 
groups of figures in the round. May be brightly colored. These range 
from approximately 4 to 40 in. in height. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 3rd century A.D.
    d. Terracotta Figurines--Terracotta statues and statuettes, 
including deities, human, and animal figures, as well as groups of 
figures in the round. Late 7th century B.C. to 3rd century A.D.
    2. Vessels
    a. Neolithic Pottery--Handmade, often decorated with a lustrous 
burnish, decorated with applique[acute] and/or incision, sometimes with 
added paint. These come in a variety of shapes from simple bowls and 
vases to large storage jars. Approximate date: 10th millennium B.C. to 
3rd millennium B.C.
    b. Greek Pottery--Includes both local and imported fine and coarse 
wares and amphorae. Also imported Attic Black Figure, Red Figure and 
White Ground Pottery--these are made in a specific set of shapes (e.g., 
amphorae, kraters, hydriae, oinochoi, kylikes) decorated with black 
painted figures on a clear clay ground (Black Figure), decorative 
elements in reserve with background fired black (Red Figure), and 
multi-colored figures painted on a white ground (White Ground). 
Corinthian Pottery--Imported painted pottery made in Corinth in a 
specific range of shapes for perfume and unguents and for drinking or 
pouring liquids. The very characteristic painted and incised designs 
depict human and animal figural scenes, rows of animals, and floral 
decoration. Approximate date: 8th century B.C. to 6th century B.C.
    c. Punic and Roman Pottery--Includes fine and coarse wares, 
including terra sigillata and other red gloss wares, and cooking wares 
and mortaria, storage and shipping amphorae.
    d. Byzantine Pottery--Includes undecorated plain wares, lamps, 
utilitarian, tableware, serving and storage jars, amphorae, special 
shapes such as pilgrim flasks. Can be matte painted or glazed, 
including incised ``sgraffitto'' and stamped with elaborate polychrome 
decorations using floral, geometric, human, and animal motifs. 
Approximate date: 324 A.D. to 15th century A.D.
    e. Islamic and Ottoman Pottery--Includes plain or utilitarian wares 
as well as painted wares.
    f. Oil Lamps and Molds--Rounded bodies with a hole on the top and 
in the nozzle, handles or lugs and figural motifs (beading, rosette, 
silphium). Include glazed ceramic mosque lamps, which may have a 
straight or round bulbous body with flared top, and several branches. 
Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    3. Objects of Daily Use--Including game pieces, loom weights, toys, 
and lamps.

[[Page 31657]]

D. Glass, Faience, and Semi-Precious Stone

    1. Architectural Elements--Mosaics and glass windows.
    2. Vessels--Shapes include small jars, bowls, animal shaped, 
goblet, spherical, candle holders, perfume jars (unguentaria), and 
mosque lamps. Those from prehistory and ancient history may be engraved 
and/or colorless or blue, green or orange, while those from the Islamic 
Period may include animal, floral, and/or geometric motifs. Approximate 
date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    3. Beads--Globular and relief beads. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    4. Mosque Lamps--May have a straight or round bulbous body with 
flared top, and several branches. Approximate date: 642 A.D. to 1750 
A.D.

E. Mosaic

    1. Floor Mosaics--Including landscapes, scenes of deities, humans, 
or animals, and activities such as hunting and fishing. There may also 
be vegetative, floral, or geometric motifs and imitations of stone. 
Often have religious imagery. They are made from stone cut into small 
bits (tesserae) and laid into a plaster matrix. Approximate date: 5th 
century B.C. to 4th century A.D.
    2. Wall and Ceiling Mosaics--Generally portray similar motifs as 
seen in floor mosaics. Similar technique to floor mosaics, but may 
include tesserae of both stone and glass. Approximate date: 5th century 
B.C. to 4th century A.D.

F. Painting

    1. Rock Art--Painted and incised drawings on natural rock surfaces. 
There may be human, animal, geometric and/or floral motifs. Include 
fragments. Approximate date: 12,000 B.C. to 100 A.D.
    2. Wall Painting--With figurative (deities, humans, animals), 
floral, and/or geometric motifs, as well as funerary scenes. These are 
painted on stone, mud plaster, lime plaster (wet--buon fresco--and 
dry--secco fresco), sometimes to imitate marble. May be on domestic or 
public walls as well as in tombs. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. 
to 1551 A.D.
G. Plaster--Stucco reliefs, plaques, stelae, and inlays or other 
architectural decoration in stucco.

H. Textiles, Basketry, and Rope

    1. Textiles--Linen cloth was used in Greco-Roman times for mummy 
wrapping, shrouds, garments, and sails. Islamic textiles in linen and 
wool, including garments and hangings.
    2. Basketry--Plant fibers were used to make baskets and containers 
in a variety of shapes and sizes, as well as sandals and mats.
    3. Rope--Rope and string were used for a great variety of purposes, 
including binding, lifting water for irrigation, fishing nets, 
measuring, and stringing beads for jewelry and garments.

I. Bone, Ivory, Shell, and Other Organics

    1. Small Statuary and Figurines--Subject matter includes human, 
animal, and hybrid figures, and parts thereof as well as groups of 
figures in the round. These range from approximately 4 to 40 in. in 
height. Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    2. Reliefs, Plaques, Stelae, and Inlays--Carved and sculpted. May 
have figurative, floral and/or geometric motifs.
    3. Personal Ornaments and Objects of Daily Use--In bone, ivory, and 
spondylus shell. Types include amulets, combs, pins, spoons, small 
containers, bracelets, buckles, and beads. Approximate date: 1st 
millennium B.C. to 15th century A.D.
    4. Seals and Stamps--Small devices with at least one side engraved 
with a design for stamping or sealing; they can be discoid, cuboid, 
conoid, or in the shape of animals or fantastic creatures (e.g., a 
scarab). Approximate date: 1st millennium B.C. to 2nd millennium B.C.
    5. Luxury Objects--Ivory, bone, and shell were used either alone or 
as inlays in luxury objects including furniture, chests and boxes, 
writing and painting equipment, musical instruments, games, cosmetic 
containers, combs, jewelry, amulets, seals, and vessels made of ostrich 
egg shell.
J. Wood--Items such as tablets (tabulae), sometimes pierced with holes 
on the borders and with text written in ink on one or both faces, 
typically small in size (4 to 12 in. in length), recording sales of 
property (such as slaves, animals, grain) and other legal documents 
such as testaments. Approximate date: late 2nd to 4th centuries A.D.

II. Ottoman Ethnological Material

A. Stone

    1. Architectural Elements--The most common stones are marble, 
limestone, and sandstone. From sites such as forts, palaces, mosques, 
shrines, tombs, and monuments, including doors, door frames, window 
fittings, columns, capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, pilasters, 
engaged columns, altars, mihrabs (prayer niches), screens, fountains, 
mosaics, inlays, and blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings. Often 
decorated in relief with religious motifs.
    2. Architectural and Non-architectural Relief Sculpture--In marble, 
limestone, and sandstone. Types include carved slabs with religious, 
figural, floral, or geometric motifs, as well as plaques and stelae, 
sometimes inscribed.
    3. Statuary--Primarily in marble, but also in limestone and 
sandstone. Large- and small-scale, such as human (including historical 
portraits or busts) and animal figures.
    4. Sepulchers--In marble, limestone, and other kinds of stone. 
Types of burial containers include sarcophagi, caskets, coffins, and 
chest urns. May be plain or have figural, geometric, or floral motifs 
painted on them, be carved in relief, and/or have decorative moldings.
    5. Inscriptions, Memorial Stones, and Tombstones--Primarily in 
marble, most frequently engraved with Arabic script.
    6. Vessels and Containers--Include stone lamps and containers such 
as those used in religious services, as well as smaller funerary urns.

B. Metal

    1. Architectural Elements--Primarily copper, brass, lead, and 
alloys. From sites such as forts, palaces, mosques, shrines, tombs, and 
monuments, including doors, door fixtures, other lathes, chandeliers, 
screens, and sheets to protect domes.
    2. Architectural and Non-architectural Relief Sculpture--Primarily 
bronze and brass. Includes appliques, plaques, and stelae. Often with 
religious, figural, floral, or geometric motifs. May have inscriptions 
in Arabic.
    3. Vessels and Containers--In brass, copper, silver, or gold, 
plain, engraved, or hammered. Types include jugs, pitchers, plates, 
cups, lamps, and containers used for religious services (like Qur'an 
boxes). Often engraved or otherwise decorated.
    4. Jewelry and Personal Adornments--In a wide variety of metals 
such as iron, brass, copper, silver, and gold. Includes rings and ring 
seals, head ornaments, earrings, pendants, amulets, bracelets, 
talismans, and belt buckles. May be adorned with inlaid beads, 
gemstones, and leather.
    5. Weapons and Armor--Often in iron or steel. Includes daggers, 
swords, saifs, scimitars, other blades, with or without sheaths, as 
well as spears, firearms, and cannons. Ottoman types may be inlaid with 
gemstones, embellished with silver or gold, or engraved with floral or 
geometric motifs and inscriptions. Grips or hilts may be made of metal, 
wood, or

[[Page 31658]]

even semi-precious stones such as agate, and bound with leather. Armor 
consisting of small metal scales, originally sewn to a backing of cloth 
or leather, and augmented by helmets, body armor, shields, and horse 
armor.
    6. Ceremonial Paraphernalia--Including boxes (such as Qur'an 
boxes), plaques, pendants, candelabra, stamp and seal rings.
    7. Musical Instruments--In a wide variety of metals. Includes 
cymbals and trumpets.

C. Ceramic and Clay

    1. Architectural Decorations--Including carved and molded brick, 
and engraved and/or painted tile wall ornaments and panels, sometimes 
with Arabic script. May be from forts, palaces, mosques, shrines, 
tombs, or monuments.
    2. Vessels and Containers--Includes glazed, molded, and painted 
ceramics. Types include boxes, plates, lamps, jars, and flasks. May be 
plain or decorated with floral or geometric patterns, or Arabic script, 
primarily using blue, green, brown, black, or yellow colors.

D. Wood

    1. Architectural Elements--From sites such as forts, palaces, 
mosques, shrines, tombs, monuments, and madrassas, including doors, 
door fixtures, panels, beams, balconies, stages, screens, ceilings, and 
tent posts. Types include doors, door frames, windows, window frames, 
walls, panels, beams, ceilings, and balconies. May be decorated with 
religious, geometric or floral motifs or Arabic script.
    2. Architectural and Non-architectural Relief Sculpture--Carved and 
inlaid wood panels, rooms, beams, balconies, stages, panels, ceilings, 
and doors, frequently decorated with religious, floral, or geometric 
motifs. May have script in Arabic or other languages.
    3. Qur'an Boxes--May be carved and inlaid, with decorations in 
religious, floral, or geometric motifs, or Arabic script.
    4. Study Tablets--Arabic inscribed training boards for teaching the 
Qur'an.

E. Bone and Ivory

    1. Ceremonial Paraphernalia--Types include boxes, reliquaries (and 
their contents), plaques, pendants, candelabra, stamp and seal rings.
    2. Inlays--For religious decorative and architectural elements.

F. Glass--Vessels and containers in glass from mosques, shrines, tombs, 
and monuments, including glass and enamel mosque lamps and ritual 
vessels.

G. Textiles--In linen, silk, and wool. Religious textiles and fragments 
from mosques, shrines, tombs, and monuments, including garments, 
hangings, prayer rugs, and shrine covers.

H. Leather and Parchment

    1. Books and Manuscripts--Either as sheets or bound volumes. Text 
is often written on vellum or other parchment (cattle, sheep, goat, or 
camel) and then gathered in leather bindings. Paper may also be used. 
Types include the Qur'an and other Islamic books and manuscripts, often 
written in brown ink, and then further embellished with colorful floral 
or geometric motifs.
    2. Musical Instruments--Leather drums of various sizes (e.g., 
bendir drums used in Sufi rituals, wedding processions and Mal'uf 
performances).

I. Painting and Drawing--Ottoman Period paintings may depict courtly 
themes (e.g., rulers, musicians, riders on horses) and city views, 
among other topics.

Inapplicability of Notice and Delayed Effective Date

    This amendment involves a foreign affairs function of the United 
States and is, therefore, being made without notice or public procedure 
under 5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1). For the same reason, a delayed effective date 
is not required under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3).

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the 
provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do 
not apply.

Executive Orders 12866 and 13771

    CBP has determined that this document is not a regulation or rule 
subject to the provisions of Executive Order 12866 or Executive Order 
13771 because it pertains to a foreign affairs function of the United 
States, as described above, and therefore is specifically exempted by 
section 3(d)(2) of Executive Order 12866 and section 4(a) of Executive 
Order 13771.

Signing Authority

    This regulation is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 
0.1(a)(1), pertaining to the Secretary of the Treasury's authority (or 
that of his/her delegate) to approve regulations related to customs 
revenue functions.

List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 12

    Cultural property, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, 
Prohibited merchandise.

Amendment to CBP Regulations

    For the reasons set forth above, part 12 of title 19 of the Code of 
Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 12) is amended as set forth below:

PART 12--SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE

0
1. The general authority citation for part 12 and the specific 
authority citation for Sec.  12.104g continue to read as follows:

    Authority:  5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), 
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624;
* * * * *

    Sections 12.104 through 12.104i also issued under 19 U.S.C. 
2612;
* * * * *


0
2. In Sec.  12.104g:
0
a. The table in paragraph (a) is amended by adding the entry for Libya 
in appropriate alphabetical order; and
0
b. The table in paragraph (b) is amended by removing the entry for 
``Libya'' in its entirety, but retaining the table headings.
    The addition reads as follows:


Sec.  12.104g   Specific items or categories designated by agreements 
or emergency actions.

* * * * *
    (a) * * *

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
               State party                             Cultural property                     Decision No.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Libya...................................  Archaeological and ethnological material    CBP Dec. 18-07.
                                           from Libya.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



[[Page 31659]]

Kevin K. McAleenan,
Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
    Approved: July 3, 2018.
Timothy E. Skud,
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.
[FR Doc. 2018-14637 Filed 7-6-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 9111-14-P