Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of a Revision to an Approval of an Existing Information Collection: Operating Requirements: Commuter and On-Demand Operation, 27822-27823 [2018-12798]

Download as PDF daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES 27822 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 115 / Thursday, June 14, 2018 / Notices final rule, § 61.159(c) allows pilots to log SIC time in part 135 operations in a single engine turbine-powered airplane or a multi-engine airplane that otherwise does not require an SIC. This will require the pilot to obtain a logbook endorsement from the pilot in command for each individual flight to log this time as SIC. The FAA estimates that of the 76,957 Commercial Pilots with airplane and instrument privileges that approximately 10% (7,696) may actively pursue a SIC position with a Part 135 operator that is approved for logging SIC time as described for this provision. But, because of the limited number of operators (approximately 457 operators as of September 28, 2017) that would qualify or actually pursue this authorization, the FAA estimates that only 15% (1,154 pilots) might actually become qualified annually to log SIC time under this provision. This additional record keeping requirement will be reflected in Section 61.159, Aeronautical experience. The FAA estimates this SIC training program burden increase is 1,154 hours annually. Respondents: The total number of respondents in the airman certification program is estimated to be approximately 25 percent of the population of active certificated pilots and instructors. Given a population of 825,000, the result is approximately 206,250 respondents providing data on an annual basis. The total number of applicants for a remote pilot certificate with a small UAS rating is estimated to be 39,229 annually. Frequency: As needed. Estimated Average Burden per Response: For the hour burdens resulting from the application requirements of the collection of information other than remote pilots with small UAS ratings, the FAA estimates that forms are submitted for these certificates and ratings at an average preparation time of 15 minutes (0.25 hrs) each. The average time estimate of 0.25 hours assumes that many individual applicants will submit an 8710–1 form more than once for various reasons, and that most of the information provided on the form likely will not have changed. For Part 107 we estimate that an average of 39,229 forms are submitted annually that require an average preparation time of 0.25 hours to complete. Estimated Total Annual Burden: The total number of annual responses for the airman certification program is estimated to be 1,196,653. The FAA estimates the total reporting burden hours to be 43,157 hours. The FAA estimates the total recordkeeping burden hours to be 282,329 hours. The VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:38 Jun 13, 2018 Jkt 244001 FAA estimates the burden for the collection of information to be 325,486 hours annually. This is a burden reduction of 5,015 annual burden hours from the currently approved information collection. Issued in Washington, DC, on May 30, 2018. Barbara L. Hall, FAA Information Collection Clearance Officer, Performance, Policy, and Records Management Branch, ASP–110. [FR Doc. 2018–12796 Filed 6–13–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of a Revision to an Approval of an Existing Information Collection: Operating Requirements: Commuter and On-Demand Operation Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, FAA invites public comments about our intention to request the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval to renew an information collection. The revision of this collection involves the amendment of current regulations, which allows a certificate holder’s pilots to log secondin-command (SIC) time in operations conducted under part 135 in an airplane or operation that does not otherwise require a SIC. This revision also removes the burden for initial certification under current regulations, as that is already counted under ICR 2120–0593 (Part 119). DATES: Written comments should be submitted by August 13, 2018. ADDRESSES: Send comments to the FAA at the following address: Barbara Hall, Federal Aviation Administration, ASP– 110, 10101 Hillwood Parkway, Fort Worth, TX 76177. Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspect of this information collection, including (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for FAA’s performance; (b) the accuracy of the estimated burden; (c) ways for FAA to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information collection; and (d) ways that the burden could be minimized without reducing the quality of the collected information. The agency SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00074 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 will summarize and/or include your comments in the request for OMB’s clearance of this information collection. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara Hall by email at: Barbara.L.Hall@faa.gov; phone: 940– 594–5913. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 2120–0039. Title: Operating Requirements: Commuter and On-Demand Operation. Form Numbers: N/A. Type of Review: This is a revision of an existing information collection. Background: The FAA is publishing the final rule Regulatory Relief, Aviation Training devices; Pilot Certification, Training, and Pilot Schools; and Other Provisions (RIN 2120–AK28; Docket No. FAA–2016–6142). In that rule, the FAA is amending § 135.99 by adding paragraph (c) to allow a certificate holder to receive approval of a secondin-command (SIC) professional development program (SIC PDP) via operations specifications (Ops Specs) to allow the certificate holder’s pilots to log SIC time in operations conducted under part 135 in an airplane or operation that does not otherwise require a SIC. As explained in the rule, the FAA believes that a comprehensive SIC PDP will provide opportunities for beneficial flight experience that may not otherwise exist and also provide increased safety in operations for those flights conducted in a multicrew environment. The FAA is establishing requirements in § 135.99(c) for certificate holders, airplanes, and flightcrew members during operations conducted under an approved SIC PDP. Those changes are reflected in this information collection. The FAA is also changing certain logging requirements to enable the logging of SIC time obtained under a SIC PDP. Those changes are reflected in a revision to information collection 2120– 0021. Respondents: Operators who currently possess an FAA approved PIC or SIC training program could revise and utilize those existing programs to qualify their pilots seeking approval to log SIC time. Those operators that do not already possess an approved PIC/ SIC training program (that must include crew resource management training) would be required to submit a proposed new SIC training program for FAA approval. This would be amending an existing part 119 certificate. As of September 28, 2017 the FAA estimates that there were approximately 457 part 135 operators with single engine turbine-powered airplanes or multiengine airplanes that would E:\FR\FM\14JNN1.SGM 14JNN1 daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 115 / Thursday, June 14, 2018 / Notices qualify or actually pursue the authorization to conduct a SIC professional development program. The FAA estimates that approximately 20 operators would be required to submit a newly developed SIC Professional Development Training Program for approval in the first year that the program is available. The FAA estimates that 50 operators will request an amendment to their existing PIC/SIC training program. This time burden is reflected in § 135.325, Training program and revision. Frequency: As needed. Estimated Average Burden per Response: Section 135.99(c) permits a certificate holder to seek approval of an SIC professional development program via issuance of operations specifications (Ops Specs) to allow the certificate holder’s pilots to log SIC time. Under an approved SIC professional development program, pilots may log SIC time in part 135 operations conducted in multiengine airplanes and single engine turbine-powered airplanes that do not otherwise require an SIC, if those pilots: (1) Meet certification, training, and qualification requirements for pilots in part 135 operations, and (2) serve under the supervision of a part 135 PIC who meets certain experience requirements. The FAA estimates that 20 operators will take approximately 40 hours each to develop and submit an acceptable new SIC training program. This program change will result in a burden increase of 800 hours in the first year of information collection only. The FAA estimates that 50 operators will take approximately 20 hours each to revise and submit an acceptable SIC training program. This program change will result in a burden increase of 1000 hours. The new or revised SIC training program will result in a burden of 1800 total hours in the first year of information collection. In addition, the FAA has revised the burden in section 135.325 to remove the calculation of the burden for new applicants (for initial approval of training programs); this burden should not be reflected in this collection as it is already addressed in a previously approved collection (2120–0593 Certification: Air Carriers and Commercial Operators—FAR Part 119). This change is necessary to avoid double-counting the burden. Estimated Total Annual Burden: The overall burden for part 135 was previously estimated at 1,154,674 hours. With the removal of the initial certification burden already accounted for in the part 119 statement, addition of the SIC training program VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:38 Jun 13, 2018 Jkt 244001 development and approval burden, the total new annual reduced burden estimate is 1,146,938.6 hours. This is a reduction of 7,735.4 hours from the previous estimate. Issued in Washington, DC, on May 30, 2018. Barbara L. Hall, FAA Information Collection Clearance Officer, Performance, Policy, and Records Management Branch, ASP–110. [FR Doc. 2018–12798 Filed 6–13–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary of Transportation [DOT–OST–2018–0081] Solving for Safety Visualization Challenge Solver Solicitation Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Office of the Secretary of Transportation, DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) is launching the Solving for Safety Visualization Challenge to incentivize the use of safety data in the development of innovative analytical visualization tools that will reveal insights into serious crashes and improve understanding of transportation safety. The Challenge serves as a platform to capture the imaginations of technology and data firms, transportation stakeholders, and state and local agencies to unlock their creativity, and empower them to develop innovative new data visualization tools that can help improve road and rail user safety, to benefit all transportation users. The Challenge is open to individuals and teams (Solvers) from the business and research communities, including technology companies, analytics firms, transportation carriers, industry associations, research institutions, universities, mapping and visualization providers. Solvers will compete for cash prizes that will be awarded throughout the multi-stage Challenge. The Challenge prize purse is $350,000, with four semi-finalists competing for a portion of the $100,000 interim prize and two final-stage Solvers competing for a portion of the $250,000 final prize. DATES: The Challenge will begin on June 14, 2018. After the launch, USDOT will accept Stage I submissions up to 11:59 p.m. EDT on July 31, 2018. A panel of judges will review team submissions and announce Stage I finalists in August 2018. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 27823 For more information, and to register your intent to compete individually or as part of a team, visit www.transportation.gov/ Solve4Safety, email Solve4Safety@ dot.gov or contact Ed Strocko at 202– 366–8189. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Problem In 2017, motor vehicle traffic crashes resulted in an estimated 37,150 fatalities.1 Comprehensively, crashes are a societal harm that cost the Nation over $800 billion annually in lives lost or injured, as well as lost work productivity and property damage.2 When the cost of serious crashes is put into context, the weight of this issue becomes much more grave and the need for an innovative, non-traditional approach becomes apparent. Safety is USDOT’s number one priority, and we are committed to reducing the incidence of serious and fatal injuries on our roadways. The USDOT’s transportation safety programs have decades of research and design behind them and have proven effective in reducing injuries and fatalities by 40% between 1990 and 2011. In recent years, these advances have leveled off, and new insights and strategies are required to make further advances. Traditional factors do not fully explain the causes of the recent significant increase in traffic fatalities. Increases in driving are one factor; however, the rate of fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT) also increased from 1.08 fatalities per 100 million VMT in 2014 to an estimated 1.17 in 2017.1 Economic conditions, gasoline prices, weather and other factors are also correlated with increased traffic fatalities. USDOT seeks to reverse the current trend, rapidly detect changes that indicate unsafe conditions, and reduce transportation-related fatalities and serious injuries across the transportation system. The Department is pursuing data-informed decision-making to help strategically prioritize and address transportation safety risks. One pillar of this approach is data visualization. USDOT seeks clear, compelling data visualization tools that make data analysis and insights accessible to policy-makers, transportation providers and the public who make safety choices every day. 1 https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ ViewPublication/812542. 2 https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ ViewPublication/812451. E:\FR\FM\14JNN1.SGM 14JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 115 (Thursday, June 14, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 27822-27823]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-12798]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration


Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; 
Clearance of a Revision to an Approval of an Existing Information 
Collection: Operating Requirements: Commuter and On-Demand Operation

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, FAA 
invites public comments about our intention to request the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) approval to renew an information 
collection. The revision of this collection involves the amendment of 
current regulations, which allows a certificate holder's pilots to log 
second-in-command (SIC) time in operations conducted under part 135 in 
an airplane or operation that does not otherwise require a SIC. This 
revision also removes the burden for initial certification under 
current regulations, as that is already counted under ICR 2120-0593 
(Part 119).

DATES: Written comments should be submitted by August 13, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Send comments to the FAA at the following address: Barbara 
Hall, Federal Aviation Administration, ASP-110, 10101 Hillwood Parkway, 
Fort Worth, TX 76177.
    Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspect of 
this information collection, including (a) Whether the proposed 
collection of information is necessary for FAA's performance; (b) the 
accuracy of the estimated burden; (c) ways for FAA to enhance the 
quality, utility and clarity of the information collection; and (d) 
ways that the burden could be minimized without reducing the quality of 
the collected information. The agency will summarize and/or include 
your comments in the request for OMB's clearance of this information 
collection.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara Hall by email at: 
[email protected]; phone: 940-594-5913.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    OMB Control Number: 2120-0039.
    Title: Operating Requirements: Commuter and On-Demand Operation.
    Form Numbers: N/A.
    Type of Review: This is a revision of an existing information 
collection.
    Background: The FAA is publishing the final rule Regulatory Relief, 
Aviation Training devices; Pilot Certification, Training, and Pilot 
Schools; and Other Provisions (RIN 2120-AK28; Docket No. FAA-2016-
6142). In that rule, the FAA is amending Sec.  135.99 by adding 
paragraph (c) to allow a certificate holder to receive approval of a 
second-in-command (SIC) professional development program (SIC PDP) via 
operations specifications (Ops Specs) to allow the certificate holder's 
pilots to log SIC time in operations conducted under part 135 in an 
airplane or operation that does not otherwise require a SIC. As 
explained in the rule, the FAA believes that a comprehensive SIC PDP 
will provide opportunities for beneficial flight experience that may 
not otherwise exist and also provide increased safety in operations for 
those flights conducted in a multicrew environment. The FAA is 
establishing requirements in Sec.  135.99(c) for certificate holders, 
airplanes, and flightcrew members during operations conducted under an 
approved SIC PDP. Those changes are reflected in this information 
collection.
    The FAA is also changing certain logging requirements to enable the 
logging of SIC time obtained under a SIC PDP. Those changes are 
reflected in a revision to information collection 2120-0021.
    Respondents: Operators who currently possess an FAA approved PIC or 
SIC training program could revise and utilize those existing programs 
to qualify their pilots seeking approval to log SIC time. Those 
operators that do not already possess an approved PIC/SIC training 
program (that must include crew resource management training) would be 
required to submit a proposed new SIC training program for FAA 
approval. This would be amending an existing part 119 certificate. As 
of September 28, 2017 the FAA estimates that there were approximately 
457 part 135 operators with single engine turbine-powered airplanes or 
multiengine airplanes that would

[[Page 27823]]

qualify or actually pursue the authorization to conduct a SIC 
professional development program.
    The FAA estimates that approximately 20 operators would be required 
to submit a newly developed SIC Professional Development Training 
Program for approval in the first year that the program is available. 
The FAA estimates that 50 operators will request an amendment to their 
existing PIC/SIC training program. This time burden is reflected in 
Sec.  135.325, Training program and revision.
    Frequency: As needed.
    Estimated Average Burden per Response: Section 135.99(c) permits a 
certificate holder to seek approval of an SIC professional development 
program via issuance of operations specifications (Ops Specs) to allow 
the certificate holder's pilots to log SIC time. Under an approved SIC 
professional development program, pilots may log SIC time in part 135 
operations conducted in multiengine airplanes and single engine 
turbine-powered airplanes that do not otherwise require an SIC, if 
those pilots: (1) Meet certification, training, and qualification 
requirements for pilots in part 135 operations, and (2) serve under the 
supervision of a part 135 PIC who meets certain experience 
requirements.
    The FAA estimates that 20 operators will take approximately 40 
hours each to develop and submit an acceptable new SIC training 
program. This program change will result in a burden increase of 800 
hours in the first year of information collection only.
    The FAA estimates that 50 operators will take approximately 20 
hours each to revise and submit an acceptable SIC training program. 
This program change will result in a burden increase of 1000 hours.
    The new or revised SIC training program will result in a burden of 
1800 total hours in the first year of information collection.
    In addition, the FAA has revised the burden in section 135.325 to 
remove the calculation of the burden for new applicants (for initial 
approval of training programs); this burden should not be reflected in 
this collection as it is already addressed in a previously approved 
collection (2120-0593 Certification: Air Carriers and Commercial 
Operators--FAR Part 119). This change is necessary to avoid double-
counting the burden.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden: The overall burden for part 135 was 
previously estimated at 1,154,674 hours. With the removal of the 
initial certification burden already accounted for in the part 119 
statement, addition of the SIC training program development and 
approval burden, the total new annual reduced burden estimate is 
1,146,938.6 hours. This is a reduction of 7,735.4 hours from the 
previous estimate.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on May 30, 2018.
Barbara L. Hall,
FAA Information Collection Clearance Officer, Performance, Policy, and 
Records Management Branch, ASP-110.
[FR Doc. 2018-12798 Filed 6-13-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-13-P