Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for Chicago O'Hare International Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Newark Liberty International Airport, and San Francisco International Airport for the Winter 2018/2019 Scheduling Season, 21335-21338 [2018-09894]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 90 / Wednesday, May 9, 2018 / Notices Trangle’’ building, 93200, Saint-Denis, France. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karan Hofmann at khofmann@rtca.org or 202–330–0680, or The RTCA Secretariat, 1150 18th Street NW, Suite 910, Washington, DC 20036, or by telephone at (202) 833–9339, fax at (202) 833–9434, or website at http:// www.rtca.org. Pursuant to section 10(a) (2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92– 463, 5 U.S.C., App.), notice is hereby given for a meeting of the Thirty Sixth RTCA SC–214 Standards for Air Traffic Data Communications Services Plenary. The agenda will include the following: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1. Welcome and Administrative Remarks 2. Introductions 3. Agenda Review 4. Meeting-Minutes Review 5. Review/Resolution of DO–224D FRAC Comments 6. Review/Resolution of DO–281C and ED–92C Final Review and Comment(FRAC)/Open Consultation Comments 7. Approve release of DO–224D for presentation to PMC 8. Approve release of DO–281C for presentation to PMC and ED–92C to Council 9. Industry Presentation: Connectionless VDL2 Network 10. Schedule Update 11. Date, Place and Time of Next Meeting 12. Other Topics 13. Adjourn Plenary amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES Attendance is open to the interested public but limited to space availability. With the approval of the chairman, members of the public may present oral statements at the meeting. Persons wishing to present statements or obtain information should contact the person listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Members of the public may present a written statement to the committee at any time. Issued in Washington, DC, on April 30, 2018. Michelle Swearingen, Systems and Equipment Standards Branch, AIR–6B0, Policy and Innovation Division, AIR–600, Federal Aviation Administration. [FR Doc. 2018–09445 Filed 5–8–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:39 May 08, 2018 Jkt 244001 RTCA PMC Program Management Committee Plenary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: RTCA PMC Program Management Committee Plenary. AGENCY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA PMC Program Management Committee Plenary. DATES: The meeting will be held June 21, 2018 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at: RTCA Headquarters, 1150 18th Street NW, Suite 910, Washington, DC 20036. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karan Hofmann at khofmann@rtca.org or 202–330–0680, or The RTCA Secretariat, 1150 18th Street NW, Suite 910, Washington, DC, 20036, or by telephone at (202) 833–9339, fax at (202) 833–9434, or website at http:// www.rtca.org. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 10(a) (2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92– 463, 5 U.S.C., App.), notice is hereby given for a meeting of the RTCA PMC Program Management Committee Plenary. The agenda will include the following: 1. Welcome and Introductions 2. Review/Approve a. Meeting Summary March 22, 2018 b. Administrative SC TOR Revisions 3. Publication Consideration/Approval a. New Document—MOPS for GNSS Active Antenna in the L1/E1 and L5/E5A Bands prepared by SC–159 (Navigation Equipment Using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)) b. DO–356A—Airworthiness Security Methods and Considerations prepared by SC–216, Aeronautical Systems Security c. DO–213A Change 1—Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Nose-Mounted Radomes prepared by SC–230 (Weather Detection Systems) d. DO–220A Change 1—Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for Airborne Weather Radar Systems prepared by SC–230 (Weather Detection Systems) 4. Integration and Coordination Meeting (ICC) 5. Cross Cutting Committee (CCC) 6. Past Action Item Review 7. Discussion SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 21335 a. SC–206—Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Data Link Services—Discussion—Revised TOR b. SC–213—Enhanced Flight Vision Systems/Synthetic Vision— Discussion—Possible Revised TOR c. SC–230—Weather Detection Systems—Discussion—Revised TOR d. SC–236—Standards for Wireless Avionics Intra-Communication System (WAIC) within 4300–4400 MHz—Discussion—Revised TOR e. NAC—Status Update f. DAC—Status Update g. FAA Actions Taken on Previously Published Documents—Report h. Special Committees—Chairmen’s Reports and Active Inter-Special Committee Requirements Agreements (ISRA)—Review i. European/EUROCAE Coordination—Status Update 8. Other Business 9. Schedule for Committee Deliverables and Next Meeting Date 10. New Action Item Summary Attendance is open to the interested public but limited to space availability. With the approval of the chairman, members of the public may present oral statements at the meeting. Persons wishing to present statements or obtain information should contact the person listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Members of the public may present a written statement to the committee at any time. Issued in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2018. Michelle Swearingen, Systems and Equipment Standards Branch, AIR–6B0, Policy and Innovation Division, AIR–600, Federal Aviation Administration. [FR Doc. 2018–09828 Filed 5–8–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for Chicago O’Hare International Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Newark Liberty International Airport, and San Francisco International Airport for the Winter 2018/2019 Scheduling Season Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of submission deadline. AGENCY: Under this notice, the FAA announces the submission deadline of May 17, 2018, for winter 2018/2019 SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\09MYN1.SGM 09MYN1 amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES 21336 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 90 / Wednesday, May 9, 2018 / Notices flight schedules at Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD), John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), and San Francisco International Airport (SFO). The deadline coincides with the schedule submission deadline for the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Slot Conference for the winter 2018/2019 scheduling season. DATES: Schedules must be submitted no later than May 17, 2018. ADDRESSES: Schedules may be submitted by mail to the Slot Administration Office, AGC–200, Office of the Chief Counsel, 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591; facsimile: 202–267–7277; or by email to: 7–AWA-slotadmin@faa.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bryan Bourgoin, System Operations Services, Air Traffic Organization, Federal Aviation Administration, AJR– 0, Room 300W, 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591; telephone number: 202–267–0968; email: bryan.bourgoin@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA has designated EWR, LAX, ORD\\, and SFO as IATA Level 2 airports and JFK as an IATA Level 3 airport under the Worldwide Slot Guidelines (WSG). The FAA currently limits scheduled operations at JFK by Order until October 27, 2018.1 The FAA intends to extend the effective date of the JFK Order prior to the expiration of the current Order. The FAA is primarily concerned about scheduled and other regularly conducted commercial operations during peak hours, but carriers may submit schedule plans for the entire day. At ORD, the peak hours for the winter 2018/2019 scheduling season are 0700 to 2100 Central Time (1300 to 0300 UTC), at LAX and SFO from 0600 to 2300 Pacific Time (1400 to 0700 UTC), and at EWR and JFK from 0600 to 2300 Eastern Time (1100 to 0400 UTC). These hours are unchanged from previous scheduling seasons. Carriers should submit schedule information in sufficient detail including, at minimum, the marketing or operating carrier, flight number, scheduled time of operation, frequency, aircraft equipment, and effective dates. IATA standard schedule information format and data elements for communications at Level 2 and Level 3 airports in the IATA Standard Schedules Information Manual (SSIM) Chapter 6 may be used. The WSG 1 Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008), as amended 81 FR 40167 (June 21, 2016). VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:39 May 08, 2018 Jkt 244001 provides additional information on schedule submissions at Level 2 and Level 3 airports. The U.S. winter scheduling season is from October 28, 2018, through March 30, 2019, in recognition of the IATA northern winter scheduling period. The FAA understands there may be differences in schedule times due to different U.S. daylight saving time dates and will accommodate these differences to the extent possible. General Information for All Airports The FAA considers several factors and priorities as it reviews schedule requests at Level 2 airports. The WSG states that schedule facilitation is based on schedule adjustments mutually agreed between the airlines and the facilitator; to avoid exceeding the airport’s coordination parameters, that the concepts of historic precedence and series of slots do not apply at Level 2 airports, and that the facilitator should adjust the smallest number of flights by the least amount of time necessary to avoid exceeding the airport’s coordination parameters. The WSG also includes priorities such as services from the previous equivalent season over new demand for the same timings, services that are unchanged over services that plan to change time or other capacity relevant parameters, introduction of year-round services, effective period of operation, regularly planned operations over ad hoc operations, and other operational factors that may limit a carrier’s timing flexibility. In addition, Congress, the Department of Transportation (DOT), through the FAA and the Office of the Secretary (OST), and the Department of Justice have adopted a number of measures to promote competition and new entry at U.S. slot controlled airports and, likewise, the WSG has priorities to consider new entry and competition at Level 3 airports. The FAA prioritizes new entrant flights within the scheduling limits for the airport. Generally, the FAA uses average hourly runway capacity throughput for airports and performance metrics in its schedule reviews at Level 2 airports.2 The FAA also considers other factors 2 The FAA typically determines an airport’s average adjusted runway capacity or throughput for Level 2 and Level 3 airports by reviewing hourly data on the arrival and departure rates that air traffic control indicates could be accepted for that hour, commonly known as ‘‘called’’ rates. We also review the actual number of arrivals and departures that operated in the same hour. Generally, the FAA uses the higher of the two numbers, called or actual, for identifying trends and schedule review purposes. Some dates are excluded from analysis, such as during periods when extended airport closures or construction could affect capacity. PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 that can affect operations, such as capacity changes due to runway, taxiway, or other airport construction, air traffic control procedural changes, airport surface operations, or historical or projected flight delays and congestion. At JFK, the scheduling limit of 81 operations per hour is established in the FAA Order. Slot management in the United States differs from other countries that follow the IATA WSG. In the United States, the FAA is responsible for facilitation and coordination of runway access for takeoffs and landings at Level 2 and Level 3 airports; however, the airport authority or its designee is responsible for facilitation and coordination of terminal/gate/airport facility access. The process with the individual airports for terminal access and other airport services is separate from, and in addition to, the FAA schedule review based on runway capacity. Approval from both the FAA and the airport authority for runway and airport availability, respectively, is necessary before implementing schedule plans. Contact information for Level 2 and Level 3 airports is available at http:// www.iata.org/policy/slots/Pages/slotguidelines.aspx. The FAA seeks to improve communications with carriers and schedule facilitators at Level 2 airports on potential runway schedule issues or terminal and gate issues that may affect the runway times. The FAA also seeks to reduce the time that carriers consider proposed offers on schedules, especially within peak periods or in periods of limited availability with competing requests. Retaining open offers for extended periods of time may delay the facilitation process for the airport. Reducing this delay is particularly important to allow the FAA to make informed decisions at airports where some hours are at or near the scheduling limits. If carriers do not accept the offers or continue to submit revised schedules that are above the limits, the FAA cannot effectively assess the final proposed schedules. The agency recognizes that there are circumstances that may require some schedules to remain pending. However, the FAA expects to substantially complete the process on initial submissions each scheduling season within 30 days of the end of the Slot Conference. After this time, the agency would confirm the acceptance of offers or issue a denial of schedule requests so that there is no ambiguity about the initial approved and unapproved schedules. Finally, the FAA notes that the schedule information submitted by carriers to the FAA may be subject to E:\FR\FM\09MYN1.SGM 09MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 90 / Wednesday, May 9, 2018 / Notices disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The WSG also provides for release of information at certain stages of slot coordination and schedule facilitation. In general, once it takes action, the FAA may release information on slot allocation or similar slot transactions or schedule information reviewed as part of the schedule facilitation process. The FAA does not expect that practice to change and most slot and schedule information would not be exempt from release under FOIA. The FAA recognizes that some airlines may submit information on schedule plans that is not available to the public and may be considered by the carrier to be proprietary. Carriers that submit slot or schedule information deemed proprietary should clearly mark such information accordingly. The FAA will take the necessary steps to protect properly designated information to the extent allowable by law. amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES JFK Schedules The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) plans construction on JFK Runway 13L/31R. The FAA will review the final phasing and assess the operational impacts once the construction plans are available. Mitigation strategies for prior runway construction projects could be used as needed. These include a ‘‘playbook’’ describing operational plans for various runway configurations and operating conditions, working with carriers to reduce schedules during certain periods or retime flights to less congested periods, limiting approval for new flights, or encouraging temporary reductions by waiving minimum slot usage requirements. The PANYNJ holds regular meetings with airlines and other stakeholders to discuss construction plans and consults with the FAA and local air traffic control facilities to minimize operational impacts. JFK operators also meet regularly to discuss operational issues at the airport. The FAA meets quarterly with stakeholders on operational issues in the greater New York City area. These various local meetings may be the best source of current construction-related information to assist in planning schedules and operations. EWR Schedules The FAA is continuing to monitor operations and delays at EWR, especially in the busiest afternoon and evening hours. The FAA announced the change in designation to Level 2 at EWR in April 2016.3 Delays in summer 2016 3 Change of Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) Designation, 81 FR 19861 (Apr. 6, 2016). VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:39 May 08, 2018 Jkt 244001 increased over summer 2015, in part because allocated slots in the afternoon and evening hours were used at higher rates than in 2015. Subsequently, as expected, delays further increased as a result of new entry at EWR enabled by the change to Level 2. However, compared to summer 2007 when the airport operated without scheduling limits and slots 4, most performance metrics for summer 2017 were better than summer 2007 despite the additional flights under Level 2. The FAA recognizes there have been a number of changes in the NYC area since 2007, including changes in airspace and procedures, regulatory changes such as crew flight and duty time and long flight (tarmac) delays, and network management by airlines. The FAA is reviewing the current performance goals as well as any related capacity and operational impacts caused by these changes. Since transitioning to Level 2, requests for flights in the afternoon and evening hours have consistently exceeded the scheduling limits at EWR. The FAA advised carriers it would not be able to accommodate all requests for new operations and has reached agreement in most cases with carriers to retime flights as necessary in the initial seasons under Level 2. For the summer 2018 season, the FAA lowered the scheduling limit from 81 to 79 operations per hour based on an updated airport capacity analysis and review of summer 2017 performance. The winter season limits were already at 79 per hour based on winter season capacity analyses. For summer 2018, the FAA encouraged carriers to reduce operations in the peak periods and operate flights in less congested hours to improve operations and reduce delays, particularly in the afternoon and evening hours. However, the FAA advised it would accept flights above the new hourly limits if the flights were operated in summer 2017. The FAA also indicated new flights were possible in hours with fewer than 79 operations. Despite the FAA’s efforts to facilitate voluntary scheduling cooperation at EWR, certain carriers have been unwilling to reduce operations in peak hours to assist with the growing delays. Average demand for summer 2018 in the afternoon and evening hours 4 Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008). The EWR Order took effect in June 2008. In addition to reviewing performance metrics on a year-over-year basis for the busiest summer months, one FAA goal in adopting the Order was to manage schedules and keep delays from exceeding summer 2007 levels. In summer 2017, the number of arriving flights delayed by two hours or more increased by 5.5 percent compared to summer 2007. PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 21337 remains at 81 operations per hour as it was in summer 2017. There are periods when the demand in half-hours or consecutive half-hours exceeds the optimum runway capacity. The imbalance of scheduled arrivals and departures in certain periods has also contributed to increased congestion and delays when the demand exceeds the called arrival or departure rates. For example, early afternoon arrivals exceed optimum runway capacity and air traffic control regularly implements traffic management initiatives including ground delay programs. Recent FAA modeling indicates retiming arrivals from the 1400 hour to the 1300 and 1200 hours could have significant delay reduction benefits and help preserve the Level 2 designation at EWR. For the summer 2018 season, airlines generally agreed to retime requests for new flights to periods outside of the peak hours. However, this growth has resulted in more hours with operations at the scheduling limits. As the summer 2018 schedules are expected to be similar to summer 2017, the performance metrics are highly unlikely to improve without further summer schedule adjustments. In light of the increasing delays in the peak afternoon hours due to the unwillingness of certain carriers to voluntarily retime historic flights into other less congested periods and the imbalance of arrivals and departures, the FAA is adopting new half-hourly scheduling limits of 43 operations, in addition to the current hourly limit of 79 per hour. As noted earlier, it is important to maintain a balance between arrivals and departures to limit delays. The maximum number of arrivals or departures, respectively, which can be accommodated is 43 in an hour and 24 in a half-hour. This would allow some higher levels of operations in certain periods (not to exceed the hourly limits) and some recovery from lower demand in adjacent periods.5 The FAA is seeking voluntary cooperation by all carriers to retime flights within the described limits. Based on the average winter 2017/2018 schedules, modest changes would be needed in only a few periods to be within these limits. Additional flights could be approved in hours that are below the scheduling limits. Based on demand in winter 2017/ 2018 and summer 2018, the FAA anticipates the highest demand for flights will be in the 0700 and 0800 local hours (1200 to 1359 UTC) and 5 The half-hour and arrival and departure limits are approximately 55 percent of the typical hourly adjusted airport capacity. E:\FR\FM\09MYN1.SGM 09MYN1 21338 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 90 / Wednesday, May 9, 2018 / Notices 1400 to 2159 local hours (1900 to 0259 UTC). Requests for new flights will not be approved unless the hourly scheduled operations are within the previously described hourly limits. Consistent with the WSG, carriers should be prepared to adjust schedules to meet the hourly limits in order to minimize potential congestion and delay. The FAA seeks to reach agreement with carriers to schedule flights within the scheduling limits and urges all carriers to cooperate. The FAA is introducing the half-hourly and arrivals and departures limits within each hour in an effort to preserve the Level 2 designation at EWR. If voluntary schedule adjustments are not achievable and delays continue to increase, the FAA will consider whether a Level 3 designation is necessary. If a Level 3 designation is warranted, the FAA will work closely with OST regarding policies for the reintroduction of slot controls at EWR, which may include considering options to address access at the airport. In addition, the DOT and the FAA will determine whether a schedule reduction meeting is necessary pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 41722. Issued in Washington, DC, on May 4, 2018. Jeffrey Planty, Deputy Vice President, System Operations Services. [FR Doc. 2018–09894 Filed 5–8–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration [Docket No. FHWA–2018–0032] Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Comments for a New Information Collection Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: The FHWA invites public comments about our intention to request the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) approval for a new information collection, which is summarized below under Supplementary Information. We are required to publish this notice in the Federal Register by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Please submit comments by July 9, 2018. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by DOT Docket ID Number amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:39 May 08, 2018 Jkt 244001 2018–0032 by any of the following methods: Website: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Fax: 1–202–493–2251. Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590–0001. Hand Delivery or Courier: U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susanna Hughes Reck, Office of Infrastructure, HISM–20, (202) 366– 1548 Federal Highway Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Biennial Performance Reporting for the TPM Program. Background: The MAP–21 (Pub. L. 112–141) and FAST Act (Pub. L. 114– 94) transformed the Federal-aid highway program by establishing new requirements for transportation performance management (TPM) to ensure the most efficient investment of Federal transportation funds. Prior to MAP–21, there were no explicit requirements for State DOTs to demonstrate how their transportation program supported national performance outcomes. State DOTs were not required to measure condition or performance, establish targets, assess progress toward targets, or report on condition or performance in a nationally consistent manner that FHWA could use to assess the entire system. It has been difficult for FHWA to examine the effectiveness of the Federal-aid highway program as a means to address surface transportation performance at a national level without States reporting on the above factors. The new TPM requirements, as established by MAP–21 and FAST Act, change this paradigm and require states to measure condition or performance, establish targets, assess progress towards targets and report on condition or performance. State DOTs now must submit biennial performance reports (23 U.S.C. 150 (e) PO 00000 Frm 00082 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and 23 CFR 490.107). The information being requested in the TPM Biennial Reports will be provided to the DOT in an electronic format through an online data form called the Performance Management Form (PMF). Alternative formats will be made available where necessary. As part of the rulemaking 1 implementing the MAP–21 and FAST Act requirements, FHWA evaluated all of the Biennial Reporting requirements in the individual regulatory impact assessments (RIA) and determined the following: Respondents: 52 State DOTs, including Washington DC and Puerto Rico. Frequency: Biennially. Estimated Average Burden per Response: Approximately 2,128 hours annually for an individual State DOT to compile, organize, and submit the report to FHWA. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: Approximately 110,656 hours annually. Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspect of this information collection, including: (1) Ways for the FHWA to enhance the quality, usefulness, and clarity of the collected information; and (2) ways that the burden could be minimized,, without reducing the quality of the collected information. The agency will summarize and/or include your comments in the request for OMB’s clearance of this information collection. Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, as amended; and 49 CFR 1.48. Issued On: May 3, 2018. Michael Howell, Information Collection Officer. [FR Doc. 2018–09872 Filed 5–8–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–22–P 1 2nd National Performance Management Measures Rule (PM2): Assessing Pavement Condition for National Highway Performance Program and Bridge Condition for National Highway Performance Program; Assessing Performance of National Highway System, etc. (RIN: 2125–AF53) https://www.regulations.gov/ contentStreamer?documentId=FHWA-2013-00530222&contentType=pdf. 3rd National Performance Management Measures Rule (PM3): Assessing Performance of National Highway System, Freight Movement on Interstate System, and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program (RIN 2125–AF54) https:// www.regulations.gov/ contentStreamer?documentId=FHWA-2013-00548287&contentType=pdf. E:\FR\FM\09MYN1.SGM 09MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 90 (Wednesday, May 9, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 21335-21338]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-09894]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration


Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for 
Chicago O'Hare International Airport, John F. Kennedy International 
Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Newark Liberty 
International Airport, and San Francisco International Airport for the 
Winter 2018/2019 Scheduling Season

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of 
Transportation.

ACTION: Notice of submission deadline.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Under this notice, the FAA announces the submission deadline 
of May 17, 2018, for winter 2018/2019

[[Page 21336]]

flight schedules at Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD), John F. 
Kennedy International Airport (JFK), Los Angeles International Airport 
(LAX), Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), and San Francisco 
International Airport (SFO). The deadline coincides with the schedule 
submission deadline for the International Air Transport Association 
(IATA) Slot Conference for the winter 2018/2019 scheduling season.

DATES: Schedules must be submitted no later than May 17, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Schedules may be submitted by mail to the Slot 
Administration Office, AGC-200, Office of the Chief Counsel, 800 
Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591; facsimile: 202-267-7277; 
or by email to: [email protected].

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bryan Bourgoin, System Operations 
Services, Air Traffic Organization, Federal Aviation Administration, 
AJR-0, Room 300W, 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591; 
telephone number: 202-267-0968; email: [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA has designated EWR, LAX, ORD\\, and 
SFO as IATA Level 2 airports and JFK as an IATA Level 3 airport under 
the Worldwide Slot Guidelines (WSG). The FAA currently limits scheduled 
operations at JFK by Order until October 27, 2018.\1\ The FAA intends 
to extend the effective date of the JFK Order prior to the expiration 
of the current Order.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International 
Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008), as amended 81 FR 40167 (June 
21, 2016).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FAA is primarily concerned about scheduled and other regularly 
conducted commercial operations during peak hours, but carriers may 
submit schedule plans for the entire day. At ORD, the peak hours for 
the winter 2018/2019 scheduling season are 0700 to 2100 Central Time 
(1300 to 0300 UTC), at LAX and SFO from 0600 to 2300 Pacific Time (1400 
to 0700 UTC), and at EWR and JFK from 0600 to 2300 Eastern Time (1100 
to 0400 UTC). These hours are unchanged from previous scheduling 
seasons. Carriers should submit schedule information in sufficient 
detail including, at minimum, the marketing or operating carrier, 
flight number, scheduled time of operation, frequency, aircraft 
equipment, and effective dates. IATA standard schedule information 
format and data elements for communications at Level 2 and Level 3 
airports in the IATA Standard Schedules Information Manual (SSIM) 
Chapter 6 may be used. The WSG provides additional information on 
schedule submissions at Level 2 and Level 3 airports.
    The U.S. winter scheduling season is from October 28, 2018, through 
March 30, 2019, in recognition of the IATA northern winter scheduling 
period. The FAA understands there may be differences in schedule times 
due to different U.S. daylight saving time dates and will accommodate 
these differences to the extent possible.

General Information for All Airports

    The FAA considers several factors and priorities as it reviews 
schedule requests at Level 2 airports. The WSG states that schedule 
facilitation is based on schedule adjustments mutually agreed between 
the airlines and the facilitator; to avoid exceeding the airport's 
coordination parameters, that the concepts of historic precedence and 
series of slots do not apply at Level 2 airports, and that the 
facilitator should adjust the smallest number of flights by the least 
amount of time necessary to avoid exceeding the airport's coordination 
parameters. The WSG also includes priorities such as services from the 
previous equivalent season over new demand for the same timings, 
services that are unchanged over services that plan to change time or 
other capacity relevant parameters, introduction of year-round 
services, effective period of operation, regularly planned operations 
over ad hoc operations, and other operational factors that may limit a 
carrier's timing flexibility. In addition, Congress, the Department of 
Transportation (DOT), through the FAA and the Office of the Secretary 
(OST), and the Department of Justice have adopted a number of measures 
to promote competition and new entry at U.S. slot controlled airports 
and, likewise, the WSG has priorities to consider new entry and 
competition at Level 3 airports. The FAA prioritizes new entrant 
flights within the scheduling limits for the airport.
    Generally, the FAA uses average hourly runway capacity throughput 
for airports and performance metrics in its schedule reviews at Level 2 
airports.\2\ The FAA also considers other factors that can affect 
operations, such as capacity changes due to runway, taxiway, or other 
airport construction, air traffic control procedural changes, airport 
surface operations, or historical or projected flight delays and 
congestion. At JFK, the scheduling limit of 81 operations per hour is 
established in the FAA Order.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ The FAA typically determines an airport's average adjusted 
runway capacity or throughput for Level 2 and Level 3 airports by 
reviewing hourly data on the arrival and departure rates that air 
traffic control indicates could be accepted for that hour, commonly 
known as ``called'' rates. We also review the actual number of 
arrivals and departures that operated in the same hour. Generally, 
the FAA uses the higher of the two numbers, called or actual, for 
identifying trends and schedule review purposes. Some dates are 
excluded from analysis, such as during periods when extended airport 
closures or construction could affect capacity.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Slot management in the United States differs from other countries 
that follow the IATA WSG. In the United States, the FAA is responsible 
for facilitation and coordination of runway access for takeoffs and 
landings at Level 2 and Level 3 airports; however, the airport 
authority or its designee is responsible for facilitation and 
coordination of terminal/gate/airport facility access. The process with 
the individual airports for terminal access and other airport services 
is separate from, and in addition to, the FAA schedule review based on 
runway capacity. Approval from both the FAA and the airport authority 
for runway and airport availability, respectively, is necessary before 
implementing schedule plans. Contact information for Level 2 and Level 
3 airports is available at http://www.iata.org/policy/slots/Pages/slot-guidelines.aspx.
    The FAA seeks to improve communications with carriers and schedule 
facilitators at Level 2 airports on potential runway schedule issues or 
terminal and gate issues that may affect the runway times. The FAA also 
seeks to reduce the time that carriers consider proposed offers on 
schedules, especially within peak periods or in periods of limited 
availability with competing requests. Retaining open offers for 
extended periods of time may delay the facilitation process for the 
airport. Reducing this delay is particularly important to allow the FAA 
to make informed decisions at airports where some hours are at or near 
the scheduling limits. If carriers do not accept the offers or continue 
to submit revised schedules that are above the limits, the FAA cannot 
effectively assess the final proposed schedules. The agency recognizes 
that there are circumstances that may require some schedules to remain 
pending. However, the FAA expects to substantially complete the process 
on initial submissions each scheduling season within 30 days of the end 
of the Slot Conference. After this time, the agency would confirm the 
acceptance of offers or issue a denial of schedule requests so that 
there is no ambiguity about the initial approved and unapproved 
schedules.
    Finally, the FAA notes that the schedule information submitted by 
carriers to the FAA may be subject to

[[Page 21337]]

disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The WSG also 
provides for release of information at certain stages of slot 
coordination and schedule facilitation. In general, once it takes 
action, the FAA may release information on slot allocation or similar 
slot transactions or schedule information reviewed as part of the 
schedule facilitation process. The FAA does not expect that practice to 
change and most slot and schedule information would not be exempt from 
release under FOIA. The FAA recognizes that some airlines may submit 
information on schedule plans that is not available to the public and 
may be considered by the carrier to be proprietary. Carriers that 
submit slot or schedule information deemed proprietary should clearly 
mark such information accordingly. The FAA will take the necessary 
steps to protect properly designated information to the extent 
allowable by law.

JFK Schedules

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) plans 
construction on JFK Runway 13L/31R. The FAA will review the final 
phasing and assess the operational impacts once the construction plans 
are available. Mitigation strategies for prior runway construction 
projects could be used as needed. These include a ``playbook'' 
describing operational plans for various runway configurations and 
operating conditions, working with carriers to reduce schedules during 
certain periods or retime flights to less congested periods, limiting 
approval for new flights, or encouraging temporary reductions by 
waiving minimum slot usage requirements. The PANYNJ holds regular 
meetings with airlines and other stakeholders to discuss construction 
plans and consults with the FAA and local air traffic control 
facilities to minimize operational impacts. JFK operators also meet 
regularly to discuss operational issues at the airport. The FAA meets 
quarterly with stakeholders on operational issues in the greater New 
York City area. These various local meetings may be the best source of 
current construction-related information to assist in planning 
schedules and operations.

EWR Schedules

    The FAA is continuing to monitor operations and delays at EWR, 
especially in the busiest afternoon and evening hours. The FAA 
announced the change in designation to Level 2 at EWR in April 2016.\3\ 
Delays in summer 2016 increased over summer 2015, in part because 
allocated slots in the afternoon and evening hours were used at higher 
rates than in 2015. Subsequently, as expected, delays further increased 
as a result of new entry at EWR enabled by the change to Level 2. 
However, compared to summer 2007 when the airport operated without 
scheduling limits and slots \4\, most performance metrics for summer 
2017 were better than summer 2007 despite the additional flights under 
Level 2. The FAA recognizes there have been a number of changes in the 
NYC area since 2007, including changes in airspace and procedures, 
regulatory changes such as crew flight and duty time and long flight 
(tarmac) delays, and network management by airlines. The FAA is 
reviewing the current performance goals as well as any related capacity 
and operational impacts caused by these changes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ Change of Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) 
Designation, 81 FR 19861 (Apr. 6, 2016).
    \4\ Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at Newark Liberty 
International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008). The EWR Order 
took effect in June 2008. In addition to reviewing performance 
metrics on a year-over-year basis for the busiest summer months, one 
FAA goal in adopting the Order was to manage schedules and keep 
delays from exceeding summer 2007 levels. In summer 2017, the number 
of arriving flights delayed by two hours or more increased by 5.5 
percent compared to summer 2007.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Since transitioning to Level 2, requests for flights in the 
afternoon and evening hours have consistently exceeded the scheduling 
limits at EWR. The FAA advised carriers it would not be able to 
accommodate all requests for new operations and has reached agreement 
in most cases with carriers to retime flights as necessary in the 
initial seasons under Level 2. For the summer 2018 season, the FAA 
lowered the scheduling limit from 81 to 79 operations per hour based on 
an updated airport capacity analysis and review of summer 2017 
performance. The winter season limits were already at 79 per hour based 
on winter season capacity analyses. For summer 2018, the FAA encouraged 
carriers to reduce operations in the peak periods and operate flights 
in less congested hours to improve operations and reduce delays, 
particularly in the afternoon and evening hours. However, the FAA 
advised it would accept flights above the new hourly limits if the 
flights were operated in summer 2017. The FAA also indicated new 
flights were possible in hours with fewer than 79 operations.
    Despite the FAA's efforts to facilitate voluntary scheduling 
cooperation at EWR, certain carriers have been unwilling to reduce 
operations in peak hours to assist with the growing delays. Average 
demand for summer 2018 in the afternoon and evening hours remains at 81 
operations per hour as it was in summer 2017. There are periods when 
the demand in half-hours or consecutive half-hours exceeds the optimum 
runway capacity. The imbalance of scheduled arrivals and departures in 
certain periods has also contributed to increased congestion and delays 
when the demand exceeds the called arrival or departure rates. For 
example, early afternoon arrivals exceed optimum runway capacity and 
air traffic control regularly implements traffic management initiatives 
including ground delay programs. Recent FAA modeling indicates retiming 
arrivals from the 1400 hour to the 1300 and 1200 hours could have 
significant delay reduction benefits and help preserve the Level 2 
designation at EWR.
    For the summer 2018 season, airlines generally agreed to retime 
requests for new flights to periods outside of the peak hours. However, 
this growth has resulted in more hours with operations at the 
scheduling limits. As the summer 2018 schedules are expected to be 
similar to summer 2017, the performance metrics are highly unlikely to 
improve without further summer schedule adjustments.
    In light of the increasing delays in the peak afternoon hours due 
to the unwillingness of certain carriers to voluntarily retime historic 
flights into other less congested periods and the imbalance of arrivals 
and departures, the FAA is adopting new half-hourly scheduling limits 
of 43 operations, in addition to the current hourly limit of 79 per 
hour. As noted earlier, it is important to maintain a balance between 
arrivals and departures to limit delays. The maximum number of arrivals 
or departures, respectively, which can be accommodated is 43 in an hour 
and 24 in a half-hour. This would allow some higher levels of 
operations in certain periods (not to exceed the hourly limits) and 
some recovery from lower demand in adjacent periods.\5\ The FAA is 
seeking voluntary cooperation by all carriers to retime flights within 
the described limits. Based on the average winter 2017/2018 schedules, 
modest changes would be needed in only a few periods to be within these 
limits. Additional flights could be approved in hours that are below 
the scheduling limits.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ The half-hour and arrival and departure limits are 
approximately 55 percent of the typical hourly adjusted airport 
capacity.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Based on demand in winter 2017/2018 and summer 2018, the FAA 
anticipates the highest demand for flights will be in the 0700 and 0800 
local hours (1200 to 1359 UTC) and

[[Page 21338]]

1400 to 2159 local hours (1900 to 0259 UTC). Requests for new flights 
will not be approved unless the hourly scheduled operations are within 
the previously described hourly limits. Consistent with the WSG, 
carriers should be prepared to adjust schedules to meet the hourly 
limits in order to minimize potential congestion and delay.
    The FAA seeks to reach agreement with carriers to schedule flights 
within the scheduling limits and urges all carriers to cooperate. The 
FAA is introducing the half-hourly and arrivals and departures limits 
within each hour in an effort to preserve the Level 2 designation at 
EWR. If voluntary schedule adjustments are not achievable and delays 
continue to increase, the FAA will consider whether a Level 3 
designation is necessary. If a Level 3 designation is warranted, the 
FAA will work closely with OST regarding policies for the 
reintroduction of slot controls at EWR, which may include considering 
options to address access at the airport. In addition, the DOT and the 
FAA will determine whether a schedule reduction meeting is necessary 
pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 41722.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on May 4, 2018.
Jeffrey Planty,
Deputy Vice President, System Operations Services.
[FR Doc. 2018-09894 Filed 5-8-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-13-P