Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews for 35 Southeastern Species, 20092-20094 [2018-09604]

Download as PDF 20092 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 88 / Monday, May 7, 2018 / Notices Common name Ae ......................................... Status Known range of species occurrence Endangered ......... Hawaii .................................. 61 FR 53137, 10/10/1996. Endangered ......... Hawaii .................................. 59 FR 49025, 9/26/1994. Endangered ......... Endangered ......... Hawaii .................................. Hawaii .................................. 59 FR 49025, 9/26/1994. 57 FR 20772, 5/15/1992. Scientific name Zanthoxylum dipetalum tomentosum. var. Final listing rule and publication date Ferns and Allies No common name ............... No common name ............... Wawaeiole ............................ Asplenium peruvianum var. insulare. Diplazium molokaiense ............ Huperzia mannii ....................... Request for New Information To ensure that a 5-year review is complete and based on the best available scientific and commercial information, we request new information from all sources. See What Information Do We Consider in Our Review? for specific criteria. If you submit information, please support it with documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to gather and analyze the data, and/or copies of any pertinent publications, reports, or letters by knowledgeable sources. If you wish to provide information for any species listed in the table, please submit your comments and materials to the appropriate contact in ADDRESSES. Theresa E. Rabot, Acting Regional Director, Pacific Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2018–09603 Filed 5–4–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R4–ES–2017–N178; FXES11130900000C2–189–FF09E32000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews for 35 Southeastern Species AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Comments and materials received will be available for public inspection, by appointment, during normal business hours at the offices to which the comments are submitted. Completed and Active Reviews daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information. ACTION: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are initiating 5-year status reviews of 35 species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. A 5-year review is an assessment of the best scientific and commercial data available at the time of the review. We are requesting submission of information that has become available since the last reviews of these species. SUMMARY: To allow us adequate time to conduct these reviews, we must receive your comments or information on or before July 6, 2018. However, we will continue to accept new information about any listed species at any time. DATES: For instructions on how to submit information and review information that we receive on these species, see Request for New Information under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. A list of all completed and currently active 5-year reviews addressing species for which the Pacific Region of the Service has lead responsibility is available at https://www.fws.gov/pacific/ ecoservices/endangered/recovery/ 5year.html. ADDRESSES: Authority species-specific information, see Request for New Information under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. This document is published under the authority of the Endangered Species Act VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:38 May 04, 2018 Jkt 244001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 For Why do we conduct 5-year reviews? Under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, (ESA 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), we maintain lists of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species (referred to as the Lists) in title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 50 CFR 17.11 (for wildlife) and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the ESA requires us to review each listed species’ status at least once every 5 years. Our regulations at 50 CFR 424.21 require that we publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing those species under active review. For additional information about 5-year reviews, go to https://www.fws.gov/ endangered/what-we-do/recoveryoverview.html, scroll down to ‘‘Learn More about 5-Year Reviews,’’ and click on our factsheet. Species Under Review This notice announces our active review of 28 species that are currently listed as endangered: Fish and Wildlife Ivory-billed woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) Bermuda petrel (=cahow) (Pterodroma cahow) Laurel dace (Chrosomus saylori) Yellowcheek darter (Etheostoma moorei) Watercress darter (Etheostoma nuchale) Smoky madtom (Noturus baileyi) Chucky madtom (Noturus crypticus) Alabama sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus suttkusi) Dromedary pearlymussel (Dromus dromas) Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) Cracking pearlymussel (Hemistena lata) Alabama lampmussel (Lampsilis virescens) Birdwing pearlymussel (Lemiox rimosus) Alabama pearlshell (Margaritifera marrianae) Fat pocketbook (Potamilus capax) Pale lilliput (Toxolasma cylindrellus) Slender campeloma (Campeloma decampi) E:\FR\FM\07MYN1.SGM 07MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 88 / Monday, May 7, 2018 / Notices Armored snail (Pyrgulopsis (=Marstonia) pachyta) Plants Arenaria cumberlandensis (Cumberland sandwort) Astralagus bibullatus (Guthrie’s (=Pyne’s) ground plum) Baptisia arachnifera (Hairy rattleweed) Campanula robinsiae (Brooksville bellflower) Cyathea dryopteroides (Elfin tree fern) Harrisia aboriginum (Aboriginal prickly-apple) Justicia cooleyi (Cooley’s water-willow) Lesquerella perforata (Spring Creek bladderpod) Nolina brittoniana (Britton’s beargrass) Trillium persistens (Persistent trillium) This notice announces our active review of 7 species that are currently listed as threatened: Fish and Wildlife Eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon corais couperi) Ringed map turtle (=sawback) (Graptemys oculifera) Slackwater darter (Etheostoma boschungi) Yellowfin madtom (Noturus flavipinnis) Pygmy sculpin (Cottus pygmaeus) Plants Macbridea alba (White birds in a nest) Scutellaria floridana (Florida skullcap) daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES What information do we consider in our review? A 5-year review considers the best scientific and commercial data that have become available since the current listing determination or most recent status review of each species, such as: A. Species biology, including but not limited to population trends, distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics; B. Habitat conditions, including but not limited to amount, distribution, and suitability; C. Conservation measures that have been implemented to benefit the species; D. Threat status and trends (see the five factors under the heading How Do We Determine Whether A Species Is Endangered or Threatened?); and E. Other new information, data, or corrections, including but not limited to taxonomic or nomenclatural changes, identification of erroneous information contained in the List, and improved analytical methods. We request any new information concerning the status of any of these 35 species. Information submitted should be supported by documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:38 May 04, 2018 Jkt 244001 used to gather and analyze the data, and/or copies of any pertinent publications, reports, or letters by knowledgeable sources. We have completed 5-year review documents for the majority of our listed species in the Southeast. In many cases, we will only have to update previous 5year reviews, but we could possibly conduct a species status assessment (SSA) for some species. An SSA is a compilation of the best available information on the species, as well as its ecological needs based on environmental factors. Next, an SSA describes the current condition of the species’ habitat and demographics, and the probable explanations for past and ongoing changes in abundance and distribution within the species’ range. Last, an SSA forecasts the species’ response to probable future scenarios of environmental conditions and conservation efforts. Overall, an SSA uses the conservation biology principles of resiliency, redundancy, and representation (collectively known as the ‘‘3 Rs’’) to evaluate the current and future condition of the species. As a result, the SSA characterizes a species’ ability to sustain populations in the wild over time based on the best scientific understanding of current and future abundance and distribution within the species’ ecological settings. An SSA is a biological risk assessment to aid decision makers who must use the best available scientific information to make policy decisions under the ESA. The SSA provides decision makers with a scientifically rigorous characterization of a species’ status that and the likelihood that the species will sustain populations, along with key uncertainties in that characterization. Definitions A. Species means any species or subspecies of fish, wildlife, or plant, and any distinct population segment of any species of vertebrate which interbreeds when mature. B. Endangered means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. C. Threatened means any species that is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. How do we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened? Section 4(a)(1) of the ESA requires that we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened based on one or more of the following five factors: PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 20093 A. The present or threatened destruction, modification, or curtailment of its habitat or range; B. Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes; C. Disease or predation; D. The inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms; or E. Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence. Request for New Information To do any of the following, contact the person associated with the species you are interested in below: A. To get more information on a species; B. To submit information on a species; or C. To review information we receive, which will be available for public inspection by appointment, during normal business hours, at the listed addresses. Fish and Wildlife • Ivory-billed woodpecker: Amy Trahan, by mail at Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 646 Cajundome Blvd., Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506; by fax 337–291–3139, by phone at 337–291– 3100, or by email at lafayette@fws.gov. • Cahow (Bermuda petrel): John Hammond, by mail at the Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 551 Pylon Drive, #F, Raleigh, NC 27606; by fax at 919–856–4556; by phone at 919–856– 4520; or by email at raleigh_es@fws.gov. • Yellowfin madtom, smoky madtom, and laurel dace: Warren Stiles; and Chucky madtom, Cumberlandian combshell, birdwing pearlymussel, cracking pearlymussel, and dromedary pearlymussel: Stephanie Chance, both by mail at the Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 446 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501; by fax at 931– 528–7075; by phone at 931–528–6481; or by email at cookeville@fws.gov. • Yellowcheek darter: Chris Davidson, by mail at Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 110 South Amity Road, Suite 300, Conway, AR 72032; by fax at 501–513–4480; by phone at 501–513–4481; or by email at arkansas-es_recovery@fws.gov. • Ringed map turtle: Linda Laclaire; fat pocketbook: Paul Hartfield; and slackwater darter, pygmy sculpin, and watercress darter: Daniel Drennen, all three by mail at the Mississippi Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 6578 Dogwood View Parkway, Jackson, MS E:\FR\FM\07MYN1.SGM 07MYN1 20094 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 88 / Monday, May 7, 2018 / Notices daltland on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES 39213; by fax at 601–965–4340; by phone at 601–965–4900; or by email at Mississippi_field_office@fws.gov. • Alabama sturgeon: Jennifer Grunewald; Alabama pearlshell: Anthony Ford; Alabama lampmussel, pale lilliput, slender campeloma, and armored snail: Evan Collins, all three by mail at Alabama Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1208B Main St., Daphne, AL 36526; by fax at 251–441–6222; by phone at 251–441–5184; or by email at Alabama@fws.gov. • Eastern indigo snake: Michele Elmore, by mail at Georgia Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 52560, Fort Benning, GA 31995; by fax at 706–544– 6419; by phone at 706–544–6428; or by email at georgiaes@fws.gov. Plants • Cumberland sandwort, Pyne’s ground plum, and Spring Creek bladderpod: Geoff Call, by mail at the Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see contact information above). • Hairy rattleweed: April Punsulan, by mail at Charleston Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 176 Croghan Spur Road, Suite 200, Charleston, SC 29412; by fax at 843–727–4218; by phone at 843–727–4707; or by email at charleston_recovery@fws.gov. • Brooksville bellflower, Cooley’s water-willow, and Britton’s beargrass: Todd Mecklenborg, by mail at North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256; by fax 904–731– 3045, by phone at 904–731–3336, or by email at northflorida@fws.gov. • Elfin tree fern: Angel Colon, by mail at the Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Road 301, Km. 5.1, P.O. Box ´ 491, Boqueron, PR 00622; by fax at 787– 851–7440; by phone at 787–851–7297; or by email at caribbean_es@fws.gov. • Aboriginal prickly-apple: David Bender, by mail at South Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1339 20th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960; by fax 772–562–4288; by phone at 772–562– 3909 extension 294; or by email at SFESO_plant_5-year_reviews@fws.gov. • White birds in a nest and Florida skullcap: Vivian Negron-Ortiz, by mail at the Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 32405; by fax at 850–769–2177; by phone at 850–769–0552; or by email at panamacity@fws.gov. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:38 May 04, 2018 Jkt 244001 • Persistent trillium: David Caldwell, by mail at Georgia Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see contact information above). Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that the entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Availability of Status Reviews All completed status reviews under the ESA are available via the Service website: https://www.fws.gov/ endangered/species/us-species.html. Authority We publish this document under the authority of the Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Dated: March 20, 2018. Mike Oetker, Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region. [FR Doc. 2018–09604 Filed 5–4–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Fire Island National Seashore National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notification of boundary revision. AGENCY: The boundary of Fire Island National Seashore is modified to include 0.23 acres of land, more or less. Fee simple interest in the parcel will be donated to the United States from the National Park Foundation. The property is located in Suffolk County, New York, immediately adjacent to the northwestern boundary of the William Floyd Estate on the mainland portion of Fire Island National Seashore. DATES: The effective date of this boundary revision is May 7, 2018. ADDRESSES: The map depicting this boundary revision is available for inspection at the following locations: National Park Service, Land Resources Program Center, Northeast Region, 200 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Dated: March 5, 2018. Debbie Conway, Acting Regional Director, Northeast Region. [FR Doc. 2018–09583 Filed 5–4–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P [NPS–NER–FIIS–24967; PS.SNELA0076.00.1] SUMMARY: 19106–2878, and National Park Service, Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street NW, Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Deputy Realty Officer Jennifer Cherry, National Park Service, Land Resources Program Center, Northeast Region, New England Office, 115 John Street, 5th Floor, Lowell, MA 01852, telephone (978) 970–5260. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to 54 U.S.C. 100506(c), the boundary of Fire Island National Seashore is modified to include one adjoining tract containing 0.23 acres of land, more or less. The boundary revision is depicted on Map No. 615/137,241, dated March 2017. Specifically, 54 U.S.C. 100506(c) provides that, after notifying the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate, the Secretary of the Interior is authorized to make this boundary revision upon publication of notice in the Federal Register. The Committees have been notified of this boundary revision. This boundary revision and subsequent acquisition will ensure preservation and protection of the Park’s historic and natural resources. INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Public Availability of FY 2016 Service Contracts Inventory Analysis, and Planned Analysis of FY 2017 Service Contracts Inventory U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In accordance with Section 743 of Division C of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2010, the U.S. International Trade Commission is publishing this notice to advise the public of the availability of the FY 2016 Service Contracts Inventory Analysis, and Planned Analysis of FY 2017 Service Contracts Inventory. The FY 2016 inventory analysis provides information on specific service contract actions that were analyzed as part of the FY 2016 inventory. The 2016 inventory provides information on service contract actions over $25,000, which were made in FY 2016. The inventory information SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\07MYN1.SGM 07MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 88 (Monday, May 7, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 20092-20094]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-09604]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R4-ES-2017-N178; FXES11130900000C2-189-FF09E32000]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status 
Reviews for 35 Southeastern Species

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are 
initiating 5-year status reviews of 35 species under the Endangered 
Species Act of 1973, as amended. A 5-year review is an assessment of 
the best scientific and commercial data available at the time of the 
review. We are requesting submission of information that has become 
available since the last reviews of these species.

DATES: To allow us adequate time to conduct these reviews, we must 
receive your comments or information on or before July 6, 2018. 
However, we will continue to accept new information about any listed 
species at any time.

ADDRESSES: For instructions on how to submit information and review 
information that we receive on these species, see Request for New 
Information under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For species-specific information, see 
Request for New Information under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Why do we conduct 5-year reviews?

    Under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, (ESA 16 
U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), we maintain lists of endangered and threatened 
wildlife and plant species (referred to as the Lists) in title 50 of 
the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 50 CFR 17.11 (for wildlife) 
and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the ESA requires us to 
review each listed species' status at least once every 5 years. Our 
regulations at 50 CFR 424.21 require that we publish a notice in the 
Federal Register announcing those species under active review. For 
additional information about 5-year reviews, go to https://www.fws.gov/endangered/what-we-do/recovery-overview.html, scroll down to ``Learn 
More about 5-Year Reviews,'' and click on our factsheet.

Species Under Review

    This notice announces our active review of 28 species that are 
currently listed as endangered:

Fish and Wildlife

Ivory-billed woodpecker (Campephilus principalis)
Bermuda petrel (=cahow) (Pterodroma cahow)
Laurel dace (Chrosomus saylori)
Yellowcheek darter (Etheostoma moorei)
Watercress darter (Etheostoma nuchale)
Smoky madtom (Noturus baileyi)
Chucky madtom (Noturus crypticus)
Alabama sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus suttkusi)
Dromedary pearlymussel (Dromus dromas)
Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens)
Cracking pearlymussel (Hemistena lata)
Alabama lampmussel (Lampsilis virescens)
Birdwing pearlymussel (Lemiox rimosus)
Alabama pearlshell (Margaritifera marrianae)
Fat pocketbook (Potamilus capax)
Pale lilliput (Toxolasma cylindrellus)
Slender campeloma (Campeloma decampi)

[[Page 20093]]

Armored snail (Pyrgulopsis (=Marstonia) pachyta)

Plants

Arenaria cumberlandensis (Cumberland sandwort)
Astralagus bibullatus (Guthrie's (=Pyne's) ground plum)
Baptisia arachnifera (Hairy rattleweed)
Campanula robinsiae (Brooksville bellflower)
Cyathea dryopteroides (Elfin tree fern)
Harrisia aboriginum (Aboriginal prickly-apple)
Justicia cooleyi (Cooley's water-willow)
Lesquerella perforata (Spring Creek bladderpod)
Nolina brittoniana (Britton's beargrass)
Trillium persistens (Persistent trillium)

    This notice announces our active review of 7 species that are 
currently listed as threatened:

Fish and Wildlife

Eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon corais couperi)
Ringed map turtle (=sawback) (Graptemys oculifera)
Slackwater darter (Etheostoma boschungi)
Yellowfin madtom (Noturus flavipinnis)
Pygmy sculpin (Cottus pygmaeus)

Plants

Macbridea alba (White birds in a nest)
Scutellaria floridana (Florida skullcap)

What information do we consider in our review?

    A 5-year review considers the best scientific and commercial data 
that have become available since the current listing determination or 
most recent status review of each species, such as:
    A. Species biology, including but not limited to population trends, 
distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics;
    B. Habitat conditions, including but not limited to amount, 
distribution, and suitability;
    C. Conservation measures that have been implemented to benefit the 
species;
    D. Threat status and trends (see the five factors under the heading 
How Do We Determine Whether A Species Is Endangered or Threatened?); 
and
    E. Other new information, data, or corrections, including but not 
limited to taxonomic or nomenclatural changes, identification of 
erroneous information contained in the List, and improved analytical 
methods.
    We request any new information concerning the status of any of 
these 35 species. Information submitted should be supported by 
documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to 
gather and analyze the data, and/or copies of any pertinent 
publications, reports, or letters by knowledgeable sources.
    We have completed 5-year review documents for the majority of our 
listed species in the Southeast. In many cases, we will only have to 
update previous 5-year reviews, but we could possibly conduct a species 
status assessment (SSA) for some species. An SSA is a compilation of 
the best available information on the species, as well as its 
ecological needs based on environmental factors. Next, an SSA describes 
the current condition of the species' habitat and demographics, and the 
probable explanations for past and ongoing changes in abundance and 
distribution within the species' range. Last, an SSA forecasts the 
species' response to probable future scenarios of environmental 
conditions and conservation efforts. Overall, an SSA uses the 
conservation biology principles of resiliency, redundancy, and 
representation (collectively known as the ``3 Rs'') to evaluate the 
current and future condition of the species. As a result, the SSA 
characterizes a species' ability to sustain populations in the wild 
over time based on the best scientific understanding of current and 
future abundance and distribution within the species' ecological 
settings.
    An SSA is a biological risk assessment to aid decision makers who 
must use the best available scientific information to make policy 
decisions under the ESA. The SSA provides decision makers with a 
scientifically rigorous characterization of a species' status that and 
the likelihood that the species will sustain populations, along with 
key uncertainties in that characterization.

Definitions

    A. Species means any species or subspecies of fish, wildlife, or 
plant, and any distinct population segment of any species of vertebrate 
which interbreeds when mature.
    B. Endangered means any species that is in danger of extinction 
throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
    C. Threatened means any species that is likely to become an 
endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a 
significant portion of its range.

How do we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened?

    Section 4(a)(1) of the ESA requires that we determine whether a 
species is endangered or threatened based on one or more of the 
following five factors:
    A. The present or threatened destruction, modification, or 
curtailment of its habitat or range;
    B. Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or 
educational purposes;
    C. Disease or predation;
    D. The inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms; or
    E. Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued 
existence.

Request for New Information

    To do any of the following, contact the person associated with the 
species you are interested in below:
    A. To get more information on a species;
    B. To submit information on a species; or
    C. To review information we receive, which will be available for 
public inspection by appointment, during normal business hours, at the 
listed addresses.

Fish and Wildlife

     Ivory-billed woodpecker: Amy Trahan, by mail at Louisiana 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 646 
Cajundome Blvd., Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506; by fax 337-291-3139, 
by phone at 337-291-3100, or by email at [email protected].
     Cahow (Bermuda petrel): John Hammond, by mail at the 
Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, 551 Pylon Drive, #F, Raleigh, NC 27606; by fax at 919-856-
4556; by phone at 919-856-4520; or by email at [email protected].
     Yellowfin madtom, smoky madtom, and laurel dace: Warren 
Stiles; and Chucky madtom, Cumberlandian combshell, birdwing 
pearlymussel, cracking pearlymussel, and dromedary pearlymussel: 
Stephanie Chance, both by mail at the Tennessee Ecological Services 
Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 446 Neal Street, 
Cookeville, TN 38501; by fax at 931-528-7075; by phone at 931-528-6481; 
or by email at [email protected].
     Yellowcheek darter: Chris Davidson, by mail at Arkansas 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 110 
South Amity Road, Suite 300, Conway, AR 72032; by fax at 501-513-4480; 
by phone at 501-513-4481; or by email at [email protected].
     Ringed map turtle: Linda Laclaire; fat pocketbook: Paul 
Hartfield; and slackwater darter, pygmy sculpin, and watercress darter: 
Daniel Drennen, all three by mail at the Mississippi Ecological 
Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 6578 Dogwood 
View Parkway, Jackson, MS

[[Page 20094]]

39213; by fax at 601-965-4340; by phone at 601-965-4900; or by email at 
[email protected].
     Alabama sturgeon: Jennifer Grunewald; Alabama pearlshell: 
Anthony Ford; Alabama lampmussel, pale lilliput, slender campeloma, and 
armored snail: Evan Collins, all three by mail at Alabama Ecological 
Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1208B Main St., 
Daphne, AL 36526; by fax at 251-441-6222; by phone at 251-441-5184; or 
by email at [email protected].
     Eastern indigo snake: Michele Elmore, by mail at Georgia 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. 
Box 52560, Fort Benning, GA 31995; by fax at 706-544-6419; by phone at 
706-544-6428; or by email at [email protected].

Plants

     Cumberland sandwort, Pyne's ground plum, and Spring Creek 
bladderpod: Geoff Call, by mail at the Tennessee Ecological Services 
Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see contact information 
above).
     Hairy rattleweed: April Punsulan, by mail at Charleston 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 176 
Croghan Spur Road, Suite 200, Charleston, SC 29412; by fax at 843-727-
4218; by phone at 843-727-4707; or by email at 
[email protected].
     Brooksville bellflower, Cooley's water-willow, and 
Britton's beargrass: Todd Mecklenborg, by mail at North Florida 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 
Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256; by fax 904-731-3045, 
by phone at 904-731-3336, or by email at [email protected].
     Elfin tree fern: Angel Colon, by mail at the Caribbean 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Road 
301, Km. 5.1, P.O. Box 491, Boquer[oacute]n, PR 00622; by fax at 787-
851-7440; by phone at 787-851-7297; or by email at 
[email protected].
     Aboriginal prickly-apple: David Bender, by mail at South 
Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, 1339 20th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960; by fax 772-562-4288; 
by phone at 772-562-3909 extension 294; or by email at [email protected].
     White birds in a nest and Florida skullcap: Vivian Negron-
Ortiz, by mail at the Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 
32405; by fax at 850-769-2177; by phone at 850-769-0552; or by email at 
[email protected].
     Persistent trillium: David Caldwell, by mail at Georgia 
Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see 
contact information above).

Public Availability of Comments

    Before including your address, phone number, email address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that the entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

Availability of Status Reviews

    All completed status reviews under the ESA are available via the 
Service website: https://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html.

Authority

    We publish this document under the authority of the Endangered 
Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.).

    Dated: March 20, 2018.
Mike Oetker,
Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region.
[FR Doc. 2018-09604 Filed 5-4-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4333-15-P