Agency Information Collection Activities; Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) and Junior Duck Stamp Contests, 4671-4674 [2018-01968]

Download as PDF sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 22 / Thursday, February 1, 2018 / Notices Collection Request should be forwarded to DHS/NPPD/IP, ATTN: 1670–0013, 245 Murray Lane SW, Mail Stop 0380, Arlington, VA 20598–0640. Instructions: All submissions received must include the words ‘‘Department of Homeland Security’’ and the docket number for this action. Comments received will be posted without alteration at https://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Comments submitted in response to this notice may be made available to the public through relevant websites. For this reason, please do not include in your comments information of a confidential nature, such as sensitive personal information or proprietary information. If you send an email comment, your email address will be automatically captured and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made available on the internet. Please note that responses to this public comment request containing any routine notice about the confidentiality of the communication will be treated as public comments that may be made available to the public notwithstanding the inclusion of the routine notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For specific questions related to collection activities, please contact Quintin Whitaker at 703–235–9485 or at PSCP@ HQ.DHS.GOV. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Partnerships between the U.S. Government and the private sector at times necessitate the sharing of classified information. The PSCP and Cyber Information Sharing and Collaboration Program (CISCP) facilitate this sharing by sponsoring security clearances for certain members of each sector based on either their membership on a Sector Coordinating Council (SCC)/ association or their infrastructure protection job-related duties. In order to begin the process of approving a nominee to participate in the clearance program, DHS collects the nominee’s employment information and Personally Identifiable Information (PII). The nominee’s association/SCC membership or employment information is reviewed for approval, and his or her PII is input into the Electronic Questionnaires for Investigations Processing (e-QIP) system, the Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) secure portal for investigation processing. The U.S. Government is authorized to ask for this information under Section 201 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107–296, 6 U.S.C. 121), and Executive Orders 12968, 13526, and VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:34 Jan 31, 2018 Jkt 244001 13549, which authorize the collection of this information. The PSCP is designed to facilitate access to security clearances for private sector officials involved in the infrastructure protection mission. The CISCP is designed to facilitate access to security clearances for private sector entities involved in cybersecurity information sharing related to the National Cybersecurity Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) via CRADAs and for individuals via the CCIPP. CRADAs are agreements between the U.S. government and private entities for joint research and development efforts, and can be used to create bi-directional information sharing frameworks between DHS and private sector entities. The CCIPP, commonly referred to as the ‘‘Hybrid,’’ is a tool through which DHS shares classified cybersecurity-related information with critical infrastructure partners. These partners are subject matter experts within specific industries and have specialized knowledge not available within DHS. Private citizens do not receive monetary compensation for their time. DHS has created these programs to sponsor clearances for these individuals who are not employed by or contracted with another Federal agency (the traditional means of obtaining a clearance) and must have clearances. Program changes require a revision of the existing collection. These changes include: Updating the title of the collection, the form being used by CISCP, and updates to the form itself. The form will be used by the CISCP in the same manner as the PSCP to sponsor private sector entities and individuals for security clearances. The CISCP will increase the burden totals by 360 responses, 60 burden hours, and $6,155 annual burden cost. For the PSCP, the burden estimates have decreased by 200 responses, 33 burden hours and $706 annual burden cost based on actual responses received. As a result, the total burden estimates will increase overall by 160 responses, 27 burden hours, $5,448 annual burden costs. The changes to the form itself include: adding CRADA and CCIPP to the title; adding drop down capabilities relevant for the CRADA and the CCIPP, adding justification guidance to the back of the form, and updating the wording of the field titles and instructions to improve clarity. The changes to the form itself will not change the burden estimates as the only field being added is a menu to distinguish the program type. The annual government cost for the collection has increased by $242,850 due to the addition of the CISCP and has increased by $91,998 for the PSCP due to updated wage rates. As a result, the PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4671 annual government cost has increased by $334,848. This is a revised information collection. OMB is particularly interested in comments that: 1. Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; 2. Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; 3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and 4. Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. Title of Collection: Private Sector Clearance Program, Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, and Classified Critical Infrastructure Protection Program Request. OMB Control Number: 1670–0013. Frequency: Annually. Affected Public: Private and Public Sector. Number of Respondents: 660. Estimated Time per Respondent: 10 minutes. Total Burden Hours: 110 hours. Total Burden Cost (capital/startup): $0. Total Recordkeeping Burden: $0. Total Burden Cost (operating/ maintaining): $0. David Epperson, Chief Information Officer. [FR Doc. 2018–02009 Filed 1–31–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–9P–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–HQ–MB–2017–N168; FF09M13200/ 189/FXMB12330900000; OMB Control Number 1018–New] Agency Information Collection Activities; Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) and Junior Duck Stamp Contests AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. E:\FR\FM\01FEN1.SGM 01FEN1 4672 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 22 / Thursday, February 1, 2018 / Notices Notice of information collection; request for comment. ACTION: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service, we) are proposing a new information collection. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before April 2, 2018. ADDRESSES: Send your comments on the information collection request (ICR) by mail to the Service Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: BPHC, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041– 3803 (mail); or by email to Info_Coll@ fws.gov. Please reference OMB Control Number 1018–Duck Stamp in the subject line of your comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request additional information about this ICR, contact Madonna L. Baucum, Service Information Collection Clearance Officer, by email at Info_ Coll@fws.gov, or by telephone at (703) 358–2503. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we provide the general public and other Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on new, proposed, revised, and continuing collections of information. This helps us assess the impact of our information collection requirements and minimize the public’s reporting burden. It also helps the public understand our information collection requirements and provide the requested data in the desired format. We are soliciting comments on the proposed ICR that is described below. We are especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is the collection necessary to the proper functions of the Service; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the Service enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (5) how might the Service minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Comments that you submit in response to this notice are a matter of public record. We will include or summarize each comment in our request to OMB to approve this ICR. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:34 Jan 31, 2018 Jkt 244001 personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Abstract History of the Federal Duck Stamp On March 16, 1934, Congress passed, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed, the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act (16 U.S.C. 718–718k). Popularly known as the Duck Stamp Act, it required all waterfowl hunters 16 years or older to buy a stamp annually. The revenue generated was originally earmarked for the Department of Agriculture, but 5 years later was transferred to the Department of the Interior and the Service. In the years since its enactment, the Federal Duck Stamp Program has become one of the most popular and successful conservation programs ever initiated. Today, some 1.5 million stamps are sold each year, and as of 2017, Federal Duck Stamps have generated more than $1 billion for the preservation of more than 6 million acres of waterfowl habitat in the United States. Numerous other birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, and amphibians have similarly prospered because of habitat protection made possible by the program. An estimated one-third of the Nation’s endangered and threatened species find food or shelter in refuges preserved by Duck Stamp funds. Moreover, the protected wetlands help dissipate storms, purify water supplies, store flood water, and nourish fish hatchlings important for sport and commercial fishermen. History of the Duck Stamp Contest Jay N. ‘‘Ding’’ Darling, a nationally known political cartoonist for the Des Moines Register and a noted hunter and wildlife conservationist, designed the first Federal Duck Stamp at President Roosevelt’s request. In subsequent years, noted wildlife artists submitted designs. The first Federal Duck Stamp Contest was opened in 1949 to any U.S. artist who wished to enter, and 65 artists submitted a total of 88 design entries. Since then, the contest has been known as the Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp Art (Duck Stamp) Contest and has attracted large numbers of entrants. The Duck Stamp Contest (50 CFR part 91) remains the only art competition of its kind sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Secretary of the Interior appoints a panel of noted art, PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 waterfowl, and philatelic authorities to select each year’s winning design. Winners receive no compensation for the work, except a pane of their stamps, but winners may sell prints of their designs, which are sought by hunters, conservationists, and art collectors. The Service selects five or fewer species of waterfowl each year; each entry must employ one of the Servicedesignated species as the dominant feature (defined as being in the foreground and clearly the focus of attention). Designs may also include hunting dogs, hunting scenes, waterfowl decoys, national wildlife refuges as the background of habitat scenes, noneligible species, or other scenes that depict uses of the stamp for sporting, conservation, and collecting purposes. Entries may be in any media EXCEPT photography or computer-generated art. Designs must be the contestants’ original hand-drawn creation and may not be copied or duplicated from previously published art, including photographs, or from images in any format published on the internet. History of the Junior Duck Stamp Contest The Federal Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program (Junior Duck Stamp Program) began in 1989 as an extension of the Migratory Bird Conservation and Hunting Stamp. The national Junior Duck Stamp art contest started in 1993, and the first stamp design was selected from entries from eight participating states. The program was recognized by Congress with the 1994 enactment of the Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program Act (16 U.S.C. 719). All 50 states, Washington, DC, and 2 of the U.S. Territories currently participate in the annual contest. The Junior Duck Stamp Program introduces wetland and waterfowl conservation to students in kindergarten through high school. It crosses cultural, ethnic, social, and geographic boundaries to teach greater awareness and guide students in exploring our nation’s natural resources. It is the Service’s premier conservation education initiative. The Junior Duck Stamp Program includes a dynamic art- and sciencebased curriculum. This non-traditional pairing of subjects brings new interest to both the sciences and the arts. The program teaches students across the nation conservation through the arts, using scientific and wildlife observation principles to encourage visual communication about what they learn. Four curriculum guides, with activities and resources, were developed for use E:\FR\FM\01FEN1.SGM 01FEN1 4673 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 22 / Thursday, February 1, 2018 / Notices as a year-round study plan to assist students in exploring science in real-life situations. Modeled after the Federal Duck Stamp Contest, the annual Junior Duck Stamp Art and Conservation Message Contest (Junior Duck Stamp Contest) was developed as a visual assessment of a student’s learning and progression. The Junior Duck Stamp Contest encourages partnerships among Federal and State government agencies, nongovernment organizations, businesses, and volunteers to help recognize and honor thousands of teachers and students throughout the United States for their participation in conservation-related activities. Since 2000, the contest has received more than 478,000 entries. The winning artwork from the national art contest serves as the design for the Junior Duck Stamp, which the Service produces annually. This $5 stamp has become a much sought after collector’s item. One hundred percent of the revenue from the sale of Junior Duck stamps goes to support recognition and environmental education activities for students who participate in the program. More than $1.25 million in Junior Duck Stamp proceeds have been used to provide recognition, incentives, and scholarships to participating students, teachers, and schools. The Program continues to educate youth about land stewardship and the importance of connecting to their natural worlds. Several students who have participated in the Junior Duck Stamp Program have gone on to become full-time wildlife artists and conservation professionals; many attribute their interest and success to their early exposure to the Junior Duck Stamp Program. Who Can Enter the Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp Contests The Duck Stamp Contest is open to all U.S. citizens, nationals, and resident aliens who are at least 18 years of age by June 1. Individuals enrolled in kindergarten through grade 12 may participate in the Junior Duck Stamp Contest. All eligible students are encouraged to participate in the Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program annual art and conservation message contest as part of the program curriculum through public, private, and homeschools, as well as through nonformal educational experiences such as those found in scouting, art studios, and nature centers. Entry Requirements Each entry in the Duck Stamp Contest requires a completed entry form and an entry fee. Information required on the entry form includes: • ‘‘Display, Participation & Reproduction Rights Agreement’’ certification form; • Basic contact information (name, address, phone numbers, and email address); • Date of birth (to verify eligibility); • Species portrayed and medium used; and • Name of hometown newspaper (for press coverage). Each entry in the Junior Duck Stamp Contest requires a completed entry form that requests: Total number of annual respondents Activity Average number of submissions each • Basic contact information (name, address, phone numbers, and email address); • Age (to verify eligibility); • Parent’s name and contact information; • Whether the student has a Social Security or VISA immigration number (to verify eligibility to receive prizes); • Whether the student is a foreign exchange student; • Grade of student (so they may be judged with their peers); • The title, species, medium used, and conservation message associated with the drawing; • Basic contact information for their teacher and school (name, address, phone numbers, and email address); and • Certification of authenticity. Students in Grades 7–12 and all national level students are also required to include citations for any resources they used to develop their designs. We use this information to verify that the student has not plagiarized or copied someone else’s work. The Service also translates entry forms into other appropriate languages to increase the understanding of the rules and what the parents and students are signing. Title of Collection: Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) and Junior Duck Stamp Contests. OMB Control Number: 1018—NEW. Form Number: None. Type of Review: Existing collection in use without an OMB Control Number. Respondents/Affected Public: Individuals. Respondent’s Obligation: Voluntary. Frequency of Collection: Annually. Total number of annual responses Average completion time per response (min) Total annual burden hours Duck Stamp Program Contest Entry Form Individuals ............................................................................ 200 1 200 15 50 Junior Duck Stamp Program Contest Entry Form Individuals ............................................................................ 25,000 1 25,000 * 30 12,500 Totals ............................................................................ 25,200 1 25,200 ........................ 12,550 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES * Burden for Junior Duck Stamp Program entry form is longer since both the parents and teacher must sign the form, and the student must provide references. Total Estimated Annual Nonhour Burden Cost: $25,000.00 annually associated with entry fees required for contest entry submissions and mailing costs for submissions to the Federal Duck Stamp Contest. There are no fees VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:34 Jan 31, 2018 Jkt 244001 associated with the Junior Duck Stamp Contest submissions. An agency may not conduct or sponsor and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 The authority for this action is the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). E:\FR\FM\01FEN1.SGM 01FEN1 4674 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 22 / Thursday, February 1, 2018 / Notices Dated: January 29, 2018. Madonna L. Baucum, Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2018–01968 Filed 1–31–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R4–ES–2017–N148; FXES11140400000–178–FF04E00000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; Incidental Take Permit Application, Habitat Conservation Plan for Skink Species, and Environmental Assessment for Roadway Relocation in Polk County, FL Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. AGENCY: Under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA), we, the Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the receipt and availability of a proposed habitat conservation plan and environmental assessment related to an application for a permit associated with relocation of a 1.3-mile segment of Dude Ranch Road (project) located in Polk County, Florida. If issued, the permit would authorize take of the threatened sand skink and blue-tailed mole skink incidental to project construction. We invite the public to comment on these documents. DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by March 5, 2018. ADDRESSES: Obtaining Documents: Documents are available for public inspection by appointment during regular business hours at either of the following locations: • Atlanta Regional Office, Ecological Services, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1875 Century Boulevard, Atlanta, GA 30345. • South Florida Ecological Services Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1339 20th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Submitting Comments: Submit comments by one of the following methods. Please reference TE21091C–0 in all comments. For additional guidance, please see Public Comments under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. U.S. mail: You may mail comments to the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Atlanta Regional Office. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:34 Jan 31, 2018 Jkt 244001 Hand-delivery: You may hand-deliver comments to the Atlanta or the Vero Beach Offices. Email: You may email comments to david_dell@fws.gov. Please include your name and email address in your email message. If you do not receive an email confirmation from us that we have received your email message, contact us directly at either telephone number in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. David Dell, Regional HCP Coordinator, at the Atlanta Regional Office (see ADDRESSES); or Mr. John Wrublik, Project Manager, at the South Florida Ecological Services Office (see ADDRESSES); telephone: 772–469–4282. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), please call the Federal Relay Service at 800–877–8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq., ESA), we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the receipt and availability of a proposed habitat conservation plan (HCP), accompanying incidental take permit (ITP) application, and environmental assessment (EA) related to an application from Cemex Construction Materials Florida, LLC (applicant) for a permit to take sand skink (Neoseps reynoldsi) and bluetailed mole skink (Eumeces egregius lividus) (covered species), incidental to the relocation of a 1.3-mile segment of Dude Ranch Road in Polk County, Florida. We invite the public to comment on these documents. The applicants’ proposed HCP describes the mitigation and minimization measures proposed to address the impacts to the covered species. Per the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; NEPA), the EA analyzes the take of the covered species and impact to the environment. The applicant requests a 5-year ITP under section 10(a)(1)(B) of the ESA, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Environmental Assessment The EA assesses the likely environmental impacts associated with the implementation of the activities, including the environmental consequences of the no-action alternative, relocation of the roadway segment outside of the proposed footprint, and the proposed action. The proposed action alternative is issuance of the ITP and implementation of the HCP as submitted by the applicant. The applicant anticipates destroying approximately 12.1 acres of occupied sand skink and blue-tailed mole skink PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 habitat incidental to relocation and construction of a 1.3-mile section of Dude Ranch Road in Polk County, Florida. The existing paved two-lane county roadway is being relocated, per permission of Polk County, to allow for sand mining within the existing Dude Ranch Road footprint and lands adjacent to this footprint. The applicant indicates that sand mining in this area would not be financially feasible without relocation of the roadway. Polk County requires the applicant to relocate the roadway segment to maintain access for local residents and the public to the areas adjacent to the project site. Habitat Conservation Plan The HCP includes measures to minimize and mitigate impacts to the sand skink and the blue-tailed mole skink resulting from the roadway relocation. To minimize impacts to these species and their habitat, the footprint of the relocated roadway was reduced to the greatest extent practicable. The mitigation proposed by the applicant consists of the purchase of 24.2 credits (equaling 12.1 acres of skink habitat) from the Scrub Conservation Bank (SCB) in Highlands County, Florida. The SCB, which is a Service approved conservation bank, will preserve and manage skink habitat in perpetuity. Public Comments We specifically request information, views, and opinions from the public on our proposed Federal action, including identification of any other aspects of or impacts to the human environment not already identified in the EA prepared pursuant to the NEPA regulations at 40 CFR 1506.6. Further, we specifically solicit information regarding the adequacy of the HCP per 50 CFR parts 13 and 17. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Covered Area Sand skinks and blue-tailed mole skinks historically occurred within xeric uplands throughout the sandy ridges of central Florida. The area encompassed by the ITP application and HCP consists of 12.1 acres of privately owned lands E:\FR\FM\01FEN1.SGM 01FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 22 (Thursday, February 1, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4671-4674]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-01968]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-HQ-MB-2017-N168; FF09M13200/189/FXMB12330900000; OMB Control 
Number 1018-New]


Agency Information Collection Activities; Federal Migratory Bird 
Hunting and Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) and Junior Duck Stamp 
Contests

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

[[Page 4672]]


ACTION: Notice of information collection; request for comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we, 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service, we) are proposing a new 
information collection.

DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before 
April 2, 2018.

ADDRESSES: Send your comments on the information collection request 
(ICR) by mail to the Service Information Collection Clearance Officer, 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: BPHC, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls 
Church, VA 22041-3803 (mail); or by email to [email protected]. Please 
reference OMB Control Number 1018-Duck Stamp in the subject line of 
your comments.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request additional information 
about this ICR, contact Madonna L. Baucum, Service Information 
Collection Clearance Officer, by email at [email protected], or by 
telephone at (703) 358-2503.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995, we provide the general public and other Federal agencies 
with an opportunity to comment on new, proposed, revised, and 
continuing collections of information. This helps us assess the impact 
of our information collection requirements and minimize the public's 
reporting burden. It also helps the public understand our information 
collection requirements and provide the requested data in the desired 
format.
    We are soliciting comments on the proposed ICR that is described 
below. We are especially interested in public comment addressing the 
following issues: (1) Is the collection necessary to the proper 
functions of the Service; (2) will this information be processed and 
used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) 
how might the Service enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (5) how might the Service minimize the 
burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use 
of information technology.
    Comments that you submit in response to this notice are a matter of 
public record. We will include or summarize each comment in our request 
to OMB to approve this ICR. Before including your address, phone 
number, email address, or other personal identifying information in 
your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment--including 
your personal identifying information--may be made publicly available 
at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your 
personal identifying information from public review, we cannot 
guarantee that we will be able to do so.

Abstract

History of the Federal Duck Stamp

    On March 16, 1934, Congress passed, and President Franklin D. 
Roosevelt signed, the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act (16 U.S.C. 718-
718k). Popularly known as the Duck Stamp Act, it required all waterfowl 
hunters 16 years or older to buy a stamp annually. The revenue 
generated was originally earmarked for the Department of Agriculture, 
but 5 years later was transferred to the Department of the Interior and 
the Service.
    In the years since its enactment, the Federal Duck Stamp Program 
has become one of the most popular and successful conservation programs 
ever initiated. Today, some 1.5 million stamps are sold each year, and 
as of 2017, Federal Duck Stamps have generated more than $1 billion for 
the preservation of more than 6 million acres of waterfowl habitat in 
the United States. Numerous other birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, and 
amphibians have similarly prospered because of habitat protection made 
possible by the program. An estimated one-third of the Nation's 
endangered and threatened species find food or shelter in refuges 
preserved by Duck Stamp funds. Moreover, the protected wetlands help 
dissipate storms, purify water supplies, store flood water, and nourish 
fish hatchlings important for sport and commercial fishermen.

History of the Duck Stamp Contest

    Jay N. ``Ding'' Darling, a nationally known political cartoonist 
for the Des Moines Register and a noted hunter and wildlife 
conservationist, designed the first Federal Duck Stamp at President 
Roosevelt's request. In subsequent years, noted wildlife artists 
submitted designs. The first Federal Duck Stamp Contest was opened in 
1949 to any U.S. artist who wished to enter, and 65 artists submitted a 
total of 88 design entries. Since then, the contest has been known as 
the Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp Art (Duck 
Stamp) Contest and has attracted large numbers of entrants.
    The Duck Stamp Contest (50 CFR part 91) remains the only art 
competition of its kind sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Secretary 
of the Interior appoints a panel of noted art, waterfowl, and 
philatelic authorities to select each year's winning design. Winners 
receive no compensation for the work, except a pane of their stamps, 
but winners may sell prints of their designs, which are sought by 
hunters, conservationists, and art collectors.
    The Service selects five or fewer species of waterfowl each year; 
each entry must employ one of the Service-designated species as the 
dominant feature (defined as being in the foreground and clearly the 
focus of attention). Designs may also include hunting dogs, hunting 
scenes, waterfowl decoys, national wildlife refuges as the background 
of habitat scenes, non-eligible species, or other scenes that depict 
uses of the stamp for sporting, conservation, and collecting purposes. 
Entries may be in any media EXCEPT photography or computer-generated 
art. Designs must be the contestants' original hand-drawn creation and 
may not be copied or duplicated from previously published art, 
including photographs, or from images in any format published on the 
internet.

History of the Junior Duck Stamp Contest

    The Federal Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program 
(Junior Duck Stamp Program) began in 1989 as an extension of the 
Migratory Bird Conservation and Hunting Stamp. The national Junior Duck 
Stamp art contest started in 1993, and the first stamp design was 
selected from entries from eight participating states. The program was 
recognized by Congress with the 1994 enactment of the Junior Duck Stamp 
Conservation and Design Program Act (16 U.S.C. 719). All 50 states, 
Washington, DC, and 2 of the U.S. Territories currently participate in 
the annual contest.
    The Junior Duck Stamp Program introduces wetland and waterfowl 
conservation to students in kindergarten through high school. It 
crosses cultural, ethnic, social, and geographic boundaries to teach 
greater awareness and guide students in exploring our nation's natural 
resources. It is the Service's premier conservation education 
initiative.
    The Junior Duck Stamp Program includes a dynamic art- and science-
based curriculum. This non-traditional pairing of subjects brings new 
interest to both the sciences and the arts. The program teaches 
students across the nation conservation through the arts, using 
scientific and wildlife observation principles to encourage visual 
communication about what they learn. Four curriculum guides, with 
activities and resources, were developed for use

[[Page 4673]]

as a year-round study plan to assist students in exploring science in 
real-life situations.
    Modeled after the Federal Duck Stamp Contest, the annual Junior 
Duck Stamp Art and Conservation Message Contest (Junior Duck Stamp 
Contest) was developed as a visual assessment of a student's learning 
and progression. The Junior Duck Stamp Contest encourages partnerships 
among Federal and State government agencies, nongovernment 
organizations, businesses, and volunteers to help recognize and honor 
thousands of teachers and students throughout the United States for 
their participation in conservation-related activities. Since 2000, the 
contest has received more than 478,000 entries.
    The winning artwork from the national art contest serves as the 
design for the Junior Duck Stamp, which the Service produces annually. 
This $5 stamp has become a much sought after collector's item. One 
hundred percent of the revenue from the sale of Junior Duck stamps goes 
to support recognition and environmental education activities for 
students who participate in the program. More than $1.25 million in 
Junior Duck Stamp proceeds have been used to provide recognition, 
incentives, and scholarships to participating students, teachers, and 
schools. The Program continues to educate youth about land stewardship 
and the importance of connecting to their natural worlds. Several 
students who have participated in the Junior Duck Stamp Program have 
gone on to become full-time wildlife artists and conservation 
professionals; many attribute their interest and success to their early 
exposure to the Junior Duck Stamp Program.

Who Can Enter the Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp Contests

    The Duck Stamp Contest is open to all U.S. citizens, nationals, and 
resident aliens who are at least 18 years of age by June 1. Individuals 
enrolled in kindergarten through grade 12 may participate in the Junior 
Duck Stamp Contest. All eligible students are encouraged to participate 
in the Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program annual art and 
conservation message contest as part of the program curriculum through 
public, private, and homeschools, as well as through nonformal 
educational experiences such as those found in scouting, art studios, 
and nature centers.

Entry Requirements

    Each entry in the Duck Stamp Contest requires a completed entry 
form and an entry fee. Information required on the entry form includes:
     ``Display, Participation & Reproduction Rights Agreement'' 
certification form;
     Basic contact information (name, address, phone numbers, 
and email address);
     Date of birth (to verify eligibility);
     Species portrayed and medium used; and
     Name of hometown newspaper (for press coverage).
    Each entry in the Junior Duck Stamp Contest requires a completed 
entry form that requests:
     Basic contact information (name, address, phone numbers, 
and email address);
     Age (to verify eligibility);
     Parent's name and contact information;
     Whether the student has a Social Security or VISA 
immigration number (to verify eligibility to receive prizes);
     Whether the student is a foreign exchange student;
     Grade of student (so they may be judged with their peers);
     The title, species, medium used, and conservation message 
associated with the drawing;
     Basic contact information for their teacher and school 
(name, address, phone numbers, and email address); and
     Certification of authenticity.
    Students in Grades 7-12 and all national level students are also 
required to include citations for any resources they used to develop 
their designs. We use this information to verify that the student has 
not plagiarized or copied someone else's work. The Service also 
translates entry forms into other appropriate languages to increase the 
understanding of the rules and what the parents and students are 
signing.
    Title of Collection: Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and 
Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) and Junior Duck Stamp Contests.
    OMB Control Number: 1018--NEW.
    Form Number: None.
    Type of Review: Existing collection in use without an OMB Control 
Number.
    Respondents/Affected Public: Individuals.
    Respondent's Obligation: Voluntary.
    Frequency of Collection: Annually.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Average                         Average
                                   Total number      number of     Total  number    completion     Total annual
            Activity                 of annual      submissions     of  annual       time per      burden hours
                                    respondents        each          responses    response (min)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Duck Stamp Program Contest Entry Form
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individuals.....................             200               1             200              15              50
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  Junior Duck Stamp Program Contest Entry Form
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individuals.....................          25,000               1          25,000            * 30          12,500
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Totals......................          25,200               1          25,200  ..............          12,550
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* Burden for Junior Duck Stamp Program entry form is longer since both the parents and teacher must sign the
  form, and the student must provide references.

    Total Estimated Annual Nonhour Burden Cost: $25,000.00 annually 
associated with entry fees required for contest entry submissions and 
mailing costs for submissions to the Federal Duck Stamp Contest. There 
are no fees associated with the Junior Duck Stamp Contest submissions.
    An agency may not conduct or sponsor and a person is not required 
to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a 
currently valid OMB control number.
    The authority for this action is the Paperwork Reduction Act of 
1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.).


[[Page 4674]]


    Dated: January 29, 2018.
Madonna L. Baucum,
Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service.
[FR Doc. 2018-01968 Filed 1-31-18; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4333-15-P