In the Matter of: Joseph Esequiel-Gonzalez, Inmate Number: 04655-479, FCI Bastrop Federal Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 1010, Bastrop, TX 78602; Order Denying Export Privileges, 61536-61537 [2017-28006]

Download as PDF sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 61536 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 248 / Thursday, December 28, 2017 / Notices information under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act. Agency: U.S. Census Bureau. Title: Survey of Housing Starts, Sales & Completions. OMB Control Number: 0607–0110. Form Number(s): SOC–Q1/SF.1, SCO– Q1/MF.1. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Number of Respondents: 19,440. Average Hours per Response: 5 minutes. Burden Hours: 150,066. Needs and Uses: The U.S. Census Bureau is requesting a revision and extension of the currently approved collection for the Survey of Housing Starts, Sales, and Completions, otherwise known as the Survey of Construction (SOC). Government agencies and private companies use statistics from SOC to monitor and evaluate the large and dynamic housing construction industry. Data for two Principal Federal Economic Indicators are produced from the SOC: New Residential Construction (housing starts and housing completions) and New Residential Sales. In addition, a number of other statistical series are produced, including extensive information on the physical characteristics of new residential buildings, and indexes measuring rates of inflation in the price of new buildings. The collection of data on housing units sold and completed and physical characteristics is funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) via a reimbursable agreement with the Census Bureau. HUD uses data on housing market conditions to inform its policies. These statistics are based on a sample of residential buildings in permit-issuing places and a road canvass in a sample of land areas not covered by building permit systems. The respondents are homebuilders, real estate agents, rental agents, or new homeowners of sampled residential buildings. Field Representatives contact respondents multiple times based on the number of projects in the sample and the number of months required to complete the project (usually about 8 months). After discussions with HUD and other key data users, we identified one new data item on ceiling height to be added to the single-family questionnaire. The Census Bureau uses the information collected in the SOC to publish estimates of the number of new residential housing units started, under construction, completed, and the number of new houses sold and for sale. The Census Bureau also publishes many financial and physical characteristics of VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:14 Dec 27, 2017 Jkt 244001 new housing units. Government agencies use these statistics to evaluate economic policy, measure progress towards the national housing goal, make policy decisions, and formulate legislation. For example, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System uses data from this survey to evaluate the effect of interest rates in this interest-rate sensitive area of the economy. The Bureau of Economic Analysis uses the data in developing the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The private sector uses the information for estimating the demand for building materials and the many products used in new housing and to schedule production, distribution, and sales efforts. The financial community uses the data to estimate the demand for short-term (construction loans) and long-term (mortgages) borrowing. Affected Public: Individuals; Businesses. Frequency: Monthly. Respondent’s Obligation: Voluntary. Legal Authority: Title 13, United States Code, Sections 131 and 182. This information collection request may be viewed at www.reginfo.gov. Follow the instructions to view Department of Commerce collections currently under review by OMB. Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to OIRA_Submission@ omb.eop.gov or fax to (202) 395–5806. Sheleen Dumas, Departmental PRA Lead, Office of the Chief Information Officer. [FR Doc. 2017–28021 Filed 12–27–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–07–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Joseph EsequielGonzalez, Inmate Number: 04655–479, FCI Bastrop Federal Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 1010, Bastrop, TX 78602; Order Denying Export Privileges On August 30, 2016, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Joseph Esequiel-Gonzalez (‘‘Esequiel-Gonzalez’’) was convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778 (2012)) (‘‘AECA’’). Specifically, EsequielGonzalez was convicted of knowingly and willfully exporting, attempting to export, and causing to be exported from the United States to Mexico a .380 caliber pistol, which was designated as PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 a defense article on the United States Munitions List, without the required U.S. Department of State license. Esequiel-Gonzalez was sentenced to 55 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and a special assessment of $100. Section 766.25 of the Export Administration Regulations (‘‘EAR’’ or ‘‘Regulations’’) 1 provides, in pertinent part, that ‘‘[t]he Director of the Office of Exporter Services, in consultation with the Director of the Office of Export Enforcement, may deny the export privileges of any person who has been convicted of a violation of the EAA [Export Administration Act], the EAR, or any order, license, or authorization issued thereunder; any regulation, license or order issued under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701–1706); 18 U.S.C. 793, 794 or 798; section 4(b) of the Internal Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 783(b)); or section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778).’’ 15 CFR 766.25(a); see also Section 11(h) of the EAA, 50 U.S.C. 4610(h). The denial of export privileges under this provision may be for a period of up to 10 years from the date of the conviction. 15 CFR 766.25(d); see also 50 U.S.C. 4610(h). In addition, Section 750.8 of the Regulations states that the Bureau of Industry and Security’s Office of Exporter Services may revoke any Bureau of Industry and Security (‘‘BIS’’) licenses previously issued pursuant to the Export Administration Act (‘‘EAA’’ or ‘‘the Act’’) or the Regulations in which the person had an interest at the time of his/her conviction. BIS has received notice of EsequielGonzalez’s conviction for violating Section 38 of the AECA, and has provided notice and an opportunity for Esequiel-Gonzalez to make a written submission to BIS, as provided in Section 766.25 of the Regulations. BIS has not received a submission from Esequiel-Gonzalez. Based upon my review and consultations with BIS’s Office of Export Enforcement, including its Director, and the facts available to BIS, I have decided to deny Esequiel1 The Regulations are currently codified in the Code of Federal Regulations at 15 CFR parts 730– 774 (2017). The Regulations issued pursuant to the Export Administration Act (50 U.S.C. 4601–4623 (Supp. III 2015) (available at http:// uscode.house.gov)) (‘‘EAA’’ or ‘‘the Act’’). Since August 21, 2001, the Act has been in lapse and the President, through Executive Order 13222 of August 17, 2001 (3 CFR, 2001 Comp. 783 (2002)), which has been extended by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 15, 2017 (82 FR 39005 (Aug. 16, 2017)), has continued the Regulations in effect under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701, et seq. (2012)). E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 248 / Thursday, December 28, 2017 / Notices Gonzalez’s export privileges under the Regulations for a period of 10 years from the date of Esequiel-Gonzalez’s conviction. I have also decided to revoke all licenses issued pursuant to the Act or Regulations in which Esequiel-Gonzalez had an interest at the time of his conviction. Accordingly, it is hereby ordered: First, from the date of this Order until August 30, 2026, Joseph EsequielGonzalez, with a last known address of Inmate Number 04655–479, FCI Bastrop Federal Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 1010, Bastrop, TX 78602, and when acting for or on his behalf, his successors, assigns, employees, agents or representatives (‘‘the Denied Person’’), may not, directly or indirectly, participate in any way in any transaction involving any commodity, software or technology (hereinafter collectively referred to as ‘‘item’’) exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, including, but not limited to: A. Applying for, obtaining, or using any license, license exception, or export control document; B. Carrying on negotiations concerning, or ordering, buying, receiving, using, selling, delivering, storing, disposing of, forwarding, transporting, financing, or otherwise servicing in any way, any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or engaging in any other activity subject to the Regulations; or C. Benefitting in any way from any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or from any other activity subject to the Regulations. Second, no person may, directly or indirectly, do any of the following: A. Export or reexport to or on behalf of the Denied Person any item subject to the Regulations; B. Take any action that facilitates the acquisition or attempted acquisition by the Denied Person of the ownership, possession, or control of any item subject to the Regulations that has been or will be exported from the United States, including financing or other support activities related to a transaction whereby the Denied Person acquires or attempts to acquire such ownership, possession or control; C. Take any action to acquire from or to facilitate the acquisition or attempted acquisition from the Denied Person of any item subject to the Regulations that has been exported from the United States; VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:14 Dec 27, 2017 Jkt 244001 D. Obtain from the Denied Person in the United States any item subject to the Regulations with knowledge or reason to know that the item will be, or is intended to be, exported from the United States; or E. Engage in any transaction to service any item subject to the Regulations that has been or will be exported from the United States and which is owned, possessed or controlled by the Denied Person, or service any item, of whatever origin, that is owned, possessed or controlled by the Denied Person if such service involves the use of any item subject to the Regulations that has been or will be exported from the United States. For purposes of this paragraph, servicing means installation, maintenance, repair, modification or testing. Third, after notice and opportunity for comment as provided in Section 766.23 of the Regulations, any other person, firm, corporation, or business organization related to EsequielGonzalez by ownership, control, position of responsibility, affiliation, or other connection in the conduct of trade or business may also be made subject to the provisions of this Order in order to prevent evasion of this Order. Fourth, in accordance with Part 756 of the Regulations, Esequiel-Gonzalez may file an appeal of this Order with the Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security. The appeal must be filed within 45 days from the date of this Order and must comply with the provisions of Part 756 of the Regulations. Fifth, a copy of this Order shall be delivered to Esequiel-Gonzalez and shall be published in the Federal Register. Sixth, this Order is effective immediately and shall remain in effect until August 30, 2026. Issued this 19th day of December 2017. Karen H. Nies-Vogel, Director, Office of Exporter Services. [FR Doc. 2017–28006 Filed 12–27–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Hunter Perry, 173 Red Hawk Drive, Vine Grove, KY 40175; Order Denying Export Privileges On July 20, 2016, in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky, Hunter Perry (‘‘Perry’’) was convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778 (2012)) (‘‘AECA’’). Specifically, PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61537 Perry was convicted of knowingly and willfully exporting or causing to be exported from the United States to the United Kingdom defense articles on the United States Munitions List, without the required U.S. Department of State licenses, including, inter alia, a D–760 night vision scope, a PAS–13 thermal scope, a PAS–23 mini-thermal scope, and a PVS–15 night vision binocular. Perry was sentenced to one day in prison, one year of supervised release, and a special assessment of $500. Section 766.25 of the Export Administration Regulations (‘‘EAR’’ or ‘‘Regulations’’) 1 provides, in pertinent part, that ‘‘[t]he Director of the Office of Exporter Services, in consultation with the Director of the Office of Export Enforcement, may deny the export privileges of any person who has been convicted of a violation of the EAA [Export Administration Act], the EAR, or any order, license, or authorization issued thereunder; any regulation, license or order issued under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701–1706); 18 U.S.C. 793, 794 or 798; section 4(b) of the Internal Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 783(b)); or section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778).’’ 15 CFR 766.25(a); see also Section 11(h) of the EAA, 50 U.S.C. 4610(h). The denial of export privileges under this provision may be for a period of up to 10 years from the date of the conviction. 15 CFR 766.25(d); see also 50 U.S.C. 4610(h). In addition, Section 750.8 of the Regulations states that the Bureau of Industry and Security’s Office of Exporter Services may revoke any Bureau of Industry and Security (‘‘BIS’’) licenses previously issued pursuant to the Export Administration Act (‘‘EAA’’ or ‘‘the Act’’) or the Regulations in which the person had an interest at the time of his/her conviction. BIS has received notice of Perry’s conviction for violating Section 38 of the AECA, and has provided notice and an opportunity for Perry to make a written submission to BIS, as provided in Section 766.25 of the Regulations. BIS has not received a submission from Perry. 1 The Regulations are currently codified in the Code of Federal Regulations at 15 CFR parts 730– 774 (2017). The Regulations issued pursuant to the Export Administration Act (50 U.S.C. 4601–4623 (Supp. III 2015) (available at http:// uscode.house.gov)) (‘‘EAA’’ or ‘‘the Act’’). Since August 21, 2001, the Act has been in lapse and the President, through Executive Order 13222 of August 17, 2001 (3 CFR, 2001 Comp. 783 (2002)), which has been extended by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 15, 2017 (82 FR 39005 (Aug. 16, 2017)), has continued the Regulations in effect under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701, et seq. (2012)). E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 248 (Thursday, December 28, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 61536-61537]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-28006]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Bureau of Industry and Security


In the Matter of: Joseph Esequiel-Gonzalez, Inmate Number: 04655-
479, FCI Bastrop Federal Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 1010, 
Bastrop, TX 78602; Order Denying Export Privileges

    On August 30, 2016, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern 
District of Texas, Joseph Esequiel-Gonzalez (``Esequiel-Gonzalez'') was 
convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
U.S.C. 2778 (2012)) (``AECA''). Specifically, Esequiel-Gonzalez was 
convicted of knowingly and willfully exporting, attempting to export, 
and causing to be exported from the United States to Mexico a .380 
caliber pistol, which was designated as a defense article on the United 
States Munitions List, without the required U.S. Department of State 
license. Esequiel-Gonzalez was sentenced to 55 months in prison, three 
years of supervised release, and a special assessment of $100.
    Section 766.25 of the Export Administration Regulations (``EAR'' or 
``Regulations'') \1\ provides, in pertinent part, that ``[t]he Director 
of the Office of Exporter Services, in consultation with the Director 
of the Office of Export Enforcement, may deny the export privileges of 
any person who has been convicted of a violation of the EAA [Export 
Administration Act], the EAR, or any order, license, or authorization 
issued thereunder; any regulation, license or order issued under the 
International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706); 18 
U.S.C. 793, 794 or 798; section 4(b) of the Internal Security Act of 
1950 (50 U.S.C. 783(b)); or section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act 
(22 U.S.C. 2778).'' 15 CFR 766.25(a); see also Section 11(h) of the 
EAA, 50 U.S.C. 4610(h). The denial of export privileges under this 
provision may be for a period of up to 10 years from the date of the 
conviction. 15 CFR 766.25(d); see also 50 U.S.C. 4610(h). In addition, 
Section 750.8 of the Regulations states that the Bureau of Industry and 
Security's Office of Exporter Services may revoke any Bureau of 
Industry and Security (``BIS'') licenses previously issued pursuant to 
the Export Administration Act (``EAA'' or ``the Act'') or the 
Regulations in which the person had an interest at the time of his/her 
conviction.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The Regulations are currently codified in the Code of 
Federal Regulations at 15 CFR parts 730-774 (2017). The Regulations 
issued pursuant to the Export Administration Act (50 U.S.C. 4601-
4623 (Supp. III 2015) (available at http://uscode.house.gov)) 
(``EAA'' or ``the Act''). Since August 21, 2001, the Act has been in 
lapse and the President, through Executive Order 13222 of August 17, 
2001 (3 CFR, 2001 Comp. 783 (2002)), which has been extended by 
successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of 
August 15, 2017 (82 FR 39005 (Aug. 16, 2017)), has continued the 
Regulations in effect under the International Emergency Economic 
Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701, et seq. (2012)).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    BIS has received notice of Esequiel-Gonzalez's conviction for 
violating Section 38 of the AECA, and has provided notice and an 
opportunity for Esequiel-Gonzalez to make a written submission to BIS, 
as provided in Section 766.25 of the Regulations. BIS has not received 
a submission from Esequiel-Gonzalez.
    Based upon my review and consultations with BIS's Office of Export 
Enforcement, including its Director, and the facts available to BIS, I 
have decided to deny Esequiel-

[[Page 61537]]

Gonzalez's export privileges under the Regulations for a period of 10 
years from the date of Esequiel-Gonzalez's conviction. I have also 
decided to revoke all licenses issued pursuant to the Act or 
Regulations in which Esequiel-Gonzalez had an interest at the time of 
his conviction.
    Accordingly, it is hereby ordered:
    First, from the date of this Order until August 30, 2026, Joseph 
Esequiel-Gonzalez, with a last known address of Inmate Number 04655-
479, FCI Bastrop Federal Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 1010, 
Bastrop, TX 78602, and when acting for or on his behalf, his 
successors, assigns, employees, agents or representatives (``the Denied 
Person''), may not, directly or indirectly, participate in any way in 
any transaction involving any commodity, software or technology 
(hereinafter collectively referred to as ``item'') exported or to be 
exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, 
including, but not limited to:
    A. Applying for, obtaining, or using any license, license 
exception, or export control document;
    B. Carrying on negotiations concerning, or ordering, buying, 
receiving, using, selling, delivering, storing, disposing of, 
forwarding, transporting, financing, or otherwise servicing in any way, 
any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the 
United States that is subject to the Regulations, or engaging in any 
other activity subject to the Regulations; or
    C. Benefitting in any way from any transaction involving any item 
exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to 
the Regulations, or from any other activity subject to the Regulations.
    Second, no person may, directly or indirectly, do any of the 
following:
    A. Export or reexport to or on behalf of the Denied Person any item 
subject to the Regulations;
    B. Take any action that facilitates the acquisition or attempted 
acquisition by the Denied Person of the ownership, possession, or 
control of any item subject to the Regulations that has been or will be 
exported from the United States, including financing or other support 
activities related to a transaction whereby the Denied Person acquires 
or attempts to acquire such ownership, possession or control;
    C. Take any action to acquire from or to facilitate the acquisition 
or attempted acquisition from the Denied Person of any item subject to 
the Regulations that has been exported from the United States;
    D. Obtain from the Denied Person in the United States any item 
subject to the Regulations with knowledge or reason to know that the 
item will be, or is intended to be, exported from the United States; or
    E. Engage in any transaction to service any item subject to the 
Regulations that has been or will be exported from the United States 
and which is owned, possessed or controlled by the Denied Person, or 
service any item, of whatever origin, that is owned, possessed or 
controlled by the Denied Person if such service involves the use of any 
item subject to the Regulations that has been or will be exported from 
the United States. For purposes of this paragraph, servicing means 
installation, maintenance, repair, modification or testing.
    Third, after notice and opportunity for comment as provided in 
Section 766.23 of the Regulations, any other person, firm, corporation, 
or business organization related to Esequiel-Gonzalez by ownership, 
control, position of responsibility, affiliation, or other connection 
in the conduct of trade or business may also be made subject to the 
provisions of this Order in order to prevent evasion of this Order.
    Fourth, in accordance with Part 756 of the Regulations, Esequiel-
Gonzalez may file an appeal of this Order with the Under Secretary of 
Commerce for Industry and Security. The appeal must be filed within 45 
days from the date of this Order and must comply with the provisions of 
Part 756 of the Regulations.
    Fifth, a copy of this Order shall be delivered to Esequiel-Gonzalez 
and shall be published in the Federal Register.
    Sixth, this Order is effective immediately and shall remain in 
effect until August 30, 2026.

    Issued this 19th day of December 2017.
Karen H. Nies-Vogel,
Director, Office of Exporter Services.
[FR Doc. 2017-28006 Filed 12-27-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE P