Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama, 61654-61657 [2017-27975]

Download as PDF sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 61654 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 248 / Thursday, December 28, 2017 / Notices issues of importance to small shippers and small railroads, including car supply, rates, competition, and procedures for addressing claims. ICCTA instructs RSTAC to endeavor to develop private-sector mechanisms to prevent, or identify and address, obstacles to the most effective and efficient transportation system practicable. RSTAC also prepares an annual report concerning its activities and recommendations on whatever regulatory or legislative relief it considers appropriate. RSTAC is not subject to the Federal Advisory Committee Act. RSTAC currently consists of 19 members. Of this number, 15 members are appointed by the Chairman of the Board, and the remaining four members are comprised of the Secretary of Transportation and the Members of the Board, who serve as ex officio, nonvoting members. Of the 15 appointed members, nine are voting members and are appointed from senior executive officers of organizations engaged in the railroad and rail shipping industries. At least four of the voting members must be representatives of small shippers as determined by the Chairman, and at least four of the voting members must be representatives of Class II or III railroads. The remaining six members to be appointed—three representing Class I railroads and three representing large shipper organizations—serve in a nonvoting, advisory capacity, but are entitled to participate in RSTAC deliberations. RSTAC is required by statute to meet at least semi-annually. In recent years, RSTAC has met four times a year. Meetings are generally held at the Board’s headquarters in Washington, DC, although some meetings are held in other locations. RSTAC members receive no compensation for their services and are required to provide for the expenses incidental to their service, including travel expenses, as the Board cannot provide for these expenses. RSTAC may solicit and use private funding for its activities, again subject to certain restrictions in ICCTA. RSTAC members currently have elected to submit annual dues to pay for RSTAC expenses. RSTAC members must be citizens of the United States and represent as broadly as practicable the various segments of the railroad and rail shipper industries. They may not be full-time employees of the United States. According to revised guidance issued by the Office of Management and Budget, it is permissible for federally registered lobbyists to serve on advisory committees, such as RSTAC, as long as VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:14 Dec 27, 2017 Jkt 244001 they do so in a representative capacity, rather than an individual capacity. See Revised Guidance on Appointment of Lobbyists to Fed. Advisory Comms., Bds., & Comm’ns., 79 FR 47,482 (Aug. 13, 2014). Members of RSTAC are appointed to serve in a representative capacity. RSTAC members are appointed for three-year terms. A member may serve after the expiration of his or her term until a successor has taken office. No member will be eligible to serve in excess of two consecutive terms. Due to the expiration of several RSTAC members’ terms, vacancies exist for the following: Two small shipper representatives, one large shipper representative, two small railroad representatives, and two large railroad representatives. Upon appointment by the Board Chairman, the new representatives will serve for three years and may be eligible to serve a second three-year term following the end of their first term. Suggestions for candidates to fill these vacancies should be submitted in letter form, identify the name of the candidate, provide a summary of why the candidate is qualified to serve on RSTAC, and contain a representation that the candidate is willing to serve as an RSTAC member effective immediately upon appointment. RSTAC candidate suggestions should be filed with the Board by January 22, 2018. Members selected to serve on RSTAC are chosen at the discretion of the Board Chairman. Please note that submissions will be available to the public at the Board’s offices and posted on the Board’s website under Docket No. EP 526 (Sub-No. 10). Authority: 49 U.S.C. 1325. Decided: December 21, 2017. By the Board, Scott M. Zimmerman, Acting Director, Office of Proceedings. Jeffrey Herzig, Clearance Clerk. [FR Doc. 2017–28011 Filed 12–27–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4915–01–P OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00122 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In accordance with the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia and Panama. The level of a country’s trade surplus in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products for which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA–DR); (iv) the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru TPA); (v) the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (Colombia TPA); and (vi) the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement (Panama TPA). DATES: This notice is applicable on January 1, 2018. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ronald Baumgarten, Office of Agricultural Affairs, (202) 395–9583 or Ronald_Baumgarten@ustr.eop.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Chile FTA Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Chile FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR to publish annually a determination of the amount of Chile’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile’s imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of Chile’s trade surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14. E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 248 / Thursday, December 28, 2017 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in any calendar year (CY) (beginning in CY 2015) shall be the quantity of goods equal to the amount of Chile’s trade surplus in subdivision (a) of the note. During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Chile’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 593,524 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Servicio Nacional de Aduana. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Chile’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9911.17.05 in CY 2018. II. Morocco FTA Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651) implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Morocco FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR annually to publish a determination of the amount of Morocco’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco’s trade surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14. Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Morocco’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:14 Dec 27, 2017 Jkt 244001 amount equal to the amount by which Morocco’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Morocco’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 730,647 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Morocco’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2018. III. CAFTA–DR Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central AmericaUnited States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109–53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 (71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 (72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 (73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 (75 FR 34311), implemented the CAFTA–DR on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the CAFTA–DR. Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to publish annually a determination of the amount of each CAFTA–DR country’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each CAFTA–DR country’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA–DR are not included in the calculation of that country’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of each CAFTA–DR country entered under PO 00000 Frm 00123 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61655 subheading 9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country and that calendar year. A. Costa Rica During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Costa Rica’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 122,509 metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Costa Rica’s trade surplus is 122,509 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2018 is 13,640 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Costa Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 13,640 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Costa Rica’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Costa Rica for CY 2018). B. Dominican Republic During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, the Dominican Republic’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 148,476 metric tons according to data published by the National Direction of Customs (DGA). Based on this data, USTR has determined that the Dominican Republic’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018. C. El Salvador During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, El Salvador’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 224,658 metric tons according to data published by the Salvadoran Sugar Council and the Central Bank of El Salvador. Based on this data, USTR has determined that El Salvador’s trade surplus is 224,658 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for CY 2018 is 34,680 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered duty-free E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 61656 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 248 / Thursday, December 28, 2017 / Notices under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 34,680 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for El Salvador for CY 2018). D. Guatemala During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Guatemala’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 1,787,825 metric tons according to data published by the ´ Asociacion de Azucareros de Guatemala (ASAZGUA). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Guatemala’s trade surplus is 1,787,825 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2018 is 47,940 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 47,940 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Guatemala’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Guatemala for CY 2018). sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES E. Honduras During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Honduras’ exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 106,893 metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of Honduras. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Honduras’ trade surplus is 106,893 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 2018 is 9,920 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 9,920 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Honduras’ trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Honduras for CY 2018). F. Nicaragua During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Nicaragua’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 208,507 metric tons according to data published by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Development, Industry, and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Nicaragua’s trade surplus is 208,507 metric tons. The specific quantity set VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:14 Dec 27, 2017 Jkt 244001 out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Nicaragua for CY 2018 is 27,280 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 27,280 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Nicaragua’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Nicaragua for CY 2018). IV. Peru TPA Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110–138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 4105) implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Peru TPA. Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to annually publish a determination of the amount of Peru’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Peru’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Peru TPA and Peru’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Peru’s trade surplus. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Peru’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 248,472 metric tons according to data published by Superintendencia Nacional de ´ Administracion Tributaria (SUNAT). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Peru’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States dutyfree under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2018. V. Colombia TPA Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. PO 00000 Frm 00124 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 112–42; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 29519) implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Colombia TPA. Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to publish annually a determination of the amount of Colombia’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Colombia’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Colombia TPA and Colombia’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia’s trade surplus. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Colombia’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 217,455 metric tons according to data published by Global Trade Atlas (GTA) and the Colombian Directorate of National Taxes and Customs (DIAN). Based on this data, USTR has determined that Colombia’s trade surplus is 217,455 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Colombia for CY 2018 is 54,500 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2018 is 54,500 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Colombia for CY 2018). VI. Panama TPA Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112–43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505) implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA. Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to publish E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 248 / Thursday, December 28, 2017 / Notices annually a determination of the amount of Panama’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Panama’s trade surplus. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, Panama’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 705 metric tons according to data published by the National Institute of Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Panama’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Panama are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17 in CY 2018. Sharon Bomer Lauritsen, Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Agricultural Affairs. [FR Doc. 2017–27975 Filed 12–27–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3290–F8–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of Approval of New Information Collection: Generic Clearance for Customer Interactions Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, FAA invites public comments concerning our intention to request the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval of a new generic information collection. As part of a Federal Government-wide effort to streamline SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:14 Dec 27, 2017 Jkt 244001 the process to seek feedback from the public, FAA is requesting approval of a New Generic Information Collection Request: ‘‘Generic Clearance for Customer Interactions’’. DATES: Written comments should be submitted by February 26, 2018. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara Hall at (940) 594–5913, or by email at: Barbara.L.Hall@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 2120–NEW. Title: Generic Clearance for Customer Interactions. Form Numbers: There are no FAA forms associated with this generic information collection. Type of Review: New generic information collection. Background: Customer Interactions provide the Federal Aviation Administration valuable information and connect the agency to the public that we serve. In order to ensure a timely and consistent process for Paperwork Reduction Act compliance, the Federal Aviation Administration is proposing to develop a Generic Information Collection Request to be utilized for Customer Interactions that support the Agency’s mission. Customer Interactions can support the Federal Aviation Administration’s mission by allowing the Agency to collect qualitative and quantitative data that can help inform scientific research; aviation assessments and monitoring efforts; validate models or tools; and enhance the quantity and quality of data collected across communities. Customer Interactions also create an avenue to incorporate local knowledge and needs, and can contribute to increased data sharing, open data, and government transparency. The Federal Aviation Administration may sponsor the collection of this type of information in connection with aviation projects. All such collections will follow Agency policies and regulations. If a new collection is not within the parameters of this generic Information Collection Request (ICR), the Agency will submit a separate information collection request to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. Collections under this generic ICR will be from volunteers who participate on their own initiative through an open and transparent process; the collections will be low-burden for participants; collections will be low-cost for both the participants and the Federal Government; and data will be available to support the endeavors of the Agency, states, tribal or local entities where data collection occurs. Respondents: Approximately 11,000 Individuals and Households, Businesses PO 00000 Frm 00125 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61657 and Organizations, State, Local or Tribal Government. Frequency: Once per request. Estimated Average Burden per Response: 10 minutes. Estimated Total Annual Burden: 1,833 hours. ADDRESSES: Send comments to the FAA at the following address: Barbara Hall, Federal Aviation Administration, ASP– 110, 10101 Hillwood Parkway, Fort Worth, TX 76177. Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspect of this information collection, including (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for FAA’s performance; (b) the accuracy of the estimated burden; (c) ways for FAA to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information collection; and (d) ways that the burden could be minimized without reducing the quality of the collected information. The agency will summarize and/or include your comments in the request for OMB’s clearance of this information collection. Issued in Fort Worth, TX, on December 19, 2017. Barbara L. Hall, FAA Information Collection Clearance Officer, Performance, Policy, and Records Management Branch, ASP–110. [FR Doc. 2017–28049 Filed 12–27–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration [Docket No. FAA–2017–1197; Notice of Availability Docket No. 17–AEA–25] Notice of Availability of Categorical Exclusion and Record of Decision (CATEX/ROD) for LGA RNAV (GPS) Runway 13 Procedure Federal Aviation Administration, (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of availability. AGENCY: The FAA, Eastern Service Area is issuing this notice to advise the public of the availability of the Categorical Exclusion/Record of Decision (CATEX/ROD) for the LaGuardia Airport (LGA) RNAV (GPS) Runway 13 (RWY 13) procedure. The FAA reviewed the action and determined it to be categorically excluded from further environmental documentation. SUMMARY: Mr. Ryan W. Almasy, Federal Aviation Administration, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, 1701 Columbia Avenue, College Park, Georgia FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 248 (Thursday, December 28, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 61654-61657]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-27975]


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OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE


Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods 
and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, 
Colombia, and Panama

AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: In accordance with the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade 
Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the 
trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia and Panama. 
The level of a country's trade surplus in these goods relates to the 
quantity of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products for 
which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) 
the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the 
United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the 
Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement 
(CAFTA-DR); (iv) the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru 
TPA); (v) the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement 
(Colombia TPA); and (vi) the United States-Panama Trade Promotion 
Agreement (Panama TPA).

DATES: This notice is applicable on January 1, 2018.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ronald Baumgarten, Office of 
Agricultural Affairs, (202) 395-9583 or [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Chile FTA

    Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Chile Free Trade 
Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), 
Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789) 
implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Chile FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR to 
publish annually a determination of the amount of Chile's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System 
(HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 
1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, 
except that Chile's imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 
1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment 
under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of Chile's 
trade surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) 
reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14.

[[Page 61655]]

    Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in any calendar 
year (CY) (beginning in CY 2015) shall be the quantity of goods equal 
to the amount of Chile's trade surplus in subdivision (a) of the note.
    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Chile's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 593,524 
metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the 
Servicio Nacional de Aduana. Based on this data, USTR has determined 
that Chile's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with 
U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are 
not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 
9911.17.05 in CY 2018.

II. Morocco FTA

    Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free Trade 
Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), 
Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651) 
implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Morocco 
FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 requires USTR 
annually to publish a determination of the amount of Morocco's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 
1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that 
Morocco's imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 
and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the 
Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco's trade 
surplus. Proclamation 8771 of December 29, 2011 (77 FR 413) 
reclassified HS subheading 1701.11 as 1701.13 and 1701.14.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Morocco's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which 
Morocco's trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that 
note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Morocco's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 730,647 
metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the 
Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR has determined that 
Morocco's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. 
Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, 
goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free 
under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under 
subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2018.

III. CAFTA-DR

    Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central America-
United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109-53; 
19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 
2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 
2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 
2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 
(71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 
(72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 
(73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 
(75 FR 34311), implemented the CAFTA-DR on behalf of the United States 
and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in 
the CAFTA-DR.
    Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to 
publish annually a determination of the amount of each CAFTA-DR 
country's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS 
subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 
1702.60, except that each CAFTA-DR country's exports to the United 
States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under 
HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff 
treatment under the CAFTA-DR are not included in the calculation of 
that country's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides 
duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products of each CAFTA-DR country entered under subheading 
9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country's trade 
surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country 
and that calendar year.

A. Costa Rica

    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Costa Rica's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 122,509 
metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs 
Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that Costa Rica's trade surplus is 122,509 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2018 is 13,640 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Costa Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 13,640 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Costa Rica's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that note for Costa Rica for CY 2018).

B. Dominican Republic

    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
the Dominican Republic's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those 
goods by 148,476 metric tons according to data published by the 
National Direction of Customs (DGA). Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that the Dominican Republic's trade surplus is negative. 
Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to 
enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 
2018.

C. El Salvador

    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
El Salvador's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 224,658 
metric tons according to data published by the Salvadoran Sugar Council 
and the Central Bank of El Salvador. Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that El Salvador's trade surplus is 224,658 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for CY 2018 is 34,680 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of El Salvador that may be entered duty-free

[[Page 61656]]

under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 34,680 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of El Salvador's trade surplus and the 
specific quantity set out in that note for El Salvador for CY 2018).

D. Guatemala

    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Guatemala's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 
1,787,825 metric tons according to data published by the 
Asociaci[oacute]n de Azucareros de Guatemala (ASAZGUA). Based on this 
data, USTR has determined that Guatemala's trade surplus is 1,787,825 
metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2018 is 47,940 
metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate 
quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under 
subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 47,940 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Guatemala's trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that note for Guatemala for CY 2018).

E. Honduras

    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Honduras' exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 106,893 
metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of 
Honduras. Based on this data, USTR has determined that Honduras' trade 
surplus is 106,893 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. 
Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 
2018 is 9,920 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the 
aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free 
under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 9,920 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Honduras' trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that note for Honduras for CY 2018).

F. Nicaragua

    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Nicaragua's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 208,507 
metric tons according to data published by the Nicaraguan Ministry of 
Development, Industry, and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that Nicaragua's trade surplus is 208,507 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for Nicaragua for CY 2018 is 27,280 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY 2018 is 27,280 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Nicaragua's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that note for Nicaragua for CY 2018).

IV. Peru TPA

    Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion 
Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110-138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), 
Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 4105) 
implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Peru TPA.
    Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to 
annually publish a determination of the amount of Peru's trade surplus, 
by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 
1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that 
Peru's imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 
and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Peru TPA and Peru's 
exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 
1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 are not included in the 
calculation of Peru's trade surplus.
    Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 
9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru's trade surplus or 
the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Peru's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 248,472 
metric tons according to data published by Superintendencia Nacional de 
Administraci[oacute]n Tributaria (SUNAT). Based on this data, USTR has 
determined that Peru's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in 
accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, 
goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free 
under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2018.

V. Colombia TPA

    Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Colombia Trade 
Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-42; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 29519) 
implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Colombia TPA.
    Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to 
publish annually a determination of the amount of Colombia's trade 
surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 
1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, 
except that Colombia's imports of U.S. goods classified under 
subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the 
Colombia TPA and Colombia's exports to the United States of goods 
classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 
1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia's trade 
surplus.
    Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-
free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under 
subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia's 
trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that 
calendar year.
    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Colombia's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 217,455 
metric tons according to data published by Global Trade Atlas (GTA) and 
the Colombian Directorate of National Taxes and Customs (DIAN). Based 
on this data, USTR has determined that Colombia's trade surplus is 
217,455 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 
32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Colombia for CY 2018 
is 54,500 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the 
aggregate quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free 
under subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2018 is 54,500 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Colombia's trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that note for Colombia for CY 2018).

VI. Panama TPA

    Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade Promotion 
Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), 
Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505) 
implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and modified 
the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA.
    Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 requires USTR to 
publish

[[Page 61657]]

annually a determination of the amount of Panama's trade surplus, by 
volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama's 
imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 
that are originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama's exports to 
the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 
1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the 
calculation of Panama's trade surplus.
    Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 
9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama's trade surplus 
or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Panama's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 705 
metric tons according to data published by the National Institute of 
Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. 
Based on this data, USTR has determined that Panama's trade surplus is 
negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter 
XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Panama are not eligible to enter the 
United States duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17 in CY 2018.

Sharon Bomer Lauritsen,
Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Agricultural Affairs.
[FR Doc. 2017-27975 Filed 12-27-17; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3290-F8-P