Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review, 56028-56030 [2017-25495]

Download as PDF 56028 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 226 / Monday, November 27, 2017 / Notices 4. Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. 5. Assess information collection costs. Proposed Project National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) (OMB Control Number 0920–0278, Expiration Date 02/28/2018)—Revision—National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description Section 306 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C. 242k), as amended, authorizes that the Secretary of Health and Human Services (DHHS), acting through NCHS, shall collect statistics on ‘‘utilization of health care’’ in the United States. The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) has conducted annually since 1992. NCHS is seeking determining health care work force needs, and assessing the health status of the population. Starting 2018, CDC will implement the ED component of NHAMCS. However, between December 2017 and May 2018, the 2017 survey will run concurrently with the 2018 survey. This is typical with any data collection cycle: It begin in the last month of the preceding year and ends around the middle of the following year. For the 2017 data collection, CDC will collect information on all three settings (ED, OPD, and ASL). For this three-year request, CDC does not expect substantive changes or supplements for the survey. Users of NHAMCS data include, but are not limited to, congressional offices, Federal agencies, state and local governments, schools of public health, colleges and Universities, private industry, nonprofit foundations, professional associations, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and health planners. There are no costs to the respondents other than their time. The total estimated annualized burden hours are 1,806. OMB approval to extend this survey for an additional three years. The target universe of the NHAMCS is in-person visits made to emergency departments (EDs) of non-Federal, shortstay hospitals (hospitals with an average length of stay of less than 30 days) that have at least six beds for inpatient use, and with a specialty of general (medical or surgical) or children’s general. NHAMCS was initiated to complement the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS, OMB Control Number 0920–0234, Expiration Date 03/31/2019), which provides similar data concerning patient visits to physicians’ offices. NAMCS and NHAMCS are the principal sources of data on ambulatory care provided in the United States. NHAMCS provides a range of baseline data on the characteristics of the users and providers of hospital ambulatory medical care. Data collected include patients’ demographic characteristics, reason(s) for visit, providers’ diagnoses, diagnostic services, medications, and disposition. These data, together with trend data, may be used to monitor the effects of change in the health care system, for the planning of health services, improving medical education, ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondents Form name Hospital Chief Executive Officer ....... Ancillary Service Executive—Reabstraction. Medical Record Clerk—Reabstraction. Hospital Induction 2017 Data Collection. Hospital Induction 2018+ Data Collection. Ambulatory Unit Induction (ED, OPD and ASL). Ambulatory Unit Induction (ED only) Retrieving Patient Records (ED, OPD and ASL). Reabstraction Telephone Call (ED, OPD and ASL). Pulling and re-filing Patient Records (ED, OPD and ASL). Total ........................................... ........................................................... Hospital Chief Executive Officer ....... Ancillary Service Executive ............... asabaliauskas on DSKBBXCHB2PROD with NOTICES Ancillary Service Executive ............... Medical Record Clerk ....................... Leroy A. Richardson, Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2017–25496 Filed 11–24–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P 16:59 Nov 24, 2017 1 75/60 75 340 1 75/60 425 810 1 15/60 203 583 396 1 144 15/60 1/60 146 950 29 1 5/60 2 29 10 1/60 5 ........................ ........................ ........................ 1,806 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–18–1190] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review Jkt 244001 PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Total burden (in hours) 60 In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the information VerDate Sep<11>2014 Average burden per response (in hours) Number of responses per respondent Sfmt 4703 collection request titled ZEN Colombia Study: Zika in Pregnant Women and Children in Colombia to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. CDC previously published a ‘‘Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations’’ notice on August 30, 2017 to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. CDC did not receive comments related to the previous notice. This notice serves to allow an additional 30 days for public and affected agency comments. E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 226 / Monday, November 27, 2017 / Notices CDC will accept all comments for this proposed information collection project. The Office of Management and Budget is particularly interested in comments that: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including, through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and (e) Assess information collection costs. To request additional information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Direct written comments and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Provide written comments within 30 days of notice publication. asabaliauskas on DSKBBXCHB2PROD with NOTICES Proposed Project ZEN Colombia Study: Zika in Pregnant Women and Children in Colombia (OMB Control Number 0920– 1190, expires 07/31/2019)—Revision— National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a mosquito-borne flavivirus transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes, and also through sexual and mother-to-child transmission; laboratory-acquired infections have also been reported. Health officials observed sporadic evidence of human ZIKV infection in Africa and Asia prior to 2007, when an outbreak of ZIKV caused an estimated 5,000 infections in the State of Yap, Federated States of Micronesia. Since then, health officials have found evidence of ZIKV in 65 countries and territories, mostly in Central and South VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:59 Nov 24, 2017 Jkt 244001 America. Common symptoms of ZIKV in humans include rash, fever, arthralgia, and nonpurulent conjunctivitis. The illness is usually mild and self-limited, with symptoms lasting for several days to a week; however, based on previous outbreaks, some infections are asymptomatic. The prevalence of asymptomatic infection in the current Central and South American epidemic is unknown. Although the clinical presentation of ZIKV infection is typically mild, ZIKV infection in pregnancy can cause microcephaly and related brain abnormalities when fetuses are exposed in utero. Other adverse pregnancy outcomes related to ZIKV infection remain under study, and include pregnancy loss, other major birth defects, arthrogryposis, eye abnormalities, and neurologic abnormalities. As the spectrum of adverse health outcomes potentially related to ZIKV infection continues to grow, large gaps remain in our understanding of ZIKV infection in pregnancy. These include the full spectrum of adverse health outcomes in pregnant women, fetuses, and infants associated with ZIKV infection; the relative contributions of sexual transmission and mosquito-borne transmission to occurrence of infections in pregnancy; and variability in the risk of adverse fetal outcomes by gestational week of maternal infection or symptoms of infection. There is an urgency to fill these large gaps in our understanding given the rapidity of the epidemic’s spread and the severe health outcomes associated with ZIKV to date. Colombia’s Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) began surveillance for ZIKV in 2015, reporting the first autochthonous transmission in October 2015 in the north of the country. As of December 2016, Colombia has reported over 106,000-suspected ZIKV cases, with over 19,000 of them among pregnant women. With a causal link established between ZIKV infection in pregnancy and microcephaly, there is an urgent need to understand: How to prevent ZIKV transmission; the full spectrum of adverse maternal, fetal, and infant health outcomes associated with ZIKV infection; and risk factors for occurrence of these outcomes. To answer these questions, INS and the CDC will follow 5,000 women enrolled in the first trimester of pregnancy, their male partners, and their infants, in various cities in Colombia where ZIKV transmission is currently ongoing. The primary study objectives are to: (1) Describe the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the study population; (2) Identify risk factors for PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 56029 ZIKV infection in pregnant women and their infants. These include behaviors such as use of mosquito-bite prevention measures or condoms, and factors associated with maternal-to-child transmission; (3) Assess the risk for adverse maternal, fetal, and infant outcomes associated with ZIKV infection; (4) Assess modifiers of the risk for adverse outcomes among pregnant women and their infants following ZIKV infection. This includes investigating associations with gestational age at infection, presence of ZIKV symptoms, extended viremia, mode of transmission, prior infections or immunizations, and co-infections. The project aims to enroll approximately 5,000 women, 1,250 male partners, 4,500 newborns, and a subset of 900 infants/children. Pregnant women will be recruited in the first trimester of pregnancy for study enrollment, followed by assessments during pregnancy (every other week until 32 weeks gestation and monthly thereafter), and within 10 days postpartum. At all visits, participants will complete visit-specific questionnaires. In addition to the questionnaires, at all pregnancy and delivery visits, participants will receive Colombian national recommended clinical care and provide samples for laboratory testing. Researchers will recruit male partners around the time of the pregnant partners’ study enrollment, followed by monthly visits until his pregnant partner reaches the third trimester (approximately 27 weeks gestation). If the male partner contracts ZIKV during this time, visits will occur every other week until the partner has two negative consecutive tests for ZIKV or the pregnancy ends. At all study visits, male partners will complete visit-specific questionnaires and provide samples for laboratory testing. Researchers will follow all newborns of mothers participating in the study every other week from birth to 6 months of age. At all visits, infants will receive national recommended clinical care (at birth and follow-up visits at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months), provide samples for laboratory testing, and mothers will complete study-specific questionnaires about infant ZIKV symptoms and developmental milestones. During follow-up, infants will also have cranial ultrasounds, their head circumference measured, and hearing and vision tests. For mothers and their infants and as part of clinical care, researchers will abstract relevant information from medical records. The revised information collection package includes the following changes. E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1 56030 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 226 / Monday, November 27, 2017 / Notices During the data collection period, researchers will follow a subset of 900 infants until 2-years of age. A parent of each of these infants will answer a questionnaire at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months, as well as have other clinical their partners, and their infants; and to help agencies prepare to provide services to affected children and families. Participation in this study is voluntary and there are no costs to participants other than their time. The total burden hours are 14,210. assessments performed to examine developmental delays. CDC will use study results to guide recommendations made by both INS and CDC to prevent ZIKV infection; to improve counseling of patients about risks to themselves, their pregnancies, ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondents Form name Pregnant Women ............................................ Pregnant Women Eligibility Questionnaire .... Pregnant Women Enrollment Questionnaire Adult Symptoms Questionnaire ..................... Pregnant Women Follow-up Questionnaire ... Infant Symptoms Questionnaire ..................... Parent-Child Eligibility Questionnaire ............. Parent-Child Enrollment Questionnaire ......... Parent-Child Follow-up Questionnaire ........... Ages and Stages Questionnaire: 2 and 6 Month Visits. Ages and Stages Questionnaire: 12 and 24 Month Visits. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development. Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire ........ Peabody Developmental Motor Scales .......... Parenting Stress Index IV .............................. Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Test of Nonverbal Intelligence ....................... Male Partner Eligibility Questionnaire ............ Male Enrollment Questionnaire ...................... Adult Symptoms Questionnaire ..................... Male partners .................................................. Leroy A. Richardson, Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2017–25495 Filed 11–24–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request asabaliauskas on DSKBBXCHB2PROD with NOTICES Title: Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) MultiComponent Evaluation Extension. OMB No.: 0970–0398. Description: The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) and the Office of Planning, Research, Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) are requesting an extension without change of a currently approved information collection (OMB No. 0970–0398). The purpose of the extension is to complete the ongoing follow-up data collection for the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) MultiComponent Evaluation, which was designed to document how PREP programs are designed and implemented in the field, collect performance measure data for PREP programs, and assess the effectiveness of selected PREP-funded programs. The PREP Multi-Component Evaluation contains three components: A Design and Implementation Study, a Number of responses per respondent Average burden per response (in hours) 600 500 500 500 2,250 1,000 900 900 2,250 1 1 15 8 14 1 1 4 2 5/60 35/60 10/60 15/60 10/60 5/60 20/60 15/60 15/60 900 2 15/60 900 3 30/60 900 900 900 900 1 1 5 5 5/60 30/60 10/60 5/60 900 150 125 125 1 1 1 7 20/60 5/60 25/60 10/60 Performance Analysis Study, and an Impact and In-Depth Implementation Study. Data collection related to the Design and Implementation Study is complete; data collection related to the Performance Analysis Study will be complete in late summer 2017. This notice is specific to data collection activities for the Impact and In-Depth Implementation Study, which is being conducted in four sites. The proposed extension is necessary to complete ongoing follow-up data collection. The resulting data will be used in a rigorous program impact analysis to assess the effectiveness of each program in reducing teen sexual activity and associated risk behaviors. Respondents: Youth participants who agreed to participate in the study upon enrollment in the four impact study sites. ANNUAL BURDEN ESTIMATES Instrument Total/annual number of respondents Number of responses per respondents Average burden hours per response Total/annual burden hours Second follow-up survey ................................................................................. 325 1 .75 244 VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:59 Nov 24, 2017 Jkt 244001 PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 226 (Monday, November 27, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 56028-56030]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-25495]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[30Day-18-1190]


Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the information 
collection request titled ZEN Colombia Study: Zika in Pregnant Women 
and Children in Colombia to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
for review and approval. CDC previously published a ``Proposed Data 
Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations'' notice on 
August 30, 2017 to obtain comments from the public and affected 
agencies. CDC did not receive comments related to the previous notice. 
This notice serves to allow an additional 30 days for public and 
affected agency comments.

[[Page 56029]]

    CDC will accept all comments for this proposed information 
collection project. The Office of Management and Budget is particularly 
interested in comments that:
    (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is 
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility;
    (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of 
the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used;
    (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to 
be collected;
    (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those 
who are to respond, including, through the use of appropriate 
automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting 
electronic submission of responses; and
    (e) Assess information collection costs.
    To request additional information on the proposed project or to 
obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call 
(404) 639-7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Direct written comments 
and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice to the 
Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th 
Street NW., Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395-5806. Provide 
written comments within 30 days of notice publication.

Proposed Project

    ZEN Colombia Study: Zika in Pregnant Women and Children in Colombia 
(OMB Control Number 0920-1190, expires 07/31/2019)--Revision--National 
Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a mosquito-borne flavivirus 
transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes, and also through sexual and 
mother-to-child transmission; laboratory-acquired infections have also 
been reported. Health officials observed sporadic evidence of human 
ZIKV infection in Africa and Asia prior to 2007, when an outbreak of 
ZIKV caused an estimated 5,000 infections in the State of Yap, 
Federated States of Micronesia. Since then, health officials have found 
evidence of ZIKV in 65 countries and territories, mostly in Central and 
South America. Common symptoms of ZIKV in humans include rash, fever, 
arthralgia, and nonpurulent conjunctivitis. The illness is usually mild 
and self-limited, with symptoms lasting for several days to a week; 
however, based on previous outbreaks, some infections are asymptomatic. 
The prevalence of asymptomatic infection in the current Central and 
South American epidemic is unknown.
    Although the clinical presentation of ZIKV infection is typically 
mild, ZIKV infection in pregnancy can cause microcephaly and related 
brain abnormalities when fetuses are exposed in utero. Other adverse 
pregnancy outcomes related to ZIKV infection remain under study, and 
include pregnancy loss, other major birth defects, arthrogryposis, eye 
abnormalities, and neurologic abnormalities.
    As the spectrum of adverse health outcomes potentially related to 
ZIKV infection continues to grow, large gaps remain in our 
understanding of ZIKV infection in pregnancy. These include the full 
spectrum of adverse health outcomes in pregnant women, fetuses, and 
infants associated with ZIKV infection; the relative contributions of 
sexual transmission and mosquito-borne transmission to occurrence of 
infections in pregnancy; and variability in the risk of adverse fetal 
outcomes by gestational week of maternal infection or symptoms of 
infection. There is an urgency to fill these large gaps in our 
understanding given the rapidity of the epidemic's spread and the 
severe health outcomes associated with ZIKV to date.
    Colombia's Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) began surveillance for 
ZIKV in 2015, reporting the first autochthonous transmission in October 
2015 in the north of the country. As of December 2016, Colombia has 
reported over 106,000-suspected ZIKV cases, with over 19,000 of them 
among pregnant women. With a causal link established between ZIKV 
infection in pregnancy and microcephaly, there is an urgent need to 
understand: How to prevent ZIKV transmission; the full spectrum of 
adverse maternal, fetal, and infant health outcomes associated with 
ZIKV infection; and risk factors for occurrence of these outcomes. To 
answer these questions, INS and the CDC will follow 5,000 women 
enrolled in the first trimester of pregnancy, their male partners, and 
their infants, in various cities in Colombia where ZIKV transmission is 
currently ongoing.
    The primary study objectives are to: (1) Describe the 
sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the study population; 
(2) Identify risk factors for ZIKV infection in pregnant women and 
their infants. These include behaviors such as use of mosquito-bite 
prevention measures or condoms, and factors associated with maternal-
to-child transmission; (3) Assess the risk for adverse maternal, fetal, 
and infant outcomes associated with ZIKV infection; (4) Assess 
modifiers of the risk for adverse outcomes among pregnant women and 
their infants following ZIKV infection. This includes investigating 
associations with gestational age at infection, presence of ZIKV 
symptoms, extended viremia, mode of transmission, prior infections or 
immunizations, and co-infections.
    The project aims to enroll approximately 5,000 women, 1,250 male 
partners, 4,500 newborns, and a subset of 900 infants/children. 
Pregnant women will be recruited in the first trimester of pregnancy 
for study enrollment, followed by assessments during pregnancy (every 
other week until 32 weeks gestation and monthly thereafter), and within 
10 days postpartum. At all visits, participants will complete visit-
specific questionnaires. In addition to the questionnaires, at all 
pregnancy and delivery visits, participants will receive Colombian 
national recommended clinical care and provide samples for laboratory 
testing.
    Researchers will recruit male partners around the time of the 
pregnant partners' study enrollment, followed by monthly visits until 
his pregnant partner reaches the third trimester (approximately 27 
weeks gestation). If the male partner contracts ZIKV during this time, 
visits will occur every other week until the partner has two negative 
consecutive tests for ZIKV or the pregnancy ends. At all study visits, 
male partners will complete visit-specific questionnaires and provide 
samples for laboratory testing.
    Researchers will follow all newborns of mothers participating in 
the study every other week from birth to 6 months of age. At all 
visits, infants will receive national recommended clinical care (at 
birth and follow-up visits at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months), provide samples 
for laboratory testing, and mothers will complete study-specific 
questionnaires about infant ZIKV symptoms and developmental milestones. 
During follow-up, infants will also have cranial ultrasounds, their 
head circumference measured, and hearing and vision tests. For mothers 
and their infants and as part of clinical care, researchers will 
abstract relevant information from medical records.
    The revised information collection package includes the following 
changes.

[[Page 56030]]

During the data collection period, researchers will follow a subset of 
900 infants until 2-years of age. A parent of each of these infants 
will answer a questionnaire at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months, as well as 
have other clinical assessments performed to examine developmental 
delays.
    CDC will use study results to guide recommendations made by both 
INS and CDC to prevent ZIKV infection; to improve counseling of 
patients about risks to themselves, their pregnancies, their partners, 
and their infants; and to help agencies prepare to provide services to 
affected children and families. Participation in this study is 
voluntary and there are no costs to participants other than their time.
    The total burden hours are 14,210.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                      Average
                                                                     Number of       Number of      burden per
          Type of respondents                   Form name           respondents    responses per   response  (in
                                                                                    respondent        hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pregnant Women........................  Pregnant Women                       600               1            5/60
                                         Eligibility
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Pregnant Women                       500               1           35/60
                                         Enrollment
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Adult Symptoms                       500              15           10/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Pregnant Women Follow-up             500               8           15/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Infant Symptoms                    2,250              14           10/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Parent-Child Eligibility           1,000               1            5/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Parent-Child Enrollment              900               1           20/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Parent-Child Follow-up               900               4           15/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Ages and Stages                    2,250               2           15/60
                                         Questionnaire: 2 and 6
                                         Month Visits.
                                        Ages and Stages                      900               2           15/60
                                         Questionnaire: 12 and
                                         24 Month Visits.
                                        Bayley Scales of Infant              900               3           30/60
                                         and Toddler Development.
                                        Strengths and                        900               1            5/60
                                         Difficulties
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Peabody Developmental                900               1           30/60
                                         Motor Scales.
                                        Parenting Stress Index               900               5           10/60
                                         IV.
                                        Center for Epidemiologic             900               5            5/60
                                         Studies Depression
                                         Scale.
                                        Test of Nonverbal                    900               1           20/60
                                         Intelligence.
Male partners.........................  Male Partner Eligibility             150               1            5/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Male Enrollment                      125               1           25/60
                                         Questionnaire.
                                        Adult Symptoms                       125               7           10/60
                                         Questionnaire.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Leroy A. Richardson,
Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific 
Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the 
Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2017-25495 Filed 11-24-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4163-18-P