Notice of Entering Into a Compact With the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, 55119-55121 [2017-25198]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 222 / Monday, November 20, 2017 / Notices Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Room 112, Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 205–2000. Hearing impaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at (202) 205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server at https:// www.usitc.gov. The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The Office of Docket Services, U.S. International Trade Commission, telephone (202) 205–1802. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: nshattuck on DSK9F9SC42PROD with NOTICES Authority: The authority for institution of this investigation is contained in section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337 and in section 210.10 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure, 19 CFR 210.10 (2017). Scope of Investigation: Having considered the complaint, as amended, the U.S. International Trade Commission, on November 14, 2017, ordered that— (1) Pursuant to subsection (b) of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, an investigation be instituted to determine whether there is a violation of subsection (a)(1)(B) of section 337 in the importation into the United States, the sale for importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain gas spring nailer products and components thereof by reason of infringement of one or more of claim 30 of the ’547 patent; claims 1 and 11 of the ’296 patent; claims 1 and 32 of the ’297 patent; claims 1, 10, and 16 of the ’718 patent; claims 1 and 16 of the ’722 patent; and claim 1 of the ’282 patent; and whether an industry in the United States exists as required by subsection (a)(2) of section 337; (2) For the purpose of the investigation so instituted, the following are hereby named as parties upon which this notice of investigation shall be served: (a) The complainant is: Kyocera Senco Brands Inc., 4270 Ivy Pointe Boulevard, Cincinnati, OH 45245. (b) The respondents are the following entities alleged to be in violation of section 337, and are the parties upon which the amended complaint is to be served: Hitachi Koki U.S.A., Limited, VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:15 Nov 17, 2017 Jkt 244001 1111 Broadway Avenue, Braselton, GA 38517. (3) For the investigation so instituted, the Chief Administrative Law Judge, U.S. International Trade Commission, shall designate the presiding Administrative Law Judge. The Office of Unfair Import Investigations will not be named as a party to this investigation. Responses to the amended complaint and the notice of investigation must be submitted by the named respondent in accordance with section 210.13 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure, 19 CFR 210.13. Pursuant to 19 CFR 201.16(e) and 210.13(a), such responses will be considered by the Commission if received not later than 20 days after the date of service by the Commission of the amended complaint and the notice of investigation. Extensions of time for submitting responses to the amended complaint and the notice of investigation will not be granted unless good cause therefor is shown. Failure of the respondent to file a timely response to each allegation in the amended complaint and in this notice may be deemed to constitute a waiver of the right to appear and contest the allegations of the amended complaint and this notice, and to authorize the administrative law judge and the Commission, without further notice to the respondent, to find the facts to be as alleged in the amended complaint and this notice and to enter an initial determination and a final determination containing such findings, and may result in the issuance of an exclusion order or a cease and desist order or both directed against the respondent. By order of the Commission. Issued: November 14, 2017. Lisa R. Barton, Secretary to the Commission. [FR Doc. 2017–25053 Filed 11–17–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION [MCC FR 18–03] Notice of Entering Into a Compact With ˆ the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire Millennium Challenge Corporation. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In accordance with Section 610(b)(2) of the Millennium Challenge Act of 2003, as amended, and the heading ‘‘Millennium Challenge Corporation’’ of the Department of State, SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 55119 Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2017, the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) is publishing a summary of the Millennium Challenge Compact between the United States of America, acting through MCC, and the Republic ˆ of Cote d’Ivoire. Representatives of MCC ˆ and Cote d’Ivoire signed the compact on November 7, 2017. The complete text of the compact has been posted at: https:// www.mcc.gov/resources/doc/compactcote-divoire. Dated: November 15, 2017. Jeanne M. Hauch, Vice President and General Counsel, Millennium Challenge Corporation. ˆ Summary of the Cote d’Ivoire Compact ˆ Overview of MCC Cote d’Ivoire Compact MCC has signed a five-year, $524,740,000 compact with the ˆ Government of Cote d’Ivoire that is aimed at reducing poverty and accelerating economic growth. The compact seeks to address two binding ˆ constraints to economic growth in Cote d’Ivoire: (i) Low levels of basic, technical, and vocational skills; and (ii) barriers to moving goods and people, especially in Abidjan. The compact will address these constraints through two projects designed to support the diversification of the Ivoirian economy in its drive for emergence: (i) the Skills for Employability and Productivity Project (‘‘Skills Project’’); and (ii) the Abidjan Transport Project. Background and Context After passing only five MCC policy ˆ indicators in fiscal year 2012, Cote d’Ivoire began a systematic effort to improve its policy performance in order to qualify for MCC funding. As a result ˆ of those efforts, Cote d’Ivoire has consistently passed the MCC scorecard since FY 2015, and in FY 2017 the country passed 14 indicators. In FY 2015, MCC’s Board of Directors selected ˆ Cote d’Ivoire for a threshold program and in FY 2016, based on continued policy improvement, for development of a compact proposal. The compact is ˆ seen in Cote d’Ivoire as the fruit of a long journey of sustained engagement with MCC and is poised to become a central pillar of the country’s relationship with the United States. ˆ Cote d’Ivoire is located in the coastal zone of West Africa and has a population of 22.7 million people, 41.5 percent of whom are under the age of 14, and a gross national income per capita of $1,420. With five major ethnic groups, a sizeable immigrant population making up a quarter of the population, and more than 60 local languages E:\FR\FM\20NON1.SGM 20NON1 55120 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 222 / Monday, November 20, 2017 / Notices nshattuck on DSK9F9SC42PROD with NOTICES spoken throughout the country, social cohesion has historically been fragile with deep divisions along national, ethnic, religious, and geographical lines. While Yamoussoukro is the official capital, Abidjan is the informal seat of government and home to approximately 19 percent of the population, making it the country’s critical driver for economic growth. From independence in 1960 until ˆ 1979, Cote d’Ivoire enjoyed strong economic growth and was seen by many as the economic, political, and cultural center of West Africa. However, the country’s economy was largely dependent on a few main exports, notably cocoa. When the world market price for cocoa fell sharply in the 1980s, ˆ Cote d’Ivoire’s economy collapsed. The country struggled with political instability throughout the 1990s and 2000s, including a civil war from 2002 to 2004, and a second civil war from March to April 2011. Since 2012, political stability has allowed the economy to recover from years of stagnation, with gross domestic product growth rates averaging nine percent per year over the past five years. Despite this recovery, there is a palpable sense ˆ among Cote d’Ivoire’s population that the fruits of recent growth have not been widely shared. Moreover, despite some recent diversification, the country remains overly dependent on the same narrow set of exports. Compact Overview and Budget The compact is based on the premise ˆ that for Cote d’Ivoire to achieve sustainable and inclusive growth—and escape the boom and bust cycle of the past—it must diversify its economy. ˆ MCC and Cote d’Ivoire identified two constraints to economic growth that will be addressed in the compact: (i) Low levels of basic, technical, and vocational skills; and (ii) barriers to moving goods and people, especially in Abidjan. The compact will address these constraints through the Skills and Abidjan ˆ Transport Projects. Cote d’Ivoire is committed to implementing these projects in a sustainable manner in order to • Resolve critical youth education and unemployment issues; • increase the competitiveness of Abidjan as the country’s economic growth hub by improving the mobility of goods and people; and • diversify its economy while promoting public-private partnerships. The compact is expected to allow ˆ Cote d’Ivoire to resume its economic preeminence in West Africa and become a desired location for employmentintensive industries such as VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:15 Nov 17, 2017 Jkt 244001 manufacturing and business process outsourcing, as well as help mitigate lingering socio-political issues. The budget for the compact is detailed below: ˆ TABLE 1—COTE D’IVOIRE’S COMPACT BUDGET SUMMARY Total (US $) Component 1. Skills Project ..................... 1.1 Secondary Education Activity ................................... 1.2 Technical and Vocational Education and Training Activity ............................... 1.3 Project Management ...... 2. Abidjan Transport Project 2.1 Transport Infrastructure Activity ............................... 2.2 Transport Management and Planning Activity ........ 3. Monitoring and Evaluation 3.1 Monitoring and Evaluation Activities ..................... 4. Program Administration and Oversight .................... 4.1 Program Administration and Oversight .................... Total Program Budget ....... 154,950,000 111,300,000 35,000,000 8,650,000 292,340,000 238,720,000 53,620,000 12,700,000 12,700,000 64,750,000 64,750,000 524,740,000 Project Summaries Skills Project ($154,950,000) The Skills Project aims to (i) to increase the number of years of education received and improve the acquisition of quality, in-demand basic skills, including reading, math, and soft skills, for lower secondary students; and (ii) to improve the acquisition of quality, in-demand technical skills and increase job-placement rates among graduates of compact-supported technical and vocational education and training (TVET) centers. The Skills Project is designed to equip those in Abidjan, as well as in two additional economic hubs, with skills to meet the demands of the private sector in an expanding and diversifying economy. Investments ˆ ˆ in the regions of Gbeke, in the centerˆ north of Cote d’Ivoire, and San Pedro, in the west of the country, will allow MCC funding to capitalize on opportunities to address the country’s profound gender, socioeconomic, and geographic inequalities and to improve access to basic education, technical vocational training, and economic opportunities more broadly. The Skills Project is composed of the following two activities: • Secondary Education Activity: This activity aims to increase access to lower secondary education in two regions of ˆ Cote d’Ivoire and improve the access to, and quality of, secondary education and PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the governance of the sector. MCC funding will support the building of, and support to, approximately 74–84 new lower secondary schools in the ˆ ˆ rural and peri-urban areas of the Gbeke and San Pedro regions. This funding will be supported by policy and institutional reforms at the national level in gender, monitoring and evaluation systems, and teacher training to improve capacity and overall governance, equity, and system performance. • Technical and Vocational Education and Training Activity: This activity aims to develop a new TVET model of partnership that provides training to students in the skills and knowledge in demand by the private sector. This TVET model will be implemented through sustainable training centers developed and managed through a public-private partnership ˆ with industries in Cote d’Ivoire. The activity will be implemented with a goal of catalyzing a shift within the training system towards better identifying and meeting the training needs of the private sector. MCC funding will support the building of up to four new private sector-driven TVET centers, development of a quality management and accountability systems for improved sector governance, and introduction of key quality management and accountability tools to strengthen the Ministry of Environment’s capacity to manage for results. MCC funding will also support the necessary revisions to legislation and regulations to accommodate the TVET model. The TVET centers will be required to develop a gender and social inclusion policy and action plan that describes key social and gender considerations, strategic approaches, and expected outcomes. Abidjan Transport Project ($292,340,000) The Abidjan Transport Project aims to reduce vehicle operating costs and travel times along targeted road segments, while improving overall pedestrian and vehicle mobility and safety. MCC funding will support infrastructure works designed to improve traffic fluidity and decongest central corridors of the city linking the Port of Abidjan to points north, west, and east, as well as integrate new pavement design technologies that aim to reduce total lifecycle user costs. This project consists of two activities: • Transport Infrastructure Activity: The Transport Infrastructure Activity aims to rehabilitate up to 32 kilometers of critical roadway and adjoining infrastructure in the central corridor of E:\FR\FM\20NON1.SGM 20NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 222 / Monday, November 20, 2017 / Notices nshattuck on DSK9F9SC42PROD with NOTICES Abidjan to (i) improve overall travel times, traffic movement, and road safety; (ii) integrate multi-modal transport planning; and (iii) reduce household transport costs and increase revenue for businesses. • Transport Management and Planning Activity: This activity aims to build the technical and managerial ˆ capacity of Cote d’Ivoire’s roadtransport-related agencies in the areas of infrastructure asset-management techniques, and long-term road planning and maintenance. MCC funding will include the following: (i) The creation, development and institutionalization of a graduate education program in infrastructure asset management; (ii) the development of a road asset inventory and database, as well as a road safety database for Abidjan; (iii) traffic management and coordination assistance; and (iv) the development and expansion of a program that provides routine cleaning, upkeep and maintenance of the road and bridge network in Abidjan. Economic Analysis The estimated economic rate of return (ERR) for the Skills Project is 10.6 percent over 20 years. The project seeks to improve student learning outcomes and increase the number of years that students attend school. Both of these benefits are expected to increase future lifetime earnings for the participating students. The Technical and Vocational Education and Training Activity is expected to result in students acquiring specific, market-demanded skills through additional years of schooling, which results in higher employment rates and higher lifetime earnings. The estimated ERR for the Abidjan Transport Project is 22.6 percent over 20 years. While vehicle operating costs and time savings are expected to be the immediate microeconomic benefits of the project, the project is also expected ˆ to contribute to the economy of Cote d’Ivoire’s largest city by improving access to jobs, goods, and social services. Overall, the compact is expected to benefit at least 11,300,000 people over 20 years. Approximately 300,000 Skills Project beneficiaries are expected to be Abidjan residents and therefore also beneficiaries of the Abidjan Transport Project; accordingly, they have been deducted from the total number of compact beneficiaries to avoid double counting. Policy Reform and the Compact ˆ MCC and Cote d’Ivoire have agreed on several policy reform areas to support the sustainability of the compact VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:15 Nov 17, 2017 Jkt 244001 ˆ program. In the Skills Project, Cote d’Ivoire will allocate sufficient annual public expenditures for lower secondary education and TVET to support and maintain MCC’s investments by providing adequate teachers and budgets for secondary schools and operational subsidies for TVET centers. ˆ Cote d’Ivoire will also develop, institutionalize, and operationalize a national gender policy for the education sector in order to help rectify gender disparities in the Ivoirian education system. Finally, MCC plans to contribute to the modernization of the country’s outdated and ineffective teacher training program and, through the TVET investment, help the government transition from being an ineffective service provider to being a regulator and financer of training provided in TVET centers that are operated by and for the private sector. In the Abidjan Transport Project, MCC’s assistance will be accompanied by reforms designed to improve the governance and financial sustainability ˆ of Cote d’Ivoire’s road maintenance ˆ fund. In particular, Cote d’Ivoire will increase the amount of revenue allocated to the road fund over the life of the compact, reduce the debt burden currently held by the road fund, and increase road user participation in the governance structure of the road fund in order to create a more market-oriented ˆ entity. Cote d’Ivoire has also agreed on mechanisms to eliminate illegal truck parking in the zone around the Port of Abidjan, which is expected to contribute significantly to the reduction of traffic congestion in this important area of the city. [FR Doc. 2017–25198 Filed 11–17–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9211–03–P NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (17–085)] NASA Heliophysics Advisory Committee Meeting National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. AGENCY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Heliophysics Advisory Committee. This Committee reports to the Director, Heliophysics Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters. The meeting will be held for the purpose of soliciting, from the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 55121 scientific community and other persons, scientific and technical information relevant to program planning. Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 1:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.; Thursday, November 30, 2017, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.; and December 1, 2017, 9:00 a.m.– 3:45 p.m., Local Time. DATES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546. Room number on November 29 will be Room 5H41; on November 30, Room 7H41–A; and on December 1, Room 5H41–A. ADDRESSES: Ms. KarShelia Henderson, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358–2355, fax (202) 358–2779, or khenderson@ nasa.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The meeting will be open to the public up to the capacity of the room. This meeting will also be available telephonically and by WebEx. You must use a touch-tone phone to participate in this meeting. Any interested person may dial the USA toll free conference call number 1–888–603–8921 or toll number 1–312–470–7052, passcode 9896208, to participate in this meeting by telephone for all three days. The WebEx link is https://nasa.webex.com/; on November 29 the meeting number is 999 227 289 and the password is HPAC2017!, and on November 30 and December 1 the meeting number is 995 903 023 and the password is HPAC2017@. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: • Heliophysics Division Update • Government Performance and Results Modernization Act (GPRAMA) Discussion and Recommendations • Senior Review of Operating Missions Outbrief • Heliophysics Research and Analysis Program • Heliophysics Science Centers Program • Discussion of NASA High End Computing (HEC) and Future HighPerformance Computing Resources for the Heliophysics Community The agenda will be posted on the Heliophysics Advisory Committee Web page: https://science.nasa.gov/ researchers/nac/science-advisorycommittees/hpac. It is imperative that the meeting be held on this date to accommodate the E:\FR\FM\20NON1.SGM 20NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 222 (Monday, November 20, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 55119-55121]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-25198]


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MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION

[MCC FR 18-03]


Notice of Entering Into a Compact With the Republic of C[ocirc]te 
d'Ivoire

AGENCY: Millennium Challenge Corporation.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 610(b)(2) of the Millennium 
Challenge Act of 2003, as amended, and the heading ``Millennium 
Challenge Corporation'' of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, 
and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2017, the Millennium Challenge 
Corporation (MCC) is publishing a summary of the Millennium Challenge 
Compact between the United States of America, acting through MCC, and 
the Republic of C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire. Representatives of MCC and 
C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire signed the compact on November 7, 2017. The 
complete text of the compact has been posted at: https://www.mcc.gov/resources/doc/compact-cote-divoire.

    Dated: November 15, 2017.
Jeanne M. Hauch,
Vice President and General Counsel, Millennium Challenge Corporation.

Summary of the C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire Compact

Overview of MCC C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire Compact

    MCC has signed a five-year, $524,740,000 compact with the 
Government of C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire that is aimed at reducing poverty and 
accelerating economic growth. The compact seeks to address two binding 
constraints to economic growth in C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire: (i) Low levels 
of basic, technical, and vocational skills; and (ii) barriers to moving 
goods and people, especially in Abidjan. The compact will address these 
constraints through two projects designed to support the 
diversification of the Ivoirian economy in its drive for emergence: (i) 
the Skills for Employability and Productivity Project (``Skills 
Project''); and (ii) the Abidjan Transport Project.

Background and Context

    After passing only five MCC policy indicators in fiscal year 2012, 
C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire began a systematic effort to improve its policy 
performance in order to qualify for MCC funding. As a result of those 
efforts, C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire has consistently passed the MCC scorecard 
since FY 2015, and in FY 2017 the country passed 14 indicators. In FY 
2015, MCC's Board of Directors selected C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire for a 
threshold program and in FY 2016, based on continued policy 
improvement, for development of a compact proposal. The compact is seen 
in C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire as the fruit of a long journey of sustained 
engagement with MCC and is poised to become a central pillar of the 
country's relationship with the United States.
    C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire is located in the coastal zone of West Africa 
and has a population of 22.7 million people, 41.5 percent of whom are 
under the age of 14, and a gross national income per capita of $1,420. 
With five major ethnic groups, a sizeable immigrant population making 
up a quarter of the population, and more than 60 local languages

[[Page 55120]]

spoken throughout the country, social cohesion has historically been 
fragile with deep divisions along national, ethnic, religious, and 
geographical lines. While Yamoussoukro is the official capital, Abidjan 
is the informal seat of government and home to approximately 19 percent 
of the population, making it the country's critical driver for economic 
growth.
    From independence in 1960 until 1979, C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire enjoyed 
strong economic growth and was seen by many as the economic, political, 
and cultural center of West Africa. However, the country's economy was 
largely dependent on a few main exports, notably cocoa. When the world 
market price for cocoa fell sharply in the 1980s, C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire's 
economy collapsed. The country struggled with political instability 
throughout the 1990s and 2000s, including a civil war from 2002 to 
2004, and a second civil war from March to April 2011. Since 2012, 
political stability has allowed the economy to recover from years of 
stagnation, with gross domestic product growth rates averaging nine 
percent per year over the past five years. Despite this recovery, there 
is a palpable sense among C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire's population that the 
fruits of recent growth have not been widely shared. Moreover, despite 
some recent diversification, the country remains overly dependent on 
the same narrow set of exports.

Compact Overview and Budget

    The compact is based on the premise that for C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire to 
achieve sustainable and inclusive growth--and escape the boom and bust 
cycle of the past--it must diversify its economy. MCC and C[ocirc]te 
d'Ivoire identified two constraints to economic growth that will be 
addressed in the compact: (i) Low levels of basic, technical, and 
vocational skills; and (ii) barriers to moving goods and people, 
especially in Abidjan. The compact will address these constraints 
through the Skills and Abidjan Transport Projects. C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire 
is committed to implementing these projects in a sustainable manner in 
order to
     Resolve critical youth education and unemployment issues;
     increase the competitiveness of Abidjan as the country's 
economic growth hub by improving the mobility of goods and people; and
     diversify its economy while promoting public-private 
partnerships.
    The compact is expected to allow C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire to resume its 
economic preeminence in West Africa and become a desired location for 
employment-intensive industries such as manufacturing and business 
process outsourcing, as well as help mitigate lingering socio-political 
issues.
    The budget for the compact is detailed below:

          Table 1--C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire's Compact Budget Summary
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Component                          Total  (US $)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Skills Project.......................................     154,950,000
1.1 Secondary Education Activity........................     111,300,000
1.2 Technical and Vocational Education and Training           35,000,000
 Activity...............................................
1.3 Project Management..................................       8,650,000
2. Abidjan Transport Project............................     292,340,000
2.1 Transport Infrastructure Activity...................     238,720,000
2.2 Transport Management and Planning Activity..........      53,620,000
3. Monitoring and Evaluation............................      12,700,000
3.1 Monitoring and Evaluation Activities................      12,700,000
4. Program Administration and Oversight.................      64,750,000
4.1 Program Administration and Oversight................      64,750,000
                                                         ---------------
  Total Program Budget..................................     524,740,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Project Summaries

Skills Project ($154,950,000)
    The Skills Project aims to (i) to increase the number of years of 
education received and improve the acquisition of quality, in-demand 
basic skills, including reading, math, and soft skills, for lower 
secondary students; and (ii) to improve the acquisition of quality, in-
demand technical skills and increase job-placement rates among 
graduates of compact-supported technical and vocational education and 
training (TVET) centers. The Skills Project is designed to equip those 
in Abidjan, as well as in two additional economic hubs, with skills to 
meet the demands of the private sector in an expanding and diversifying 
economy. Investments in the regions of Gb[ecirc]k[ecirc], in the 
center-north of C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire, and San Pedro, in the west of the 
country, will allow MCC funding to capitalize on opportunities to 
address the country's profound gender, socioeconomic, and geographic 
inequalities and to improve access to basic education, technical 
vocational training, and economic opportunities more broadly. The 
Skills Project is composed of the following two activities:
     Secondary Education Activity: This activity aims to 
increase access to lower secondary education in two regions of 
C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire and improve the access to, and quality of, 
secondary education and the governance of the sector. MCC funding will 
support the building of, and support to, approximately 74-84 new lower 
secondary schools in the rural and peri-urban areas of the 
Gb[ecirc]k[ecirc] and San Pedro regions. This funding will be supported 
by policy and institutional reforms at the national level in gender, 
monitoring and evaluation systems, and teacher training to improve 
capacity and overall governance, equity, and system performance.
     Technical and Vocational Education and Training Activity: 
This activity aims to develop a new TVET model of partnership that 
provides training to students in the skills and knowledge in demand by 
the private sector. This TVET model will be implemented through 
sustainable training centers developed and managed through a public-
private partnership with industries in C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire. The 
activity will be implemented with a goal of catalyzing a shift within 
the training system towards better identifying and meeting the training 
needs of the private sector. MCC funding will support the building of 
up to four new private sector-driven TVET centers, development of a 
quality management and accountability systems for improved sector 
governance, and introduction of key quality management and 
accountability tools to strengthen the Ministry of Environment's 
capacity to manage for results. MCC funding will also support the 
necessary revisions to legislation and regulations to accommodate the 
TVET model. The TVET centers will be required to develop a gender and 
social inclusion policy and action plan that describes key social and 
gender considerations, strategic approaches, and expected outcomes.
Abidjan Transport Project ($292,340,000)
    The Abidjan Transport Project aims to reduce vehicle operating 
costs and travel times along targeted road segments, while improving 
overall pedestrian and vehicle mobility and safety. MCC funding will 
support infrastructure works designed to improve traffic fluidity and 
decongest central corridors of the city linking the Port of Abidjan to 
points north, west, and east, as well as integrate new pavement design 
technologies that aim to reduce total lifecycle user costs. This 
project consists of two activities:
     Transport Infrastructure Activity: The Transport 
Infrastructure Activity aims to rehabilitate up to 32 kilometers of 
critical roadway and adjoining infrastructure in the central corridor 
of

[[Page 55121]]

Abidjan to (i) improve overall travel times, traffic movement, and road 
safety; (ii) integrate multi-modal transport planning; and (iii) reduce 
household transport costs and increase revenue for businesses.
     Transport Management and Planning Activity: This activity 
aims to build the technical and managerial capacity of C[ocirc]te 
d'Ivoire's road-transport-related agencies in the areas of 
infrastructure asset-management techniques, and long-term road planning 
and maintenance. MCC funding will include the following: (i) The 
creation, development and institutionalization of a graduate education 
program in infrastructure asset management; (ii) the development of a 
road asset inventory and database, as well as a road safety database 
for Abidjan; (iii) traffic management and coordination assistance; and 
(iv) the development and expansion of a program that provides routine 
cleaning, upkeep and maintenance of the road and bridge network in 
Abidjan.

Economic Analysis

    The estimated economic rate of return (ERR) for the Skills Project 
is 10.6 percent over 20 years. The project seeks to improve student 
learning outcomes and increase the number of years that students attend 
school. Both of these benefits are expected to increase future lifetime 
earnings for the participating students. The Technical and Vocational 
Education and Training Activity is expected to result in students 
acquiring specific, market-demanded skills through additional years of 
schooling, which results in higher employment rates and higher lifetime 
earnings.
    The estimated ERR for the Abidjan Transport Project is 22.6 percent 
over 20 years. While vehicle operating costs and time savings are 
expected to be the immediate microeconomic benefits of the project, the 
project is also expected to contribute to the economy of C[ocirc]te 
d'Ivoire's largest city by improving access to jobs, goods, and social 
services.
    Overall, the compact is expected to benefit at least 11,300,000 
people over 20 years. Approximately 300,000 Skills Project 
beneficiaries are expected to be Abidjan residents and therefore also 
beneficiaries of the Abidjan Transport Project; accordingly, they have 
been deducted from the total number of compact beneficiaries to avoid 
double counting.

Policy Reform and the Compact

    MCC and C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire have agreed on several policy reform 
areas to support the sustainability of the compact program. In the 
Skills Project, C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire will allocate sufficient annual 
public expenditures for lower secondary education and TVET to support 
and maintain MCC's investments by providing adequate teachers and 
budgets for secondary schools and operational subsidies for TVET 
centers. C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire will also develop, institutionalize, and 
operationalize a national gender policy for the education sector in 
order to help rectify gender disparities in the Ivoirian education 
system. Finally, MCC plans to contribute to the modernization of the 
country's outdated and ineffective teacher training program and, 
through the TVET investment, help the government transition from being 
an ineffective service provider to being a regulator and financer of 
training provided in TVET centers that are operated by and for the 
private sector.
    In the Abidjan Transport Project, MCC's assistance will be 
accompanied by reforms designed to improve the governance and financial 
sustainability of C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire's road maintenance fund. In 
particular, C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire will increase the amount of revenue 
allocated to the road fund over the life of the compact, reduce the 
debt burden currently held by the road fund, and increase road user 
participation in the governance structure of the road fund in order to 
create a more market-oriented entity. C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire has also 
agreed on mechanisms to eliminate illegal truck parking in the zone 
around the Port of Abidjan, which is expected to contribute 
significantly to the reduction of traffic congestion in this important 
area of the city.

[FR Doc. 2017-25198 Filed 11-17-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 9211-03-P