Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK, 50667-50675 [2017-23794]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices Northern California RAC Utah Jeff Fontana, BLM Northern California District, 2550 Riverside Drive, Susanville, CA 96130, 530–252–5332. Utah RAC Lola Bird, BLM Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, UT 84101, 801–539–4033. Carrizo Plain National Monument Advisory Committee Serena Baker, BLM Central California District Office, 5152 Hillsdale Circle, El Dorado Hills, CA 95762, 916–941–3146. Idaho Boise District RAC Michael Williamson, BLM Boise District Office, 3948 South Development Avenue, Boise, ID 83705, 208–384– 3393. Montana and Dakotas Central Montana RAC Jonathan Moor, BLM Lewistown Field Office, 920 Northeast Main Street, Lewistown, MT 59457, 406–538–1943. Wyoming RAC Kristen Lenhardt, BLM Wyoming State Office, 5353 Yellowstone Road, P.O. Box 1828, Cheyenne, WY 82003, 307–775–6015. Authority: 43 CFR 1784.4–1. John F. Ruhs, Acting Deputy Director. 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Steens Mountain Advisory Council Tara Thissell, BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hine, OR 97738, 541–573–4519. VerDate Sep<11>2014 Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Advisory Committee Larry Crutchfield, BLM Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Office, 669 South Highway 89 A, Kanab, UT 84741, 435–644–1209. 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0024128: PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (Museum) at the University of Oklahoma has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50667 request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice by December 1, 2017. Dr. Marc Levine, Assistant Curator of Archaeology, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, 2401 Chautauqua Avenue, Norman, OK 73072–7029, telephone (405) 325–1994, email mlevine@ou.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the following counties in the State of Oklahoma: Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Cotton, Custer, Garfield, Garvin, Grady, Kiowa, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Roger Mills, and Washita. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. ADDRESSES: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In 1978 and 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were removed from the Devils Canyon site (34Ki0001) in Kiowa County, OK. The site was first surveyed and recorded by David J. Werner of the University of Oklahoma in 1947, and later resurveyed in 1978 by Richard Drass of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. Additional materials from the site were donated to the Museum by landowner Bernice Winters in 1978 and 1981. Individuals 1 and 2 are commingled fragmentary remains of adults of E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 50668 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices indeterminate sex. An infant approximately 1 year old is represented by a single deciduous molar and is designated as Individual 3. Individuals 4 and 5 are partial and complete crania, respectively, and are likely adult male. No known individuals were identified. The associated funerary objects from the site are collectively associated with Individuals 1, 2, and 3 and include 23 faunal bone fragments, 2 of which are burned. The Devils Canyon site is a historic period Wichita settlement. The determination is based on U.S. Government records which note that the U.S. Army visited the site in 1834. In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Edwards/Carter site (34Bk0002) in Beckham County, OK. This site was recorded for the Oklahoma Archeological Survey by Rex Wilson and Charles Robertson in October of 1955, and again in August of 1965. Most of the excavations were conducted by the University of Oklahoma Field School in 1968 and the associated collections were subsequently turned over to the Museum. The human remains consist of commingled cranial and long bone fragments and one molar tooth. The two individuals represented are adults, one probable male and one of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Edwards/Carter site is associated with the Edwards Complex, dating from approximately A.D. 1500–1650 and including the initial Spanish contact period. Based on continuity of the cultural material, these remains may be related to the western group of the Wichita. Oral history, as well as postcontact European records, supports the presence of the Wichita in the area at this time. In 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were removed from the Sandstone Creek 1 site (34Bk0001) in Beckham County, OK. The site was recorded by the University of Oklahoma by Cain in 1955 and surveyed by Fenton Wheeler. Materials from the site, including Burials 1 and 3, were transferred to the Museum at an unknown date. Remains from Burial 2 are not present at the Museum. Burial 1 contains, at minimum, two individuals. Burial 1A is a partial skeleton of a young adult male, 20–35 years old, and Burial 1B is a vertebral column of an adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 3 contains at least three individuals. Burial 3A is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult male, Burial 3B is a fragmentary skeleton of a probable male adult, and Burial 3C consists of cranial remains of a child, 4– VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 6 years old. No known individuals were identified. The 4 associated funerary objects from Burial 3 are deer teeth. In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Hubbard 2 site (34Bk0005) in Beckham County, OK. The burial and associated funerary objects from this site were excavated by amateur archeologists, reburied, later salvaged in 1978, and then transferred to the Museum in 1979. The human remains consist of a complete skeleton of a young adult female, 20–35 years old. No known individual was identified. The 41 associated funerary objects include 4 hammerstones, 1 ground stone fragment, 1 flint core, 1 quartzite core, 1 chipped stone axe, 28 chipped stone flakes, and 5 faunal bone fragments. In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Fowler site (34Bk0006) in Beckham County, OK. This site was exposed by erosion associated with an artificial pond on private land. The Oklahoma Archeological Survey Data Record indicates that, prior to 1959, the owner excavated, reburied, and re-excavated one of the three burials at the site. According to the Burial Data Records, Burial 2 was excavated by the State Crime Bureau and later turned over to the Museum. Burials 1 and 3 were either reburied or may still be in the possession of the land owner. Only Burial 2 was found to be in the possession of the Museum. Burial 2 consists of two individuals. Individual 1 is a partial skeleton of a young adult male, 25–30 years old. Individual 2 is an adult represented by three teeth and one cranial fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the I–40 Burial site (34Bk0049) in Beckham County, OK. The burial was salvaged on June 23, 1973, by the Oklahoma Highway Archeological Survey prior to highway construction on Interstate-40 near Sayre, OK (ODOTstate property). Materials from the site were turned over to the Museum in June of 1973. The burial consists of highly fragmentary skeletal remains of an adult, at least 35 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The 10 associated funerary objects include 1 deer ulna fragment, 8 faunal bone awl fragments, and 1 chipped stone core. In September of 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Red Rock Canyon 1 site (34Cd0138) in Caddo County, OK. The site is located along a PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 canyon wall in Red Rock Canyon State Park. The site had been disturbed by park personnel who had been removing dirt from the area. Collections were then made by the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1982, while further investigating construction damage in the park. Materials recovered were subsequently donated to the Museum in October of 1982. The human remains are a fragmentary skeleton of an adult male. No known individual was identified. The 14 associated funerary objects include 9 faunal bone fragments, three of which are burned, 1 small sample of charcoal, 1 pottery sherd, 2 chipped stone flakes, and 1 small fragment of dried organic matter. In 1974 and 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Takoah site (34Cd0244) in Caddo County, OK. The site was first surveyed and recorded in 1974 by Charles Wallis of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission for the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and was excavated in 1975. Recovered materials were accessioned by the Museum in 1975 and 1988. Two burials were excavated at the site. Burial 1 is a partial skeleton of a young adult female, 20–35 years old. Burial 2 is a partial skeleton of an adult male, 25–45 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 172 associated funerary objects were-removed from site 34Cd0244. Burial 1 is associated with 76 faunal bones or bone fragments, 13 chipped stone cobble fragments, 24 chipped stone flakes, 1 chipped stone projectile point fragment, 1 ground stone mano, 1 ground stone fragment, 2 unmodified rocks, 1 piece of clay, 2 wood fragments, 2 shells, 17 shell fragments, and 1 soil sample from the burial. Burial 2 is associated with 18 faunal bone fragments, 4 chipped stone cobble fragments, 1 unmodified cobble, 6 chipped stone flakes, 1 shell fragment, and 1 soil sample taken from within the skull of the individual in Burial 2. In 1988, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Majors 3 site (34Cd0299) in Caddo County, OK. The remains were excavated by Jack Hofman on private land and accessioned by the Museum in 1988. The human remains removed from the site consist of a partial skeleton of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On August 27, 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from an unnamed site (34Cn0036) in Canadian County, OK. This site was discovered on November 17, 1975, during a survey of land proposed for the construction of a rest E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices area along Interstate-40. The material and remains from this site were turned over to the Museum in 1981. The human remains consist of 10 small bone fragments of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On November 10, 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Sanders site (34Ct0011) in Cotton County, OK. The human remains and associated artifacts from the Sanders Site were recovered by Robert Brooks of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey on November 10, 1987, after the site had been vandalized by unauthorized digging on private land, and subsequently donated to the Museum in 1988. Two burials were excavated at the site. Burial 1 contains a partial skeleton of an adult female, 18–25 years old. Burial 2 contains a fragmentary skeleton of a child, 5–6 years old, and 3 long bone fragments of an infant, both of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 143 associated funerary objects are associated with both burials and include 49 chipped stone fragments, 26 ground stone fragments, 9 pottery sherds, 5 shell fragments, and 54 faunal bone fragments. In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Henry site (34Ct0017) in Cotton County, OK. The site was exposed on private land, recovered in 1971 by the Oklahoma Anthropological Society, supervised by Hofman, and subsequently donated to the Museum in the same year. Two burials were excavated. Burial 1 is a complete skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35–50 years old. Burial 2 is a complete skeleton of an older adult female, over 50 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 5 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Ct0017. Burial 1 is associated with 1 chipped stone knife, 1 flake, and 1 shell pendant. Burial 2 is associated with 2 chipped stone flakes. In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Austin site (34Ct0021) in Cotton County, OK. A burial was exposed by a road grader and reported to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey by private citizens. The skeletal remains and associated funerary objects were excavated by Robert Brooks in 1985, and donated to the Museum on July 29, 1985. The human remains consist of a very fragmentary skeleton representing a young adult, 20–25 years old, probably male. No known individual was identified. The 10 associated funerary VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 objects include 7 shell fragments, 1 pottery sherd, 1 chipped stone flake, and 1 charcoal sample. On September 22, 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Carley site (34Cu0082) in Custer County, OK. A private collector reported the site to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and it was recorded by Survey staff on September 22, 1978. The collector gave materials from the site to the Survey who then transferred them to the Museum in 1980. The remains are commingled and fragmentary, representing at least 2 adult females and 1 adult male. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In June of 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Kingery site (34Gf0000) in Garfield County, OK. The site was excavated by the Oklahoma River Basin Survey, with field work directed by Barr and assisted by Slovacek, Brown, and Harwood from the Ponca City, OK, Chapter of the Anthropological Society. The human remains were transferred to the Museum in 1966. The human remains from the site are fragmentary and commingled and represent one young adult female, 20–35 years old and one middle-aged adult male, 35–50 years old. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In April of 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from an unnamed site (34Ml0000) in McClain County, OK. A pottery vessel was found in a grave exposed by erosion on the L.E. Howorton Farm near Rosedale, OK, by Bill Eddleman and donated to the Museum by William Villines on May 8, 1958. Additional skeletal material was discovered in the Museum collections in 1995, also from an unknown location near Rosedale. The skeletal remains and pottery vessel may have originated from the same burial. Individuals 1 and 2 are commingled remains of an adult female and an adult of indeterminate sex. Individual 3 is represented by a single long bone fragment of an infant, less than 3 years old. No known individuals were identified. The 9 associated funerary objects are associated with all 3 individuals from the site and include 1 partially restored pottery vessel, 1 chipped stone flake, 1 faunal bone, and 6 pottery sherds. In December of 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Willingham site (34Ml0005) in McClain County, OK. The site was first recorded by W.H. Villines in 1953. Excavations were conducted in PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50669 1958 by the Oklahoma Anthropological Society under the direction of Sherman Lawton and Robert Bell and material from the site was subsequently donated to the Museum the same year. In 1964, bulldozing operations at an oil well exposed additional material at the site and was excavated by the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. Three burials were discovered but are not in the possession of the Museum. It is unclear if they were excavated or left in the ground. The human remains from the site in the possession of the Museum consist of a long bone fragment and a heavily worn tooth of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The 88 associated funerary objects include 3 chipped stone scrapers, 2 modified flint fragments, 10 chipped stone flakes, 1 lithic abrader fragment, 1 ground stone mano fragment, 3 unmodified sandstone fragments, 3 unmodified large stones, 15 faunal bone fragments, 7 shell fragments, and 43 pottery sherds. In June of 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Baker 1 site (34Rm0074) in Roger Mills County, OK. Material from the site was recovered during a surface survey after the site was disturbed by the construction of a dam. The collection was recorded by Don Wyckoff of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and subsequently turned over to the Museum the same year. The human remains consist of a single tooth of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The 24 associated funerary objects include 22 flakes, 1 flint core, and 1 quartzite core. Sites 34Bk0001, 34Bk0005, 34Bk0006, 34Bk0049, 34Cd0138, 34Cd0244, 34Cd0299, 34Cn0036, 34Ct0011, 34Ct0017, 34Ct0021, 34Cu0082, 34Gf0000, 34Ml0000, 34Ml0005, and 34Rm0074 are Plains Village Period in age, dating from approximately A.D. 900–1500. The Carley site (34Cu0082) may have also been occupied into the period of initial Spanish contact. These determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools). Ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and oral historical evidence support the cultural continuity of Plains Village Period populations in these areas with the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Hubbard site (34Bk0004) in Beckham County, OK. The site was discovered on private property after the spring floods of 1957. The landowner contacted the Sheriff’s E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 50670 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices office and the remains were sent to the State Crime Bureau in Oklahoma City, OK, who forwarded them to Alice Brues of the University of Oklahoma Medical Center. Brues identified the remains as Native American and further excavation was carried out by the Highway Salvage Archaeology Program. The remains were subsequently donated to the Museum in 1957. Burial 1 contains two individuals, including the partial skeleton of a probable female adolescent, 10–14 years old, and a portion of the face of an adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 2 contains a child, 6–8 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Coy Nuttley site (34Bk0023) in Beckham County, OK. Material from the Coy Nuttley Site, an open habitation site on private land near Elk City, OK, was given to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey by an amateur collector and subsequently donated to the Museum in June of 1987. The human remains consist of a cranial fragment and two loose teeth of an adult of indeterminate sex and three loose teeth of a child, 9–12 years old. No known individuals were identified. The 11 associated funerary objects, linked to both individuals, are fragments of deer bone. In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from an unnamed site (34Bk0094) in Beckham County, OK. The human remains were found by a private land owner and turned over to Larry Neal and Alan Wormser of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1984 and later donated to the Museum in 1988. The human remains from this site consist of a partial cranium of a young adult, 20– 35 years old, probably male. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Goodman 1 site (34Cu0001) in Custer County, OK. The site was originally discovered by the landowner when a large piece of daub was discovered during plowing in 1941. In 1951, the tenant reported that, while digging a cellar, he uncovered two burials which were subsequently donated to the Museum the same year. Burial 1 is a complete skeleton of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. A second burial was recorded from the site but is not in the possession of the Museum. No known individual was identified. A total of 46 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Cu0001. Burial 1 is associated with 3 VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 shell fragments, 1 ground stone mano fragment, 1 stone elbow pipe, and 6 faunal bone fragments. Burial 2 is associated with 1 ceramic pot without handles, 1 ceramic pot with handles, 31 shell beads, 1 chipped stone projectile point, and 1 flint knife. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Heerwald (Jordan) site (34Cu0027) in Custer County, OK. This site is on private land on a ridge south of Turkey Creek, a tributary of the Washita River. Material was recovered by James Schaeffer of the Highway Salvage Archaeology program in 1957, when I–40 was constructed south of old US 66, and was subsequently donated to the Museum. The burial contains 3 individuals. Individual 1 is a partial skeleton of a young adult female, 20–25 years old, Individual 2 is a partial skeleton of a child, 6–7 years old, and Individual 3 is a partial skeleton of a fetus. No known individuals were identified. The 45 associated funerary objects include 1 pottery sherd, 3 shells, 2 unmodified shell fragments, 1 modified shell, 6 unmodified sandstone fragments, 1 ground stone mano, 1 projectile point fragment, 1 Washita type projectile point, 1 Harrell type projectile point (embedded in the first lumbar vertebra of Individual 1), 3 chipped stone flakes, 1 chipped stone end scraper, 2 chipped stone fragments, 1 chipped stone cobble, 20 faunal bone fragments, and 1 charcoal sample. In March and April of 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Cotter-Hutson site (34Cu0041) in Custer County, OK. The human remains and associated objects from Burial 1 of the Cotter-Hutson site were discovered by a private land owner while plowing and then recovered by members of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and the Oklahoma Anthropological Society in March of 1969. Burial 2 was recovered in April of 1969. Both burials and associated funerary objects were donated to the Museum in 1981. Burial 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of a child, 6–7 years old. Burial 2 is a partial skeleton of a child, 4–5 years old. A third individual is an adult male represented by a mandible found on the surface. No known individuals were identified. A total of 119 associated funerary objects were recovered from site 34Cu0041. Burial 1 is associated with 5 deer bone and tooth fragments, 8 shell fragments, 3 pottery sherds, 8 ground stone fragments, 3 ground stone fragments, 2 pebbles, 6 flakes, 15 seeds, 1 faunal bone fragment, 17 chipped stone flakes from the surface directly above the burial, and 2 bags of soil from PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the burial itself. Burial 2 is associated with 38 seeds, 6 faunal bone fragments, 1 ground stone fragment, 1 shell scraper, 1 shell fragment, and 2 bags of burial soil and burned material. In 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Arrington site (34Cu0042) in Custer County, OK. The site was reported to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1969 by a private landowner who had discovered a burial while plowing. Material from the site was subsequently donated to the Museum the same year. The human remains are a partial skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35–50 years old. No known individual was identified. The 10 associated funerary objects include 1 unburned faunal bone fragment, 4 burned faunal bone fragments, 2 shell fragments, and 3 chipped stone flakes. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were removed from the Selzer site (34Gd0016) in Grady County, OK. The site was exposed by flooding in 1957 on a terrace above the Washita River on privately held land. Three burials were excavated and later donated to the Museum. Burial 1 is a young adult female, 18–22 years old, Burial 2 is an adult male, and Burial 3 is an adult of indeterminate sex. There are two additional individuals that are fragmentary and commingled. Individual 4 is a probable young adult female, 20–35 years old. Individual 5 is an adolescent, 15–18 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. A total of 29 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Gd0016. Burial 3 is associated with 18 pottery sherds and 2 shell fragments. Individuals 4 and 5 are associated with 1 chipped stone flake, 1 ground stone mano, and 7 shell fragments. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the WRP 9 site (34Gd0024) in Grady County, OK. The site was originally reported in 1963 by Dick McWilliams who discovered the burial eroding out of a road cut. The burial was salvaged by the Museum later that year. The burial is a complete skeleton of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On September 13, 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 6 individuals were removed from the Horne 1 site (34Gd0078) in Grady County, OK. The site was uncovered when an Oklahoma Natural Gas pipeline went through the area in 1977. The site was officially recorded by the Oklahoma Archeological Survey on E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices September 13, 1977, and material from the site was donated to the Museum in 1981 and 1985. The skeletal remains of three of the individuals include an adult male, 30–40 years old, an infant, 1–1.5 years old, and a child, 6–9 years old. Three other individuals are commingled and all are adults of indeterminate sex. The commingled remains may contain fragmentary skeletal material belonging to the three previously mentioned individuals. No known individuals were identified. The 138 associated funerary objects include 2 chipped stone cobbles, 3 chipped stone cobble fragments, 3 unmodified lithic fragments, 2 pottery sherds, 3 shell fragments, 123 faunal bone fragments, 1 faunal tooth, and 1 bison tibia digging tool. In June of 1992, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Jewett site (34Gd0081) in Grady County, OK. This site is located on privately held land and was initially recorded by the staff of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey on November 4, 1977. Salvage was conducted by Robert Brooks, prompted by the discovery of a burial during construction of an oil field in 1992. Remains were removed under the state burial law and transferred to the Museum the same year. Burial 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 2 is a fragmentary skeleton of a probable young adult female, 20–35 years old. Burials 3 and 4 are both fragmentary skeletons of adults of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In November 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from an unnamed site (34Gv0000) in Garvin County, OK. Human remains from the site were initially collected by Jesse Taylor from a creek bottom near Elmer City, OK, and then transferred to the State Archaeologist by the Oklahoma Medical Examiner’s Office. The material was later received by the Museum from the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in May of 1988. The human remains consist of a single complete cranium of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the summer of 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Braiden site (34Gv0001) in Garvin County, OK. This site was excavated by the Works Progress Administration on private land in 1937, and formally recorded by Charles Bareis in February of 1955. The material was subsequently donated to the Museum. Burial 1 VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 contains two individuals, a cranium of an adult male and loose teeth of a child, 3–6 years old. Burial 2 contains small bone fragments of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 105 associated funerary objects from Burial 2 include 35 faunal bone fragments, 19 chipped stone fragments, 2 chipped stone knives, 3 chipped stone points, 4 chipped stone scrapers, and 42 pottery sherds. In 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 individuals were removed from the Grant Site (34Gv0002) in Garvin County, OK. Located on a terrace above the Washita River near Wynnewood, OK, the site was excavated by the Works Progress Administration in 1937, under the direction of Forrest E. Clements of the University of Oklahoma. Material from the site was taken to the University of Oklahoma for storage and the human remains and associated funerary objects were accessioned by the Museum in 1937 and 1948. Individual 1 is a partial skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35–50 years old. Individual 2 is a partial skeleton of a middle-aged adult male, 35–50 years old. Individual 3 is a partial skeleton of an infant, 1–2 years old. Individual 4 is a fragmentary skeleton of an infant, 1–3 years old. Individual 5 is a fragmentary skeleton of an infant, 6 months to 1 year old. Individual 6 is a fragmentary skeleton of a newborn infant. Individual 7 is a complete skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35–50 years old. Individual 8 is a partial skull of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. Individual 9 is a fragmentary skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35–50 years old. Individual 10 is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult of indeterminate sex. Individuals 11 and 12 are represented by fragmentary and commingled post-cranial remains. Both of these individuals are adults, one female, and the other of indeterminate sex. Individuals 13, 14, and 15 are represented by fragmentary and commingled remains of at least two adults of indeterminate sex and one child. Individual 16 is a fragmentary skeleton of a middle-aged to older adult female, 40–55 years old. Individuals 17 and 18 are represented by fragmentary and commingled post-cranial remains of at least two adults of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. A total of 32 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Gv0002. Individual 1 is associated with 1 pottery sherd. Individual 2 is associated with 1 complete ceramic bowl. Individual 3 is associated with 6 faunal bone fragments. Individual 4 is associated with 1 pottery PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50671 sherd, 1 faunal bone fragment, and 1 shell scraper. Individual 5 is associated with 1 unmodified rock. Individual 7 is associated with 18 faunal bone fragments, 1 bison scapula hoe, and 1 bone awl. In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Lacey Farm 1 site (34Gv0005) in Garvin County, OK. The site is on a high ridge north of the Washita River. It was recorded by Charles Bareis in 1955, however, prior to that time many private collectors had visited the site. The site was resurveyed in 1993, by Richard Drass and material from the site was subsequently turned over to the Museum. Individual 1 is a partial cranium of an adult male. Individual 2 is a fragmentary cranium of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. A total of 38 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Gv0005. Individual 1 is associated with 5 pottery sherds and 2 modified faunal bone fragments. Individual 2 is associated with 1 two-handed ground stone mano, 1 faunal bone awl, 2 faunal skull and horn hoes, 7 faunal bone hoe fragments, 2 modified faunal bone fragments, 9 unmodified faunal bone fragments, 2 deer bone fragments, 1 deer tooth, and 6 pottery sherds. In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Arthur site (34Gv0032) in Garvin County, OK. The remains were recovered in 1982, during excavations under a house by Robert Brooks and were accessioned by the Museum in 1987. The remains consist of a fragmentary skeleton of an infant approximately 1 year old. No known individual was identified. The 532 associated funerary objects include 135 shell fragments, 149 pottery sherds, 20 clay fragments, 15 sandstone fragments, 1 hammer stone, 170 chipped stone flakes, 1 chipped stone projectile point, 1 chipped stone biface fragment, 29 faunal bone fragments, 10 burned faunal bone fragments, and 1 charcoal sample. Between 1982 and 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 8 individuals were removed from the Thelma Wilson site (34Gv0043) in Garvin County, OK. This site, overlooking the Washita River east of Pauls Valley, was initially surveyed and recorded by Don Wyckoff of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1970. In 1982, Jim Mayberry contacted the survey to report material eroding from a cut bank on the site. In early 1983, Richard Drass and Robert Brooks assisted Jim Mayberry in salvaging the material. The burials and associated objects were turned over to the Museum E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 50672 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices in 1985. Burial 1 is a fragmentary skull of a child, 3–5 years old. Burial 2 contains a fragmentary skeleton of an adult male and a fragmentary skeleton of a young adult, 20–35 years old, of indeterminate sex. Burial 3 is a fragmentary cranium of an adolescent, 12–15 years old. Burial 4 is a single molar tooth and small bone fragments of a middle-aged adult, 35–50 years old, of indeterminate sex. Burial 5 is a single molar tooth and cranial fragments of a child, 10–12 years old. Two additional individuals are represented by a single molar tooth of a child, 3–5 years old, and a cranial fragment of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. A total of 17 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Gv0043. Both individuals in Burial 2 are associated with 1 pottery sherd, 2 modified lithic flakes, 2 unmodified lithic flakes, 1 unmodified stone pebble, 1 lithic atlatl hook, 1 boatstone, 1 faunal bone fragment, and 3 fragments of burned faunal bone. Burial 3 is associated with 4 pottery sherds and 1 unmodified lithic flake. In 1980 and 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Franklin Cordell site (34Wa0003) in Washita County, OK. Located on a cultivated and terraced hillside in Washita County, this site was first surveyed by Robert Bell of the University of Oklahoma in 1955. Prior to that time however, the site was often visited by amateur collectors. A subsequent survey was carried out by Richard Drass in 1977, after plowing had exposed additional material. In 1980, an extensive excavation was conducted by the Eastern Oklahoma County Chapter of the Oklahoma Archaeological Society under the direction of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, supervised by David Hughes. The material was transferred to the Museum in 1980 and 1981. Individual 1 is an adult greater than 35 years old, of indeterminate sex, and represented by a single mandible fragment. Individual 2 is an adolescent or young adult, approximately 18–22 years old, of indeterminate sex, also represented by a single mandible fragment. Individual 3 is an adult greater than 20 years old, of indeterminate sex, and represented by 5 loose teeth and a manual phalange. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On September 7, 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, 7 individuals were removed from the Hinz site (34Wa0004) in Washita County, OK. This site was exposed by cultivation and erosion and first VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 discovered by Denny Carley of Southwestern Oklahoma State University in 1974. Carley notified the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and on September 7, 1974, Roger Saunders, Jack Hoffman, and Daryl Wheaton of the Survey excavated the site. The material was transferred to the Museum in 1981. Three burials were excavated. Burial 1 is a complete skeleton of a child, 4–6 years old. Burial 2 is a partial skeleton of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. Burial 3 is a partial skeleton of an adult of indeterminate sex. Individual 4 is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult of indeterminate sex. Individual 5 is a fragmentary skeleton of a child. Individuals 6 and 7 are represented by loose teeth and commingled small bone fragments of an adult of indeterminate sex and a child, 5–7 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 54 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Wa0004. Burial 1 is associated with 12 chipped stone flakes and fragments, 1 piece of sandstone, 1 pottery sherd, 2 mussel shells, and 2 conch shell pendants. Burial 2 is associated with 15 pottery sherds, 1 faunal bone fragment, and 7 shell fragments. Burial 3 is associated with 11 chipped stone flakes, 1 pottery sherd, and 1 piece of sandstone. In 1955 and 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 66 individuals were removed from the McLemore/Cross site (34Wa0005) in Washita County, OK. This site was discovered by a private citizen and recorded by Rex Wilson of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1955. A large-scale excavation was conducted in 1960, directed by Don Wyckoff and Robert Bell. Most of the material from the McLemore site, including the human remains and associated funerary objects, were transferred to the Museum in 1960. An additional human bone was transferred to the Museum in 2008 by a private collector. Burial 1 has 2 individuals, both are infants, 0.5–1 year old. Burial 2 is a middle-aged adult female, 35–45 years old. Burial 3 is an infant, 1.5–2 years old. Burial 4 is a middle-aged adult female, 40–55 years old. Burial 5 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 6 is an infant, 0.5–1 year old. There are 2 individuals from Burial 7, a young adult, 20–25 years old, probably a female, and an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 8 is also a newborn infant. Burial 9 has 2 individuals, a child, 9–12 years old and an infant, 1–1.5 years old. Burial 10 is a middle-aged adult female, 35–40 years old. Burial 11 is an infant, 1–1.5 years old. Burial 12 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 13 is an PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 adolescent, 18–20 years old, probably a male. Burial 14 is a middle-aged adult male, 35–45 years old. Burial 15 is a middle-aged adult female, 35–50 years old. Burial 16 is an infant, 0.5–1 year old. Burial 17 is an infant, 0.5–1.5 years old. Burial 18 are two infants, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 19 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 20 is a middle-aged adult female, 35–45 years old. Burial 21 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 22 has 2 individuals, a young adult male, 30–35 years old and an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 23 also has 2 individuals, a young adult female, 25–30 years old and a fetus. Burial 24 is an adult, 30–39 years old, probably a female. Burial 25 is an infant, 1.5–3 years old. Burial 27 has 3 individuals, a young adult female, 27–35 years old and 2 newborn infants. Burials 28 and 29 are both infants, 0– 0.5 year old. Burial 30A is a middleaged adult female, 45–50 years old and Burial 30B is a middle- aged adult, 40– 44 years old, probably a male. Burial 31 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 32 is an infant, 1.5–2 years old. Burial 33 is a middle-aged adult male, 45–55 years old. There are 2 individuals from Burial 34, a middle-aged adult male, 45–50 years old and a middle-aged adult of indeterminate sex, 40–44 years old. Burial 35 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 36 has 2 individuals, a child, 2– 3 years old and an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 37 also has 2 individuals, a child, 2–3 years old and an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 38 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 39 is a child, 3–5 years old. Burial 40 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 41 is a child, 2–3 years old. Burials 42 and 43 are both infants, 0– 0.5 year old. Burial 44 is a child, 5–6 years old. Burial 45 is a middle-aged adult male, 45–55 years old. Burials 46 and 47 are two probable young adult females, 25–30 years old. Burial 48 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 49 is a young adult of indeterminate sex, 20–35 years old. Burials 50 and 51 are middleaged adults of indeterminate sex, 35–50 years old. Burial 52 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. Burial 53 is an adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 54 is an infant, 0–0.5 year old. No known individuals were identified. There are 292 isolated and commingled bone and bone fragments from the site, likely belonging to the individuals listed above. A total of 1,053 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Wa0005. The two individuals from Burial 1 are associated with 2 chipped stone fragments, 3 pottery sherds, and 4 faunal bone fragments. Burial 2 is associated with 1 unmodified stone, 1 chipped stone scraper, 2 pottery sherds, E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices and 1 shell fragment. Burial 3 is associated with 1 fragment of petrified wood. Burial 4 is associated with 2 chipped stone flakes, 9 pottery sherds, and 2 faunal bone fragments. Burial five is associated with 3 faunal bone fragments. Burial 6 is associated with 1 bone fragment and 1 shell fragment. The two individuals from Burial 7 are associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point, 2 pottery sherds, and 6 faunal bone fragments. Burial 8 is associated with 1 human effigy pot and 1 soil sample taken from the pot. The two individuals from Burial 9 are associated with 1 ceramic pot, 2 pottery sherds, 9 ceramic figurine fragments, 6 shell fragments, and 11 faunal bone fragments. Burial 10 is associated with 1 ceramic pot. Burial 11 is associated with 1 ceramic pot, 1 pottery sherd, 1 shell, 1 shell fragment, 1 unmodified faunal bone fragment, and 1 faunal bone awl fragment. Burial 12 is associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point fragment, 2 faunal bone fragments, and 1 faunal tooth. Burial 13 is associated 6 chipped stone fragments, 1 unmodified rock, 3 pottery sherds, 1 partial skeleton of a crow, 3 faunal bone fragments, 1 soil sample taken from the burial, and 1 chipped stone projectile point embedded in a vertebra of the individual. Burial 14 is associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point, 1 stone pipe, 1 chipped stone core, 1 chipped stone flake, 2 chipped stone fragments, 3 pottery sherds, 5 faunal bone fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from the burial. Burial 15 is associated with 1 chipped stone flake, 8 chipped stone fragments, 1 chipped stone scraper, 8 fragments of soapstone, 2 pieces of unmodified sandstone, 1 ceramic pot, 3 pottery sherds, 1 shell, 1 shell fragment, 1 deer mandible grater, 2 faunal bone hoes, 2 modified faunal bone fragments, and 4 unmodified faunal bone fragments. Burial 16 is associated with 1 ceramic pot. The two individuals from Burial 18 are associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 unmodified rock, 1 faunal scapula hoe, and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 20 is associated with 1 chipped stone fragment, 1 unmodified rock, 1 ceramic pot, 2 modified faunal bone fragments, and 1 unmodified faunal bone fragment. Burial 21 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 faunal bone fragment, 2 shell scrapers, and 5 shell fragments. The two individuals from Burial 22 are associated with 1 chipped stone end scraper, 1 chipped stone fragment, 2 unmodified stones, 9 pottery sherds, 1 ceramic pot, 2 shell fragments, 1 shell bead, and 10 faunal bone fragments. The two individuals from Burial 23 are associated with 15 VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 chipped stone fragments, 2 pottery sherds, 8 shell fragments, 2 modified faunal bone fragments, 9 unmodified faunal bone fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from the burial. Burial 24 is associated with 1 soapstone fragment, 2 chipped stone fragments, 3 shell fragments, and 7 faunal bone fragments. Burial 25 is associated with 1 ceramic pot, 1 pottery sherd, and 1 shell. Burial 26 is associated with 3 shell fragments and 3 faunal bone fragments. The three individuals from Burial 27 are associated 2 unmodified rocks, 2 ceramic pots, 4 pottery sherds, 1 shell pendant, 21 shells and shell fragments, 2 deer mandible graters, and 6 faunal bone fragments. Burial 28 is associated with 16 soapstone fragments and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 30A is associated with 2 pottery sherds and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 30B is associated with 1 shell fragment and 4 faunal bone fragments. Burials 30A and 30B are also associated with 1 chipped stone flake, 4 pottery sherds, 2 shells, 1 fragment of burned faunal bone, and 3 faunal bone fragments. Burial 31 is associated with 1 ground stone mano and 2 shells. Burial 32 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 shell fragment, and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 33 is associated with 18 chipped stone fragments, 5 pottery sherds, 4 shell fragments, 11 burned faunal bone fragments, and 12 unmodified faunal bone fragments. The two individuals from Burial 34 are associated with 6 chipped stone knives, 4 chipped stone projectile points, 1 chipped stone flake, 4 chipped stone fragments, 2 unmodified lithic fragments, 1 piece of worked selenite, 1 ceramic pot, 2 pottery sherds, 1 ball of clay, 2 shells, 2 faunal bone awls, and 3 faunal bone fragments. The two individuals from Burial 36 are associated with 3 pottery sherds, 3 shells, 121 shell beads, and 1 faunal bone fragment. The two individuals from Burial 37 are associated with 1 ceramic pot, 1 faunal bone fragment, and 422 shell beads. Burial 38 is associated with 1 pottery sherd and 3 shell fragments. Burial 39 is associated with 1 chipped stone fragment, 2 unmodified stones, 12 pottery sherds, 4 faunal bone fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from the burial. Burial 40 is associated with 1 chipped stone scraper, 3 shell fragments, and 1 burned faunal bone fragment. Burial 41 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 burned faunal bone fragment, and 1 unmodified faunal bone fragment. Burial 42 is associated with 1 chipped stone fragment, 2 shell fragments, and 3 faunal bone fragments. Burial 44 is associated with 2 pottery sherds and 5 PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50673 faunal bone fragments. Burial 45 is associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point, 2 chipped stone fragments, 1 unmodified stone, 1 stone pipe, 4 pottery sherds, 3 burned faunal bone fragments, 3 unmodified faunal bone fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from the burial. Burial 46 is associated with 1 unmodified rock, 1 pottery sherd, 4 shell fragments, and 2 faunal bone fragments. Burial 47 is associated with 2 chipped stone knives, 1 chipped stone fragment, 1 unmodified stone, 1 ceramic pot, 1 pottery sherd, 3 shells, 1 shell bead, and 2 soil samples taken from the burial. Burial 48 is associated with 1 shell and 1 pottery sherd. Additionally, 3 soil samples were taken from the general burial area and are associated with all of the human remains collectively. In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Duerksen site (34Wa0143) in Washita County, OK. The remains were found near the Washita River by Denny Carley, a member of the Oklahoma Anthropological Society. He donated the remains to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1977, which were later transferred to the Museum in 1980. The human remains consist of a fragmentary cranium of a young adult male, 20–35 years old. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sites 34Bk0004, 34Bk0023, 34Bk0094, 34Cu0001, 34Cu0027, 34Cu0041, 34Cu0042, 34Gd0016, 34Gd0024, 34Gd0078, 34Gd0081, 34Gv0000, 34Gv0001, 34Gv0002, 34Gv0005, 34Gv0032, 34Gv0043, 34Wa0003, 34Wa0004, 34Wa0005, and 34Wa0143 are Plains Village Period, Washita River phase in age, dating approximately from A.D. 1250–1400. It is possible that the Braiden site (34Gv0001) could also date to the earlier Paoli phase (A.D. 900– 1250), and the Lacey Farm 1 site (34Gv0005) has Paoli phase components in addition to Washita River phase components. These determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools), oral history, and post-contact European records. The Paoli and Washita River phases demonstrate continuity in material culture with known groups of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. In 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Coulter site (34Ml0008) in McClain County, OK. The human remains and associated funerary objects were salvaged from a slush pit in the middle of the Coulter Site by William Villines. The site was recorded E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 50674 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices by Stephan de Borhegyi for the University of Oklahoma in 1955, and then the material was donated to the Museum later in the same year. The human remains removed from the site include two commingled partial skeletons, both of whom are adult males. No known individuals were identified. The 343 associated funerary objects include 187 pottery sherds, 1 partially restored pot, 1 ceramic spindle whorl, 15 shell fragments, 118 faunal bone fragments, 1 faunal bone awl, 1 ground stone mano fragment, 9 chipped stone flakes, 8 chipped stone cores, and 2 chipped stone scrapers. This site is Plains Village Period, Paoli phase in age, dating from approximately A.D. 900–1250. This determination is based on archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools), oral history, and post-contact European records. The Paoli phase demonstrates continuity in material culture with the subsequent Washita River phase (A.D. 1250–1400) and later known groups of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Patton site (34Bk0093) in Beckham County, OK. The human remains were collected in the field by Larry Neal and Alan Wormser of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and later donated to the Museum in 1988. Individual 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of a young adult female, 20–35 years old. Individual 2 is a fragmentary skeleton of an adolescent, 12–15 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Linville 2 site (34Rm0492) in Roger Mills County, OK. The site was exposed by a bulldozer and material was recovered as part of a salvage operation funded by the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, conducted by Richard Drass, Pete Thurmond, John Flick, Don Wyckoff, Louis Albert, Peggy Flynn, and Michael Moore. The material was transferred to the Museum in 1987. The burial is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult female. No known individual was identified. The 158 associated funerary objects include 24 pottery sherds, 27 chipped stone flakes, 1 small stone projectile point, 11 shell fragments, 32 faunal bone fragments, 1 faunal bone awl, 58 cobbles and cobble fragments, 1 cobble biface, 2 charred nutshells, and 1 sample of organic material. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 Sites 34Bk0093 and 34Rm0492 are from the Plains Village Period and date to the Custer phase, from approximately A.D. 800–1250. These determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools), oral history, and post-contact European records. The Custer phase demonstrates continuity in material culture with the subsequent Washita River phase (A.D. 1250–1400) and later known groups of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. In 1981 and 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Carnegie Canyon site (34Cd0076) in Caddo County, OK, by the Oklahoma Conservation Commission. Excavations by Christopher Lintz and Stephan Hall occurred in 1981 and 1983, and material from the site was transferred to the Museum in 1983 and 1985. Individual 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of a probable female adult. Individual 2 is a single long bone fragment of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 13 associated funerary objects are 12 faunal bone fragments associated with Individual 1 and 1 soil sample associated with Individual 2. In 1989, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Cut Bank Site (34Ln0101) in Lincoln County, OK. This site was surveyed and recorded in 1989 by Charles S. Wallis Jr. of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission as part of the Bellcow Reservoir Resurvey and Testing Program in conjunction with studies on the impact area of the Kickapoo Nations Watershed in northwestern Lincoln County, OK. Material from the site was turned over to the Museum in 1991. The human remains consist of a single cranial fragment of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1952 and 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Brewer site (34Ml0003) in McClain County, OK. This site is on the south bank of the Canadian River and was originally surveyed and recorded in 1950, by the University of Oklahoma. William Villines of Rosedale, OK, brought a collection from the site to the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma in 1951. Additional material was salvaged by Richard Drass, Robert Brooks, and Alan Wormser of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, after more material had been exposed by oil well workers in 1986. The material was PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 accessioned by the Museum in 1953 and 1988. Burial 1 contains two individuals, an adult male and a young adult, 20–35 years old, of indeterminate sex. Burial 2 contains a young adult, 20–35 years old, of indeterminate sex. Burial 3 contains a probable young adult female, 20–35 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 61 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Ml0003. Both individuals from Burial 1 are associated with 1 chipped stone flake tool, 1 modified cobble, 1 bone pin, 1 ground stone fragment, 11 pottery sherds, 1 shell fragment, 1 shell scraper, 5 faunal bone fragments, and 1 charcoal sample. Burial 2 is associated with 7 pottery sherds, 7 worked shell fragments, 6 chipped stone flakes, 1 ground stone fragment, 1 faunal bone fragment, 1 soil sample, and 10 soil flotation samples. Burial 3 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 ground stone fragment, 1 shell fragment, and 2 faunal bone fragments. On November 26, 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Chevrolet site (34Ok0100) in Oklahoma County, OK. This site was exposed by heavy machinery during a construction project along Crutcho Creek in Oklahoma County and salvaged by Richard Drass and Sarah Herstand of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. The material was transferred to the Museum in 1981. The human remains are a fragmentary skeleton of an adolescent, 13–16 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The 42 associated funerary objects include 11 unmodified sandstone fragments, 1 chipped stone biface, 1 modified cobble, 11 chipped stone flakes, 2 pieces of charred material, 1 soil sample from the burial, 13 pieces of baked earth, and 2 pottery sherds. In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from an unnamed site (34Pt0000) in Pottawatomie County, OK. The human remains were collected by Michael Moore during a survey project near the Rose-Fast site and accessioned by the Museum in 1988. The human remains are highly fragmentary and commingled and represent an adult male, an adult female, and a child, 8– 12 years old. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sites 34Cd0076, 34Ln0101, 34Ml0003, 34Ok0100, and 34Pt0000 date to the Plains Woodland Period (A.D. 1–1000). The Brewer site (34Ml0003) may also date to the Plains Village Period. The unnamed site from Pottawatomie County is in close proximity to, and is believed to be associated with, the Rose- E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 210 / Wednesday, November 1, 2017 / Notices Fast site, a Plains Woodland Period site. These determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools), oral history, and post-contact European records. Ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and oral historical evidence support the cultural continuity of the Woodland Period with the subsequent Plains Village Period in the area and with the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. Determinations Made by the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Officials of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 193 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 3,389 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Marc Levine, Assistant Curator of Archaeology, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, 2401 Chautauqua Avenue, Norman, OK 73072–7029, telephone (405) 325–1994, email mlevine@ou.edu, by December 1, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma, may proceed. The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma, that this notice has been published. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Oct 31, 2017 Jkt 244001 Dated: September 8, 2017. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2017–23794 Filed 10–31–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0024125: PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Human Remains Repository, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Human Remains Repository, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Human Remains Repository, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Human Remains Repository, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, at the address in this notice by December 1, 2017. ADDRESSES: Dr. Rick L. Weathermon, Curator, Human Remains Repository, Department 3431, Anthropology, 1000 East University Avenue, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, telephone (307) 314–2035, email rikw@ uwyo.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50675 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Human Remains Repository, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from multiple counties in the State of Wyoming. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Human Remains Repository, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming. The Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek Reservation, South Dakota; Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South Dakota; Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of the Lower Brule Reservation, South Dakota; Lower Sioux Indian Community in the State of Minnesota; Oglala Sioux Tribe (previously listed as the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota); Prairie Island Indian Community in the State of Minnesota; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Santee Sioux Nation, Nebraska; Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota; SissetonWahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, South Dakota; Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; Upper Sioux Community, Minnesota; and Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota were invited to consult, but did not participate. History and Description of the Remains At some time prior to 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from the area of Pumpkin Buttes in Campbell County, WY, by members of the Wyoming Archaeological Society, Sheridan Chapter. In 1998, the E:\FR\FM\01NON1.SGM 01NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 210 (Wednesday, November 1, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 50667-50675]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-23794]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0024128: PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of 
Natural History, Norman, OK

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (Museum) at 
the University of Oklahoma has completed an inventory of human remains 
and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that 
there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and 
associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any 
Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control 
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal 
descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the 
address in this notice by December 1, 2017.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Marc Levine, Assistant Curator of Archaeology, Sam Noble 
Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, 2401 
Chautauqua Avenue, Norman, OK 73072-7029, telephone (405) 325-1994, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Sam Noble Oklahoma 
Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK. The human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed from the following counties in the State 
of Oklahoma: Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Cotton, Custer, Garfield, 
Garvin, Grady, Kiowa, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Roger 
Mills, and Washita.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Sam 
Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes 
(Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1978 and 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 
individuals were removed from the Devils Canyon site (34Ki0001) in 
Kiowa County, OK. The site was first surveyed and recorded by David J. 
Werner of the University of Oklahoma in 1947, and later resurveyed in 
1978 by Richard Drass of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. Additional 
materials from the site were donated to the Museum by landowner Bernice 
Winters in 1978 and 1981. Individuals 1 and 2 are commingled 
fragmentary remains of adults of

[[Page 50668]]

indeterminate sex. An infant approximately 1 year old is represented by 
a single deciduous molar and is designated as Individual 3. Individuals 
4 and 5 are partial and complete crania, respectively, and are likely 
adult male. No known individuals were identified. The associated 
funerary objects from the site are collectively associated with 
Individuals 1, 2, and 3 and include 23 faunal bone fragments, 2 of 
which are burned. The Devils Canyon site is a historic period Wichita 
settlement. The determination is based on U.S. Government records which 
note that the U.S. Army visited the site in 1834.
    In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Edwards/Carter site (34Bk0002) in Beckham County, OK. 
This site was recorded for the Oklahoma Archeological Survey by Rex 
Wilson and Charles Robertson in October of 1955, and again in August of 
1965. Most of the excavations were conducted by the University of 
Oklahoma Field School in 1968 and the associated collections were 
subsequently turned over to the Museum. The human remains consist of 
commingled cranial and long bone fragments and one molar tooth. The two 
individuals represented are adults, one probable male and one of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The Edwards/Carter site is associated with the Edwards Complex, 
dating from approximately A.D. 1500-1650 and including the initial 
Spanish contact period. Based on continuity of the cultural material, 
these remains may be related to the western group of the Wichita. Oral 
history, as well as post-contact European records, supports the 
presence of the Wichita in the area at this time.
    In 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were 
removed from the Sandstone Creek 1 site (34Bk0001) in Beckham County, 
OK. The site was recorded by the University of Oklahoma by Cain in 1955 
and surveyed by Fenton Wheeler. Materials from the site, including 
Burials 1 and 3, were transferred to the Museum at an unknown date. 
Remains from Burial 2 are not present at the Museum. Burial 1 contains, 
at minimum, two individuals. Burial 1A is a partial skeleton of a young 
adult male, 20-35 years old, and Burial 1B is a vertebral column of an 
adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 3 contains at least three 
individuals. Burial 3A is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult male, 
Burial 3B is a fragmentary skeleton of a probable male adult, and 
Burial 3C consists of cranial remains of a child, 4-6 years old. No 
known individuals were identified. The 4 associated funerary objects 
from Burial 3 are deer teeth.
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Hubbard 2 site (34Bk0005) in Beckham County, OK. The 
burial and associated funerary objects from this site were excavated by 
amateur archeologists, reburied, later salvaged in 1978, and then 
transferred to the Museum in 1979. The human remains consist of a 
complete skeleton of a young adult female, 20-35 years old. No known 
individual was identified. The 41 associated funerary objects include 4 
hammerstones, 1 ground stone fragment, 1 flint core, 1 quartzite core, 
1 chipped stone axe, 28 chipped stone flakes, and 5 faunal bone 
fragments.
    In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Fowler site (34Bk0006) in Beckham County, OK. This 
site was exposed by erosion associated with an artificial pond on 
private land. The Oklahoma Archeological Survey Data Record indicates 
that, prior to 1959, the owner excavated, reburied, and re-excavated 
one of the three burials at the site. According to the Burial Data 
Records, Burial 2 was excavated by the State Crime Bureau and later 
turned over to the Museum. Burials 1 and 3 were either reburied or may 
still be in the possession of the land owner. Only Burial 2 was found 
to be in the possession of the Museum. Burial 2 consists of two 
individuals. Individual 1 is a partial skeleton of a young adult male, 
25-30 years old. Individual 2 is an adult represented by three teeth 
and one cranial fragment. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the I-40 Burial site (34Bk0049) in Beckham County, OK. The 
burial was salvaged on June 23, 1973, by the Oklahoma Highway 
Archeological Survey prior to highway construction on Interstate-40 
near Sayre, OK (ODOT-state property). Materials from the site were 
turned over to the Museum in June of 1973. The burial consists of 
highly fragmentary skeletal remains of an adult, at least 35 years old, 
of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The 10 
associated funerary objects include 1 deer ulna fragment, 8 faunal bone 
awl fragments, and 1 chipped stone core.
    In September of 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Red Rock Canyon 1 site (34Cd0138) in 
Caddo County, OK. The site is located along a canyon wall in Red Rock 
Canyon State Park. The site had been disturbed by park personnel who 
had been removing dirt from the area. Collections were then made by the 
Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1982, while further investigating 
construction damage in the park. Materials recovered were subsequently 
donated to the Museum in October of 1982. The human remains are a 
fragmentary skeleton of an adult male. No known individual was 
identified. The 14 associated funerary objects include 9 faunal bone 
fragments, three of which are burned, 1 small sample of charcoal, 1 
pottery sherd, 2 chipped stone flakes, and 1 small fragment of dried 
organic matter.
    In 1974 and 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Takoah site (34Cd0244) in Caddo 
County, OK. The site was first surveyed and recorded in 1974 by Charles 
Wallis of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission for the Oklahoma 
Archeological Survey and was excavated in 1975. Recovered materials 
were accessioned by the Museum in 1975 and 1988. Two burials were 
excavated at the site. Burial 1 is a partial skeleton of a young adult 
female, 20-35 years old. Burial 2 is a partial skeleton of an adult 
male, 25-45 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 
172 associated funerary objects were-removed from site 34Cd0244. Burial 
1 is associated with 76 faunal bones or bone fragments, 13 chipped 
stone cobble fragments, 24 chipped stone flakes, 1 chipped stone 
projectile point fragment, 1 ground stone mano, 1 ground stone 
fragment, 2 unmodified rocks, 1 piece of clay, 2 wood fragments, 2 
shells, 17 shell fragments, and 1 soil sample from the burial. Burial 2 
is associated with 18 faunal bone fragments, 4 chipped stone cobble 
fragments, 1 unmodified cobble, 6 chipped stone flakes, 1 shell 
fragment, and 1 soil sample taken from within the skull of the 
individual in Burial 2.
    In 1988, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Majors 3 site (34Cd0299) in Caddo County, OK. The 
remains were excavated by Jack Hofman on private land and accessioned 
by the Museum in 1988. The human remains removed from the site consist 
of a partial skeleton of a young adult male, 20-35 years old. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On August 27, 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from an unnamed site (34Cn0036) in Canadian 
County, OK. This site was discovered on November 17, 1975, during a 
survey of land proposed for the construction of a rest

[[Page 50669]]

area along Interstate-40. The material and remains from this site were 
turned over to the Museum in 1981. The human remains consist of 10 
small bone fragments of an adult of indeterminate sex. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On November 10, 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were removed from the Sanders site (34Ct0011) in Cotton 
County, OK. The human remains and associated artifacts from the Sanders 
Site were recovered by Robert Brooks of the Oklahoma Archeological 
Survey on November 10, 1987, after the site had been vandalized by 
unauthorized digging on private land, and subsequently donated to the 
Museum in 1988. Two burials were excavated at the site. Burial 1 
contains a partial skeleton of an adult female, 18-25 years old. Burial 
2 contains a fragmentary skeleton of a child, 5-6 years old, and 3 long 
bone fragments of an infant, both of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The 143 associated funerary objects are 
associated with both burials and include 49 chipped stone fragments, 26 
ground stone fragments, 9 pottery sherds, 5 shell fragments, and 54 
faunal bone fragments.
    In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Henry site (34Ct0017) in Cotton County, OK. The site 
was exposed on private land, recovered in 1971 by the Oklahoma 
Anthropological Society, supervised by Hofman, and subsequently donated 
to the Museum in the same year. Two burials were excavated. Burial 1 is 
a complete skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35-50 years old. 
Burial 2 is a complete skeleton of an older adult female, over 50 years 
old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 5 associated 
funerary objects were removed from site 34Ct0017. Burial 1 is 
associated with 1 chipped stone knife, 1 flake, and 1 shell pendant. 
Burial 2 is associated with 2 chipped stone flakes.
    In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Austin site (34Ct0021) in Cotton County, OK. A burial 
was exposed by a road grader and reported to the Oklahoma Archeological 
Survey by private citizens. The skeletal remains and associated 
funerary objects were excavated by Robert Brooks in 1985, and donated 
to the Museum on July 29, 1985. The human remains consist of a very 
fragmentary skeleton representing a young adult, 20-25 years old, 
probably male. No known individual was identified. The 10 associated 
funerary objects include 7 shell fragments, 1 pottery sherd, 1 chipped 
stone flake, and 1 charcoal sample.
    On September 22, 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were removed from the Carley site (34Cu0082) in Custer 
County, OK. A private collector reported the site to the Oklahoma 
Archeological Survey and it was recorded by Survey staff on September 
22, 1978. The collector gave materials from the site to the Survey who 
then transferred them to the Museum in 1980. The remains are commingled 
and fragmentary, representing at least 2 adult females and 1 adult 
male. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In June of 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Kingery site (34Gf0000) in Garfield 
County, OK. The site was excavated by the Oklahoma River Basin Survey, 
with field work directed by Barr and assisted by Slovacek, Brown, and 
Harwood from the Ponca City, OK, Chapter of the Anthropological 
Society. The human remains were transferred to the Museum in 1966. The 
human remains from the site are fragmentary and commingled and 
represent one young adult female, 20-35 years old and one middle-aged 
adult male, 35-50 years old. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In April of 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were removed from an unnamed site (34Ml0000) in McClain 
County, OK. A pottery vessel was found in a grave exposed by erosion on 
the L.E. Howorton Farm near Rosedale, OK, by Bill Eddleman and donated 
to the Museum by William Villines on May 8, 1958. Additional skeletal 
material was discovered in the Museum collections in 1995, also from an 
unknown location near Rosedale. The skeletal remains and pottery vessel 
may have originated from the same burial. Individuals 1 and 2 are 
commingled remains of an adult female and an adult of indeterminate 
sex. Individual 3 is represented by a single long bone fragment of an 
infant, less than 3 years old. No known individuals were identified. 
The 9 associated funerary objects are associated with all 3 individuals 
from the site and include 1 partially restored pottery vessel, 1 
chipped stone flake, 1 faunal bone, and 6 pottery sherds.
    In December of 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Willingham site (34Ml0005) in McClain 
County, OK. The site was first recorded by W.H. Villines in 1953. 
Excavations were conducted in 1958 by the Oklahoma Anthropological 
Society under the direction of Sherman Lawton and Robert Bell and 
material from the site was subsequently donated to the Museum the same 
year. In 1964, bulldozing operations at an oil well exposed additional 
material at the site and was excavated by the Oklahoma Archeological 
Survey. Three burials were discovered but are not in the possession of 
the Museum. It is unclear if they were excavated or left in the ground. 
The human remains from the site in the possession of the Museum consist 
of a long bone fragment and a heavily worn tooth of an adult of 
indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The 88 
associated funerary objects include 3 chipped stone scrapers, 2 
modified flint fragments, 10 chipped stone flakes, 1 lithic abrader 
fragment, 1 ground stone mano fragment, 3 unmodified sandstone 
fragments, 3 unmodified large stones, 15 faunal bone fragments, 7 shell 
fragments, and 43 pottery sherds.
    In June of 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Baker 1 site (34Rm0074) in Roger Mills 
County, OK. Material from the site was recovered during a surface 
survey after the site was disturbed by the construction of a dam. The 
collection was recorded by Don Wyckoff of the Oklahoma Archeological 
Survey and subsequently turned over to the Museum the same year. The 
human remains consist of a single tooth of an adult of indeterminate 
sex. No known individual was identified. The 24 associated funerary 
objects include 22 flakes, 1 flint core, and 1 quartzite core.
    Sites 34Bk0001, 34Bk0005, 34Bk0006, 34Bk0049, 34Cd0138, 34Cd0244, 
34Cd0299, 34Cn0036, 34Ct0011, 34Ct0017, 34Ct0021, 34Cu0082, 34Gf0000, 
34Ml0000, 34Ml0005, and 34Rm0074 are Plains Village Period in age, 
dating from approximately A.D. 900-1500. The Carley site (34Cu0082) may 
have also been occupied into the period of initial Spanish contact. 
These determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic 
cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or 
bone tools). Ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and oral historical evidence 
support the cultural continuity of Plains Village Period populations in 
these areas with the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were 
removed from the Hubbard site (34Bk0004) in Beckham County, OK. The 
site was discovered on private property after the spring floods of 
1957. The landowner contacted the Sheriff's

[[Page 50670]]

office and the remains were sent to the State Crime Bureau in Oklahoma 
City, OK, who forwarded them to Alice Brues of the University of 
Oklahoma Medical Center. Brues identified the remains as Native 
American and further excavation was carried out by the Highway Salvage 
Archaeology Program. The remains were subsequently donated to the 
Museum in 1957. Burial 1 contains two individuals, including the 
partial skeleton of a probable female adolescent, 10-14 years old, and 
a portion of the face of an adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 2 
contains a child, 6-8 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Coy Nuttley site (34Bk0023) in Beckham County, OK. 
Material from the Coy Nuttley Site, an open habitation site on private 
land near Elk City, OK, was given to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey 
by an amateur collector and subsequently donated to the Museum in June 
of 1987. The human remains consist of a cranial fragment and two loose 
teeth of an adult of indeterminate sex and three loose teeth of a 
child, 9-12 years old. No known individuals were identified. The 11 
associated funerary objects, linked to both individuals, are fragments 
of deer bone.
    In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from an unnamed site (34Bk0094) in Beckham County, OK. The 
human remains were found by a private land owner and turned over to 
Larry Neal and Alan Wormser of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 
1984 and later donated to the Museum in 1988. The human remains from 
this site consist of a partial cranium of a young adult, 20-35 years 
old, probably male. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Goodman 1 site (34Cu0001) in Custer County, OK. The 
site was originally discovered by the landowner when a large piece of 
daub was discovered during plowing in 1941. In 1951, the tenant 
reported that, while digging a cellar, he uncovered two burials which 
were subsequently donated to the Museum the same year. Burial 1 is a 
complete skeleton of a young adult male, 20-35 years old. A second 
burial was recorded from the site but is not in the possession of the 
Museum. No known individual was identified. A total of 46 associated 
funerary objects were removed from site 34Cu0001. Burial 1 is 
associated with 3 shell fragments, 1 ground stone mano fragment, 1 
stone elbow pipe, and 6 faunal bone fragments. Burial 2 is associated 
with 1 ceramic pot without handles, 1 ceramic pot with handles, 31 
shell beads, 1 chipped stone projectile point, and 1 flint knife.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were 
removed from the Heerwald (Jordan) site (34Cu0027) in Custer County, 
OK. This site is on private land on a ridge south of Turkey Creek, a 
tributary of the Washita River. Material was recovered by James 
Schaeffer of the Highway Salvage Archaeology program in 1957, when I-40 
was constructed south of old US 66, and was subsequently donated to the 
Museum. The burial contains 3 individuals. Individual 1 is a partial 
skeleton of a young adult female, 20-25 years old, Individual 2 is a 
partial skeleton of a child, 6-7 years old, and Individual 3 is a 
partial skeleton of a fetus. No known individuals were identified. The 
45 associated funerary objects include 1 pottery sherd, 3 shells, 2 
unmodified shell fragments, 1 modified shell, 6 unmodified sandstone 
fragments, 1 ground stone mano, 1 projectile point fragment, 1 Washita 
type projectile point, 1 Harrell type projectile point (embedded in the 
first lumbar vertebra of Individual 1), 3 chipped stone flakes, 1 
chipped stone end scraper, 2 chipped stone fragments, 1 chipped stone 
cobble, 20 faunal bone fragments, and 1 charcoal sample.
    In March and April of 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 
3 individuals were removed from the Cotter-Hutson site (34Cu0041) in 
Custer County, OK. The human remains and associated objects from Burial 
1 of the Cotter-Hutson site were discovered by a private land owner 
while plowing and then recovered by members of the Oklahoma 
Archeological Survey and the Oklahoma Anthropological Society in March 
of 1969. Burial 2 was recovered in April of 1969. Both burials and 
associated funerary objects were donated to the Museum in 1981. Burial 
1 is a fragmentary skeleton of a child, 6-7 years old. Burial 2 is a 
partial skeleton of a child, 4-5 years old. A third individual is an 
adult male represented by a mandible found on the surface. No known 
individuals were identified. A total of 119 associated funerary objects 
were recovered from site 34Cu0041. Burial 1 is associated with 5 deer 
bone and tooth fragments, 8 shell fragments, 3 pottery sherds, 8 ground 
stone fragments, 3 ground stone fragments, 2 pebbles, 6 flakes, 15 
seeds, 1 faunal bone fragment, 17 chipped stone flakes from the surface 
directly above the burial, and 2 bags of soil from the burial itself. 
Burial 2 is associated with 38 seeds, 6 faunal bone fragments, 1 ground 
stone fragment, 1 shell scraper, 1 shell fragment, and 2 bags of burial 
soil and burned material.
    In 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Arrington site (34Cu0042) in Custer County, OK. The 
site was reported to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1969 by a 
private landowner who had discovered a burial while plowing. Material 
from the site was subsequently donated to the Museum the same year. The 
human remains are a partial skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35-
50 years old. No known individual was identified. The 10 associated 
funerary objects include 1 unburned faunal bone fragment, 4 burned 
faunal bone fragments, 2 shell fragments, and 3 chipped stone flakes.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were 
removed from the Selzer site (34Gd0016) in Grady County, OK. The site 
was exposed by flooding in 1957 on a terrace above the Washita River on 
privately held land. Three burials were excavated and later donated to 
the Museum. Burial 1 is a young adult female, 18-22 years old, Burial 2 
is an adult male, and Burial 3 is an adult of indeterminate sex. There 
are two additional individuals that are fragmentary and commingled. 
Individual 4 is a probable young adult female, 20-35 years old. 
Individual 5 is an adolescent, 15-18 years old, of indeterminate sex. 
No known individuals were identified. A total of 29 associated funerary 
objects were removed from site 34Gd0016. Burial 3 is associated with 18 
pottery sherds and 2 shell fragments. Individuals 4 and 5 are 
associated with 1 chipped stone flake, 1 ground stone mano, and 7 shell 
fragments.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the WRP 9 site (34Gd0024) in Grady County, OK. The site 
was originally reported in 1963 by Dick McWilliams who discovered the 
burial eroding out of a road cut. The burial was salvaged by the Museum 
later that year. The burial is a complete skeleton of a young adult 
male, 20-35 years old. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On September 13, 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 6 
individuals were removed from the Horne 1 site (34Gd0078) in Grady 
County, OK. The site was uncovered when an Oklahoma Natural Gas 
pipeline went through the area in 1977. The site was officially 
recorded by the Oklahoma Archeological Survey on

[[Page 50671]]

September 13, 1977, and material from the site was donated to the 
Museum in 1981 and 1985. The skeletal remains of three of the 
individuals include an adult male, 30-40 years old, an infant, 1-1.5 
years old, and a child, 6-9 years old. Three other individuals are 
commingled and all are adults of indeterminate sex. The commingled 
remains may contain fragmentary skeletal material belonging to the 
three previously mentioned individuals. No known individuals were 
identified. The 138 associated funerary objects include 2 chipped stone 
cobbles, 3 chipped stone cobble fragments, 3 unmodified lithic 
fragments, 2 pottery sherds, 3 shell fragments, 123 faunal bone 
fragments, 1 faunal tooth, and 1 bison tibia digging tool.
    In June of 1992, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 
individuals were removed from the Jewett site (34Gd0081) in Grady 
County, OK. This site is located on privately held land and was 
initially recorded by the staff of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey on 
November 4, 1977. Salvage was conducted by Robert Brooks, prompted by 
the discovery of a burial during construction of an oil field in 1992. 
Remains were removed under the state burial law and transferred to the 
Museum the same year. Burial 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of an adult of 
indeterminate sex. Burial 2 is a fragmentary skeleton of a probable 
young adult female, 20-35 years old. Burials 3 and 4 are both 
fragmentary skeletons of adults of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In November 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from an unnamed site (34Gv0000) in Garvin 
County, OK. Human remains from the site were initially collected by 
Jesse Taylor from a creek bottom near Elmer City, OK, and then 
transferred to the State Archaeologist by the Oklahoma Medical 
Examiner's Office. The material was later received by the Museum from 
the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in May of 1988. The human remains 
consist of a single complete cranium of a young adult male, 20-35 years 
old. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    In the summer of 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were removed from the Braiden site (34Gv0001) in Garvin 
County, OK. This site was excavated by the Works Progress 
Administration on private land in 1937, and formally recorded by 
Charles Bareis in February of 1955. The material was subsequently 
donated to the Museum. Burial 1 contains two individuals, a cranium of 
an adult male and loose teeth of a child, 3-6 years old. Burial 2 
contains small bone fragments of an adult of indeterminate sex. No 
known individuals were identified. The 105 associated funerary objects 
from Burial 2 include 35 faunal bone fragments, 19 chipped stone 
fragments, 2 chipped stone knives, 3 chipped stone points, 4 chipped 
stone scrapers, and 42 pottery sherds.
    In 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 individuals 
were removed from the Grant Site (34Gv0002) in Garvin County, OK. 
Located on a terrace above the Washita River near Wynnewood, OK, the 
site was excavated by the Works Progress Administration in 1937, under 
the direction of Forrest E. Clements of the University of Oklahoma. 
Material from the site was taken to the University of Oklahoma for 
storage and the human remains and associated funerary objects were 
accessioned by the Museum in 1937 and 1948. Individual 1 is a partial 
skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35-50 years old. Individual 2 
is a partial skeleton of a middle-aged adult male, 35-50 years old. 
Individual 3 is a partial skeleton of an infant, 1-2 years old. 
Individual 4 is a fragmentary skeleton of an infant, 1-3 years old. 
Individual 5 is a fragmentary skeleton of an infant, 6 months to 1 year 
old. Individual 6 is a fragmentary skeleton of a newborn infant. 
Individual 7 is a complete skeleton of a middle-aged adult female, 35-
50 years old. Individual 8 is a partial skull of a young adult male, 
20-35 years old. Individual 9 is a fragmentary skeleton of a middle-
aged adult female, 35-50 years old. Individual 10 is a fragmentary 
skeleton of an adult of indeterminate sex. Individuals 11 and 12 are 
represented by fragmentary and commingled post-cranial remains. Both of 
these individuals are adults, one female, and the other of 
indeterminate sex. Individuals 13, 14, and 15 are represented by 
fragmentary and commingled remains of at least two adults of 
indeterminate sex and one child. Individual 16 is a fragmentary 
skeleton of a middle-aged to older adult female, 40-55 years old. 
Individuals 17 and 18 are represented by fragmentary and commingled 
post-cranial remains of at least two adults of indeterminate sex. No 
known individuals were identified. A total of 32 associated funerary 
objects were removed from site 34Gv0002. Individual 1 is associated 
with 1 pottery sherd. Individual 2 is associated with 1 complete 
ceramic bowl. Individual 3 is associated with 6 faunal bone fragments. 
Individual 4 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 faunal bone 
fragment, and 1 shell scraper. Individual 5 is associated with 1 
unmodified rock. Individual 7 is associated with 18 faunal bone 
fragments, 1 bison scapula hoe, and 1 bone awl.
    In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Lacey Farm 1 site (34Gv0005) in Garvin County, OK. The 
site is on a high ridge north of the Washita River. It was recorded by 
Charles Bareis in 1955, however, prior to that time many private 
collectors had visited the site. The site was resurveyed in 1993, by 
Richard Drass and material from the site was subsequently turned over 
to the Museum. Individual 1 is a partial cranium of an adult male. 
Individual 2 is a fragmentary cranium of an adult of indeterminate sex. 
No known individuals were identified. A total of 38 associated funerary 
objects were removed from site 34Gv0005. Individual 1 is associated 
with 5 pottery sherds and 2 modified faunal bone fragments. Individual 
2 is associated with 1 two-handed ground stone mano, 1 faunal bone awl, 
2 faunal skull and horn hoes, 7 faunal bone hoe fragments, 2 modified 
faunal bone fragments, 9 unmodified faunal bone fragments, 2 deer bone 
fragments, 1 deer tooth, and 6 pottery sherds.
    In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Arthur site (34Gv0032) in Garvin County, OK. The 
remains were recovered in 1982, during excavations under a house by 
Robert Brooks and were accessioned by the Museum in 1987. The remains 
consist of a fragmentary skeleton of an infant approximately 1 year 
old. No known individual was identified. The 532 associated funerary 
objects include 135 shell fragments, 149 pottery sherds, 20 clay 
fragments, 15 sandstone fragments, 1 hammer stone, 170 chipped stone 
flakes, 1 chipped stone projectile point, 1 chipped stone biface 
fragment, 29 faunal bone fragments, 10 burned faunal bone fragments, 
and 1 charcoal sample.
    Between 1982 and 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 8 
individuals were removed from the Thelma Wilson site (34Gv0043) in 
Garvin County, OK. This site, overlooking the Washita River east of 
Pauls Valley, was initially surveyed and recorded by Don Wyckoff of the 
Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1970. In 1982, Jim Mayberry contacted 
the survey to report material eroding from a cut bank on the site. In 
early 1983, Richard Drass and Robert Brooks assisted Jim Mayberry in 
salvaging the material. The burials and associated objects were turned 
over to the Museum

[[Page 50672]]

in 1985. Burial 1 is a fragmentary skull of a child, 3-5 years old. 
Burial 2 contains a fragmentary skeleton of an adult male and a 
fragmentary skeleton of a young adult, 20-35 years old, of 
indeterminate sex. Burial 3 is a fragmentary cranium of an adolescent, 
12-15 years old. Burial 4 is a single molar tooth and small bone 
fragments of a middle-aged adult, 35-50 years old, of indeterminate 
sex. Burial 5 is a single molar tooth and cranial fragments of a child, 
10-12 years old. Two additional individuals are represented by a single 
molar tooth of a child, 3-5 years old, and a cranial fragment of an 
adult of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. A 
total of 17 associated funerary objects were removed from site 
34Gv0043. Both individuals in Burial 2 are associated with 1 pottery 
sherd, 2 modified lithic flakes, 2 unmodified lithic flakes, 1 
unmodified stone pebble, 1 lithic atlatl hook, 1 boatstone, 1 faunal 
bone fragment, and 3 fragments of burned faunal bone. Burial 3 is 
associated with 4 pottery sherds and 1 unmodified lithic flake.
    In 1980 and 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were removed from the Franklin Cordell site (34Wa0003) in 
Washita County, OK. Located on a cultivated and terraced hillside in 
Washita County, this site was first surveyed by Robert Bell of the 
University of Oklahoma in 1955. Prior to that time however, the site 
was often visited by amateur collectors. A subsequent survey was 
carried out by Richard Drass in 1977, after plowing had exposed 
additional material. In 1980, an extensive excavation was conducted by 
the Eastern Oklahoma County Chapter of the Oklahoma Archaeological 
Society under the direction of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, 
supervised by David Hughes. The material was transferred to the Museum 
in 1980 and 1981. Individual 1 is an adult greater than 35 years old, 
of indeterminate sex, and represented by a single mandible fragment. 
Individual 2 is an adolescent or young adult, approximately 18-22 years 
old, of indeterminate sex, also represented by a single mandible 
fragment. Individual 3 is an adult greater than 20 years old, of 
indeterminate sex, and represented by 5 loose teeth and a manual 
phalange. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    On September 7, 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, 7 
individuals were removed from the Hinz site (34Wa0004) in Washita 
County, OK. This site was exposed by cultivation and erosion and first 
discovered by Denny Carley of Southwestern Oklahoma State University in 
1974. Carley notified the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and on 
September 7, 1974, Roger Saunders, Jack Hoffman, and Daryl Wheaton of 
the Survey excavated the site. The material was transferred to the 
Museum in 1981. Three burials were excavated. Burial 1 is a complete 
skeleton of a child, 4-6 years old. Burial 2 is a partial skeleton of a 
young adult male, 20-35 years old. Burial 3 is a partial skeleton of an 
adult of indeterminate sex. Individual 4 is a fragmentary skeleton of 
an adult of indeterminate sex. Individual 5 is a fragmentary skeleton 
of a child. Individuals 6 and 7 are represented by loose teeth and 
commingled small bone fragments of an adult of indeterminate sex and a 
child, 5-7 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total of 
54 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Wa0004. Burial 
1 is associated with 12 chipped stone flakes and fragments, 1 piece of 
sandstone, 1 pottery sherd, 2 mussel shells, and 2 conch shell 
pendants. Burial 2 is associated with 15 pottery sherds, 1 faunal bone 
fragment, and 7 shell fragments. Burial 3 is associated with 11 chipped 
stone flakes, 1 pottery sherd, and 1 piece of sandstone.
    In 1955 and 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 66 
individuals were removed from the McLemore/Cross site (34Wa0005) in 
Washita County, OK. This site was discovered by a private citizen and 
recorded by Rex Wilson of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1955. A 
large-scale excavation was conducted in 1960, directed by Don Wyckoff 
and Robert Bell. Most of the material from the McLemore site, including 
the human remains and associated funerary objects, were transferred to 
the Museum in 1960. An additional human bone was transferred to the 
Museum in 2008 by a private collector. Burial 1 has 2 individuals, both 
are infants, 0.5-1 year old. Burial 2 is a middle-aged adult female, 
35-45 years old. Burial 3 is an infant, 1.5-2 years old. Burial 4 is a 
middle-aged adult female, 40-55 years old. Burial 5 is an infant, 0-0.5 
year old. Burial 6 is an infant, 0.5-1 year old. There are 2 
individuals from Burial 7, a young adult, 20-25 years old, probably a 
female, and an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 8 is also a newborn 
infant. Burial 9 has 2 individuals, a child, 9-12 years old and an 
infant, 1-1.5 years old. Burial 10 is a middle-aged adult female, 35-40 
years old. Burial 11 is an infant, 1-1.5 years old. Burial 12 is an 
infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 13 is an adolescent, 18-20 years old, 
probably a male. Burial 14 is a middle-aged adult male, 35-45 years 
old. Burial 15 is a middle-aged adult female, 35-50 years old. Burial 
16 is an infant, 0.5-1 year old. Burial 17 is an infant, 0.5-1.5 years 
old. Burial 18 are two infants, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 19 is an infant, 
0-0.5 year old. Burial 20 is a middle-aged adult female, 35-45 years 
old. Burial 21 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 22 has 2 
individuals, a young adult male, 30-35 years old and an infant, 0-0.5 
year old. Burial 23 also has 2 individuals, a young adult female, 25-30 
years old and a fetus. Burial 24 is an adult, 30-39 years old, probably 
a female. Burial 25 is an infant, 1.5-3 years old. Burial 27 has 3 
individuals, a young adult female, 27-35 years old and 2 newborn 
infants. Burials 28 and 29 are both infants, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 30A 
is a middle-aged adult female, 45-50 years old and Burial 30B is a 
middle- aged adult, 40-44 years old, probably a male. Burial 31 is an 
infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 32 is an infant, 1.5-2 years old. Burial 
33 is a middle-aged adult male, 45-55 years old. There are 2 
individuals from Burial 34, a middle-aged adult male, 45-50 years old 
and a middle-aged adult of indeterminate sex, 40-44 years old. Burial 
35 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 36 has 2 individuals, a child, 
2-3 years old and an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 37 also has 2 
individuals, a child, 2-3 years old and an infant, 0-0.5 year old. 
Burial 38 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 39 is a child, 3-5 years 
old. Burial 40 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 41 is a child, 2-3 
years old. Burials 42 and 43 are both infants, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 
44 is a child, 5-6 years old. Burial 45 is a middle-aged adult male, 
45-55 years old. Burials 46 and 47 are two probable young adult 
females, 25-30 years old. Burial 48 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. 
Burial 49 is a young adult of indeterminate sex, 20-35 years old. 
Burials 50 and 51 are middle-aged adults of indeterminate sex, 35-50 
years old. Burial 52 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. Burial 53 is an 
adult of indeterminate sex. Burial 54 is an infant, 0-0.5 year old. No 
known individuals were identified. There are 292 isolated and 
commingled bone and bone fragments from the site, likely belonging to 
the individuals listed above.
    A total of 1,053 associated funerary objects were removed from site 
34Wa0005. The two individuals from Burial 1 are associated with 2 
chipped stone fragments, 3 pottery sherds, and 4 faunal bone fragments. 
Burial 2 is associated with 1 unmodified stone, 1 chipped stone 
scraper, 2 pottery sherds,

[[Page 50673]]

and 1 shell fragment. Burial 3 is associated with 1 fragment of 
petrified wood. Burial 4 is associated with 2 chipped stone flakes, 9 
pottery sherds, and 2 faunal bone fragments. Burial five is associated 
with 3 faunal bone fragments. Burial 6 is associated with 1 bone 
fragment and 1 shell fragment. The two individuals from Burial 7 are 
associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point, 2 pottery sherds, and 
6 faunal bone fragments. Burial 8 is associated with 1 human effigy pot 
and 1 soil sample taken from the pot. The two individuals from Burial 9 
are associated with 1 ceramic pot, 2 pottery sherds, 9 ceramic figurine 
fragments, 6 shell fragments, and 11 faunal bone fragments. Burial 10 
is associated with 1 ceramic pot. Burial 11 is associated with 1 
ceramic pot, 1 pottery sherd, 1 shell, 1 shell fragment, 1 unmodified 
faunal bone fragment, and 1 faunal bone awl fragment. Burial 12 is 
associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point fragment, 2 faunal 
bone fragments, and 1 faunal tooth. Burial 13 is associated 6 chipped 
stone fragments, 1 unmodified rock, 3 pottery sherds, 1 partial 
skeleton of a crow, 3 faunal bone fragments, 1 soil sample taken from 
the burial, and 1 chipped stone projectile point embedded in a vertebra 
of the individual. Burial 14 is associated with 1 chipped stone 
projectile point, 1 stone pipe, 1 chipped stone core, 1 chipped stone 
flake, 2 chipped stone fragments, 3 pottery sherds, 5 faunal bone 
fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from the burial. Burial 15 is 
associated with 1 chipped stone flake, 8 chipped stone fragments, 1 
chipped stone scraper, 8 fragments of soapstone, 2 pieces of unmodified 
sandstone, 1 ceramic pot, 3 pottery sherds, 1 shell, 1 shell fragment, 
1 deer mandible grater, 2 faunal bone hoes, 2 modified faunal bone 
fragments, and 4 unmodified faunal bone fragments. Burial 16 is 
associated with 1 ceramic pot. The two individuals from Burial 18 are 
associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 unmodified rock, 1 faunal scapula 
hoe, and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 20 is associated with 1 chipped 
stone fragment, 1 unmodified rock, 1 ceramic pot, 2 modified faunal 
bone fragments, and 1 unmodified faunal bone fragment. Burial 21 is 
associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 faunal bone fragment, 2 shell 
scrapers, and 5 shell fragments. The two individuals from Burial 22 are 
associated with 1 chipped stone end scraper, 1 chipped stone fragment, 
2 unmodified stones, 9 pottery sherds, 1 ceramic pot, 2 shell 
fragments, 1 shell bead, and 10 faunal bone fragments. The two 
individuals from Burial 23 are associated with 15 chipped stone 
fragments, 2 pottery sherds, 8 shell fragments, 2 modified faunal bone 
fragments, 9 unmodified faunal bone fragments, and 1 soil sample taken 
from the burial. Burial 24 is associated with 1 soapstone fragment, 2 
chipped stone fragments, 3 shell fragments, and 7 faunal bone 
fragments. Burial 25 is associated with 1 ceramic pot, 1 pottery sherd, 
and 1 shell. Burial 26 is associated with 3 shell fragments and 3 
faunal bone fragments. The three individuals from Burial 27 are 
associated 2 unmodified rocks, 2 ceramic pots, 4 pottery sherds, 1 
shell pendant, 21 shells and shell fragments, 2 deer mandible graters, 
and 6 faunal bone fragments. Burial 28 is associated with 16 soapstone 
fragments and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 30A is associated with 2 
pottery sherds and 1 faunal bone fragment. Burial 30B is associated 
with 1 shell fragment and 4 faunal bone fragments. Burials 30A and 30B 
are also associated with 1 chipped stone flake, 4 pottery sherds, 2 
shells, 1 fragment of burned faunal bone, and 3 faunal bone fragments. 
Burial 31 is associated with 1 ground stone mano and 2 shells. Burial 
32 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 shell fragment, and 1 faunal 
bone fragment. Burial 33 is associated with 18 chipped stone fragments, 
5 pottery sherds, 4 shell fragments, 11 burned faunal bone fragments, 
and 12 unmodified faunal bone fragments. The two individuals from 
Burial 34 are associated with 6 chipped stone knives, 4 chipped stone 
projectile points, 1 chipped stone flake, 4 chipped stone fragments, 2 
unmodified lithic fragments, 1 piece of worked selenite, 1 ceramic pot, 
2 pottery sherds, 1 ball of clay, 2 shells, 2 faunal bone awls, and 3 
faunal bone fragments. The two individuals from Burial 36 are 
associated with 3 pottery sherds, 3 shells, 121 shell beads, and 1 
faunal bone fragment. The two individuals from Burial 37 are associated 
with 1 ceramic pot, 1 faunal bone fragment, and 422 shell beads. Burial 
38 is associated with 1 pottery sherd and 3 shell fragments. Burial 39 
is associated with 1 chipped stone fragment, 2 unmodified stones, 12 
pottery sherds, 4 faunal bone fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from 
the burial. Burial 40 is associated with 1 chipped stone scraper, 3 
shell fragments, and 1 burned faunal bone fragment. Burial 41 is 
associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 burned faunal bone fragment, and 1 
unmodified faunal bone fragment. Burial 42 is associated with 1 chipped 
stone fragment, 2 shell fragments, and 3 faunal bone fragments. Burial 
44 is associated with 2 pottery sherds and 5 faunal bone fragments. 
Burial 45 is associated with 1 chipped stone projectile point, 2 
chipped stone fragments, 1 unmodified stone, 1 stone pipe, 4 pottery 
sherds, 3 burned faunal bone fragments, 3 unmodified faunal bone 
fragments, and 1 soil sample taken from the burial. Burial 46 is 
associated with 1 unmodified rock, 1 pottery sherd, 4 shell fragments, 
and 2 faunal bone fragments. Burial 47 is associated with 2 chipped 
stone knives, 1 chipped stone fragment, 1 unmodified stone, 1 ceramic 
pot, 1 pottery sherd, 3 shells, 1 shell bead, and 2 soil samples taken 
from the burial. Burial 48 is associated with 1 shell and 1 pottery 
sherd. Additionally, 3 soil samples were taken from the general burial 
area and are associated with all of the human remains collectively.
    In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Duerksen site (34Wa0143) in Washita County, OK. The 
remains were found near the Washita River by Denny Carley, a member of 
the Oklahoma Anthropological Society. He donated the remains to the 
Oklahoma Archeological Survey in 1977, which were later transferred to 
the Museum in 1980. The human remains consist of a fragmentary cranium 
of a young adult male, 20-35 years old. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Sites 34Bk0004, 34Bk0023, 34Bk0094, 34Cu0001, 34Cu0027, 34Cu0041, 
34Cu0042, 34Gd0016, 34Gd0024, 34Gd0078, 34Gd0081, 34Gv0000, 34Gv0001, 
34Gv0002, 34Gv0005, 34Gv0032, 34Gv0043, 34Wa0003, 34Wa0004, 34Wa0005, 
and 34Wa0143 are Plains Village Period, Washita River phase in age, 
dating approximately from A.D. 1250-1400. It is possible that the 
Braiden site (34Gv0001) could also date to the earlier Paoli phase 
(A.D. 900-1250), and the Lacey Farm 1 site (34Gv0005) has Paoli phase 
components in addition to Washita River phase components. These 
determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic 
cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or 
bone tools), oral history, and post-contact European records. The Paoli 
and Washita River phases demonstrate continuity in material culture 
with known groups of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.
    In 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Coulter site (34Ml0008) in McClain County, OK. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were salvaged from a 
slush pit in the middle of the Coulter Site by William Villines. The 
site was recorded

[[Page 50674]]

by Stephan de Borhegyi for the University of Oklahoma in 1955, and then 
the material was donated to the Museum later in the same year. The 
human remains removed from the site include two commingled partial 
skeletons, both of whom are adult males. No known individuals were 
identified. The 343 associated funerary objects include 187 pottery 
sherds, 1 partially restored pot, 1 ceramic spindle whorl, 15 shell 
fragments, 118 faunal bone fragments, 1 faunal bone awl, 1 ground stone 
mano fragment, 9 chipped stone flakes, 8 chipped stone cores, and 2 
chipped stone scrapers.
    This site is Plains Village Period, Paoli phase in age, dating from 
approximately A.D. 900-1250. This determination is based on 
archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., chipped 
and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools), oral history, and post-
contact European records. The Paoli phase demonstrates continuity in 
material culture with the subsequent Washita River phase (A.D. 1250-
1400) and later known groups of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.
    In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Patton site (34Bk0093) in Beckham County, OK. The 
human remains were collected in the field by Larry Neal and Alan 
Wormser of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and later donated to the 
Museum in 1988. Individual 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of a young adult 
female, 20-35 years old. Individual 2 is a fragmentary skeleton of an 
adolescent, 12-15 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Linville 2 site (34Rm0492) in Roger Mills County, OK. 
The site was exposed by a bulldozer and material was recovered as part 
of a salvage operation funded by the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, 
conducted by Richard Drass, Pete Thurmond, John Flick, Don Wyckoff, 
Louis Albert, Peggy Flynn, and Michael Moore. The material was 
transferred to the Museum in 1987. The burial is a fragmentary skeleton 
of an adult female. No known individual was identified. The 158 
associated funerary objects include 24 pottery sherds, 27 chipped stone 
flakes, 1 small stone projectile point, 11 shell fragments, 32 faunal 
bone fragments, 1 faunal bone awl, 58 cobbles and cobble fragments, 1 
cobble biface, 2 charred nutshells, and 1 sample of organic material.
    Sites 34Bk0093 and 34Rm0492 are from the Plains Village Period and 
date to the Custer phase, from approximately A.D. 800-1250. These 
determinations are based on archeological context and diagnostic 
cultural materials (e.g., chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or 
bone tools), oral history, and post-contact European records. The 
Custer phase demonstrates continuity in material culture with the 
subsequent Washita River phase (A.D. 1250-1400) and later known groups 
of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.
    In 1981 and 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Carnegie Canyon site (34Cd0076) in 
Caddo County, OK, by the Oklahoma Conservation Commission. Excavations 
by Christopher Lintz and Stephan Hall occurred in 1981 and 1983, and 
material from the site was transferred to the Museum in 1983 and 1985. 
Individual 1 is a fragmentary skeleton of a probable female adult. 
Individual 2 is a single long bone fragment of an adult of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 13 
associated funerary objects are 12 faunal bone fragments associated 
with Individual 1 and 1 soil sample associated with Individual 2.
    In 1989, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Cut Bank Site (34Ln0101) in Lincoln County, OK. This 
site was surveyed and recorded in 1989 by Charles S. Wallis Jr. of the 
Oklahoma Conservation Commission as part of the Bellcow Reservoir 
Resurvey and Testing Program in conjunction with studies on the impact 
area of the Kickapoo Nations Watershed in northwestern Lincoln County, 
OK. Material from the site was turned over to the Museum in 1991. The 
human remains consist of a single cranial fragment of an adult of 
indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1952 and 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 
individuals were removed from the Brewer site (34Ml0003) in McClain 
County, OK. This site is on the south bank of the Canadian River and 
was originally surveyed and recorded in 1950, by the University of 
Oklahoma. William Villines of Rosedale, OK, brought a collection from 
the site to the Department of Anthropology at the University of 
Oklahoma in 1951. Additional material was salvaged by Richard Drass, 
Robert Brooks, and Alan Wormser of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, 
after more material had been exposed by oil well workers in 1986. The 
material was accessioned by the Museum in 1953 and 1988. Burial 1 
contains two individuals, an adult male and a young adult, 20-35 years 
old, of indeterminate sex. Burial 2 contains a young adult, 20-35 years 
old, of indeterminate sex. Burial 3 contains a probable young adult 
female, 20-35 years old. No known individuals were identified. A total 
of 61 associated funerary objects were removed from site 34Ml0003. Both 
individuals from Burial 1 are associated with 1 chipped stone flake 
tool, 1 modified cobble, 1 bone pin, 1 ground stone fragment, 11 
pottery sherds, 1 shell fragment, 1 shell scraper, 5 faunal bone 
fragments, and 1 charcoal sample. Burial 2 is associated with 7 pottery 
sherds, 7 worked shell fragments, 6 chipped stone flakes, 1 ground 
stone fragment, 1 faunal bone fragment, 1 soil sample, and 10 soil 
flotation samples. Burial 3 is associated with 1 pottery sherd, 1 
ground stone fragment, 1 shell fragment, and 2 faunal bone fragments.
    On November 26, 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Chevrolet site (34Ok0100) in Oklahoma 
County, OK. This site was exposed by heavy machinery during a 
construction project along Crutcho Creek in Oklahoma County and 
salvaged by Richard Drass and Sarah Herstand of the Oklahoma 
Archeological Survey. The material was transferred to the Museum in 
1981. The human remains are a fragmentary skeleton of an adolescent, 
13-16 years old, of indeterminate sex. No known individual was 
identified. The 42 associated funerary objects include 11 unmodified 
sandstone fragments, 1 chipped stone biface, 1 modified cobble, 11 
chipped stone flakes, 2 pieces of charred material, 1 soil sample from 
the burial, 13 pieces of baked earth, and 2 pottery sherds.
    In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were 
removed from an unnamed site (34Pt0000) in Pottawatomie County, OK. The 
human remains were collected by Michael Moore during a survey project 
near the Rose-Fast site and accessioned by the Museum in 1988. The 
human remains are highly fragmentary and commingled and represent an 
adult male, an adult female, and a child, 8-12 years old. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Sites 34Cd0076, 34Ln0101, 34Ml0003, 34Ok0100, and 34Pt0000 date to 
the Plains Woodland Period (A.D. 1-1000). The Brewer site (34Ml0003) 
may also date to the Plains Village Period. The unnamed site from 
Pottawatomie County is in close proximity to, and is believed to be 
associated with, the Rose-

[[Page 50675]]

Fast site, a Plains Woodland Period site. These determinations are 
based on archeological context and diagnostic cultural materials (e.g., 
chipped and ground stone, ceramics, and/or bone tools), oral history, 
and post-contact European records. Ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and 
oral historical evidence support the cultural continuity of the 
Woodland Period with the subsequent Plains Village Period in the area 
and with the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.

Determinations Made by the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

    Officials of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 193 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 3,389 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Wichita 
and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Dr. Marc Levine, Assistant Curator of 
Archaeology, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University 
of Oklahoma, 2401 Chautauqua Avenue, Norman, OK 73072-7029, telephone 
(405) 325-1994, email [email protected], by December 1, 2017. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), 
Oklahoma, may proceed.
    The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History is responsible for 
notifying the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & 
Tawakonie), Oklahoma, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 8, 2017.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2017-23794 Filed 10-31-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P