Request for Information on the Development of the Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) for Forensic Science 2.0, 41211-41213 [2017-18355]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK30JT082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 167 / Wednesday, August 30, 2017 / Notices Working Group is open to all interested parties. DATES: An initial teleconference will take place on Thursday, August 31, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time. The goal for completion of the work is June 30, 2018. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Bohn, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899– 4800, telephone number 301–975–4731, email: robert.bohn@nist.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NCCP announces the reconstitution of its Federated Cloud Public Working Group (Working Group). The Working Group was formed to address Requirement #5 of NIST’s US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap (NIST SP 500–293) (Cloud Computing Roadmap), ‘‘Frameworks to Support Federated Community Clouds.’’ This requirement calls for ‘‘frameworks to support seamless implementation of federated community cloud environments.’’ The Working Group’s activities will resume and initiate work to try and fully understand and describe the elements of federated cloud computing. Assorted topics include developing and gaining consensus on a common federated cloud computing vocabulary, as well as developing an underlying conceptual model of what federated cloud computing is, its major components, and users/stakeholders. An initial teleconference will take place on Thursday, August 31, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time. The dial-in number is 1–877–953–0273, and the passcode is 456–4979. Members of the public who wish to participate in the teleconference should provide their name and email address to fedcloud@ nist.gov, no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, August 24, 2017. Responses received after the deadline will also be added to the group’s mailing list, but they may not receive initial documentation prior to the first meeting. Members of the public who provide their email addresses but who cannot participate in the initial teleconference will still be notified about subsequent meetings. It is anticipated that there will be subsequent monthly meetings by teleconference on the fourth Thursday of every month from either 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time or 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. A schedule of meeting times will be provided to all participants who submit their name and email address as provided above. Participation in the Working Group is open to all interested parties; there is no fee to participate. Standing Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:40 Aug 29, 2017 Jkt 241001 Documents explaining how the group will be run will be made available at the first meeting to all Working Group members. Final technical recommendations from the Working Group will be made publicly accessible on the NIST Cloud Computing Portal, and NIST may make the results of this Working Group available to Standards Developing Organizations and other interested parties. Background The Cloud Computing Roadmap is being used industry-wide to advance the rapid adoption of cloud computing. Two of the 10 requirements (numbers 5 and 8) in the Cloud Computing Roadmap point to the next generation of cloud computing which will be focused on the concept of federated clouds. Federated clouds represent a future where there is seamless integration between multiple cloud service providers. Fulfilling this vision of the future of cloud computing will require a foundational effort to understand all the technological and standards-based obstacles that will need to be addressed to build the necessary underlying architecture. Scope The scope of the project is to fully understand and describe the elements of federated cloud computing. This will involve developing and gaining consensus on a common federated cloud computing vocabulary, as well as developing an underlying conceptual model of what federated cloud computing is, its major components, and users/stakeholders. The Working Group will then use that conceptual model to map out an implementation strategy including a gap analysis to identify the missing technologies and standards needed to cultivate a seamless system of systems. The anticipated results are: • Federated Cloud Computing Vocabulary; • Conceptual Model of Federated Clouds; and • Technology Gap Analysis. The Working Group will also investigate and identify the needed technologies, tools, and standards to enable these environments. They will use material from NIST’s Cloud Computing Reference Architecture (NIST SP 500–292) and materials located at the group’s public twiki site: http://collaborate.nist.gov/twiki-cloudcomputing/bin/view/CloudComputing/ RATax_FedCommunity. The Working Group will work in a coordinated effort with the IEEE ICWG/ 2302 WG—Intercloud Working Group to PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 41211 produce an implementation of this reference material and create a compliant technical standard. A list of NIST’s Cloud Computing Working Groups can be found at http:// collaborate.nist.gov/twiki-cloudcomputing/bin/view/CloudComputing/ WebHome#Working_Groups_of_NIST_ Cloud_Com. The work of the NIST Cloud Computing Working Groups is interrelated, and this Working Group will also liaise with other working groups as needed. Authority: 15 U.S.C. 272(b)(3) & (c)(12). Kevin Kimball, NIST Chief of Staff. [FR Doc. 2017–18354 Filed 8–29–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–13–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology [Docket No.: 170717677–7677–01] Request for Information on the Development of the Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) for Forensic Science 2.0 National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice; request for information. AGENCY: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) established the Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) for Forensic Science in 2013 as part of a larger effort to strengthen forensic science in the United States. NIST has primary responsibility to support the OSAC and has publicly announced its intention to transition the administration of the OSAC to another host within five to ten years. NIST made a commitment to the forensic science community (community) that OSAC 2.0 will ensure the continued scientific integrity and stability of the organization. NIST publishes this notice to request information for consideration in the development of a comprehensive transition plan for the OSAC that meets the needs of the community and ensures that transition is conducted in a manner that safeguards the efficiency and effectiveness of the OSAC. DATES: NIST will accept written responses to this request for information until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on October 30, 2017. ADDRESSES: Responses to this request for information must be made electronically through the Federal SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1 mstockstill on DSK30JT082PROD with NOTICES 41212 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 167 / Wednesday, August 30, 2017 / Notices eRulemaking Portal: https:// www.regulations.gov/. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Please include your name, organization’s name (if any) and cite ‘‘Response to OSAC Request for Information’’ in all correspondence. All responses, including attachments, will be posted to the docket at https:// www.regulations.gov/ without change or redaction. Accordingly, respondents should not include information they do not wish to be posted (e.g., personal or confidential business information). Responses that contain profanity, vulgarity, threats, or other inappropriate language will not be posted or considered. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Grace Hao, (301) 975–4752 or Grace.Hao@NIST.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In February 2013, DOJ and NIST announced a partnership that included the formation of the OSAC. As is stated in the OSAC Charter, the purpose of the OSAC is to strengthen the Nation’s use of forensic science by: Providing technical leadership necessary to facilitate the development and promulgation of consensus-based documentary standards and guidelines for forensic science; promoting standards and guidelines that are fit-forpurpose and based on sound scientific principles; promoting the use of OSAC standards and guidelines by accreditation and certification bodies; and establishing and maintaining working relationships with other similar organizations. The OSAC Charter and Bylaws are available online at: https:// www.nist.gov/topics/forensic-science/ about-osac. These purposes of the OSAC are achieved through the OSAC Registry, the repository for all standards and guidelines. A standard or guideline is posted on the OSAC Registry only after the validity of any methods it contains has been assessed by forensic practitioners, academic researchers, measurement scientists, and statisticians through a consensus development process that allows participation and comment from all relevant stakeholders. NIST retains ultimate authority over posting of standards and responsibility for support of the OSAC Registry. The OSAC Charter states that the aims of the OSAC are to: Populate the OSAC Registry; develop and maintain the Principles of Professional Practice; compile and update the forensic science catalog of standards and related documents; maintain Priority Action Plan documents on OSAC strategic VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:40 Aug 29, 2017 Jkt 241001 objectives and associated goals and intended actions; promote and improve the communication, dissemination and use of forensic science standards, accreditation, and personnel competencies; encourage forensic science service providers in the United States to implement guidelines and standards (e.g., ISO/IEC 17025, etc.) for quality and competency; provide insight on each forensic science discipline’s research and measurement standard needs; and enlist stakeholder involvement from a broad community to provide public comment on OSAC outputs. Under the OSAC Charter, NIST has primary responsibility to coordinate development of a quality infrastructure for forensic science standards development and to support the OSAC. NIST envisioned the OSAC as a multilevel organization consisting of five Scientific Area Committees (SACs) that report to a Forensic Science Standards Board (FSSB). Each of the five SACs oversees discipline-specific subcommittees. In addition, there are three Resource Committees that provide input to the FSSB, SACs, and SAC Subcommittees. DOJ funds the OSAC through appropriated funds that are transferred to NIST. While DOJ personnel participate as members of OSAC committees and subcommittees, DOJ itself does not review or approve OSAC standards prior to posting on the Registry. Both NIST and DOJ recognized from the outset that the OSAC would be realigned over time to ensure continuous improvement and better realize its purpose and objectives. NIST has publicly announced its intention to transition the administration of the OSAC to another host within five to ten years. NIST’s goals in this transition process are to establish the next generation of OSAC (OSAC 2.0) that strengthens forensics science, follows American National Standards Institute principles for standards development, and promotes a collaborative process that actively involves practitioners and researchers. NIST notes that, as a nonregulatory research and development agency, it does not contemplate undertaking any a regulatory or quasiregulatory function in connection with OSAC 2.0. NIST is open to maintaining elements of the current OSAC structure, to modifications to the structure, as well as to substantially different structural concepts, including several examples of concepts at: https://www.nist.gov/ topics/forensic-science/potentialconcepts-osac-20. NIST notes its continuing commitment to the forensic science community, that OSAC 2.0 will PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 promote the continued scientific integrity and stability of the organization. NIST is now in the process of developing a process for the transition of OSAC 1.0 to an OSAC 2.0 structure that will accomplish these goals and safeguard the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization. To ensure that the transition plan is comprehensive and meets the needs of the community, NIST, in collaboration with DOJ, requests from the public, comments on the questions below, which will inform the approach to an OSAC 2.0 in the following six areas: (A) Purpose, (B) oversight and independence, (C) work product and aims, (D) structure, (E) participation, and (F) funding. (A) Purpose: As stated above, the OSAC charter identifies four purposes. (See section 1.1: https://www.nist.gov/ sites/default/files/documents/2017/03/ 16/fssb_osac_charter_and_bylaws_v_ 1.3.pdf). What is your opinion regarding whether the OSAC is fulfilling these purposes under the current structure? What is your opinion regarding whether these purposes/functions are appropriate for the OSAC and whether the purposes should be modified in any way? What is your opinion regarding what role, if any, the OSAC should be playing in addressing the recommendations of the 2009 National Academies of Sciences report, ‘‘Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward’’ (https:// www.nap.edu/read/12589/chapter/1)? (B) Oversight and independence: Please provide your views regarding what type of entity should host the OSAC (e.g., governmental, professional association, etc.). What is your opinion about the preferred characteristics of a host organization for an effective OSAC? What are your views as to the type of organization that should provide oversight to the OSAC? Do you believe that the OSAC should have more/less independence from a host organization? (C) Work products and aims: As stated above, the OSAC Charter identifies eight aims. (See section 1.2: https:// www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/ documents/2017/03/16/fssb_osac_ charter_and_bylaws_v_1.3.pdf.) What is your opinion regarding whether the OSAC is fulfilling these aims as structured? Do you believe that the OSAC is addressing the correct aims? What are your views as to the type of work products the OSAC should produce? What do you believe are the essential elements of work products? Please provide your opinion as to whether there should be implementation/enforcement of the E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1 mstockstill on DSK30JT082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 167 / Wednesday, August 30, 2017 / Notices work products. Do you believe that the OSAC should develop ‘‘best practices’’ and other materials that are not formal ‘‘standards’’? (D) Structure: What are your views as to whether the current the OSAC structure works efficiently? Do you believe that another structure should be utilized? Please provide your opinion about whether there are any issues in the current work product development process that should be addressed structurally. In your view, does the reliance on standards development organizations function as intended (please include the reasons for your opinion)? (E) Participation: What are your views as to the community the OSAC should serve? In your opinion, what stakeholders must be a part of the OSAC (e.g., practitioners, researchers, forensic science societies, accreditation bodies, scientific societies, human factors experts, metrologists, standards development organizations, legal practitioners)? If you think that any of these entities should be excluded, please explain why and identify other venues for the views of the excluded entities to be incorporated into forensic practice, if appropriate. In your view, should some stakeholders serve more limited roles and, if so, how and why? (F) Funding: What is your opinion as to the funding model that the OSAC should employ—Entirely funded by the Federal government, by non-Federal funds, or a combination of funding sources? (Please include your thoughts on the role of funding sources such as membership fees, certification fees, and meeting registration fees.) What are your views about the implications of funding models for the other traits, particularly oversight and independence? Response to this request for information (RFI) is voluntary, and comments are not limited to the specific questions posed. Respondents need not reply to all questions; however, it is requested that they clearly indicate the letter of each question to which they are responding. All responses to this RFI must be submitted electronically through www.regulations.gov. All responses received will be posted on www.regulations.gov without making any changes to the responses or redacting any information, including any personally identifiable information provided. It is the responsibility of the respondent to safeguard personally identifiable information. You are not required to submit personally identifying information in order to respond and it is recommended that respondents’ personally identifiable information not be included. Responses VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:40 Aug 29, 2017 Jkt 241001 may be provided anonymously, but those respondents who do share contact information are requested to include brief background information regarding the respondent’s subject-matter experience and expertise. Responses submitted through www.regulations.gov will not include the email address of the respondent unless the respondent chooses to include that information as part of the response. Authority: 15 U.S.C. 272(b)(10). Kevin Kimball, NIST Chief of Staff. [FR Doc. 2017–18355 Filed 8–29–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–13–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region IFQ Programs National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Written comments must be submitted on or before October 30, 2017. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the Internet at pracomments@doc.gov). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to Adam Bailey, National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, (727) 824–5303, or adam.bailey@ noaa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Abstract This request is for an extension and revision of a currently approved information collection under the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 41213 Control Number 0648–0551, Southeast Region IFQ (individual fishing quota) Programs. The NMFS Southeast Regional Office manages three commercial IFQ and individual transferable quota (ITQ) programs in the Southeast Region under the authority of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (Magnuson-Stevens Act), 16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq. The IFQ programs for red snapper, and grouper and tilefish occur in Federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico, and the ITQ program for wreckfish occurs in Federal waters of the South Atlantic. This collection of information tracks the transfer and use of IFQ and ITQ shares, and IFQ allocation and landings necessary to operate, administer, and review management of the IFQ and ITQ programs. Regulations for the IFQ and ITQ programs are located at 50 CFR part 622. The NMFS Southeast Regional Office also proposes to revise parts of the information collection approved under OMB Control Number 0648–0551 to account for updates to burden time and cost estimates, as well as administrative updates to online and paper forms. NMFS intends the revisions would make instructions and data collection requirements clearer and easier to understand, resulting in more accurate and efficient information available for use by fishery managers. II. Method of Collection Information for the Gulf red snapper, and grouper and tilefish IFQ programs is collected electronically via a webbased system, through satellite-linked vessel monitoring systems, through a 24-hour call line, and with paper form submission for landing corrections, closing an account, and account applications, as well as landing transactions under catastrophic circumstances. The share transfer process in the wreckfish ITQ program requires the signatures of witnesses on paper forms. The ITQ program remains paper based until the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council and NMFS consider whether to implement an electronic system. III. Data OMB Control Number: 0648–0551. Form Number(s): None. Type of Review: Regular submission (extension and revision of a currently approved information collection). Affected Public: Business or other forprofit organizations. Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,059. E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 167 (Wednesday, August 30, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 41211-41213]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-18355]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National Institute of Standards and Technology

[Docket No.: 170717677-7677-01]


Request for Information on the Development of the Organization of 
Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) for Forensic Science 2.0

AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of 
Commerce.

ACTION: Notice; request for information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and 
the Department of Justice (DOJ) established the Organization of 
Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) for Forensic Science in 2013 as part 
of a larger effort to strengthen forensic science in the United States. 
NIST has primary responsibility to support the OSAC and has publicly 
announced its intention to transition the administration of the OSAC to 
another host within five to ten years. NIST made a commitment to the 
forensic science community (community) that OSAC 2.0 will ensure the 
continued scientific integrity and stability of the organization. NIST 
publishes this notice to request information for consideration in the 
development of a comprehensive transition plan for the OSAC that meets 
the needs of the community and ensures that transition is conducted in 
a manner that safeguards the efficiency and effectiveness of the OSAC.

DATES: NIST will accept written responses to this request for 
information until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on October 30, 2017.

ADDRESSES: Responses to this request for information must be made 
electronically through the Federal

[[Page 41212]]

eRulemaking Portal: https://www.regulations.gov/. Follow the 
instructions for submitting comments. Please include your name, 
organization's name (if any) and cite ``Response to OSAC Request for 
Information'' in all correspondence.
    All responses, including attachments, will be posted to the docket 
at https://www.regulations.gov/ without change or redaction. 
Accordingly, respondents should not include information they do not 
wish to be posted (e.g., personal or confidential business 
information). Responses that contain profanity, vulgarity, threats, or 
other inappropriate language will not be posted or considered.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Grace Hao, (301) 975-4752 or 
Grace.Hao@NIST.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In February 2013, DOJ and NIST announced a 
partnership that included the formation of the OSAC. As is stated in 
the OSAC Charter, the purpose of the OSAC is to strengthen the Nation's 
use of forensic science by: Providing technical leadership necessary to 
facilitate the development and promulgation of consensus-based 
documentary standards and guidelines for forensic science; promoting 
standards and guidelines that are fit-for-purpose and based on sound 
scientific principles; promoting the use of OSAC standards and 
guidelines by accreditation and certification bodies; and establishing 
and maintaining working relationships with other similar organizations. 
The OSAC Charter and Bylaws are available online at: https://www.nist.gov/topics/forensic-science/about-osac.
    These purposes of the OSAC are achieved through the OSAC Registry, 
the repository for all standards and guidelines. A standard or 
guideline is posted on the OSAC Registry only after the validity of any 
methods it contains has been assessed by forensic practitioners, 
academic researchers, measurement scientists, and statisticians through 
a consensus development process that allows participation and comment 
from all relevant stakeholders. NIST retains ultimate authority over 
posting of standards and responsibility for support of the OSAC 
Registry.
    The OSAC Charter states that the aims of the OSAC are to: Populate 
the OSAC Registry; develop and maintain the Principles of Professional 
Practice; compile and update the forensic science catalog of standards 
and related documents; maintain Priority Action Plan documents on OSAC 
strategic objectives and associated goals and intended actions; promote 
and improve the communication, dissemination and use of forensic 
science standards, accreditation, and personnel competencies; encourage 
forensic science service providers in the United States to implement 
guidelines and standards (e.g., ISO/IEC 17025, etc.) for quality and 
competency; provide insight on each forensic science discipline's 
research and measurement standard needs; and enlist stakeholder 
involvement from a broad community to provide public comment on OSAC 
outputs.
    Under the OSAC Charter, NIST has primary responsibility to 
coordinate development of a quality infrastructure for forensic science 
standards development and to support the OSAC. NIST envisioned the OSAC 
as a multi-level organization consisting of five Scientific Area 
Committees (SACs) that report to a Forensic Science Standards Board 
(FSSB). Each of the five SACs oversees discipline-specific 
subcommittees. In addition, there are three Resource Committees that 
provide input to the FSSB, SACs, and SAC Subcommittees. DOJ funds the 
OSAC through appropriated funds that are transferred to NIST. While DOJ 
personnel participate as members of OSAC committees and subcommittees, 
DOJ itself does not review or approve OSAC standards prior to posting 
on the Registry.
    Both NIST and DOJ recognized from the outset that the OSAC would be 
realigned over time to ensure continuous improvement and better realize 
its purpose and objectives. NIST has publicly announced its intention 
to transition the administration of the OSAC to another host within 
five to ten years. NIST's goals in this transition process are to 
establish the next generation of OSAC (OSAC 2.0) that strengthens 
forensics science, follows American National Standards Institute 
principles for standards development, and promotes a collaborative 
process that actively involves practitioners and researchers. NIST 
notes that, as a non-regulatory research and development agency, it 
does not contemplate undertaking any a regulatory or quasi-regulatory 
function in connection with OSAC 2.0. NIST is open to maintaining 
elements of the current OSAC structure, to modifications to the 
structure, as well as to substantially different structural concepts, 
including several examples of concepts at: https://www.nist.gov/topics/forensic-science/potential-concepts-osac-20. NIST notes its continuing 
commitment to the forensic science community, that OSAC 2.0 will 
promote the continued scientific integrity and stability of the 
organization.
    NIST is now in the process of developing a process for the 
transition of OSAC 1.0 to an OSAC 2.0 structure that will accomplish 
these goals and safeguard the efficiency and effectiveness of the 
organization. To ensure that the transition plan is comprehensive and 
meets the needs of the community, NIST, in collaboration with DOJ, 
requests from the public, comments on the questions below, which will 
inform the approach to an OSAC 2.0 in the following six areas: (A) 
Purpose, (B) oversight and independence, (C) work product and aims, (D) 
structure, (E) participation, and (F) funding.
    (A) Purpose: As stated above, the OSAC charter identifies four 
purposes. (See section 1.1: https://www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2017/03/16/fssb_osac_charter_and_bylaws_v_1.3.pdf). What is 
your opinion regarding whether the OSAC is fulfilling these purposes 
under the current structure? What is your opinion regarding whether 
these purposes/functions are appropriate for the OSAC and whether the 
purposes should be modified in any way? What is your opinion regarding 
what role, if any, the OSAC should be playing in addressing the 
recommendations of the 2009 National Academies of Sciences report, 
``Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward'' 
(https://www.nap.edu/read/12589/chapter/1)?
    (B) Oversight and independence: Please provide your views regarding 
what type of entity should host the OSAC (e.g., governmental, 
professional association, etc.). What is your opinion about the 
preferred characteristics of a host organization for an effective OSAC? 
What are your views as to the type of organization that should provide 
oversight to the OSAC? Do you believe that the OSAC should have more/
less independence from a host organization?
    (C) Work products and aims: As stated above, the OSAC Charter 
identifies eight aims. (See section 1.2: https://www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2017/03/16/fssb_osac_charter_and_bylaws_v_1.3.pdf.) What is your opinion regarding 
whether the OSAC is fulfilling these aims as structured? Do you believe 
that the OSAC is addressing the correct aims? What are your views as to 
the type of work products the OSAC should produce? What do you believe 
are the essential elements of work products? Please provide your 
opinion as to whether there should be implementation/enforcement of the

[[Page 41213]]

work products. Do you believe that the OSAC should develop ``best 
practices'' and other materials that are not formal ``standards''?
    (D) Structure: What are your views as to whether the current the 
OSAC structure works efficiently? Do you believe that another structure 
should be utilized? Please provide your opinion about whether there are 
any issues in the current work product development process that should 
be addressed structurally. In your view, does the reliance on standards 
development organizations function as intended (please include the 
reasons for your opinion)?
    (E) Participation: What are your views as to the community the OSAC 
should serve? In your opinion, what stakeholders must be a part of the 
OSAC (e.g., practitioners, researchers, forensic science societies, 
accreditation bodies, scientific societies, human factors experts, 
metrologists, standards development organizations, legal 
practitioners)? If you think that any of these entities should be 
excluded, please explain why and identify other venues for the views of 
the excluded entities to be incorporated into forensic practice, if 
appropriate. In your view, should some stakeholders serve more limited 
roles and, if so, how and why?
    (F) Funding: What is your opinion as to the funding model that the 
OSAC should employ--Entirely funded by the Federal government, by non-
Federal funds, or a combination of funding sources? (Please include 
your thoughts on the role of funding sources such as membership fees, 
certification fees, and meeting registration fees.) What are your views 
about the implications of funding models for the other traits, 
particularly oversight and independence?
    Response to this request for information (RFI) is voluntary, and 
comments are not limited to the specific questions posed. Respondents 
need not reply to all questions; however, it is requested that they 
clearly indicate the letter of each question to which they are 
responding. All responses to this RFI must be submitted electronically 
through www.regulations.gov.
    All responses received will be posted on www.regulations.gov 
without making any changes to the responses or redacting any 
information, including any personally identifiable information 
provided. It is the responsibility of the respondent to safeguard 
personally identifiable information. You are not required to submit 
personally identifying information in order to respond and it is 
recommended that respondents' personally identifiable information not 
be included. Responses may be provided anonymously, but those 
respondents who do share contact information are requested to include 
brief background information regarding the respondent's subject-matter 
experience and expertise. Responses submitted through 
www.regulations.gov will not include the email address of the 
respondent unless the respondent chooses to include that information as 
part of the response.

    Authority: 15 U.S.C. 272(b)(10).

Kevin Kimball,
NIST Chief of Staff.
[FR Doc. 2017-18355 Filed 8-29-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3510-13-P