Agency Information Collection Activities: OMB Control Number 1028-0109; iCoast-Did the coast change?, 31347-31349 [2017-14192]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 128 / Thursday, July 6, 2017 / Notices 17.21(g) to enhance the propagation or survival of the following species: African slender-snouted crocodile (Crocodylus cataphractus), Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), red-fronted lemur (Eulemur rufus), mongoose lemur (Eulemur mongoz), ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), red-ruffed lemur (Varecia rubra), Cuban parrot (Amazona leucocephala), blue-throated macaw (Ara glaucogularis), and golden parakeet (Guarouba guarouba). This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Fossil Rim Wildlife Center, Glen Rose, TX; PRT–31693C The applicant requests a captive-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) to enhance the propagation or survival of the following species: Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), Przewalski’s horse (Equus przewalskii), black-footed cat (Felix negripes), red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis), and black rhino (Diceros bicornis). This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; PRT– 14503C The applicant requests a permit to import biological samples from the wild and captive-born Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) for the purpose of scientific research. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 1-year period. Applicant: The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham AL; PRT– 15849C The applicant requests a permit to import biological samples from the wild and captive-born Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) for the purpose of scientific research. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 1-year period. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES B. Marine Mammal 18:13 Jul 05, 2017 IV. Next Steps If the Service decides to issue permits to any of the applicants listed in this notice, we will publish a notice in the Federal Register. You may locate the Federal Register notice announcing the permit issuance date by searching in www.regulations.gov under the permit number listed in this document. V. Public Comments You may submit your comments and materials concerning this notice by one of the methods listed in ADDRESSES. We will not consider comments sent by email or fax or to an address not listed in ADDRESSES. If you submit a comment via http:// www.regulations.gov, your entire comment, including any personal identifying information, will be posted on the Web site. If you submit a hardcopy comment that includes personal identifying information, you may request at the top of your document that we withhold this information from public review. However, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. We will post all hardcopy comments on http://www.regulations.gov. VI. Authorities Endangered Species Act of 1973, (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.); Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.). Joyce Russell, Government Information Specialist, Branch of Permits, Division of Management Authority. [FR Doc. 2017–14146 Filed 7–5–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P Applicant: U.S. Fish Wildlife Service Marine Mammals Management, Anchorage, AK; PRT–039386 The applicant requests authorization to renew their permit to take Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) samples, conduct surveys, and import biological specimens for the purposes of scientific research. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Offspring Films, Bristol, UK; PRT–29633C VerDate Sep<11>2014 The applicant requests a permit to film up to 100 Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and up to 80 Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) within a six month period at the Monterey Bay area, California, and Cordova and Simpson Bay areas and Prince William Sound, Alaska, for the purpose of education. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Jkt 241001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey [GX16MN00F1F2000] Agency Information Collection Activities: OMB Control Number 1028– 0109; iCoast—Did the coast change? AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31347 Notice of a renewal of a currently approved information collection (1028–0109). ACTION: We (the U.S. Geological Survey) will ask the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to approve the information collection (IC) described below. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995, and as part of our continuing efforts to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, we invite the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on this IC. This collection is scheduled to expire on September 30, 2017. DATES: To ensure that your comments are considered, we must receive them on or before September 5, 2017. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments on this information collection to the Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Geological Survey, gs-info_ collections@usgs.gov (email). Please reference ‘Information Collection 1028– 0109, iCoast—Did the Coast Change? in all correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen L.M. Morgan, Coastal Geologist, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 600 4th. St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, 727–502–8037, kmorgan@ usgs.gov. You may also find information about this ICR at www.reginfo.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Abstract As part of its mission to document coastal change, the USGS has been taking aerial photographs of the coast before and after each major storm for the past 21 years to assess damages to the natural landscape and the built environment. A typical mission can consist of between approximately 3,000–10,000 photographs. The digital photo-archive maintained by the USGS is a valuable environmental record almost 200,000 photographs taken before and after 24 extreme storms along the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts. At the same time, the USGS has been developing mathematical models that predict the likely interactions between storm surge and coastal features, such as beaches and dunes, during extreme storms, with the aim of predicting areas that are vulnerable to storm damage. Currently the photographs are not used to inform the mathematical models. The models are based primarily on pre-storm dune height and predicted wave behavior. If scientists could ‘‘ground truth’’ coastal damage by comparing before and E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 31348 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 128 / Thursday, July 6, 2017 / Notices after photographs of the coast, the predictive models might be improved. It is not physically or economically possible for USGS scientists to examine all aerial photographs related to each storm, however, and automation of this process is also problematic. Image analysis software is not yet sophisticated enough to automatically identify damages to the natural landscape and the infrastructure that are depicted in these photographs; human perception and local knowledge are required. ‘iCoast—Did the Coast Change?’ (hereafter referred to as ‘iCoast’) is a USGS research project to construct a web-based application that will allow citizen volunteers to compare these before and after photographs of the coast and identify changes that result from extreme storms through a process known as ‘crowdsourcing’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Crowdsourcing). In concept, this application will be similar to those of other citizen science image comparison and classification projects such as the Citizen Science Alliance’s Cyclone Center project, (see www.cyclonecenter.org), which asks people to classify types of cyclones by comparing satellite images. There are two distinct purposes to ‘iCoast’: • To allow USGS scientists to ‘ground truth’ or validate their predictive storm surge models. These mathematical models, which are widely used in the emergency management community for locating areas of potential vulnerability to incoming storms, are currently based solely on pre-storm beach morphology as determined by high-resolution elevation data, and predicted wave behavior derived from parameters of the approaching storm. The on-the-ground post-storm observations provided by citizens using ‘iCoast’ will allow scientists to determine the accuracy of the models for future applications, and • to serve as a repository of images that enables citizens to become more aware of their vulnerability to coastal change and to participate in the advancement of coastal science. The application consists of sets of before-and-after photographs from each storm with accompanying educational material about coastal hazards. Since the photographs of a given area were taken on different dates following slightly different flight paths, the geographic orientation of before and after images may differ slightly. Often there will be more than one image covering approximately the same geographic area and showing the same coastal features. Participants are asked to identify which post-storm image best VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:13 Jul 05, 2017 Jkt 241001 covers the same geographic area and shows the same natural and man-made features as the image taken after the storm. After the best match between before-and-after aerial photographs is established, participants will classify post-storm coastal damage using simple one-or-two word descriptive tags. This type of tagging is similar to that used in commercial photo-sharing Web sites such as Flickr (www.flickr.com). Each participant will classify photographs of their choice. They may classify as many photographs as they wish in as many sessions as they choose. In order for a citizen to participate in classifying the photographs, the following information must be collected by this application: (1) Participants will login to the ‘iCoast’ application using externally issued credentials via the Federally approved ‘‘Open Identity Exchange’’ (www.openid.net) method. This Federal Government program benefits users by accelerating their sign up, reducing the frustration of maintaining multiple passwords, allowing them to control their own identity, and minimizing password security risks. User credentials will be managed and authenticated by Google, an Identity Provider approved by the Federal Government. During the login process participants will be redirected to a Google owned and operated login page. Following successful authentication of Id and password, participants are asked by Google to confirm agreement to their Google email address being shared with ‘iCoast’. Users have the option to decline this and halt the login process with no information shared to ‘iCoast’. If a participant accepts the sharing of their email address then the USGS will store the address within the ‘iCoast’ database. ‘iCoast’ is never supplied nor does it request a participant’s password directly. Storing of the participant’s email address by ‘iCoast’ is necessary to permit the pairing of Google login credentials with their ‘iCoast’ profile. The USGS will encrypt all stored participant email addresses. No other information or Google account access is shared by Google to ‘iCoast’ and nothing is shared from ‘iCoast’ to Google at any time. (2) Level of expertise: At initial log in to ‘iCoast’, the participant will be asked to indicate what type of ‘crowd’ or group he or she belongs to by picking from a pre-determined list (e.g. coastal scientist, coastal planner, coastal resident, general public, etc.). The participant may also optionally contribute his or her professional affiliation in an open text box, but this is not required. Professional affiliation PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 may provide additional information to the scientists to more fully assess the accuracy of a participant’s classifications. Provision of level of expertise alone will not allow an individual to be personally identified. (3) Keyword tagging: After comparing pre-and post-storm aerial photographs, participants can select predefined keyword tags OR they can submit their own in a free-form text field. The keyword tags will help the USGS determine classification accuracy, and confirm or refute pre-storm predictions of coastal inundation and damage derived from the mathematical storm surge models. This application will have many benefits. It will serve the cause of open government and open data, in that these images will be available to the public in an easily accessible online format for the first time. It will enhance the science of coastal change and allow for more accurate storm surge predictions, benefitting emergency managers and coastal planners. It will also familiarize coastal communities with coastal processes and increase their awareness of vulnerabilities to extreme storms. We anticipate that this application will be used by educators to further science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education; outreach to educators is planned. II. Data OMB Control Number: 1028–0109. Form Number: None. Title: iCoast—Did the Coast Change? Type of Request: Renewal of existing information collection. Affected Public: Coastal scientists, coastal managers, marine science students, emergency managers, citizens/ residents of coastal communities. Respondent’s Obligation: None. Participation is voluntary. Frequency of Collection: Occasional. Estimated Total Number of Annual Responses: 2000 individuals. Estimated Time per Response: 5 minutes. Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 167 hours. Estimated Reporting and Recordkeeping ‘‘Non-Hour Cost’’ Burden: There are no ‘‘non-hour cost’’ burdens associated with this IC. Public Disclosure Statement: The PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501, et seq.) provides that an agency may not conduct or sponsor and you are not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number and current expiration date. III. Request for Comments We are soliciting comments as to: (a) Whether the proposed collection of E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 128 / Thursday, July 6, 2017 / Notices information is necessary for the agency to perform its duties, including whether the information is useful; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, usefulness, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) how to minimize the burden on the respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Please note that the comments submitted in response to this notice are a matter of public record. Before including your personal mailing address, phone number, email address, or other personally identifiable information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment, including your personally identifiable information, may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personally identifiable information from public view, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Christopher Reich, Deputy Center Director, USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. [FR Doc. 2017–14192 Filed 7–5–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4338–11–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337–TA–1048] Certain Intravascular Administration Sets and Components Thereof; Notice of a Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Finding Respondent Yangzhou Weideli Trade Co., Ltd. in Default; Request for Submissions U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has determined not to review an initial determination (‘‘ID’’) (Order No. 6) of the presiding administrative law judge (‘‘ALJ’’) finding respondent Yangzhou WeiDeLi Trade Co., Ltd. in default. The Commission is requesting submissions on remedy, bonding and the public interest. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Liberman, Esq., Office of the General Counsel, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:13 Jul 05, 2017 Jkt 241001 205–3115. Copies of non-confidential documents filed in connection with this investigation are or will be available for inspection during official business hours (8:45 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.) in the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server at https://www.usitc.gov. The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https:// edis.usitc.gov. Hearing-impaired persons are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission instituted this investigation under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337 (‘‘section 337’’), on April 12, 2017, based on a complaint filed by Curlin Medical Inc. of East Aurora, New York; ZEVEX, Inc. of Salt Lake City, Utah; and Moog Inc. of East Aurora, New York (collectively, ‘‘Complainants’’). 82 FR 17690–91 (Apr. 12, 2017). The complaint alleges a violation of section 337 by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent Nos. 6,164,921 (‘‘the ‘921 patent’’) and 6,371,732 (‘‘the ‘732 patent’’). The complaint named Yangzhou WeiDeLi Trade Co., Ltd. of Yangzhou, China (‘‘Yangzhou’’ or ‘‘Respondent’’) as the only respondent in this investigation. The Commission’s Office of Unfair Import Investigations was named as a party. On April 7, 2017, the Commission served a copy of the Complaint and Notice of Investigation on Yangzhou by express delivery. EDIS Document Number 606380. Docket Services confirmed that the documents were accepted by Yangzhou on April 10, 2017. Yangzhou did not timely respond to the Complaint and Notice of Investigation. On May 10, 2017, Complainants filed a Motion for an Order to Show Cause and Entry of Default Judgement as to Respondent and for a Stay of the Procedural Schedule. (Mot.) On May 23, 2017, the ALJ issued Order No. 5, granting Complainants’ motion and ordering respondent Yangzhou to show cause why it should not be held in default for failing to respond to the complaint and notice of investigation. The order set a deadline of June 9, 2017, and no response was received from Yangzhou. On June 13, 2017, the ALJ issued the subject ID (Order No. 6). The ALJ found that Yangzhou failed to respond to PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31349 Order No. 5 and, accordingly, he determined that Yangzhou be found in default. Order No. 6 at 2. The ALJ further stated that Yangzhou therefore waived its right to appear, be served with documents, and to contest the allegations at issue in this investigation. Id. No party petitioned for review of the subject ID, and the Commission has determined not to review the ID. Complainants have indicated that they are not seeking a general exclusion order. See Complaint and Mot. In connection with the final disposition of this investigation, the Commission may (1) issue an order that could result in the exclusion of the subject articles from entry into the United States, and/or (2) issue a cease and desist order that could result in the respondent being required to cease and desist from engaging in unfair acts in the importation and sale of such articles. Accordingly, the Commission is interested in receiving written submissions that address the form of remedy, if any, that should be ordered. If a party seeks exclusion of an article from entry into the United States for purposes other than entry for consumption, the party should so indicate and provide information establishing that activities involving other types of entry either are adversely affecting it or are likely to do so. For background, see Certain Devices for Connecting Computers via Telephone Lines, Inv. No. 337–TA–360, USITC Pub. No. 2843, Comm’n Op. at 7–10 (Dec. 1994). If the Commission contemplates some form of remedy, it must consider the effects of that remedy upon the public interest. The factors the Commission will consider include the effect that an exclusion order and/or cease and desist orders would have on (1) the public health and welfare, (2) competitive conditions in the U.S. economy, (3) U.S. production of articles that are like or directly competitive with those that are subject to investigation, and (4) U.S. consumers. The Commission is therefore interested in receiving written submissions that address the aforementioned public interest factors in the context of this investigation. If the Commission orders some form of remedy, the U.S. Trade Representative, as delegated by the President, has 60 days to approve or disapprove the Commission’s action. See Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles would be entitled to enter the United States under bond, in an amount determined by the Commission and E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 128 (Thursday, July 6, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 31347-31349]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-14192]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

U.S. Geological Survey

[GX16MN00F1F2000]


Agency Information Collection Activities: OMB Control Number 
1028-0109; iCoast--Did the coast change?

AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior.

ACTION: Notice of a renewal of a currently approved information 
collection (1028-0109).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We (the U.S. Geological Survey) will ask the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) to approve the information collection (IC) 
described below. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 
1995, and as part of our continuing efforts to reduce paperwork and 
respondent burden, we invite the general public and other Federal 
agencies to take this opportunity to comment on this IC. This 
collection is scheduled to expire on September 30, 2017.

DATES: To ensure that your comments are considered, we must receive 
them on or before September 5, 2017.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments on this information collection to 
the Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Geological Survey, 
gs-info_collections@usgs.gov (email). Please reference `Information 
Collection 1028-0109, iCoast--Did the Coast Change? in all 
correspondence.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen L.M. Morgan, Coastal Geologist, 
St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, U.S. Geological 
Survey, 600 4th. St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, 727-502-8037, 
kmorgan@usgs.gov. You may also find information about this ICR at 
www.reginfo.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Abstract

    As part of its mission to document coastal change, the USGS has 
been taking aerial photographs of the coast before and after each major 
storm for the past 21 years to assess damages to the natural landscape 
and the built environment. A typical mission can consist of between 
approximately 3,000-10,000 photographs. The digital photo-archive 
maintained by the USGS is a valuable environmental record almost 
200,000 photographs taken before and after 24 extreme storms along the 
Gulf and Atlantic Coasts. At the same time, the USGS has been 
developing mathematical models that predict the likely interactions 
between storm surge and coastal features, such as beaches and dunes, 
during extreme storms, with the aim of predicting areas that are 
vulnerable to storm damage. Currently the photographs are not used to 
inform the mathematical models. The models are based primarily on pre-
storm dune height and predicted wave behavior.
    If scientists could ``ground truth'' coastal damage by comparing 
before and

[[Page 31348]]

after photographs of the coast, the predictive models might be 
improved. It is not physically or economically possible for USGS 
scientists to examine all aerial photographs related to each storm, 
however, and automation of this process is also problematic. Image 
analysis software is not yet sophisticated enough to automatically 
identify damages to the natural landscape and the infrastructure that 
are depicted in these photographs; human perception and local knowledge 
are required. `iCoast--Did the Coast Change?' (hereafter referred to as 
`iCoast') is a USGS research project to construct a web-based 
application that will allow citizen volunteers to compare these before 
and after photographs of the coast and identify changes that result 
from extreme storms through a process known as `crowdsourcing' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crowdsourcing). In concept, this application will 
be similar to those of other citizen science image comparison and 
classification projects such as the Citizen Science Alliance's Cyclone 
Center project, (see www.cyclonecenter.org), which asks people to 
classify types of cyclones by comparing satellite images.
    There are two distinct purposes to `iCoast':
     To allow USGS scientists to `ground truth' or validate 
their predictive storm surge models. These mathematical models, which 
are widely used in the emergency management community for locating 
areas of potential vulnerability to incoming storms, are currently 
based solely on pre-storm beach morphology as determined by high-
resolution elevation data, and predicted wave behavior derived from 
parameters of the approaching storm. The on-the-ground post-storm 
observations provided by citizens using `iCoast' will allow scientists 
to determine the accuracy of the models for future applications, and
     to serve as a repository of images that enables citizens 
to become more aware of their vulnerability to coastal change and to 
participate in the advancement of coastal science.
    The application consists of sets of before-and-after photographs 
from each storm with accompanying educational material about coastal 
hazards. Since the photographs of a given area were taken on different 
dates following slightly different flight paths, the geographic 
orientation of before and after images may differ slightly. Often there 
will be more than one image covering approximately the same geographic 
area and showing the same coastal features. Participants are asked to 
identify which post-storm image best covers the same geographic area 
and shows the same natural and man-made features as the image taken 
after the storm. After the best match between before-and-after aerial 
photographs is established, participants will classify post-storm 
coastal damage using simple one-or-two word descriptive tags. This type 
of tagging is similar to that used in commercial photo-sharing Web 
sites such as Flickr (www.flickr.com). Each participant will classify 
photographs of their choice. They may classify as many photographs as 
they wish in as many sessions as they choose.
    In order for a citizen to participate in classifying the 
photographs, the following information must be collected by this 
application:
    (1) Participants will login to the `iCoast' application using 
externally issued credentials via the Federally approved ``Open 
Identity Exchange'' (www.openid.net) method. This Federal Government 
program benefits users by accelerating their sign up, reducing the 
frustration of maintaining multiple passwords, allowing them to control 
their own identity, and minimizing password security risks. User 
credentials will be managed and authenticated by Google, an Identity 
Provider approved by the Federal Government. During the login process 
participants will be redirected to a Google owned and operated login 
page. Following successful authentication of Id and password, 
participants are asked by Google to confirm agreement to their Google 
email address being shared with `iCoast'. Users have the option to 
decline this and halt the login process with no information shared to 
`iCoast'. If a participant accepts the sharing of their email address 
then the USGS will store the address within the `iCoast' database. 
`iCoast' is never supplied nor does it request a participant's password 
directly. Storing of the participant's email address by `iCoast' is 
necessary to permit the pairing of Google login credentials with their 
`iCoast' profile. The USGS will encrypt all stored participant email 
addresses. No other information or Google account access is shared by 
Google to `iCoast' and nothing is shared from `iCoast' to Google at any 
time.
    (2) Level of expertise: At initial log in to `iCoast', the 
participant will be asked to indicate what type of `crowd' or group he 
or she belongs to by picking from a pre-determined list (e.g. coastal 
scientist, coastal planner, coastal resident, general public, etc.). 
The participant may also optionally contribute his or her professional 
affiliation in an open text box, but this is not required. Professional 
affiliation may provide additional information to the scientists to 
more fully assess the accuracy of a participant's classifications. 
Provision of level of expertise alone will not allow an individual to 
be personally identified.
    (3) Keyword tagging: After comparing pre-and post-storm aerial 
photographs, participants can select predefined keyword tags OR they 
can submit their own in a free-form text field. The keyword tags will 
help the USGS determine classification accuracy, and confirm or refute 
pre-storm predictions of coastal inundation and damage derived from the 
mathematical storm surge models.
    This application will have many benefits. It will serve the cause 
of open government and open data, in that these images will be 
available to the public in an easily accessible online format for the 
first time. It will enhance the science of coastal change and allow for 
more accurate storm surge predictions, benefitting emergency managers 
and coastal planners. It will also familiarize coastal communities with 
coastal processes and increase their awareness of vulnerabilities to 
extreme storms. We anticipate that this application will be used by 
educators to further science, technology, engineering and mathematics 
(STEM) education; outreach to educators is planned.

II. Data

    OMB Control Number: 1028-0109.
    Form Number: None.
    Title: iCoast--Did the Coast Change?
    Type of Request: Renewal of existing information collection.
    Affected Public: Coastal scientists, coastal managers, marine 
science students, emergency managers, citizens/residents of coastal 
communities.
    Respondent's Obligation: None. Participation is voluntary.
    Frequency of Collection: Occasional.
    Estimated Total Number of Annual Responses: 2000 individuals.
    Estimated Time per Response: 5 minutes.
    Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 167 hours.
    Estimated Reporting and Recordkeeping ``Non-Hour Cost'' Burden: 
There are no ``non-hour cost'' burdens associated with this IC.
    Public Disclosure Statement: The PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501, et seq.) 
provides that an agency may not conduct or sponsor and you are not 
required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a 
currently valid OMB control number and current expiration date.

III. Request for Comments

    We are soliciting comments as to: (a) Whether the proposed 
collection of

[[Page 31349]]

information is necessary for the agency to perform its duties, 
including whether the information is useful; (b) the accuracy of the 
agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of 
information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, usefulness, and clarity 
of the information to be collected; and (d) how to minimize the burden 
on the respondents, including the use of automated collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology.
    Please note that the comments submitted in response to this notice 
are a matter of public record. Before including your personal mailing 
address, phone number, email address, or other personally identifiable 
information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire 
comment, including your personally identifiable information, may be 
made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your 
comment to withhold your personally identifiable information from 
public view, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

Christopher Reich,
Deputy Center Director, USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science 
Center.
[FR Doc. 2017-14192 Filed 7-5-17; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4338-11-P