Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines, 27411-27414 [2017-12074]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 114 / Thursday, June 15, 2017 / Rules and Regulations (k) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless this AD specifies otherwise. (i) Airbus Service Bulletin A320–53–1308, dated November 4, 2015. (ii) Airbus Service Bulletin A320–53–1309, dated November 4, 2015. (iii) Airbus Service Bulletin A320–53– 1310, dated November 4, 2015. (iv) Airbus Service Bulletin A320–53– 1311, dated November 4, 2015. (v) Airbus Service Bulletin A320–53–1312, dated November 4, 2015. (vi) Airbus Service Bulletin A320–53– 1313, dated November 4, 2015. (3) For service information identified in this AD, contact Airbus, Airworthiness Office—EIAS, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France; telephone +33 5 61 93 36 96; fax +33 5 61 93 44 51; email account.airworth-eas@ airbus.com; Internet http://www.airbus.com. (4) You may view this service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425–227–1221. (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http:// www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibrlocations.html. Issued in Renton, Washington, on June 2, 2017. Michael Kaszycki, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2017–12170 Filed 6–14–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2016–9405; Directorate Identifier 2016–NE–22–AD; Amendment 39– 18918; AD 2017–12–03] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. pmangrum on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES AGENCY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW2037, PW2037M, and PW2040 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by an SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:00 Jun 14, 2017 Jkt 241001 unrecoverable engine in-flight shutdown (IFSD) after an ice crystal icing event. This AD requires installing a software standard eligible for installation and precludes the use of electronic engine control (EEC) software standards earlier than SCN 5B/I. We are issuing this AD to correct the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: This AD is effective July 20, 2017. ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, contact Pratt & Whitney Division, 400 Main St., East Hartford, CT 06118; phone: 800–565– 0140; fax: 860–565–5442. You may view this service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781–238–7125. It is also available on the internet at http://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2016– 9405. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2016– 9405; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The address for the Docket Office (phone: 800–647–5527) is Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kevin Clark, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803; phone: 781–238–7088; fax: 781–238–7199; email: kevin.m.clark@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to certain PW PW2037, PW2037M, and PW2040 turbofan engines. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on January 5, 2017 (82 FR 1265). The NPRM was prompted by an unrecoverable engine IFSD after an ice crystal icing event. An attempt to rapidly restart the engine was made while the EEC had the Active Clearance Control (ACC) turned on, which caused PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 27411 contraction of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) case and reduced clearances in the HPT, with subsequent HPT damage and rotor seizure. A change to the EEC software can force the ACC to activate at a higher rotor speed to prevent active ACC during engine restart. The NPRM proposed to preclude the use of EEC software standards earlier than SCN 5B/ I. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the HPT, rotor seizure, failure of one or more engines, loss of thrust control, and loss of the airplane. Comments We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing this AD. The following presents the comments received on the NPRM and the FAA’s response to each comment. The Airline Pilots Association and United Airlines support the NPRM. Request To Change Compliance The Boeing Company, PW, Delta Air Lines, Inc., FedEx, and Rudy Pueschel requested removing the engine serial number requirement for earlier compliance time and use the Asia Pacific regional requirement for earlier compliance time. The change would properly capture the risk of icing events in the Asia Pacific region. This change would also match the referenced alert service bulletin (ASB). We disagree. There are difficulties in compliance and enforcement for regulations based on regions. Using engines serial numbers (S/Ns) that are currently known to operate in the area was our approach to best capture the higher risk engines while easing compliance. The unsafe condition is addressed by upgrading at least one engine per airplane on all known engines currently operating in the Asia Pacific region within the shorter compliance period. Finally, this AD requires all engines with EEC model numbers EEC104–40 and EEC104–60 to upgrade software earlier than software standard SCN 5B/I by 2024. We did not change this AD. Request To Change Method To Identify Engines Affected by Earlier Compliance Time Delta Air Lines, Inc. and FedEx requested removing the engine serial number requirement for earlier compliance time and use extended range twin-engine operations (ETOPs) or Aircraft Tail Number requirements for earlier compliance time. The change was requested to ease with compliance and help properly capture the safety risk of operating in the Asia Pacific region. We disagree. Operators may have ETOPs flights that do not operate in the E:\FR\FM\15JNR1.SGM 15JNR1 27412 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 114 / Thursday, June 15, 2017 / Rules and Regulations Asia Pacific region and would then be mandated to the earlier compliance time unnecessarily. Typically the EEC remains with the engine instead of the aircraft so tracking engines would be more appropriate than aircraft. However, we will review any Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) submitted to cover the regional risk to any operator’s specific fleet instead of tracking through engine S/Ns. We did not change this AD. Request To Change Compliance Time Delta Air Lines, Inc. and FedEx requested using EEC S/Ns instead of engine S/Ns to track the earlier compliance times because, as the software is removed and upgraded on the EEC that the EEC should be tracked to properly follow the software upgrades. We partially agree. We agree that tracking EEC serial numbers would assist in tracking software because EECs are removed or replaced more often than engines. We disagree with this approach because our available Asia Pacific region information only includes engine S/Ns. We did not change this AD. pmangrum on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES Request To Clarify Engine S/Ns Rudy Pueschel and PW requested clarification that the affected engine S/ Ns are those engines currently operating in the Asia Pacific region, to assist operators in knowing why specific engines require earlier compliance. We agree. Knowing the engines with certain S/Ns are currently operating in the Asia Pacific region will help operators understand the risk and unsafe condition. We revised the Differences Between this Proposed AD and the Service Information section. Request To Change Compliance Time FedEx and PW requested changing the engine shop visit definition to when the EEC is accessible at a maintenance facility. The EEC is a line replaceable unit (LRU) which may be replaced outside of a major flange separation shop visit definition. This would also align with the ASB. We disagree. Our decision to use the separation of pairs of major mating engine flanges for the definition of an ‘‘engine shop visit’’ is based on the average time between shop visits and allows a period of time to operate with an adequate level of safety without unduly burdening operators not flying in the Asia Pacific Region. This is to avoid grounding aircraft that may be at a facility capable of replacing the EEC, but, not having the required parts or equipment to do so at the time. We did not change this AD. VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:00 Jun 14, 2017 Jkt 241001 Request To Change Compliance Time Request To Change Costs of Compliance Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested removing the engine shop visit requirement because the EEC is an LRU and may not line up with a major flange separation engine shop visit definition. We disagree. The risk requires complying at the next engine shop visit. Our decision to use the separation of pairs of major mating engine flanges for the definition of an ‘‘engine shop visit’’ is based on the average time between shop visits and allows a period of time to operate with an adequate level of safety without unduly burdening operators not flying in the Asia Pacific Region. This is to avoid grounding aircraft that may be at a facility capable of replacing the EEC, but, not having the required parts or equipment to do so at the time. We did not change this AD. PW requested that we change the number of affected engines to 303 because only 303 engines have EEC model numbers EEC104–40 or EEC104– 60, installed. We agree. We changed the Costs of Compliance section. Request To Change Service Information Delta Air Lines, Inc., FedEx, and PW requested changing the required action from removing software earlier than software standard SCN 5B/I to install or upgrade to software standard SCN 5B/I, because there are no instructions for removing software. PW ASB PW2000 A73–170, dated July 14, 2016 is only for upgrading the software. We partially agree. We disagree with mandating installation of software standard SCN 5B/I because that would prohibit the installation of a newer software standard in the future. We agree that an alternative to removing EEC software is needed because there are no instructions for removing software. This AD requires upgrading software, or installing an EEC that is eligible for installation. We changed paragraph (g) of this AD from ‘‘remove software’’ to ‘‘upgrade software’’. Request To Change Compliance Time Delta Air Lines, Inc. and PW requested that we specify a date in the compliance paragraphs of this AD to provide clarity on the deadline for compliance. We agree. We changed the compliance paragraphs of this AD to include specific dates. Request To Change Applicability Delta Air Lines, Inc. and PW requested that we specify EEC model numbers EEC104–40 and EEC104–60 in the Installation Prohibition section because the Installation Prohibition section applies only to EEC model numbers EEC104–40 and EEC104–60, not to all EECs. We agree. We revised paragraph (h) of this AD. PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Request To Change Discussion Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested that we change the Discussion section to clarify that for the event engine, the attempted engine relight with the ACC turned on caused contraction of the HPT case and reduced clearances in the HPT, with subsequent HPT damage and rotor seizure. Delta also requested that we clarify that the EEC controls ACC activation. We agree. We revised the Discussion section. Request To Change Difference Between This Proposed AD and the Service Information Paragraph Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested clarification in the ‘‘Differences Between this Proposed AD and the Service Information’’ section that the AD appears to apply all engines and not just to PW2000 with EEC model numbers EEC104–40 and EEC104–60. To provide further clarification, Delta also requests stating to which engines the July 2024 date applies. We agree. This AD is applicable to PW2000 engines with EEC model numbers EEC104–40 and EEC104–60. We added the affected EEC model numbers to the Differences Between this AD and the Service Information section. Request To Change Compliance Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested that we remove the ellipses from Figure 1 to paragraph (g) of this AD. Ellipses should not be in the list and may suggest missing information. We agree. We removed the ellipses from Figure 1 to paragraph (g) of this AD. Request Reopening the Additional Comment Period Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested reopening the comment period because of expected significant changes to the language of this AD. We disagree. In response to the public comments we received on the NPRM, we made minor changes to the compliance section of this AD for clarification. However, we did not make any significant changes to this AD. Also we determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this AD without delay. E:\FR\FM\15JNR1.SGM 15JNR1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 114 / Thursday, June 15, 2017 / Rules and Regulations Conclusion We reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this AD with the changes described previously. We also determined that these changes will not increase the economic burden on any operator or increase the scope of this AD. Related Service Information We reviewed PW ASB PW2000 A73– 170, dated July 14, 2016. The ASB describes procedures for modifying or replacing the EEC. This service information is reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it through their normal course of business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section. Differences Between This AD and the Service Information PW ASB PW2000 A73–170, dated July 14, 2016, specifies compliance for any PW2000 engine with EEC model numbers EEC104–40 and EEC104–60, flown, or expected to be flown, in the Asian Pacific latitudes and longitudes, 27413 while this AD lists specific engine S/Ns that are currently known to operate in the Asia Pacific region. Also, PW ASB PW2000 A73–170, dated July 14, 2016, provides until 2026 to comply, while this AD provides until July 2024 for all PW2000 engines with EEC104–40 and EEC104–60 to comply. Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD affects 303 engines, installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We estimate the following costs to comply with this AD: ESTIMATED COSTS Action Labor cost EEC software installation ................................ 1.8 work-hours × $85 per hour = $153.00 ..... Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. pmangrum on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and 14:00 Jun 14, 2017 (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): ■ Regulatory Findings VerDate Sep<11>2014 Parts cost Jkt 241001 2017–12–03 Pratt & Whitney Division: Amendment 39–18918; Docket No. FAA–2016–9405; Directorate Identifier 2016–NE–22–AD. (a) Effective Date This AD is effective July 20, 2017. (b) Affected ADs None. (c) Applicability This AD applies to all Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW2037, PW2037M, and PW2040 turbofan engines with electronic engine control (EEC), model number EEC104–40 or EEC104–60, installed, with an EEC software standard earlier than SCN 5B/I. PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 $0.00 Cost per product $153.00 Cost on U.S. operators $46,359.00 (d) Subject Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC) of America Code 7321, Fuel Control Turbine Engines. (e) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by an unrecoverable engine in-flight shutdown (IFSD) after an ice crystal icing event. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the highpressure turbine (HPT), rotor seizure, failure of one or more engines, loss of thrust control, and loss of the airplane. (f) Compliance Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done. (g) Required Action (1) For an engine with a serial number (S/ N) listed in Figure 1 to paragraph (g) of this AD, upgrade any EEC software standards earlier than SCN 5B/I at the next engine shop visit, or before December 1, 2018, whichever occurs first, or, replace the EEC with a part eligible for installation. (2) For an engine with an S/N not listed in Figure 1 to paragraph (g) of this AD, upgrade any EEC software standards earlier than SCN 5B/I at the next engine shop visit, or before July 1, 2024, whichever occurs first, or replace the EEC with a part eligible for installation. FIGURE 1 TO PARAGRAPH (g)—ENGINE S/NS 716402 727103 727134 727152 727158 727189 727202 727204 727231 727239 727240 E:\FR\FM\15JNR1.SGM 15JNR1 727272 727280 727281 727282 727286 727287 727288 728709 728715 728716 728719 728741 728743 728748 728779 728785 728795 728806 728811 728812 728820 728824 27414 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 114 / Thursday, June 15, 2017 / Rules and Regulations FIGURE 1 TO PARAGRAPH (g)—ENGINE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION S/NS—Continued Federal Aviation Administration 727251 727252 727253 727257 727269 728720 728725 728726 728729 728730 728826 728827 728840 728864 728870 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2016–4220; Directorate Identifier 2015–NM–076–AD; Amendment 39–18923; AD 2017–12–08] (h) Installation Prohibition RIN 2120–AA64 After the effective date of this AD, do not install any software standard earlier than SCN 5B/I into any EEC model number EEC104–40 or EEC104–60. Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Airplanes (i) Definition AGENCY: For the purpose of this AD, an ‘‘engine shop visit’’ is the induction of an engine into the shop for maintenance involving the separation of pairs of major mating engine flanges, except that the separation of engine flanges solely for the purposes of transportation without subsequent engine maintenance does not constitute an engine shop visit. (j) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Engine Certification Office, FAA, may approve AMOCs for this AD. Use the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19 to make your request. You may email your request to: ANE-AD-AMOC@faa.gov. (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. (k) Related Information (1) For more information about this AD, contact Kevin Clark, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803; phone: 781–238– 7088; fax: 781–238–7199; email: kevin.m.clark@faa.gov. (2) PW Alert Service Bulletin PW2000 A73–170, dated July 14, 2016, which is not incorporated by reference in this AD, can be obtained from PW, using the contact information in paragraph (k)(3) of this AD. (3) For service information identified in this AD, contact Pratt & Whitney Division, 400 Main St., East Hartford, CT 06118; phone: 800–565–0140; fax: 860–565–5442. (4) You may view this service information at FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781–238–7125. (l) Material Incorporated by Reference pmangrum on DSK3GDR082PROD with RULES None. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 2, 2017. Robert J. Ganley, Acting Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2017–12074 Filed 6–14–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:00 Jun 14, 2017 Jkt 241001 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. We are superseding Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2011–24– 06 for all BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model BAe 146–100A, –200A, and –300A airplanes; and Model Avro 146–RJ70A, 146–RJ85A, and 146– RJ100A airplanes. AD 2011–24–06 required revising the maintenance program to incorporate life limits for certain items, adding new and more restrictive inspections to detect fatigue cracking in certain structures, and adding fuel system critical design configuration control limitations (CDCCLs) to prevent ignition sources in the fuel tanks. AD 2011–24–06 also required modifying the main fittings of the main landing gear (MLG) and revising the maintenance program to incorporate new life limits on MLG uplocks and door up-locks and other MLG components. This new AD requires revising the maintenance or inspection program, as applicable, to incorporate new or revised structural inspection requirements. This AD was prompted by a determination that new or revised structural inspection requirements are necessary. We are issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. SUMMARY: This AD is effective July 20, 2017. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of January 3, 2012 (76 FR 73477, November 29, 2011). ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, contact BAE Systems (Operations) Limited, Customer Information Department, Prestwick International Airport, Ayrshire, KA9 2RW, Scotland, United Kingdom; telephone +44 1292 675207; fax +44 1292 675704; email RApublications@ baesystems.com; Internet http:// www.baesystems.com/Businesses/ RegionalAircraft/index.htm. You may DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 view this referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425–227–1221. It is also available on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2016– 4220. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2016– 4220; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The address for the Docket Office (telephone 800–647–5527) is Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Todd Thompson, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM–116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA 98057–3356; telephone 425–227–1175; fax 425–227–1149. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 to supersede AD 2011–24–06, Amendment 39–16870 (76 FR 73477, November 29, 2011) (‘‘AD 2011–24–06’’). AD 2011–24–06 applied to all BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model BAe 146–100A, –200A, and –300A airplanes; and Model Avro 146– RJ70A, 146–RJ85A, and 146–RJ100A airplanes. The SNPRM published in the Federal Register on December 13, 2016 (81 FR 89878) (‘‘the SNPRM’’). We preceded the SNPRM with a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) that published in the Federal Register on March 8, 2016 (81 FR 12044) (‘‘the NPRM’’). The NPRM was prompted by a determination that new or revised structural inspection requirements are necessary. The NPRM proposed to require revising the maintenance or inspection program, as applicable, to incorporate new or revised structural inspection requirements. We are issuing this AD to detect and correct fatigue cracking of certain structural elements, E:\FR\FM\15JNR1.SGM 15JNR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 114 (Thursday, June 15, 2017)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 27411-27414]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-12074]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2016-9405; Directorate Identifier 2016-NE-22-AD; 
Amendment 39-18918; AD 2017-12-03]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan 
Engines

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain 
Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW2037, PW2037M, and PW2040 turbofan 
engines. This AD was prompted by an unrecoverable engine in-flight 
shutdown (IFSD) after an ice crystal icing event. This AD requires 
installing a software standard eligible for installation and precludes 
the use of electronic engine control (EEC) software standards earlier 
than SCN 5B/I. We are issuing this AD to correct the unsafe condition 
on these products.

DATES: This AD is effective July 20, 2017.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, 
contact Pratt & Whitney Division, 400 Main St., East Hartford, CT 
06118; phone: 800-565-0140; fax: 860-565-5442. You may view this 
service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 
District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of 
this material at the FAA, call 781-238-7125. It is also available on 
the internet at http://www.regulations.gov by searching for and 
locating Docket No. FAA-2016-9405.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA-2016-
9405; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 
5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket 
contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and 
other information. The address for the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-
5527) is Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, 
Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kevin Clark, Aerospace Engineer, 
Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 
District Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803; phone: 781-238-7088; fax: 781-
238-7199; email: kevin.m.clark@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Discussion

    We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR 
part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to certain PW PW2037, PW2037M, 
and PW2040 turbofan engines. The NPRM published in the Federal Register 
on January 5, 2017 (82 FR 1265). The NPRM was prompted by an 
unrecoverable engine IFSD after an ice crystal icing event. An attempt 
to rapidly restart the engine was made while the EEC had the Active 
Clearance Control (ACC) turned on, which caused contraction of the 
high-pressure turbine (HPT) case and reduced clearances in the HPT, 
with subsequent HPT damage and rotor seizure. A change to the EEC 
software can force the ACC to activate at a higher rotor speed to 
prevent active ACC during engine restart. The NPRM proposed to preclude 
the use of EEC software standards earlier than SCN 5B/I. We are issuing 
this AD to prevent failure of the HPT, rotor seizure, failure of one or 
more engines, loss of thrust control, and loss of the airplane.

Comments

    We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing 
this AD. The following presents the comments received on the NPRM and 
the FAA's response to each comment. The Airline Pilots Association and 
United Airlines support the NPRM.

Request To Change Compliance

    The Boeing Company, PW, Delta Air Lines, Inc., FedEx, and Rudy 
Pueschel requested removing the engine serial number requirement for 
earlier compliance time and use the Asia Pacific regional requirement 
for earlier compliance time. The change would properly capture the risk 
of icing events in the Asia Pacific region. This change would also 
match the referenced alert service bulletin (ASB).
    We disagree. There are difficulties in compliance and enforcement 
for regulations based on regions. Using engines serial numbers (S/Ns) 
that are currently known to operate in the area was our approach to 
best capture the higher risk engines while easing compliance. The 
unsafe condition is addressed by upgrading at least one engine per 
airplane on all known engines currently operating in the Asia Pacific 
region within the shorter compliance period. Finally, this AD requires 
all engines with EEC model numbers EEC104-40 and EEC104-60 to upgrade 
software earlier than software standard SCN 5B/I by 2024. We did not 
change this AD.

Request To Change Method To Identify Engines Affected by Earlier 
Compliance Time

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. and FedEx requested removing the engine 
serial number requirement for earlier compliance time and use extended 
range twin-engine operations (ETOPs) or Aircraft Tail Number 
requirements for earlier compliance time. The change was requested to 
ease with compliance and help properly capture the safety risk of 
operating in the Asia Pacific region.
    We disagree. Operators may have ETOPs flights that do not operate 
in the

[[Page 27412]]

Asia Pacific region and would then be mandated to the earlier 
compliance time unnecessarily. Typically the EEC remains with the 
engine instead of the aircraft so tracking engines would be more 
appropriate than aircraft. However, we will review any Alternative 
Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) submitted to cover the regional risk to 
any operator's specific fleet instead of tracking through engine S/Ns. 
We did not change this AD.

Request To Change Compliance Time

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. and FedEx requested using EEC S/Ns instead of 
engine S/Ns to track the earlier compliance times because, as the 
software is removed and upgraded on the EEC that the EEC should be 
tracked to properly follow the software upgrades.
    We partially agree. We agree that tracking EEC serial numbers would 
assist in tracking software because EECs are removed or replaced more 
often than engines. We disagree with this approach because our 
available Asia Pacific region information only includes engine S/Ns. We 
did not change this AD.

Request To Clarify Engine S/Ns

    Rudy Pueschel and PW requested clarification that the affected 
engine S/Ns are those engines currently operating in the Asia Pacific 
region, to assist operators in knowing why specific engines require 
earlier compliance.
    We agree. Knowing the engines with certain S/Ns are currently 
operating in the Asia Pacific region will help operators understand the 
risk and unsafe condition. We revised the Differences Between this 
Proposed AD and the Service Information section.

Request To Change Compliance Time

    FedEx and PW requested changing the engine shop visit definition to 
when the EEC is accessible at a maintenance facility. The EEC is a line 
replaceable unit (LRU) which may be replaced outside of a major flange 
separation shop visit definition. This would also align with the ASB.
    We disagree. Our decision to use the separation of pairs of major 
mating engine flanges for the definition of an ``engine shop visit'' is 
based on the average time between shop visits and allows a period of 
time to operate with an adequate level of safety without unduly 
burdening operators not flying in the Asia Pacific Region. This is to 
avoid grounding aircraft that may be at a facility capable of replacing 
the EEC, but, not having the required parts or equipment to do so at 
the time. We did not change this AD.

Request To Change Compliance Time

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested removing the engine shop visit 
requirement because the EEC is an LRU and may not line up with a major 
flange separation engine shop visit definition.
    We disagree. The risk requires complying at the next engine shop 
visit. Our decision to use the separation of pairs of major mating 
engine flanges for the definition of an ``engine shop visit'' is based 
on the average time between shop visits and allows a period of time to 
operate with an adequate level of safety without unduly burdening 
operators not flying in the Asia Pacific Region. This is to avoid 
grounding aircraft that may be at a facility capable of replacing the 
EEC, but, not having the required parts or equipment to do so at the 
time. We did not change this AD.

Request To Change Service Information

    Delta Air Lines, Inc., FedEx, and PW requested changing the 
required action from removing software earlier than software standard 
SCN 5B/I to install or upgrade to software standard SCN 5B/I, because 
there are no instructions for removing software. PW ASB PW2000 A73-170, 
dated July 14, 2016 is only for upgrading the software.
    We partially agree. We disagree with mandating installation of 
software standard SCN 5B/I because that would prohibit the installation 
of a newer software standard in the future. We agree that an 
alternative to removing EEC software is needed because there are no 
instructions for removing software. This AD requires upgrading 
software, or installing an EEC that is eligible for installation. We 
changed paragraph (g) of this AD from ``remove software'' to ``upgrade 
software''.

Request To Change Compliance Time

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. and PW requested that we specify a date in 
the compliance paragraphs of this AD to provide clarity on the deadline 
for compliance.
    We agree. We changed the compliance paragraphs of this AD to 
include specific dates.

Request To Change Applicability

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. and PW requested that we specify EEC model 
numbers EEC104-40 and EEC104-60 in the Installation Prohibition section 
because the Installation Prohibition section applies only to EEC model 
numbers EEC104-40 and EEC104-60, not to all EECs.
    We agree. We revised paragraph (h) of this AD.

Request To Change Costs of Compliance

    PW requested that we change the number of affected engines to 303 
because only 303 engines have EEC model numbers EEC104-40 or EEC104-60, 
installed.
    We agree. We changed the Costs of Compliance section.

Request To Change Discussion

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested that we change the Discussion 
section to clarify that for the event engine, the attempted engine 
relight with the ACC turned on caused contraction of the HPT case and 
reduced clearances in the HPT, with subsequent HPT damage and rotor 
seizure. Delta also requested that we clarify that the EEC controls ACC 
activation.
    We agree. We revised the Discussion section.

Request To Change Difference Between This Proposed AD and the Service 
Information Paragraph

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested clarification in the ``Differences 
Between this Proposed AD and the Service Information'' section that the 
AD appears to apply all engines and not just to PW2000 with EEC model 
numbers EEC104-40 and EEC104-60. To provide further clarification, 
Delta also requests stating to which engines the July 2024 date 
applies.
    We agree. This AD is applicable to PW2000 engines with EEC model 
numbers EEC104-40 and EEC104-60. We added the affected EEC model 
numbers to the Differences Between this AD and the Service Information 
section.

Request To Change Compliance

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested that we remove the ellipses from 
Figure 1 to paragraph (g) of this AD. Ellipses should not be in the 
list and may suggest missing information.
    We agree. We removed the ellipses from Figure 1 to paragraph (g) of 
this AD.

Request Reopening the Additional Comment Period

    Delta Air Lines, Inc. requested reopening the comment period 
because of expected significant changes to the language of this AD.
    We disagree. In response to the public comments we received on the 
NPRM, we made minor changes to the compliance section of this AD for 
clarification. However, we did not make any significant changes to this 
AD. Also we determined that air safety and the public interest require 
adopting this AD without delay.

[[Page 27413]]

Conclusion

    We reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received, 
and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting 
this AD with the changes described previously.
    We also determined that these changes will not increase the 
economic burden on any operator or increase the scope of this AD.

Related Service Information

    We reviewed PW ASB PW2000 A73-170, dated July 14, 2016. The ASB 
describes procedures for modifying or replacing the EEC. This service 
information is reasonably available because the interested parties have 
access to it through their normal course of business or by the means 
identified in the ADDRESSES section.

Differences Between This AD and the Service Information

    PW ASB PW2000 A73-170, dated July 14, 2016, specifies compliance 
for any PW2000 engine with EEC model numbers EEC104-40 and EEC104-60, 
flown, or expected to be flown, in the Asian Pacific latitudes and 
longitudes, while this AD lists specific engine S/Ns that are currently 
known to operate in the Asia Pacific region. Also, PW ASB PW2000 A73-
170, dated July 14, 2016, provides until 2026 to comply, while this AD 
provides until July 2024 for all PW2000 engines with EEC104-40 and 
EEC104-60 to comply.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that this AD affects 303 engines, installed on 
airplanes of U.S. registry.
    We estimate the following costs to comply with this AD:

                                                 Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Cost per      Cost on U.S.
                Action                         Labor cost           Parts cost        product        operators
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EEC software installation.............  1.8 work-hours x $85 per           $0.00         $153.00      $46,359.00
                                         hour = $153.00.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 
13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, 
on the relationship between the national government and the States, or 
on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various 
levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866,
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
    (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
    (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13   [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive (AD):

2017-12-03 Pratt & Whitney Division: Amendment 39-18918; Docket No. 
FAA-2016-9405; Directorate Identifier 2016-NE-22-AD.

(a) Effective Date

    This AD is effective July 20, 2017.

(b) Affected ADs

    None.

(c) Applicability

    This AD applies to all Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW2037, 
PW2037M, and PW2040 turbofan engines with electronic engine control 
(EEC), model number EEC104-40 or EEC104-60, installed, with an EEC 
software standard earlier than SCN 5B/I.

(d) Subject

    Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC) of America Code 7321, 
Fuel Control Turbine Engines.

(e) Unsafe Condition

    This AD was prompted by an unrecoverable engine in-flight 
shutdown (IFSD) after an ice crystal icing event. We are issuing 
this AD to prevent failure of the high-pressure turbine (HPT), rotor 
seizure, failure of one or more engines, loss of thrust control, and 
loss of the airplane.

(f) Compliance

    Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, 
unless already done.

(g) Required Action

    (1) For an engine with a serial number (S/N) listed in Figure 1 
to paragraph (g) of this AD, upgrade any EEC software standards 
earlier than SCN 5B/I at the next engine shop visit, or before 
December 1, 2018, whichever occurs first, or, replace the EEC with a 
part eligible for installation.
    (2) For an engine with an S/N not listed in Figure 1 to 
paragraph (g) of this AD, upgrade any EEC software standards earlier 
than SCN 5B/I at the next engine shop visit, or before July 1, 2024, 
whichever occurs first, or replace the EEC with a part eligible for 
installation.

                 Figure 1 to Paragraph (g)--Engine S/Ns
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
           716402                   727272                  728741
           727103                   727280                  728743
           727134                   727281                  728748
           727152                   727282                  728779
           727158                   727286                  728785
           727189                   727287                  728795
           727202                   727288                  728806
           727204                   728709                  728811
           727231                   728715                  728812
           727239                   728716                  728820
           727240                   728719                  728824

[[Page 27414]]

 
           727251                   728720                  728826
           727252                   728725                  728827
           727253                   728726                  728840
           727257                   728729                  728864
           727269                   728730                  728870
------------------------------------------------------------------------

(h) Installation Prohibition

    After the effective date of this AD, do not install any software 
standard earlier than SCN 5B/I into any EEC model number EEC104-40 
or EEC104-60.

(i) Definition

    For the purpose of this AD, an ``engine shop visit'' is the 
induction of an engine into the shop for maintenance involving the 
separation of pairs of major mating engine flanges, except that the 
separation of engine flanges solely for the purposes of 
transportation without subsequent engine maintenance does not 
constitute an engine shop visit.

(j) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (1) The Manager, Engine Certification Office, FAA, may approve 
AMOCs for this AD. Use the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19 to make 
your request. You may email your request to: ANE-AD-AMOC@faa.gov.
    (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate 
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager 
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding 
district office.

(k) Related Information

    (1) For more information about this AD, contact Kevin Clark, 
Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & 
Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803; 
phone: 781-238-7088; fax: 781-238-7199; email: 
kevin.m.clark@faa.gov.
    (2) PW Alert Service Bulletin PW2000 A73-170, dated July 14, 
2016, which is not incorporated by reference in this AD, can be 
obtained from PW, using the contact information in paragraph (k)(3) 
of this AD.
    (3) For service information identified in this AD, contact Pratt 
& Whitney Division, 400 Main St., East Hartford, CT 06118; phone: 
800-565-0140; fax: 860-565-5442.
    (4) You may view this service information at FAA, Engine & 
Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For 
information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 
781-238-7125.

(l) Material Incorporated by Reference

    None.

    Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 2, 2017.
Robert J. Ganley,
Acting Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 2017-12074 Filed 6-14-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-13-P