Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Traffic and Capacity Statistics-The T-100 System, 26567-26569 [2017-11789]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 108 / Wednesday, June 7, 2017 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Nancy-Ellen Zusman, Assistant Chief Counsel, Office of Chief Counsel, (312) 353–2577 or Alan Tabachnick, Environmental Protection Specialist, Office of Environmental Programs, (202) 366–8541. FTA is located at 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. Office hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given that FTA has taken final agency actions by issuing certain approvals for the public transportation projects listed below. The actions on the projects, as well as the laws under which such actions were taken, are described in the documentation issued in connection with the projects to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and in other documents in the FTA administrative record for the projects. Interested parties may contact either the project sponsor or the relevant FTA Regional Office for more information. Contact information for FTA’s Regional Offices may be found at https:// www.fta.dot.gov. This notice applies to all FTA decisions on the listed projects as of the issuance date of this notice and all laws under which such actions were taken, including, but not limited to, NEPA [42 U.S.C. 4321–4375], Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 [49 U.S.C. 303], Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act [16 U.S.C. 470f], and the Clean Air Act [42 U.S.C. 7401–7671q]. This notice does not, however, alter or extend the limitation period for challenges of project decisions subject to previous notices published in the Federal Register. The projects and actions that are the subject of this notice are: 1. Project name and location: Green Line Extension Project, Cambridge, Medford, and Somerville, Massachusetts. Project sponsor: Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) and Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). Project description: The project would use a twobranch operation to extend light rail service to College Avenue in Medford and to Union Square in Somerville from the re-located Lechmere Station. The project would also include a maintenance facility and the Somerville Community Path. A re-evaluation was issued because of the following modifications: A re-design of stations from enclosed stations to open air platforms, a smaller maintenance facility, reduced reconstruction of some bridges, an alternative Lechmere Viaduct structure, a modification to retaining walls, a substitution of noise mitigation from noise walls to sound proofing, and a redesign of the Somerville Community Path. Final agency actions: FTA VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:37 Jun 06, 2017 Jkt 241001 determination that neither a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement nor a Supplemental Environmental Assessment is necessary. Supporting documentation: Letter by MBTA, dated March 28, 2017, and the Certificate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs on the Notice of Project Change, dated March 10, 2017. 2. Project name and location: East Link Extension Light Rail Project, King County, WA. Project sponsor: Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority (Sound Transit). Project description: The project would extend the current light rail system an additional 18 miles from Downtown Seattle to Mercer Island and Bellevue along Interstate 90 (I–90) and then through Bellevue to Overlake and Redmond. The project would include 12 stations, four park-and-ride lots, and supporting facilities. A re-evaluation was issued to assess operational changes to the I– 90 high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes between Seattle and Mercer Island and project refinements associated with integrating transit on Mercer Island. These changes altered mitigation measures in five locations, including installing traffic signals, adjusting signal timing, and minor widening and restriping at certain intersections and I– 90 ramps. Final agency actions: FTA determination that neither a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement nor a Supplemental Environmental Assessment is necessary. Supporting documentation: State Environmental Policy Act Addendum to the Final Environmental Impact Statement, dated April 2017. 3. Project name and location: Milwaukee West Line Fox River Bridge Improvement Project, Elgin, IL. Project sponsor: Metra. Project description: The project would create a new Fox River railroad bridge for Metra’s Milwaukee West Line. A new single-track bridge would be constructed immediately west of the existing, deteriorating bridge. Once the existing bridge is removed, the project would construct three piers extending east from the new bridge to support a second track. The project would also replace signal components near the bridge, install a new interlocking, and add underground cable for the signal system. Final agency actions: No use determination of Section 4(f) resources; Section 106 finding of no historic properties affected; project-level air quality conformity; and a Finding of No Significant Impact, dated May 19, 2017. Supporting documentation: Environmental Assessment, dated February 2017. Lucy Garliauskas, Associate Administrator Planning and Environment. [FR Doc. 2017–11830 Filed 6–6–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P PO 00000 Frm 00145 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 26567 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Bureau of Transportation Statistics [Docket ID Number: DOT–OST–2014–0031] Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Traffic and Capacity Statistics—The T– 100 System Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology (OST–R), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below is being forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for extension of currently approved collection. The ICR describes the nature of the information collection and its expected burden. The Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment period soliciting comments on the following collection of information was published on March 22, 2017. Airports Council International—North America strongly supports the Department of Transportation continuing to require U.S. and foreign air carriers to file traffic and capacity data. Alaska Airlines also supports BTS’s continued collection and publication of T–100 and T–100(f) data. DATES: Written comments should be submitted by July 7, 2017. ADDRESSES: Send comments to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725–17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention: OST Desk Officer. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jennifer Rodes, Office of Airline Information, RTS–42, Room E34–420, OST–R, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590–0001, Telephone Number (202) 366–8513, Fax Number (202) 366–3383 or EMAIL Jennifer.rodes@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION: OMB Approval No. 2138–0040. Title: Report of Traffic and Capacity Statistics—The T–100 System. Form No.: Schedules T–100 and T– 100(f). Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Respondents: Certificated, commuter and foreign air carriers that operate to, from or within the United States. T100 Form: Number of Respondents: 119. Number of Annual responses 1,428. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\07JNN1.SGM 07JNN1 26568 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 108 / Wednesday, June 7, 2017 / Notices Total Burden per Response: 6 hours. Total Annual Burden: 8,568 hours. T100F Form: Number of Respondents: 190. Number of Annual responses 2,280. Total Burden per Response: 2 hours. Total Annual Burden: 4,560 hours. Needs and Uses: of the volume of traffic handled by each air carrier at specific airports and in specific markets which would be affected by the proposed acquisition or merger. The Justice Department uses T– 100 data in carrying out its responsibilities relating to airline competition and consolidation. Airport Improvement The Federal Aviation Administration uses enplanement data for U.S. airports to distribute the annual Airport Improvement Program (AIP) entitlement funds to eligible primary airports, i.e., airports which account for more than 0.01 percent of the total passengers enplaned at U.S. airports. Enplanement data contained in Schedule T–100/T– 100(f) are the sole data base used by the FAA in determining airport funding. U.S. airports receiving significant service from foreign air carriers operating small aircraft could be receiving less than their fair share of AIP entitlement funds. Collecting Schedule T–100(f) data for small aircraft operations will enable the FAA to more fairly distribute these funds. Traffic Forecasting The FAA uses traffic, operational and capacity data as important safety indicators and to prepare the air carrier traffic and operation forecasts. These forecast as used by the FAA, airport managers, the airlines and others in the air travel industry as planning and budgeting tools. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Air Carrier Safety The FAA uses traffic, operational and capacity data as important safety indicators and to prepare the air carrier traffic and operation forecasts that are used in developing its budget and staffing plans, facility and equipment funding levels, and environmental impact and policy studies. The FAA monitors changes in the number of air carrier operations as a way to allocate inspection resources and in making decisions as to increased safety surveillance. Similarly, airport activity statistics are used by the FAA to develop airport profiles and establish priorities for airport inspections. Acquisitions and Mergers While the Justice Department has the primary responsibility over air carrier acquisitions and mergers, the Department reviews the transfer of international routes involved to determine if they would substantially reduce competition, or determine if the transaction would be inconsistent with the public interest. In making these determinations, the proposed transaction’s effect on competition in the markets served by the affected air carriers is analyzed. This analysis includes, among other things, a consideration of the volume of traffic and available capacity, the flight segments and origins-destinations involved, and the existence of entry barriers, such as limited airport slots or gate capacity. Also included is a review VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:37 Jun 06, 2017 Jkt 241001 Airport Capacity Analysis The mix of aircraft type are used in determining the practical annual capacity (PANCAP) at airports as prescribed in the FAA Advisory Circular Airport Capacity Criteria Used in Preparing the National Airport Plan. The PANCAP is a safety-related measure of the annual airport capacity or level of operations. It is a predictive measure which indicates potential capacity problems, delays, and possible airport expansions or runway construction needs. If the level of operations at an airport exceeds PANCAP significantly, the frequency and length of delays will increase, with a potential concurrent risk of accidents. Under this program, the FAA develops ways of increasing airport capacity at congested airports. Airline Industry Status Evaluations The Department apprises Congress, the Administration and others of the effect major changes or innovations are having on the air transportation industry. For this purpose, summary traffic and capacity data as well as the detailed segment and market data are essential. These data must be timely and inclusive to be relevant for analyzing emerging issues and must be based upon uniform and reliable data submissions that are consistent with the Department’s regulatory requirements. Mail Rates The Department is responsible for establishing intra-Alaska mail rates. Separate rates are set for mainline and bush Alaskan operations. The rates are updated every six months to reflect changes in unit costs in each ratemaking entity. Traffic and capacity data are used in conjunction with cost data to develop the required unit cost data. Essential Air Service The Department reassesses service levels at small domestic communities to PO 00000 Frm 00146 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 assure that capacity levels are adequate to accommodate current demand. System Planning at Airports The FAA is charged with administering a series of grants that are designed to accomplish the necessary airport planning for future development and growth. These grants are made to state metropolitan and regional aviation authorities to fund needed airport systems planning work. Individual airport activity statistics, nonstop market data, and service segment data are used to prepare airport activity level forecasts. Review of IATA Agreements The Department reviews all of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) agreements that relate to fares, rates, and rules for international air transportation to ensure that the agreements meet the public interest criteria. Current and historic summary traffic and capacity data, such as revenue ton-miles and available tonmiles, by aircraft type, type of service, and length of haul are needed to conduct these analyses to: (1) Develop the volume elements for passenger/ cargo cost allocations, (2) evaluate fluctuations in volume of scheduled and charter services, (3) assess the competitive impact of different operations such as charter versus scheduled, (4) calculate load factors by aircraft type, and (5) monitor traffic in specific markets. Foreign Air Carriers Applications Foreign air carriers are required to submit applications for authority to operate to the United States. In reviewing these applications the Department must find that the requested authority is encompassed in a bilateral agreement, other intergovernmental understanding, or that granting the application is in the public interest. In the latter cases, T–100 data are used in assessing the level of benefits that carriers of the applicant’s homeland presently are receiving from their U.S. operations. These benefits are compared and balanced against the benefits U.S. carriers receive from their operations to the applicant’s homeland. Air Carrier Fitness The Department determines whether U.S. air carriers are and continue to be fit, willing and able to conduct air service operations without undue risk to passengers and shippers. The Department monitors a carrier’s load factor, operational, and enplanement data to compare with other carriers with similar operating E:\FR\FM\07JNN1.SGM 07JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 108 / Wednesday, June 7, 2017 / Notices characteristics. Carriers that expand operations at a high rate are monitored more closely for safety reasons. International Civil Aviation Organization Pursuant to an international agreement, the United States is obligated to report certain air carrier data to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The traffic data supplied to ICAO are extracted from the U.S. air carriers’ Schedule T–100 submissions. The Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (44 U.S.C. 3501 note), requires a statistical agency to clearly identify information it collects for non-statistical purposes. BTS hereby notifies the respondents and the public that BTS uses the information it collects under this OMB approval for non-statistical purposes including, but not limited to, publication of both Respondent’s identity and its data, submission of the information to agencies outside BTS for review, analysis and possible use in regulatory and other administrative matters. Issued on May 31, 2017. William Chadwick, Jr., Director, Office of Airline Information. [FR Doc. 2017–11789 Filed 6–6–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–9X–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection Renewal; Comment Request; Basel II Interagency Supervisory Guidance for the Supervisory Review Process (Pillar 2) Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: The OCC, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other federal agencies to comment on a continuing information collection as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA). The OCC may not conduct or sponsor, and a respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:37 Jun 06, 2017 Jkt 241001 The OCC is soliciting comment concerning the renewal of its information collection titled ‘‘Basel II Interagency Supervisory Guidance for the Supervisory Review Process (Pillar 2).’’ DATES: Comments must be received by August 7, 2017. ADDRESSES: Because paper mail in the Washington, DC area and at the OCC is subject to delay, commenters are encouraged to submit comments by email, if possible. Comments may be sent to: Legislative and Regulatory Activities Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Attention: 1557–0242, 400 7th Street SW., Suite 3E–218, Washington, DC 20219. In addition, comments may be sent by fax to (571) 465–4326 or by electronic mail to prainfo@occ.treas.gov. You may personally inspect and photocopy comments at the OCC, 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219. For security reasons, the OCC requires that visitors make an appointment to inspect comments. You may do so by calling (202) 649–6700 or, for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, TTY, (202) 649– 5597. Upon arrival, visitors will be required to present valid governmentissued photo identification and submit to security screening in order to inspect and photocopy comments. All comments received, including attachments and other supporting materials, are part of the public record and subject to public disclosure. Do not include any information in your comment or supporting materials that you consider confidential or inappropriate for public disclosure. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shaquita Merritt, OCC Clearance Officer, (202) 649–5490 or, for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, TTY, (202) 649–5597, Legislative and Regulatory Activities Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the OMB for each collection of information that they conduct or sponsor. ‘‘Collection of information’’ is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) to include agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of title 44 requires federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB PO 00000 Frm 00147 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 26569 for approval. To comply with this requirement, the OCC is publishing notice of the renewal of this collection. Title of Information Collection: Basel II Interagency Supervisory Guidance for the Supervisory Review Process (Pillar 2). OMB Control No.: 1557–0242. Frequency of Response: Eventgenerated. Affected Public: National banks. Abstract: In 2008, the agencies 1 issued a supervisory guidance document for implementing the supervisory review process (Pillar 2).2 Sections 37, 41, 43, and 46 of the guidance contain information collections. Section 37 provides that banks should state clearly the definition of capital used in any aspect of its internal capital adequacy assessment process (ICAAP) and document any changes in the internal definition of capital. Section 41 provides that banks should maintain thorough documentation of ICAAP. Section 43 specifies that the board of director should approve the bank’s ICAAP, review it on a regular basis, and approve any changes. Boards of directors, under section 46, should periodically review the assessment of overall capital adequacy and to analyze how measures of internal capital adequacy compare with other capital measures (such as regulatory or accounting). Estimated Burden: Number of Respondents: 23. Estimated Burden per Respondent: 140 hours. Total Estimated Annual Burden: 3,220 hours. Comments: Comments submitted in response to this notice will be summarized and included in the request for OMB approval. All comments will become a matter of public record. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the OCC’s functions, including whether the information has practical utility; (b) The accuracy of the OCC’s burden estimates, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Ways to minimize the burden of the information collection on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology; and 1 OCC, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. 2 73 FR 44620 (July 31, 2008). E:\FR\FM\07JNN1.SGM 07JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 108 (Wednesday, June 7, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 26567-26569]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-11789]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Bureau of Transportation Statistics

[Docket ID Number: DOT-OST-2014-0031]


Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report 
of Traffic and Capacity Statistics--The T-100 System

AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology 
(OST-R), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this 
notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) 
abstracted below is being forwarded to the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) for extension of currently approved collection. The ICR 
describes the nature of the information collection and its expected 
burden. The Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment period 
soliciting comments on the following collection of information was 
published on March 22, 2017.
    Airports Council International--North America strongly supports the 
Department of Transportation continuing to require U.S. and foreign air 
carriers to file traffic and capacity data. Alaska Airlines also 
supports BTS's continued collection and publication of T-100 and T-
100(f) data.

DATES: Written comments should be submitted by July 7, 2017.

ADDRESSES: Send comments to the Office of Information and Regulatory 
Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725-17th Street NW., 
Washington, DC 20503, Attention: OST Desk Officer.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jennifer Rodes, Office of Airline 
Information, RTS-42, Room E34-420, OST-R, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue 
SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001, Telephone Number (202) 366-8513, Fax 
Number (202) 366-3383 or EMAIL Jennifer.rodes@dot.gov.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION: 
    OMB Approval No. 2138-0040.
    Title: Report of Traffic and Capacity Statistics--The T-100 System.
    Form No.: Schedules T-100 and T-100(f).
    Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection.
    Respondents: Certificated, commuter and foreign air carriers that 
operate to, from or within the United States.
    T100 Form:
    Number of Respondents: 119.
    Number of Annual responses 1,428.

[[Page 26568]]

    Total Burden per Response: 6 hours.
    Total Annual Burden: 8,568 hours.
    T100F Form:
    Number of Respondents: 190.
    Number of Annual responses 2,280.
    Total Burden per Response: 2 hours.
    Total Annual Burden: 4,560 hours.
    Needs and Uses:

Airport Improvement

    The Federal Aviation Administration uses enplanement data for U.S. 
airports to distribute the annual Airport Improvement Program (AIP) 
entitlement funds to eligible primary airports, i.e., airports which 
account for more than 0.01 percent of the total passengers enplaned at 
U.S. airports. Enplanement data contained in Schedule T-100/T-100(f) 
are the sole data base used by the FAA in determining airport funding. 
U.S. airports receiving significant service from foreign air carriers 
operating small aircraft could be receiving less than their fair share 
of AIP entitlement funds. Collecting Schedule T-100(f) data for small 
aircraft operations will enable the FAA to more fairly distribute these 
funds.

Air Carrier Safety

    The FAA uses traffic, operational and capacity data as important 
safety indicators and to prepare the air carrier traffic and operation 
forecasts that are used in developing its budget and staffing plans, 
facility and equipment funding levels, and environmental impact and 
policy studies. The FAA monitors changes in the number of air carrier 
operations as a way to allocate inspection resources and in making 
decisions as to increased safety surveillance. Similarly, airport 
activity statistics are used by the FAA to develop airport profiles and 
establish priorities for airport inspections.

Acquisitions and Mergers

    While the Justice Department has the primary responsibility over 
air carrier acquisitions and mergers, the Department reviews the 
transfer of international routes involved to determine if they would 
substantially reduce competition, or determine if the transaction would 
be inconsistent with the public interest. In making these 
determinations, the proposed transaction's effect on competition in the 
markets served by the affected air carriers is analyzed. This analysis 
includes, among other things, a consideration of the volume of traffic 
and available capacity, the flight segments and origins-destinations 
involved, and the existence of entry barriers, such as limited airport 
slots or gate capacity. Also included is a review of the volume of 
traffic handled by each air carrier at specific airports and in 
specific markets which would be affected by the proposed acquisition or 
merger. The Justice Department uses T-100 data in carrying out its 
responsibilities relating to airline competition and consolidation.

Traffic Forecasting

    The FAA uses traffic, operational and capacity data as important 
safety indicators and to prepare the air carrier traffic and operation 
forecasts. These forecast as used by the FAA, airport managers, the 
airlines and others in the air travel industry as planning and 
budgeting tools.

Airport Capacity Analysis

    The mix of aircraft type are used in determining the practical 
annual capacity (PANCAP) at airports as prescribed in the FAA Advisory 
Circular Airport Capacity Criteria Used in Preparing the National 
Airport Plan. The PANCAP is a safety-related measure of the annual 
airport capacity or level of operations. It is a predictive measure 
which indicates potential capacity problems, delays, and possible 
airport expansions or runway construction needs. If the level of 
operations at an airport exceeds PANCAP significantly, the frequency 
and length of delays will increase, with a potential concurrent risk of 
accidents. Under this program, the FAA develops ways of increasing 
airport capacity at congested airports.

Airline Industry Status Evaluations

    The Department apprises Congress, the Administration and others of 
the effect major changes or innovations are having on the air 
transportation industry. For this purpose, summary traffic and capacity 
data as well as the detailed segment and market data are essential. 
These data must be timely and inclusive to be relevant for analyzing 
emerging issues and must be based upon uniform and reliable data 
submissions that are consistent with the Department's regulatory 
requirements.

Mail Rates

    The Department is responsible for establishing intra-Alaska mail 
rates. Separate rates are set for mainline and bush Alaskan operations. 
The rates are updated every six months to reflect changes in unit costs 
in each rate-making entity. Traffic and capacity data are used in 
conjunction with cost data to develop the required unit cost data.

Essential Air Service

    The Department reassesses service levels at small domestic 
communities to assure that capacity levels are adequate to accommodate 
current demand.

System Planning at Airports

    The FAA is charged with administering a series of grants that are 
designed to accomplish the necessary airport planning for future 
development and growth. These grants are made to state metropolitan and 
regional aviation authorities to fund needed airport systems planning 
work. Individual airport activity statistics, nonstop market data, and 
service segment data are used to prepare airport activity level 
forecasts.

Review of IATA Agreements

    The Department reviews all of the International Air Transport 
Association (IATA) agreements that relate to fares, rates, and rules 
for international air transportation to ensure that the agreements meet 
the public interest criteria. Current and historic summary traffic and 
capacity data, such as revenue ton-miles and available ton-miles, by 
aircraft type, type of service, and length of haul are needed to 
conduct these analyses to: (1) Develop the volume elements for 
passenger/cargo cost allocations, (2) evaluate fluctuations in volume 
of scheduled and charter services, (3) assess the competitive impact of 
different operations such as charter versus scheduled, (4) calculate 
load factors by aircraft type, and (5) monitor traffic in specific 
markets.

Foreign Air Carriers Applications

    Foreign air carriers are required to submit applications for 
authority to operate to the United States. In reviewing these 
applications the Department must find that the requested authority is 
encompassed in a bilateral agreement, other intergovernmental 
understanding, or that granting the application is in the public 
interest. In the latter cases, T-100 data are used in assessing the 
level of benefits that carriers of the applicant's homeland presently 
are receiving from their U.S. operations. These benefits are compared 
and balanced against the benefits U.S. carriers receive from their 
operations to the applicant's homeland.

Air Carrier Fitness

    The Department determines whether U.S. air carriers are and 
continue to be fit, willing and able to conduct air service operations 
without undue risk to passengers and shippers.
    The Department monitors a carrier's load factor, operational, and 
enplanement data to compare with other carriers with similar operating

[[Page 26569]]

characteristics. Carriers that expand operations at a high rate are 
monitored more closely for safety reasons.

International Civil Aviation Organization

    Pursuant to an international agreement, the United States is 
obligated to report certain air carrier data to the International Civil 
Aviation Organization (ICAO). The traffic data supplied to ICAO are 
extracted from the U.S. air carriers' Schedule T-100 submissions.
    The Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency 
Act of 2002 (44 U.S.C. 3501 note), requires a statistical agency to 
clearly identify information it collects for non-statistical purposes. 
BTS hereby notifies the respondents and the public that BTS uses the 
information it collects under this OMB approval for non-statistical 
purposes including, but not limited to, publication of both 
Respondent's identity and its data, submission of the information to 
agencies outside BTS for review, analysis and possible use in 
regulatory and other administrative matters.

    Issued on May 31, 2017.
William Chadwick, Jr.,
Director, Office of Airline Information.
[FR Doc. 2017-11789 Filed 6-6-17; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-9X-P