Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas Archeological Survey, Fayetteville, AR, 11633-11637 [2017-03615]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 36 / Friday, February 24, 2017 / Notices Correction In the Federal Register (67 FR 18242, April 15, 2002), column 2, paragraph 7 is removed in its entirety. In the Federal Register (67 FR 18243, April 15, 2002), column 1, paragraph 2, sentence 1 is corrected by replacing the number 140 with the number 116. In the Federal Register (67 FR 18243, April 15, 2002), column 1, paragraph 2, sentence 2 is corrected by replacing the number 168 with the number 62. In the Federal Register (79 FR 76357, December 22, 2014), column 3, paragraph 5 is removed in its entirety. In the Federal Register (79 FR 76358, December 22, 2014), column 3, paragraph 6 is removed in its entirety. In the Federal Register (79 FR 76361, December 22, 2014), column 3, paragraph 3, sentence 1 is corrected by replacing the number 440 with the number 435. The Arkansas Archeological Survey is responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians that this notice has been published. Dated: January 17, 2017. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2017–03613 Filed 2–23–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22722; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum) has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Burke Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:20 Feb 23, 2017 Jkt 241001 descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Burke Museum at the address in this notice by March 27, 2017. ADDRESSES: Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849x2, email plape@uw.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Point Hope, North Slope Borough, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Native Village of Point Hope. History and Description of the Remains In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Point Hope, North Slope Borough, AK. The human remains were removed by William A. Shanafelt and loaned to the Burke Museum in 1930. While the Burke Museum has never formally accessioned these human remains, it has been advised to proceed and comply with NAGPRA regarding this individual. No known individuals were identified. No funerary objects are present. The human remains have been determined to be Native American based on osteological and geographical evidence. Based on the donor’s history and general provenience of removal, the human remains have been determined to be related to the Inupiat people of the Point Hope area. The Inupiat were the aboriginal occupants of the archeological sites documented in the PO 00000 Frm 00111 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 11633 Point Hope area, which date between A.D. 1000–1700 (Damas, 1984). The modern day Inupiat descendants are members of the Native Village of Point Hope (Tikigaq). Determinations Made by the Burke Museum Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and Native Village of Point Hope. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849, email plape@uw.edu, by March 27, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Native Village of Point Hope may proceed. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Native Village of Point Hope that this notice has been published. Dated: January 10, 2017. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2017–03632 Filed 2–23–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22815; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas Archeological Survey, Fayetteville, AR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Arkansas Archeological Survey has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24FEN1.SGM 24FEN1 11634 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 36 / Friday, February 24, 2017 / Notices asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Arkansas Archeological Survey. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Arkansas Archeological Survey at the address in this notice by March 27, 2017. ADDRESSES: George Sabo, Director, Arkansas Archeological Survey, 2475 North Hatch Avenue, Fayetteville, AR 72704, telephone (479) 575–3556. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Arkansas Archeological Survey, Fayetteville, AR. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from multiple counties in the state of Arkansas. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Arkansas Archeological Survey professional staff in consultation with representatives of Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, The Quapaw Tribe of Indians, and The Osage Nation (previously listed as the Osage Tribe). These human remains were inventoried and documented by physical anthropologists at the University of Arkansas. The TunicaBiloxi Indian Tribe, which the Arkansas VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:20 Feb 23, 2017 Jkt 241001 Archeological Survey had invited to consult, did not participate. History and Description of the Remains In 2011, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from a back dirt pile at site 3AS1 in Ashley County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at site 3AS1 indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Baytown Phase (A.D. 400–700). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Big Mound Ridge site (3AS6) in Ashley County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 2015. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Big Mound Ridge site (3AS6) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Baytown Phase (A.D. 400–700). In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were recovered from the Boydell site (3AS58) in Ashley County, AR. No known individuals were identified. The 8 associated funerary objects include 1 Addis Plain, var. Addis bowl fragment, 1 Addis Plain var. Greenville ceramic base, 1 Coleman Incised, var. Coleman ceramic base, 2 Mississippi Plain vessels, 1 Addis Plain var. Addis large bowl, 1 Addis Plain var. Addis bowl, and 1 L’eau Noire bowl fragment (77– 764). Diagnostic artifacts found at the Boydell site (3AS58) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200–1400). In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals were recovered from the Gordon site (3AS152) in Ashley County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Gordon site (3AS152) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200–1400). In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Gordon site (3AS152) in Ashley County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Gordon site (3AS152) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200–1400). PO 00000 Frm 00112 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Fifty Miles an Hour site (3AS189) in Ashley County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Fifty Miles an Hour site (3AS189) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541). In 2010, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals were recovered from the Sheppard site (3AS437) in Ashley County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Sheppard site (3AS437) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Woodland Period (650 B.C.–A.D. 950). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered near the town of Marsden in Bradley County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Bradley County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.–A.D. 1541). In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were recovered from the Coon Island site (3BR10) in Bradley County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Coon Island site (3BR10) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Marksville Period (100 B.C.–A.D. 400). In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 17 individuals were recovered from the Saline Sand and Gravel site (3BR40) in Bradley County, AR. No known individuals were identified. The 5 associated funerary objects include 1 Belcher Engraved bottle, 1 Mississippi Plain jar, 1 Wallace Incised bowl, 1 turtle carapace, and 1 lot of 607 grams of burial fill (78–1189). Diagnostic artifacts found at the Saline Sand and Gravel site (3BR40) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200–1400). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Saline Sand and Grave site (3BR40) in Bradley County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1982. No E:\FR\FM\24FEN1.SGM 24FEN1 asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 36 / Friday, February 24, 2017 / Notices known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Saline Sand and Gravel site (3BR40) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200–1400). In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Gene Thompson site (3BR122) in Bradley County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Gene Thompson site (3BR122) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Woodland Period (650 B.C.–A.D. 950). In 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Bangs Slough site (3CA3) in Calhoun County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Bangs Slough site (3CA3) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Coles Creek culture (A.D. 700–1000). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Keller site (3CA13) in Calhoun County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Keller site (3CA13) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Coles Creek culture (A.D. 700–1000). In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were recovered from the Powell Canal site (3CH14) in Chicot County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Powell Canal site (3CH14) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Baytown Period (A.D. 400–700). In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Bunker Black Plantation site (3CH25) in Chicot County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Bunker Black Plantation site (3CH25) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Woodland Period (650 B.C.–A.D. 950). In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were recovered from the McArthur site (3CH49) in Chicot County, AR. No known individuals were identified. The VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:20 Feb 23, 2017 Jkt 241001 8 associated funerary objects include 1 shell tempered bowl, 1 mussel shell fragment, 2 clay beads, 1 fragmentary Manchac jar, 1 reconstructed bowl, 1 turtle carapace, and 1 clay ball (70–386). Diagnostic artifacts found at the McArther site indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200– 1400). In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Hunter site (3CH135) in Chicot County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Hunter site (3CH135) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Possum Trap or Coon Bayou site (3DE37) in Desha County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Possum Trap or Coon Bayou site (3DE37) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Marksville Period (100 B.C.–A.D. 400). In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the R.H. Wolfe site (3DR1) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the R.H. Wolfe site (3DR1) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400– 1700). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Taylor Mounds site (3DR2) in Drew County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1981. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Taylor Mounds site (3DR2) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Marksville Period (100 B.C.–A.D. 400). In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Tillar Farms site (3DR30) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Tillar Farms site (3DR30) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400– 1700). PO 00000 Frm 00113 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 11635 At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were recovered from the Tillar site (3DR49) in Drew County, AR. These individuals were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1982 and 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Tillar site (3DR49) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400–1700). In 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Austin site (3DR50) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. The two associated artifacts include two clay pipes (72–153–1, –4). Diagnostic artifacts found at the Austin site (3DR50) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400–1700). In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were recovered from the McClendon site (3DR144) in Drew County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the McClendon site (3DR144) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400–1700). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the McClendon site (3DR144) in Drew County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1982. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the McClendon site (3DR144) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400–1700). In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Land’s End site (3DR184) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Land’s End site (3DR184) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Early Mississippi Period (A.D. 700–1000). In 1982 and 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Cherry site (3DR190) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Cherry site (3DR190) indicate that these human remains were E:\FR\FM\24FEN1.SGM 24FEN1 asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 11636 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 36 / Friday, February 24, 2017 / Notices probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400–1700). In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Dark Dirt Site (3DR191) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Dark Dirt site (3DR191) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Bartholomew Phase (1200–1400 A.D.). In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Lone Holly site (3DR196) in Drew County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Lone Holly site (3DR196) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200–1400). In 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, 133 individuals were recovered from the Ables Creek site (3DR214) in Drew County, AR. No known individuals were identified. The 82 funerary objects include 1 Barton Incised var. Togo jar, 1 Mississippi Plain bottle, 1 Winterville Incised bottle, 63 shell beads, 1 Mississippi Plain bottle neck, 1 Mississippi Plain var. Birch bottle, 1 polishing stone, 1 sheet of Mica, 1 squirrel skeleton, 1 unidentified incised bottle, 1 Barton Incised jar with mussel shell, 1 bone awl, 1 Mississippi Plain bowl, 2 bone hair pins, 1 shell pendant, 1 Winterville Incised small saucer, 1 Mississippi Plain seed jar, 1 Winterville Incised bottle, and 1 preform. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Ables Creek site (3DR214) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950–1541). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from an unknown location in Drew County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1969. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Drew County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.–A.D. 1541). In 1967 and 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were recovered from the Paw-Paw site (3OU22) in Ouachita County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Paw-Paw site (3OU22) indicate that these human remains were VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:20 Feb 23, 2017 Jkt 241001 probably buried during the Archaic Period (9500–650 B.C.) or Fourche Maline Tradition (800 B.C.–A.D. 900). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from an unknown location in Union County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Union County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.–A.D. 1541). In 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were recovered from the Locust Ridge site (3UN8) in Union County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Locust Ridge site (3UN8) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Baytown (A.D. 400– 700) or Coles Creek Period (A.D. 700– 1000). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Watts Field site (3UN22) in Union County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1973. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Watts Field site (3UN22) in Union County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.–A.D. 1541). In 1972 and 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 individuals were recovered from the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) in Union County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Coles Creek Period (A.D. 700–1000). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) in Union County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) in Union County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.–A.D. 1541). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one PO 00000 Frm 00114 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 individual were recovered from an unknown location in Drew County or Chicot County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Drew County and Chicot County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.–A.D. 1541). This notice includes a variety of terms commonly used in discussions of Arkansas archeology and the historical trajectories that gave rise to specific Native American communities identified in the historic record. Based on the archeological context for these sites and what is presently known about the peoples who pre-date the historic Tunica and occupied the sites listed in this notice, the Arkansas Archeological Society has determined the human remains listed in this notice are culturally affiliated with the TunicaBiloxi Indian Tribe. Determinations Made by the Arkansas Archeological Survey Officials of the Arkansas Archeological Survey have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 269 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 105 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. George Sabo, Director, Arkansas Archeological Survey, 2475 North Hatch Avenue, Fayetteville, AR 72704, telephone (479) 575–3556, by March 27, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe may proceed. E:\FR\FM\24FEN1.SGM 24FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 36 / Friday, February 24, 2017 / Notices The Arkansas Archeological Survey is responsible for notifying the TunicaBiloxi Indian Tribe that this notice has been published. Dated: January 27, 2017. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2017–03615 Filed 2–23–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22736; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Peabody Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Peabody Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice by March 27, 2017. ADDRESSES: Professor David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:20 Feb 23, 2017 Jkt 241001 CT. The human remains were removed from a site near the Little Medicine Bow River in the Freeze Out Hills, Carbon County, WY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming and Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, Oklahoma (previously listed as the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma). History and Description of the Remains Around 1883, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from a site near the Little Medicine Bow River in the Freeze Out Hills in Carbon County, WY, and donated to the Peabody Museum of Natural History in 1925. The human remains represent one adult of indeterminate sex, aged 40–50 years; one adult female, aged 25–35 years; and one subadult, probable female, aged 15– 18 years. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. According to historical documentation, an Arapaho village near the Little Medicine Bow River was attacked in 1846 and the villagers were massacred by a group of trappers from the American and Northwest Fur Companies in retribution for an earlier attack on a wagon train. Around 1883, the site was visited and human remains were removed. Determinations Made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History Officials of the Peabody Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming, and Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, PO 00000 Frm 00115 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 11637 Oklahoma (previously listed as the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Professor David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752, by March 27, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming, and Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, Oklahoma (previously listed as the CheyenneArapaho Tribes of Oklahoma), may proceed. The Peabody Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming, and Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, Oklahoma (previously listed as the CheyenneArapaho Tribes of Oklahoma), that this notice has been published. Dated: January 11, 2017. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2017–03636 Filed 2–23–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22773; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department, Little Rock, AR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24FEN1.SGM 24FEN1

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[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 36 (Friday, February 24, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 11633-11637]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-03615]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-22815; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas Archeological Survey, 
Fayetteville, AR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Arkansas Archeological Survey has completed an inventory 
of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains

[[Page 11634]]

and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any 
Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
Arkansas Archeological Survey. If no additional requestors come 
forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Arkansas Archeological Survey at the 
address in this notice by March 27, 2017.

ADDRESSES: George Sabo, Director, Arkansas Archeological Survey, 2475 
North Hatch Avenue, Fayetteville, AR 72704, telephone (479) 575-3556.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey, Fayetteville, AR. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from multiple counties in the 
state of Arkansas.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, The Quapaw Tribe of 
Indians, and The Osage Nation (previously listed as the Osage Tribe). 
These human remains were inventoried and documented by physical 
anthropologists at the University of Arkansas. The Tunica-Biloxi Indian 
Tribe, which the Arkansas Archeological Survey had invited to consult, 
did not participate.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 2011, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from a back dirt pile at site 3AS1 in Ashley County, AR. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at site 3AS1 indicate that these 
human remains were probably buried during the Baytown Phase (A.D. 400-
700).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Big Mound Ridge site (3AS6) in 
Ashley County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 2015. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the Big Mound Ridge site (3AS6) indicate that these human remains were 
probably buried during the Baytown Phase (A.D. 400-700).
    In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals 
were recovered from the Boydell site (3AS58) in Ashley County, AR. No 
known individuals were identified. The 8 associated funerary objects 
include 1 Addis Plain, var. Addis bowl fragment, 1 Addis Plain var. 
Greenville ceramic base, 1 Coleman Incised, var. Coleman ceramic base, 
2 Mississippi Plain vessels, 1 Addis Plain var. Addis large bowl, 1 
Addis Plain var. Addis bowl, and 1 L'eau Noire bowl fragment (77-764). 
Diagnostic artifacts found at the Boydell site (3AS58) indicate that 
these human remains were probably buried during the Bartholomew Phase 
(A.D. 1200-1400).
    In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals 
were recovered from the Gordon site (3AS152) in Ashley County, AR. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Gordon site (3AS152) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200-
1400).
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Gordon site (3AS152) in Ashley County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Gordon site (3AS152) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200-
1400).
    In 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Fifty Miles an Hour site (3AS189) in Ashley 
County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Fifty Miles an 
Hour site (3AS189) indicate that these human remains were probably 
buried during Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541).
    In 2010, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals 
were recovered from the Sheppard site (3AS437) in Ashley County, AR. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Sheppard site (3AS437) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Woodland Period (650 B.C.-A.D. 950).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered near the town of Marsden in Bradley County, 
AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological 
Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Bradley 
County, AR, indicate that these human remains were probably buried 
during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.-A.D. 1541).
    In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were recovered from the Coon Island site (3BR10) in Bradley County, AR. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Coon Island site 
(3BR10) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during 
the Marksville Period (100 B.C.-A.D. 400).
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 17 individuals 
were recovered from the Saline Sand and Gravel site (3BR40) in Bradley 
County, AR. No known individuals were identified. The 5 associated 
funerary objects include 1 Belcher Engraved bottle, 1 Mississippi Plain 
jar, 1 Wallace Incised bowl, 1 turtle carapace, and 1 lot of 607 grams 
of burial fill (78-1189). Diagnostic artifacts found at the Saline Sand 
and Gravel site (3BR40) indicate that these human remains were probably 
buried during the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541) or Bartholomew 
Phase (A.D. 1200-1400).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Saline Sand and Grave site (3BR40) 
in Bradley County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 1982. No

[[Page 11635]]

known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Saline Sand and Gravel site 
(3BR40) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during 
the Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541) or Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200-
1400).
    In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Gene Thompson site (3BR122) in Bradley County, 
AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects 
were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Gene Thompson site 
(3BR122) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during 
the Woodland Period (650 B.C.-A.D. 950).
    In 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Bangs Slough site (3CA3) in Calhoun County, AR. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Bangs Slough site (3CA3) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Coles 
Creek culture (A.D. 700-1000).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Keller site (3CA13) in Calhoun 
County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Keller site 
(3CA13) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during 
the Coles Creek culture (A.D. 700-1000).
    In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals 
were recovered from the Powell Canal site (3CH14) in Chicot County, AR. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Powell Canal site 
(3CH14) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during 
the Baytown Period (A.D. 400-700).
    In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Bunker Black Plantation site (3CH25) in Chicot 
County, AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Bunker Black 
Plantation site (3CH25) indicate that these human remains were probably 
buried during the Woodland Period (650 B.C.-A.D. 950).
    In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals 
were recovered from the McArthur site (3CH49) in Chicot County, AR. No 
known individuals were identified. The 8 associated funerary objects 
include 1 shell tempered bowl, 1 mussel shell fragment, 2 clay beads, 1 
fragmentary Manchac jar, 1 reconstructed bowl, 1 turtle carapace, and 1 
clay ball (70-386). Diagnostic artifacts found at the McArther site 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200-1400).
    In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Hunter site (3CH135) in Chicot County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Hunter site (3CH135) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Possum Trap or Coon Bayou site 
(3DE37) in Desha County, AR. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the Possum Trap or Coon Bayou site (3DE37) indicate that these human 
remains were probably buried during the Marksville Period (100 B.C.-
A.D. 400).
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the R.H. Wolfe site (3DR1) in Drew County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the R.H. Wolfe site (3DR1) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Taylor Mounds site (3DR2) in Drew 
County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 1981. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the Taylor Mounds site (3DR2) indicate that these human remains were 
probably buried during the Marksville Period (100 B.C.-A.D. 400).
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Tillar Farms site (3DR30) in Drew County, AR. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Tillar Farms site (3DR30) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were recovered from the Tillar site (3DR49) in Drew County, 
AR. These individuals were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey 
in 1982 and 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Tillar 
site (3DR49) indicate that these human remains were probably buried 
during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    In 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Austin site (3DR50) in Drew County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. The two associated artifacts include 
two clay pipes (72-153-1, -4). Diagnostic artifacts found at the Austin 
site (3DR50) indicate that these human remains were probably buried 
during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals 
were recovered from the McClendon site (3DR144) in Drew County, AR. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the McClendon site (3DR144) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the McClendon site (3DR144) in Drew 
County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 1982. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the McClendon site (3DR144) indicate that these human remains were 
probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Land's End site (3DR184) in Drew County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Land's End site (3DR184) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Early 
Mississippi Period (A.D. 700-1000).
    In 1982 and 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Cherry site (3DR190) in Drew County, 
AR. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects 
were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Cherry site (3DR190) 
indicate that these human remains were

[[Page 11636]]

probably buried during the Tillar Complex (A.D. 1400-1700).
    In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Dark Dirt Site (3DR191) in Drew County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Dark Dirt site (3DR191) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Bartholomew Phase (1200-1400 A.D.).
    In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Lone Holly site (3DR196) in Drew County, AR. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Lone Holly site (3DR196) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Bartholomew Phase (A.D. 1200-1400).
    In 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, 133 individuals 
were recovered from the Ables Creek site (3DR214) in Drew County, AR. 
No known individuals were identified. The 82 funerary objects include 1 
Barton Incised var. Togo jar, 1 Mississippi Plain bottle, 1 Winterville 
Incised bottle, 63 shell beads, 1 Mississippi Plain bottle neck, 1 
Mississippi Plain var. Birch bottle, 1 polishing stone, 1 sheet of 
Mica, 1 squirrel skeleton, 1 unidentified incised bottle, 1 Barton 
Incised jar with mussel shell, 1 bone awl, 1 Mississippi Plain bowl, 2 
bone hair pins, 1 shell pendant, 1 Winterville Incised small saucer, 1 
Mississippi Plain seed jar, 1 Winterville Incised bottle, and 1 
preform. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Ables Creek site (3DR214) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Mississippi Period (A.D. 950-1541).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from an unknown location in Drew County, AR. 
These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey 
in 1969. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Drew County, AR, 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.-A.D. 1541).
    In 1967 and 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were recovered from the Paw-Paw site (3OU22) in Ouachita 
County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Paw-
Paw site (3OU22) indicate that these human remains were probably buried 
during the Archaic Period (9500-650 B.C.) or Fourche Maline Tradition 
(800 B.C.-A.D. 900).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from an unknown location in Union County, AR. 
These human remains were donated to the Arkansas Archeological Survey 
in 1985. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in Union County, AR, 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.-A.D. 1541).
    In 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were recovered from the Locust Ridge site (3UN8) in Union County, AR. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Locust Ridge site 
(3UN8) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during 
the Baytown (A.D. 400-700) or Coles Creek Period (A.D. 700-1000).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Watts Field site (3UN22) in Union 
County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 1973. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the Watts Field site (3UN22) in Union County, AR, indicate that these 
human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period 
(11,650 B.C.-A.D. 1541).
    In 1972 and 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 
individuals were recovered from the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) in Union 
County, AR. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the 
Shallow Lake site (3UN52) indicate that these human remains were 
probably buried during the Coles Creek Period (A.D. 700-1000).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) in Union 
County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the Shallow Lake site (3UN52) in Union County, AR, indicate that these 
human remains were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period 
(11,650 B.C.-A.D. 1541).
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from an unknown location in Drew County or 
Chicot County, AR. These human remains were donated to the Arkansas 
Archeological Survey in 1985. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects were present. Diagnostic artifacts found in 
Drew County and Chicot County, AR, indicate that these human remains 
were probably buried during the Prehistoric Period (11,650 B.C.-A.D. 
1541).
    This notice includes a variety of terms commonly used in 
discussions of Arkansas archeology and the historical trajectories that 
gave rise to specific Native American communities identified in the 
historic record. Based on the archeological context for these sites and 
what is presently known about the peoples who pre-date the historic 
Tunica and occupied the sites listed in this notice, the Arkansas 
Archeological Society has determined the human remains listed in this 
notice are culturally affiliated with the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe.

Determinations Made by the Arkansas Archeological Survey

    Officials of the Arkansas Archeological Survey have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 269 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 105 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Tunica-
Biloxi Indian Tribe.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Dr. George Sabo, Director, Arkansas 
Archeological Survey, 2475 North Hatch Avenue, Fayetteville, AR 72704, 
telephone (479) 575-3556, by March 27, 2017. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Tunica-Biloxi 
Indian Tribe may proceed.

[[Page 11637]]

    The Arkansas Archeological Survey is responsible for notifying the 
Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe that this notice has been published.

    Dated: January 27, 2017.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2017-03615 Filed 2-23-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P