Notice of Proposed Addition of Thermal Features Within Valles Caldera National Preserve to the Geothermal Steam Act List of Significant Thermal Features Within Units of the National Park System, 95632-95639 [2016-31270]

Download as PDF 95632 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices (NCA) Advisory Council (Council) will meet as indicated below. The meeting will be held February 22, 2017. Any adjustments to this meeting will be advertised on the Dominguez-Escalante NCA RMP Web site: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/ resource-advisory-council/near-you/ colorado/dominguez-escalante-nca-ac. DATES: The meeting will be held at the Mesa County Central Services Building, 200 S. Spruce St., Room 40, Grand Junction, CO 81501. ADDRESSES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Collin Ewing, Advisory Council Designated Federal Official, 2815 H Road, Grand Junction, CO 81506. Phone: (970) 244–3049. Email: cewing@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1–800– 877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. The 10member Council advises the Secretary of the Interior, through the BLM, on a variety of planning and management issues associated with the Resource Management Plan (RMP) process for the Dominguez-Escalante NCA and Dominguez Canyon Wilderness. Topics of discussion during the meeting may include priorities for the RMP and travel plan. These meetings are open to the public. The public may present written comments to the Council. Time will be allocated at the middle and end of each meeting to hear public comments. Depending on the number of persons wishing to comment and time available, the time for individual, oral comments may be limited at the discretion of the chair. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Ruth Welch, BLM Colorado State Director. [FR Doc. 2016–31374 Filed 12–27–16; 8:45 am] sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES BILLING CODE 4310–JB–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–GRD–22583; GPO Deposit Account 4311–H2] Notice of Proposed Addition of Thermal Features Within Valles Caldera National Preserve to the Geothermal Steam Act List of Significant Thermal Features Within Units of the National Park System National Park Service, Interior. Notice of proposal. AGENCY: ACTION: The National Park Service (NPS) is publishing for public review and comment a proposal that the Department of the Interior (Department) designate the thermal features within Valles Caldera National Preserve (Preserve), New Mexico, as ‘‘significant thermal features,’’ and that they be added to the list of significant thermal features within units of the National Park System, in accordance with the Geothermal Steam Act (the Act), as amended. The Act requires that those thermal features in units of the National Park System that are determined to be significant, and included in or added to the list at 30 U.S.C. 1026, must be protected from any geothermal leasing, exploration, development or utilization that might adversely affect those features. SUMMARY: Comments must be received on or before January 27, 2017 to be assured of receiving consideration. After considering all comments received, the NPS will issue a final notice of the Department’s determination in the Federal Register. Copies of public comments received in response to this Notice will be available for public review according to the specifications of the final notice. ADDRESSES: Submit comments to the PEPC Web site at https:// parkplanning.nps.gov/vallego. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Julia F. Brunner, Policy and Regulatory Specialist, Geologic Resources Division, National Park Service, P.O. Box 25287, Lakewood CO 80225–0287; telephone 303–969–2012. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Geothermal Steam Act (the Act), as amended, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) to issue geothermal leases for exploration, development and utilization of geothermal resources on available public lands administered by the Department of the Interior, as well as on federal lands administered by the Department of Agriculture, and on lands DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 that have been conveyed by the United States subject to a reservation to the United States of the geothermal resources in those lands. 30 U.S.C. 1002. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administers the geothermal program pursuant to its regulations at 43 CFR parts 3000, 3200, and 3280. On federal lands managed by the Agriculture Department or used for a federal water power project, the BLM must first obtain the consent of the Secretary of Agriculture or Secretary of Energy, respectively, before it may issue any leases for geothermal resources underlying those lands. See 30 U.S.C. 1014(b). The Act does not make lands administered by the NPS subject to geothermal leasing, thereby prohibiting geothermal leasing in park units (30 U.S.C. 1002, 1014(c)). In addition, the Valles Caldera National Preserve has been expressly withdrawn from the operation of the geothermal leasing laws. 16 U.S.C. 698v–11(b)(9). The Act requires the Secretary to maintain a list of significant thermal features within units of the National Park System (30 U.S.C. 1026(a)). For those listed significant thermal features, the Act requires: (1) The Secretary to maintain a monitoring program, including a research program carried out by NPS in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (30 U.S.C. 1026(b)); (2) the Secretary to determine, on the basis of scientific evidence, and subject to notice and public comment, whether exploration, development, or utilization of the land subject to a lease application would be reasonably likely to result in a significant adverse effect on any listed feature and, if so, not to issue the lease (30 U.S.C. 1026(c)); (3) the Secretary to determine, on the basis of scientific evidence, whether the exploration, development, or utilization of the land subject to a lease or drilling permit is reasonably likely to adversely affect any listed features and, if so, to include stipulations in the lease or drilling permit to protect those features (30 U.S.C. 1026(d)); (4) the Secretary of Agriculture to consider the effects on significant thermal features within units of the National Park System in determining whether to consent to leasing on national forest lands or other lands administered by the Department of Agriculture (30 U.S.C. 1026(e)). The Act lists sixteen park units as having significant thermal features, and the Act also authorizes the Secretary to add significant thermal features within park units to the list after notice and public comment (see 30 U.S.C. 1026(a)). E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES With regard to the proposed designation of the thermal features within Valles Caldera, it is instructive to briefly review the earlier law and Federal Register notices on which the provisions of the Act, which are described above, were based. In 1986, the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, Pub. L. 99–591, Section 115 paragraph 2(a) (the 1986 Act) directed the Secretary to collect and publish in the Federal Register, within 120 days, a proposed list of significant thermal features within park units, and provided a preliminary list of 22 park units. The 1986 Act required four criteria to be applied to each thermal feature when making an overall determination of significance. These four criteria were: (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness, (2) Scientific and geologic significance, (3) The extent to which such features remain in a natural, undisturbed condition, and (4) Significance of thermal features to the authorized purposes for which the park unit was created. The Department designated the NPS as the lead agency to prepare and publish the list. On February 13, 1987, as directed by the 1986 Act, the NPS published a Notice of the Proposed List of Significant Thermal Features within Units of the National Park System (52 FR 4700). After receiving 23 comments on the February 1987 notice, the NPS published the final list on August 3, 1987 (52 FR 28790), concluding that 13 park units contained significant thermal features. The 1988 Act subsequently listed these 13 park units, as well as three additional park units, as containing significant thermal features (30 U.S.C. 1001(f)). VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 In the process of designating the significant thermal features pursuant to the 1986 Act, the NPS defined a ‘‘thermal feature’’ broadly as ‘‘surface manifestations of a subsurface heat source’’ (see 52 FR 29890, 28792 (Aug. 3, 1987)) or ‘‘subsurface thermal activity’’ (see 52 FR 4700, 4702 (Feb. 13, 1987)). The NPS’s 1987 definition of ‘‘thermal feature’’ encompassed not only the surface manifestations of underlying hydrothermal systems, but also surface manifestations of volcanic processes (see 52 FR 29890, 28792). When listing various thermal features, the NPS categorized them as ‘‘hydrothermal’’ or ‘‘volcanic’’ to indicate the surface manifestation resulting from differing types of subsurface thermal activity, systems or features, although this description did not affect the significance of any particular feature (see id.; 53 FR 4700, 4702). More recently, the NPS has defined ‘‘thermal resources’’ as comprising a subsurface heat source, heat conduit rock formations, and air and/or water that circulates through the formation and may discharge at the surface; such resources create features such as geysers, hot springs, mudpots, fumaroles, unique/rare mineral precipitates and formations, and hydrophilic biotic communities (NPS Management Policies § 4.8.2.3)(2006)). To be consistent with both the 1987 and the 2006 definitions, the NPS proposes in this notice to define ‘‘thermal feature’’ as the surface manifestation of subsurface thermal resources, systems, or activity, and to use the words ‘‘hydrothermal’’ and ‘‘volcanic’’ as a simple description of the type of underlying thermal activity that resulted in how the feature appears on the earth’s surface. For the purpose of this notice, the NPS also proposes to remain consistent PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 95633 with both of its 1987 interpretations of the four significance criteria as follows: (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness—NPS does not establish lower or upper limits on the size or extent of a feature. Each feature is identified according to its existing surface dimensions. For a feature to be considered significant under this criterion, it is identified as unique to the region, the nation, or, in some cases, the world. (2) Scientific and geologic significance—NPS considers the feature ‘‘significant’’ when the feature has been identified as contributing to geologic, biological, or other scientific knowledge compared with similar features in other areas or makes a significant contribution to the understanding of similar systems. (3) The extent to which such features remain in a natural, undisturbed condition—Under this criterion, no limits are established for amount or degree of development. The feature may be significant if it remains in a natural, relatively undisturbed condition. Modifications or improvements may be acceptable if: The alterations were necessary to preserve a developed feature; modifications intended to accommodate or improve public enjoyment of the feature are judged to be consistent or compatible with the intent of the enabling legislation; and so long as disturbances or developments, if any, have not affected the subsurface thermal regime. (4) Significance of thermal features to the authorized purposes for which the park unit was created—NPS considers features significant if they were the basis for establishment of the unit (i.e., the feature was specifically identified in the enabling legislation) or if they are consistent with the statutory purposes for which the area was set aside (see 52 FR at 28793). E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices Proposal sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Valles Caldera National Preserve was added as a unit of the National Park System on December 19, 2014. This unit includes the vast majority of the caldera itself, which is hereby proposed for addition to the list of significant thermal features as a single volcanic feature. Excepted from this proposal is the portion of the caldera (10–15%) which VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 lies outside the Preserve’s western and southern boundaries (see Figure 1). The subsurface heat that remains of this volcanic activity allows meteoric waters percolating down from the surface to become heated, which is expressed at the surface in several places within and in the vicinity of the caldera in the form of hydrologic hot springs or, in dry seasons, fumaroles or steam vents. The Preserve contains numerous thermal PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 features (single or grouped contiguous features such as hot spring pools) in four geographic areas containing surface waters (Redondo Creek, Alamo Canyon, Sulphur Creek Canyon, and San Antonio Creek), as well as seasonal fumaroles and acid ponds or springs. These thermal features are also separately proposed for inclusion to the list as significant thermal (hydrothermal) features. E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 EN28DE16.011</GPH> 95634 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices 95635 VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 EN28DE16.013</GPH> Figure 3. Block diagram sho\>.~ng three-dimensional low velocity seismic anomalies beneath Valles Caldera (modified from Steck et Note that north is to the left and the displayed depth is from 2.0 to 39.0 km. Warmer colors indicate increasing seismic delay (slower seismic velocity). A partially solidified magma exists beneath the southwest sector of the caldera at 7 to 15 lm1 depth (Aprea et al. EN28DE16.012</GPH> sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Figure 2. Map of the Valles Caldera National Preserve in relation to the entire caldera and the Jemez River Valley (San Diego Canyon), showing the boundary of the designated signifir;mt thermal volcanic feature. Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Caldera Thermal Feature The Department proposes to list the entirety of the caldera that lies within Valles Caldera National Preserve as one significant thermal feature. The Preserve’s thermal feature is part of a geothermal landscape that extends beyond the Preserve’s perimeter boundary; thermal features located outside the Preserve’s perimeter VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 boundary are not included in this proposed designation (Fig. 2). The magma chamber beneath the Preserve is located under the southwest portion of the caldera (Fig. 3), with surface expressions of thermal features primarily in the vicinity of Redondo Canyon, Sulphur Creek Canyon, and Alamo Canyon. A total of 29 geothermal fumaroles have been mapped in these PO 00000 Frm 00082 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 canyons (Fig. 4), and others may exist in other areas of the Preserve that have not yet been surveyed (Goff and Goff, 2017). Currently, approximately 1⁄3 of the Preserve has been surveyed. In addition, a detailed geologic and hydrologic GIS map has been developed. See http:// geoinfo.nmt.edu/repository/data/2011/ 20110002/GM-79_mapsheet.pdf. (Fig. 5). E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 EN28DE16.014</GPH> 95636 The following significance criteria have been analyzed and are applicable to every component of the caldera feature and volcanic system within the Preserve. (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness: The approximately 89,000-acre Preserve encompasses a 1.25 million year-old dormant volcanic caldera (13.7 miles in diameter) that lies in the center of the Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico. The youngest post-caldera volcanic eruption (Banco Bonito Rhyolite lava flow) occurred about 68 thousand years ago. The Valles Caldera that formed 1.25 million years ago is the younger of two calderas within the Preserve, and lies to the southwest of the comparably sized but now nearly imperceptible Toledo Caldera (1.62 Ma; Fig. 6). Each caldera produced about 95 mi3 (400 km3) of ash flow tuff collectively known as the Bandelier Tuff. Numerous geothermal features occur throughout the Jemez Mountains. The Preserve does not encompass the entirety of the Valles Caldera depression VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 itself—a portion of the northwestern caldera lies outside the boundary of the park unit to the west and south of the Preserve, in the Santa Fe National Forest. The subsurface volcanic heat anomaly or thermal system similarly extends outside of the park unit to the west. (2) Scientific and geologic significance: Water, steam, and soil samples from these sites have been and continue to be collected by scientists conducting geothermal and planetary research, and by scientists searching for living organisms in extreme environments. Because of its geologic uniqueness, NPS staff will use this area for public education, as the site illustrates the exceptional geologic values of the Jemez Mountains—sulfuric acid fumaroles and mud pots, and chloride-bicarbonate hot springs and cold springs—all characteristics of geologically active volcanic formations. PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 95637 (3) The extent to which the feature remains in a natural, undisturbed condition: The San Antonio Warm Springs and the Sulphur Springs-Alamo Canyon areas have been moderately to significantly disturbed by development (recreational structures, containment ponds, and other improvements as well as several geothermal exploration wells (drilled between 1970–1984), most of which have been permanently capped and reclaimed) that occurred prior to federal acquisition of the Preserve in 2000; however, such alterations have not changed the thermal regime. Other features, such as acid ponds and fumaroles, are undisturbed in natural habitats. Despite some past geothermal exploration and drilling, the caldera itself as a volcanic feature remains unaffected in the operation of its volcanic thermal regime, and thus remains in a natural, undisturbed condition. E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 EN28DE16.015</GPH> sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices 95638 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES (4) Significance of thermal features to the authorized purposes for which the park unit was created: Valles Caldera National Preserve was established ‘‘to protect, preserve, and restore the fish, wildlife, watershed, natural, scientific, scenic, geologic, historic, cultural, archaeological, and recreational values of the area’’ (Pub. L. 113–291, Sec. 3043(b)(1)). The caldera is an important natural and geologic resource, contributes to scientific understanding of the geology of the region, and also contributes to the other values for which this NPS unit was established. Conclusion: Because the Valles Caldera appears to meet all four criteria as a volcanic feature, the Department proposes to add it to the list of significant thermal features within the National Park System. Hydrothermal Features Like Yellowstone National Park, which is also a caldera, Valles Caldera National Preserve contains multiple hydrothermal features that are related to the magma source. In addition, the dynamic nature of this area means that additional hydrothermal features may develop over time. The NPS therefore proposes to list these hydrothermal features as one significant thermal feature. The following significance criteria have been analyzed for each feature listed and has been found to be applicable to each feature within the system. (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness: Size—The hydrothermal features within the Preserve are located on approximately 500 acres. Extent—(a) San Antonio Warm Spring is a single spring discharging potable hot water at 101 °F, over which 20thcentury ranchers built an enclosed concrete bath adjacent to a nearby cabin. This spring is located in the northcentral portion of the Preserve adjacent to the segment of the San Antonio Creek within the Valle San Antonio. (b) In addition, the Preserve has numerous hot and cold sulfuric acid fumaroles, particularly in the Alamo Canyon and Redondo Canyon regions. There are at least 29 fumaroles mapped in the Redondo and Alamo canyon areas; see Fig 2 and the map at: http:// geoinfo.nmt.edu/repository/data/2011/ 20110002/GM-79_mapsheet.pdf. Others may occur but have not been sampled or surveyed. (c) The 40-acre private inholding of Sulphur Springs contains the highest temperature hot springs (189 °F) in the state of New Mexico; the Sulphur Springs area includes at least 7 significant named hot springs, mud pots VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 and fumaroles, all of which are thermally anomalous; several other acid springs and gas vents are cold. The springs include such colorful descriptive names as Kidney and Stomach Trouble Spring, Footbath Spring, Ladies’ Bathhouse Spring, Laxitive [sic] Spring, Turkey Spring, Lemonade Spring, and Electric Spring. Some of these were historically referred to as Main Bathhouse Spring, Sour Spring, and Alum Spring. (d) Valle Grande spring: The easternmost named spring within the Preserve is the Valle Grande Spring (14 °C), although topographic maps indicate numerous other surrounding unnamed springs. Uniqueness—These springs and fumaroles (some of which take the form of bubbling mudpots in wet seasons) are indicators of subsurface thermal processes, are unique to the region, and are easily accessible for study and research; there are no comparable features in the State of New Mexico. The only other places in the United States that have such systems are Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho; Lassen Volcano, the Long Valley Caldera, and The Geysers in California, the latter two having thermal regimes degraded by geothermal production; and a very small system at Dixie Valley, Nevada. (2) Scientific and geologic significance: Water, steam, and soil samples from these sites have been and continue to be collected by scientists conducting geothermal and planetary research, and by scientists searching for living organisms in extreme environments. Because of its geologic uniqueness, NPS staff will use this area for public education, as the site illustrates the exceptional geologic values of the Jemez Mountains—sulfuric acid fumaroles, mud pots, hot springs, cold springs—all characteristics of geologically active volcanic formations. (3) The extent to which the feature remains in a natural, undisturbed condition: San Antonio Warm Spring has been slightly to moderately disturbed by construction of recreational structures such as a cabin and a containment ponds that occurred prior to federal acquisition of the Preserve in 2000, but these were constructed to support the recreational use of the feature. However, such alterations have not changed the thermal regime. The overall hydrothermal system activity and temperature thus remains unchanged and in a natural, undisturbed state. The Sulphur Springs-Alamo Canyon areas were moderately to significantly disturbed by development (recreational PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 structures, containment ponds, and other improvements as well as several geothermal exploration wells (drilled between 1970–1984); however, such alterations have not changed the thermal regime. Other features, including the Redondo Creek fumaroles (steam vents in dry season and mud pots or minor springs in wet seasons) are undisturbed in natural habitats. The overall hydrothermal system remains unchanged because it was never subjected to full-scale commercial development. (4) Significance of the feature to the authorized purposes for which the unit was created: Valles Caldera National Preserve was established ‘‘to protect, preserve, and restore the fish, wildlife, watershed, natural, scientific, scenic, geologic, historic, cultural, archaeological, and recreational values of the area’’ (Pub. L. 113–291, Sec. 3043(b)(1) (emphasis added)). While the Act does not specifically refer to hydrothermal features or their use by the public among the criteria for which the park unit was created, the presence and preservation of such features as surface expressions of the subsurface volcanic activity is consistent with the purposes and uses of which the park was created. The hydrothermal features are important geologic resources associated with the Preserve and the Jemez Mountains, contribute to scientific understanding of the geology of the region, and also contribute to the other values for which this system unit was established. Conclusion: Because the hydrothermal system at Valles Caldera appears to meet all four criteria, the Department proposes to add it to the list of significant thermal features within the National Park System. Once designated, the NPS will continue to work closely with the BLM and the U.S. Forest Service to ensure that monitoring data and other scientific information regarding the significant thermal features of Valles Caldera National Preserve are incorporated into leasing and permitting decisions. References Aprea, M., Hildebrande, S., Fehler, M., Steck, L., Baldridge, W., Roberts, P, Thurber, C., Lutter, W., (2002). Three-dimensional Kirchhoff migration: Imaging of the Jemez volcanic field using teleseismic data: Journal of Geophysical Research v. 107, p. 2247–2262. Gardner, J.N., Goff, F., Kelley, S., and Jacobs, E. (2010) Rhyolites and associated deposits of the Valles-Toledo caldera complex. New Mexico Geology, v. 32, p. 3–18. Goff, F. (2009) Valles Caldera: A Geologic History. University of New Mexico Press, E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 249 / Wednesday, December 28, 2016 / Notices Albuquerque, New Mexico. Goff, F., and Goff, C.J., In Press (2016–17), Overview of the Valles Caldera (Baca) geothermal system, New Mexico, in (McLemore, V.T. and Timmons, S., eds.) Energy and Mineral Resources of New Mexico. New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, Special Publication 13, 50 pages, with 5 tables, 1 appendix, and 40 figures. Goff, F. (2002). ‘‘Geothermal Potential of Valles Caldera, New Mexico.’’ GHC Bulletin, December 2002. Goff, F. and Grigsby, C. (1982). Valles Caldera Geothermal Systems, New Mexico, USA. Journal of Hydrology, 56 (1982) pp. 119– 136. Geologic Map of the Jemez mountains, Valles Caldera (2011). http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/ repository/data/2011/20110002/GM-79_ mapsheet.pdf. http://en.openei.org/wiki/ Valles_Caldera--Sulphur_Springs_ Geothermal_Area/#Regional Setting. Trainer, F.W.; Rogers, R.J., and M.L. Sorey, 2000. ‘‘Geothermal Hydrology of Valles Caldera and the Southwestern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico.’’ U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Investigation report 00–4067, 115 pp. www.hotspringsenthusiast.com/ newmexico.asp. Dated: December 19, 2016. Michael Bean, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 2016–31270 Filed 12–27–16; 8:45 am] By order of the Commission. Issued: December 22, 2016. Lisa R. Barton, Secretary to the Commission. BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION BILLING CODE 7020–02–P JUDICIAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and China Hearings of the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure Determination On the basis of the record 1 developed in the subject five-year reviews, the United States International Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) determines, pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’), that revocation of the countervailing duty order on heavy iron construction castings from Brazil, the antidumping duty order on heavy iron construction castings from Canada, and the antidumping duty orders on iron construction castings from Brazil and China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to industries in the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time. Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Judicial Conference of the United States. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of public hearing. AGENCY: The following public hearing on proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure has been canceled: Appellate Rules Hearing on January 20, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. Announcement for this meeting was previously published in 81 FR 52713. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rebecca A. Womeldorf, Rules Committee Secretary, Rules Committee SUMMARY: Support Office, Administrative Office of the United States Courts, Washington, DC 20544, telephone (202) 502–1820. Dated: December 22, 2016. Rebecca A. Womeldorf, Rules Committee Secretary. [FR Doc. 2016–31349 Filed 12–27–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 2210–55–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration [Docket No. DEA–392] Bulk Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Application: AMRI Rensselaer, Inc. ACTION: Notice of application. Registered bulk manufacturers of the affected basic classes, and applicants therefore, may file written comments on or objections to the issuance of the proposed registration in accordance with 21 CFR 1301.33(a) on or before February 27, 2017. ADDRESSES: Written comments should be sent to: Drug Enforcement Administration, Attention: DEA Federal Register Representative/DRW, 8701 Morrissette Drive, Springfield, Virginia 22152. DATES: The Attorney General has delegated her authority under the Controlled Substances Act to the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), 28 CFR 0.100(b). Authority to exercise all necessary functions with respect to the promulgation and implementation of 21 CFR part 1301, incident to the registration of manufacturers, distributors, dispensers, importers, and exporters of controlled substances (other than final orders in connection with suspension, denial, or revocation of registration) has been redelegated to the Deputy Assistant Administrator of the DEA Office of Diversion Control (‘‘Deputy Assistant Administrator’’) pursuant to section 7 of 28 CFR part 0, appendix to subpart R. In accordance with 21 CFR 1301.33(a), this is notice that on September 26, 2016, AMRI Rensselaer, Inc., 33 Riverside Avenue, Rensselaer, New York 12144 applied to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: [FR Doc. 2016–31335 Filed 12–27–16; 8:45 am] [Investigation Nos. 701–TA–249 and 731– TA–262, 263, and 265 (Fourth Review)] sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Background The Commission, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)), instituted these reviews on October 1, 2015 (80 FR 59192) and determined on January 4, 2016 that it would conduct full reviews (81 FR 1967, January 14, 2016). Notice of the scheduling of the Commission’s reviews and of a public hearing to be held in connection therewith was given by posting copies of the notice in the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on June 23, 2016 (81 FR 40921). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on October 20, 2016, and all persons who requested the opportunity were permitted to appear in person or by counsel. The Commission made these determinations pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)). It completed and filed its determinations in these reviews on December 21, 2016. The views of the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4655 (December 2016), entitled Iron Construction Castings from Brazil, Canada, and China: Investigation Nos. 701–TA–249 and 731–TA–262, 263, and 265 (Fourth Review). 1 The record is defined in sec. 207.2(f) of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 207.2(f)). VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:54 Dec 27, 2016 Jkt 241001 PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 95639 E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 249 (Wednesday, December 28, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 95632-95639]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-31270]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-GRD-22583; GPO Deposit Account 4311-H2]


Notice of Proposed Addition of Thermal Features Within Valles 
Caldera National Preserve to the Geothermal Steam Act List of 
Significant Thermal Features Within Units of the National Park System

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of proposal.

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SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) is publishing for public 
review and comment a proposal that the Department of the Interior 
(Department) designate the thermal features within Valles Caldera 
National Preserve (Preserve), New Mexico, as ``significant thermal 
features,'' and that they be added to the list of significant thermal 
features within units of the National Park System, in accordance with 
the Geothermal Steam Act (the Act), as amended. The Act requires that 
those thermal features in units of the National Park System that are 
determined to be significant, and included in or added to the list at 
30 U.S.C. 1026, must be protected from any geothermal leasing, 
exploration, development or utilization that might adversely affect 
those features.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before January 27, 2017 to be 
assured of receiving consideration. After considering all comments 
received, the NPS will issue a final notice of the Department's 
determination in the Federal Register. Copies of public comments 
received in response to this Notice will be available for public review 
according to the specifications of the final notice.

ADDRESSES: Submit comments to the PEPC Web site at https://parkplanning.nps.gov/vallego.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Julia F. Brunner, Policy and 
Regulatory Specialist, Geologic Resources Division, National Park 
Service, P.O. Box 25287, Lakewood CO 80225-0287; telephone 303-969-
2012.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Geothermal Steam Act (the Act), as 
amended, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) to issue 
geothermal leases for exploration, development and utilization of 
geothermal resources on available public lands administered by the 
Department of the Interior, as well as on federal lands administered by 
the Department of Agriculture, and on lands that have been conveyed by 
the United States subject to a reservation to the United States of the 
geothermal resources in those lands. 30 U.S.C. 1002. The Bureau of Land 
Management (BLM) administers the geothermal program pursuant to its 
regulations at 43 CFR parts 3000, 3200, and 3280. On federal lands 
managed by the Agriculture Department or used for a federal water power 
project, the BLM must first obtain the consent of the Secretary of 
Agriculture or Secretary of Energy, respectively, before it may issue 
any leases for geothermal resources underlying those lands. See 30 
U.S.C. 1014(b).
    The Act does not make lands administered by the NPS subject to 
geothermal leasing, thereby prohibiting geothermal leasing in park 
units (30 U.S.C. 1002, 1014(c)). In addition, the Valles Caldera 
National Preserve has been expressly withdrawn from the operation of 
the geothermal leasing laws. 16 U.S.C. 698v-11(b)(9).
    The Act requires the Secretary to maintain a list of significant 
thermal features within units of the National Park System (30 U.S.C. 
1026(a)). For those listed significant thermal features, the Act 
requires:
    (1) The Secretary to maintain a monitoring program, including a 
research program carried out by NPS in cooperation with the U.S. 
Geological Survey (30 U.S.C. 1026(b));
    (2) the Secretary to determine, on the basis of scientific 
evidence, and subject to notice and public comment, whether 
exploration, development, or utilization of the land subject to a lease 
application would be reasonably likely to result in a significant 
adverse effect on any listed feature and, if so, not to issue the lease 
(30 U.S.C. 1026(c));
    (3) the Secretary to determine, on the basis of scientific 
evidence, whether the exploration, development, or utilization of the 
land subject to a lease or drilling permit is reasonably likely to 
adversely affect any listed features and, if so, to include 
stipulations in the lease or drilling permit to protect those features 
(30 U.S.C. 1026(d));
    (4) the Secretary of Agriculture to consider the effects on 
significant thermal features within units of the National Park System 
in determining whether to consent to leasing on national forest lands 
or other lands administered by the Department of Agriculture (30 U.S.C. 
1026(e)).
    The Act lists sixteen park units as having significant thermal 
features, and the Act also authorizes the Secretary to add significant 
thermal features within park units to the list after notice and public 
comment (see 30 U.S.C. 1026(a)).

[[Page 95633]]

With regard to the proposed designation of the thermal features within 
Valles Caldera, it is instructive to briefly review the earlier law and 
Federal Register notices on which the provisions of the Act, which are 
described above, were based.
    In 1986, the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, Pub. L. 99-591, Section 115 paragraph 2(a) (the 
1986 Act) directed the Secretary to collect and publish in the Federal 
Register, within 120 days, a proposed list of significant thermal 
features within park units, and provided a preliminary list of 22 park 
units. The 1986 Act required four criteria to be applied to each 
thermal feature when making an overall determination of significance. 
These four criteria were:
    (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness,
    (2) Scientific and geologic significance,
    (3) The extent to which such features remain in a natural, 
undisturbed condition, and
    (4) Significance of thermal features to the authorized purposes for 
which the park unit was created.
    The Department designated the NPS as the lead agency to prepare and 
publish the list. On February 13, 1987, as directed by the 1986 Act, 
the NPS published a Notice of the Proposed List of Significant Thermal 
Features within Units of the National Park System (52 FR 4700). After 
receiving 23 comments on the February 1987 notice, the NPS published 
the final list on August 3, 1987 (52 FR 28790), concluding that 13 park 
units contained significant thermal features. The 1988 Act subsequently 
listed these 13 park units, as well as three additional park units, as 
containing significant thermal features (30 U.S.C. 1001(f)).
    In the process of designating the significant thermal features 
pursuant to the 1986 Act, the NPS defined a ``thermal feature'' broadly 
as ``surface manifestations of a subsurface heat source'' (see 52 FR 
29890, 28792 (Aug. 3, 1987)) or ``subsurface thermal activity'' (see 52 
FR 4700, 4702 (Feb. 13, 1987)). The NPS's 1987 definition of ``thermal 
feature'' encompassed not only the surface manifestations of underlying 
hydrothermal systems, but also surface manifestations of volcanic 
processes (see 52 FR 29890, 28792). When listing various thermal 
features, the NPS categorized them as ``hydrothermal'' or ``volcanic'' 
to indicate the surface manifestation resulting from differing types of 
subsurface thermal activity, systems or features, although this 
description did not affect the significance of any particular feature 
(see id.; 53 FR 4700, 4702).
    More recently, the NPS has defined ``thermal resources'' as 
comprising a subsurface heat source, heat conduit rock formations, and 
air and/or water that circulates through the formation and may 
discharge at the surface; such resources create features such as 
geysers, hot springs, mudpots, fumaroles, unique/rare mineral 
precipitates and formations, and hydrophilic biotic communities (NPS 
Management Policies Sec.  4.8.2.3)(2006)). To be consistent with both 
the 1987 and the 2006 definitions, the NPS proposes in this notice to 
define ``thermal feature'' as the surface manifestation of subsurface 
thermal resources, systems, or activity, and to use the words 
``hydrothermal'' and ``volcanic'' as a simple description of the type 
of underlying thermal activity that resulted in how the feature appears 
on the earth's surface.
    For the purpose of this notice, the NPS also proposes to remain 
consistent with both of its 1987 interpretations of the four 
significance criteria as follows:
    (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness--NPS does not establish lower or 
upper limits on the size or extent of a feature. Each feature is 
identified according to its existing surface dimensions. For a feature 
to be considered significant under this criterion, it is identified as 
unique to the region, the nation, or, in some cases, the world.
    (2) Scientific and geologic significance--NPS considers the feature 
``significant'' when the feature has been identified as contributing to 
geologic, biological, or other scientific knowledge compared with 
similar features in other areas or makes a significant contribution to 
the understanding of similar systems.
    (3) The extent to which such features remain in a natural, 
undisturbed condition--Under this criterion, no limits are established 
for amount or degree of development. The feature may be significant if 
it remains in a natural, relatively undisturbed condition. 
Modifications or improvements may be acceptable if: The alterations 
were necessary to preserve a developed feature; modifications intended 
to accommodate or improve public enjoyment of the feature are judged to 
be consistent or compatible with the intent of the enabling 
legislation; and so long as disturbances or developments, if any, have 
not affected the subsurface thermal regime.
    (4) Significance of thermal features to the authorized purposes for 
which the park unit was created--NPS considers features significant if 
they were the basis for establishment of the unit (i.e., the feature 
was specifically identified in the enabling legislation) or if they are 
consistent with the statutory purposes for which the area was set aside 
(see 52 FR at 28793).

[[Page 95634]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN28DE16.011

Proposal

    Valles Caldera National Preserve was added as a unit of the 
National Park System on December 19, 2014. This unit includes the vast 
majority of the caldera itself, which is hereby proposed for addition 
to the list of significant thermal features as a single volcanic 
feature. Excepted from this proposal is the portion of the caldera (10-
15%) which lies outside the Preserve's western and southern boundaries 
(see Figure 1). The subsurface heat that remains of this volcanic 
activity allows meteoric waters percolating down from the surface to 
become heated, which is expressed at the surface in several places 
within and in the vicinity of the caldera in the form of hydrologic hot 
springs or, in dry seasons, fumaroles or steam vents. The Preserve 
contains numerous thermal features (single or grouped contiguous 
features such as hot spring pools) in four geographic areas containing 
surface waters (Redondo Creek, Alamo Canyon, Sulphur Creek Canyon, and 
San Antonio Creek), as well as seasonal fumaroles and acid ponds or 
springs. These thermal features are also separately proposed for 
inclusion to the list as significant thermal (hydrothermal) features.

[[Page 95635]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN28DE16.012

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN28DE16.013


[[Page 95636]]



Caldera Thermal Feature

    The Department proposes to list the entirety of the caldera that 
lies within Valles Caldera National Preserve as one significant thermal 
feature. The Preserve's thermal feature is part of a geothermal 
landscape that extends beyond the Preserve's perimeter boundary; 
thermal features located outside the Preserve's perimeter boundary are 
not included in this proposed designation (Fig. 2). The magma chamber 
beneath the Preserve is located under the southwest portion of the 
caldera (Fig. 3), with surface expressions of thermal features 
primarily in the vicinity of Redondo Canyon, Sulphur Creek Canyon, and 
Alamo Canyon. A total of 29 geothermal fumaroles have been mapped in 
these canyons (Fig. 4), and others may exist in other areas of the 
Preserve that have not yet been surveyed (Goff and Goff, 2017). 
Currently, approximately \1/3\ of the Preserve has been surveyed. In 
addition, a detailed geologic and hydrologic GIS map has been 
developed. See http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/repository/data/2011/20110002/GM-79_mapsheet.pdf. (Fig. 5).
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN28DE16.014


[[Page 95637]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN28DE16.015

    The following significance criteria have been analyzed and are 
applicable to every component of the caldera feature and volcanic 
system within the Preserve.
    (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness:
    The approximately 89,000-acre Preserve encompasses a 1.25 million 
year-old dormant volcanic caldera (13.7 miles in diameter) that lies in 
the center of the Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico. The youngest 
post-caldera volcanic eruption (Banco Bonito Rhyolite lava flow) 
occurred about 68 thousand years ago. The Valles Caldera that formed 
1.25 million years ago is the younger of two calderas within the 
Preserve, and lies to the southwest of the comparably sized but now 
nearly imperceptible Toledo Caldera (1.62 Ma; Fig. 6). Each caldera 
produced about 95 mi\3\ (400 km\3\) of ash flow tuff collectively known 
as the Bandelier Tuff. Numerous geothermal features occur throughout 
the Jemez Mountains. The Preserve does not encompass the entirety of 
the Valles Caldera depression itself--a portion of the northwestern 
caldera lies outside the boundary of the park unit to the west and 
south of the Preserve, in the Santa Fe National Forest. The subsurface 
volcanic heat anomaly or thermal system similarly extends outside of 
the park unit to the west.
    (2) Scientific and geologic significance:
    Water, steam, and soil samples from these sites have been and 
continue to be collected by scientists conducting geothermal and 
planetary research, and by scientists searching for living organisms in 
extreme environments. Because of its geologic uniqueness, NPS staff 
will use this area for public education, as the site illustrates the 
exceptional geologic values of the Jemez Mountains--sulfuric acid 
fumaroles and mud pots, and chloride-bicarbonate hot springs and cold 
springs--all characteristics of geologically active volcanic 
formations.
    (3) The extent to which the feature remains in a natural, 
undisturbed condition:
    The San Antonio Warm Springs and the Sulphur Springs-Alamo Canyon 
areas have been moderately to significantly disturbed by development 
(recreational structures, containment ponds, and other improvements as 
well as several geothermal exploration wells (drilled between 1970-
1984), most of which have been permanently capped and reclaimed) that 
occurred prior to federal acquisition of the Preserve in 2000; however, 
such alterations have not changed the thermal regime. Other features, 
such as acid ponds and fumaroles, are undisturbed in natural habitats. 
Despite some past geothermal exploration and drilling, the caldera 
itself as a volcanic feature remains unaffected in the operation of its 
volcanic thermal regime, and thus remains in a natural, undisturbed 
condition.

[[Page 95638]]

    (4) Significance of thermal features to the authorized purposes for 
which the park unit was created:
    Valles Caldera National Preserve was established ``to protect, 
preserve, and restore the fish, wildlife, watershed, natural, 
scientific, scenic, geologic, historic, cultural, archaeological, and 
recreational values of the area'' (Pub. L. 113-291, Sec. 3043(b)(1)). 
The caldera is an important natural and geologic resource, contributes 
to scientific understanding of the geology of the region, and also 
contributes to the other values for which this NPS unit was 
established.
    Conclusion: Because the Valles Caldera appears to meet all four 
criteria as a volcanic feature, the Department proposes to add it to 
the list of significant thermal features within the National Park 
System.

Hydrothermal Features

    Like Yellowstone National Park, which is also a caldera, Valles 
Caldera National Preserve contains multiple hydrothermal features that 
are related to the magma source. In addition, the dynamic nature of 
this area means that additional hydrothermal features may develop over 
time. The NPS therefore proposes to list these hydrothermal features as 
one significant thermal feature. The following significance criteria 
have been analyzed for each feature listed and has been found to be 
applicable to each feature within the system.
    (1) Size, extent, and uniqueness:
    Size--The hydrothermal features within the Preserve are located on 
approximately 500 acres.
    Extent--(a) San Antonio Warm Spring is a single spring discharging 
potable hot water at 101[emsp14][deg]F, over which 20th-century 
ranchers built an enclosed concrete bath adjacent to a nearby cabin. 
This spring is located in the north-central portion of the Preserve 
adjacent to the segment of the San Antonio Creek within the Valle San 
Antonio.
    (b) In addition, the Preserve has numerous hot and cold sulfuric 
acid fumaroles, particularly in the Alamo Canyon and Redondo Canyon 
regions. There are at least 29 fumaroles mapped in the Redondo and 
Alamo canyon areas; see Fig 2 and the map at: http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/repository/data/2011/20110002/GM-79_mapsheet.pdf. Others may occur but 
have not been sampled or surveyed.
    (c) The 40-acre private inholding of Sulphur Springs contains the 
highest temperature hot springs (189[emsp14] [deg]F) in the state of 
New Mexico; the Sulphur Springs area includes at least 7 significant 
named hot springs, mud pots and fumaroles, all of which are thermally 
anomalous; several other acid springs and gas vents are cold. The 
springs include such colorful descriptive names as Kidney and Stomach 
Trouble Spring, Footbath Spring, Ladies' Bathhouse Spring, Laxitive 
[sic] Spring, Turkey Spring, Lemonade Spring, and Electric Spring. Some 
of these were historically referred to as Main Bathhouse Spring, Sour 
Spring, and Alum Spring.
    (d) Valle Grande spring: The easternmost named spring within the 
Preserve is the Valle Grande Spring (14 [deg]C), although topographic 
maps indicate numerous other surrounding unnamed springs.
    Uniqueness--These springs and fumaroles (some of which take the 
form of bubbling mudpots in wet seasons) are indicators of subsurface 
thermal processes, are unique to the region, and are easily accessible 
for study and research; there are no comparable features in the State 
of New Mexico. The only other places in the United States that have 
such systems are Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Montana, and 
Idaho; Lassen Volcano, the Long Valley Caldera, and The Geysers in 
California, the latter two having thermal regimes degraded by 
geothermal production; and a very small system at Dixie Valley, Nevada.
    (2) Scientific and geologic significance: Water, steam, and soil 
samples from these sites have been and continue to be collected by 
scientists conducting geothermal and planetary research, and by 
scientists searching for living organisms in extreme environments. 
Because of its geologic uniqueness, NPS staff will use this area for 
public education, as the site illustrates the exceptional geologic 
values of the Jemez Mountains--sulfuric acid fumaroles, mud pots, hot 
springs, cold springs--all characteristics of geologically active 
volcanic formations.
    (3) The extent to which the feature remains in a natural, 
undisturbed condition: San Antonio Warm Spring has been slightly to 
moderately disturbed by construction of recreational structures such as 
a cabin and a containment ponds that occurred prior to federal 
acquisition of the Preserve in 2000, but these were constructed to 
support the recreational use of the feature. However, such alterations 
have not changed the thermal regime. The overall hydrothermal system 
activity and temperature thus remains unchanged and in a natural, 
undisturbed state. The Sulphur Springs-Alamo Canyon areas were 
moderately to significantly disturbed by development (recreational 
structures, containment ponds, and other improvements as well as 
several geothermal exploration wells (drilled between 1970-1984); 
however, such alterations have not changed the thermal regime. Other 
features, including the Redondo Creek fumaroles (steam vents in dry 
season and mud pots or minor springs in wet seasons) are undisturbed in 
natural habitats. The overall hydrothermal system remains unchanged 
because it was never subjected to full-scale commercial development.
    (4) Significance of the feature to the authorized purposes for 
which the unit was created: Valles Caldera National Preserve was 
established ``to protect, preserve, and restore the fish, wildlife, 
watershed, natural, scientific, scenic, geologic, historic, cultural, 
archaeological, and recreational values of the area'' (Pub. L. 113-291, 
Sec. 3043(b)(1) (emphasis added)). While the Act does not specifically 
refer to hydrothermal features or their use by the public among the 
criteria for which the park unit was created, the presence and 
preservation of such features as surface expressions of the subsurface 
volcanic activity is consistent with the purposes and uses of which the 
park was created. The hydrothermal features are important geologic 
resources associated with the Preserve and the Jemez Mountains, 
contribute to scientific understanding of the geology of the region, 
and also contribute to the other values for which this system unit was 
established.
    Conclusion: Because the hydrothermal system at Valles Caldera 
appears to meet all four criteria, the Department proposes to add it to 
the list of significant thermal features within the National Park 
System.
    Once designated, the NPS will continue to work closely with the BLM 
and the U.S. Forest Service to ensure that monitoring data and other 
scientific information regarding the significant thermal features of 
Valles Caldera National Preserve are incorporated into leasing and 
permitting decisions.

References

Aprea, M., Hildebrande, S., Fehler, M., Steck, L., Baldridge, W., 
Roberts, P, Thurber, C., Lutter, W., (2002). Three-dimensional 
Kirchhoff migration: Imaging of the Jemez volcanic field using 
teleseismic data: Journal of Geophysical Research v. 107, p. 2247-
2262.
Gardner, J.N., Goff, F., Kelley, S., and Jacobs, E. (2010) Rhyolites 
and associated deposits of the Valles-Toledo caldera complex. New 
Mexico Geology, v. 32, p. 3-18.
Goff, F. (2009) Valles Caldera: A Geologic History. University of 
New Mexico Press,

[[Page 95639]]

Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Goff, F., and Goff, C.J., In Press (2016-17), Overview of the Valles 
Caldera (Baca) geothermal system, New Mexico, in (McLemore, V.T. and 
Timmons, S., eds.) Energy and Mineral Resources of New Mexico. New 
Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, Special Publication 
13, 50 pages, with 5 tables, 1 appendix, and 40 figures.
Goff, F. (2002). ``Geothermal Potential of Valles Caldera, New 
Mexico.'' GHC Bulletin, December 2002.
Goff, F. and Grigsby, C. (1982). Valles Caldera Geothermal Systems, 
New Mexico, USA. Journal of Hydrology, 56 (1982) pp. 119-136.
Geologic Map of the Jemez mountains, Valles Caldera (2011). http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/repository/data/2011/20110002/GM-79_mapsheet.pdf. 
http://en.openei.org/wiki/Valles_Caldera--Sulphur_Springs_Geothermal_Area/#Regional Setting.
Trainer, F.W.; Rogers, R.J., and M.L. Sorey, 2000. ``Geothermal 
Hydrology of Valles Caldera and the Southwestern Jemez Mountains, 
New Mexico.'' U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Investigation 
report 00-4067, 115 pp. www.hotspringsenthusiast.com/newmexico.asp.

    Dated: December 19, 2016.
Michael Bean,
Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks.
[FR Doc. 2016-31270 Filed 12-27-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P