Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations, 93937-93939 [2016-30778]

Download as PDF 93937 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 246 / Thursday, December 22, 2016 / Notices should be directed to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Feasibility of Social Distancing Measures in K–12 Schools in the United States—New—National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ), requests approval of a new information collection to identify potential social distancing strategies to reduce personto-person contact among students and staff in K–12 schools that are implementable without causing major detrimental effects to ongoing education activities. CDC is requesting a one-year approval to collect information. The information collection for which approval is sought is in accordance with DGMQ/CDC’s mission to reduce morbidity and mortality in mobile populations, and to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases within the United States. Insights gained from this information collection will assist in the planning and implementation of CDC Pre-Pandemic Community Mitigation Guidance on the use of school-based measures to slow transmission during an influenza pandemic. School-aged children are often the main introducers and an important transmission source of influenza and other respiratory viruses in their families, and school-based outbreaks frequently pre-date wide-spread influenza transmission in the surrounding communities. Therefore, infection control measures undertaken to reduce virus transmission among children at schools may also help prevent or postpone influenza outbreaks in communities. In respiratory transmission of influenza, proximity to the person with influenza plays a significant role. Strategies that increase physical distance between students and/ or reduce the duration of person to person contact in school settings may, theoretically, be effective in slowing influenza transmission. There have been no evaluations to date of feasibility of implementing social distancing measures other than school closures. Therefore, there is a need to research alternative social distancing strategies that can help reduce influenza transmission in schools while minimizing social and economic burdens on the community. CDC staff proposes that the information collection for this package will target senior education officials, senior health officials, and representatives from the National Association of School Nurses, school safety organizations/law enforcement, and National Distance Learning Association. CDC will collect qualitative data using focus group discussions on: (a) Current knowledge, attitudes, and potential practices with regard to organizing and delivering K–12 instruction in ways that help increase physical distance among students and/ or reduce duration of in-person instruction at schools (including use of distance learning options), while preserving the normal education process; and (b) facilitating and inhibiting factors for implementing and sustaining the potential social distancing options in emergencies as an alternative to the complete student dismissal in K–12 schools. Findings obtained from this information collection will be used to inform the update of CDC’s Prepandemic Community Mitigation Guidance on the implementation of school related measures to prevent the spread of influenza. This Guidance is used as an important planning and reference tool for both State and local health departments in the United States. There are no costs to the respondents other than their time. The maximum total estimated annual burden hours are 640. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondents Form name Senior educators; senior health officials; representatives from the National Association of School Nurses, school safety organizations/law enforcement, and National Distance Learning Association. Focus Group Interview Guide (semi-structured questionnaire). Leroy A. Richardson, Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2016–30777 Filed 12–21–16; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [60Day–17–17IM; Docket No. CDC–2016– 0120] sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES BILLING CODE 4163–18–P Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice with comment period. AGENCY: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:40 Dec 21, 2016 Jkt 241001 PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 320 Number of responses per respondent Avg. burden per response (in hrs.) 1 its continuing efforts to reduce public burden and maximize the utility of government information, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. This notice invites comment on Use of the Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (CNHGQ) during Investigations of Foodborne Disease Clusters and Outbreaks. CDC seeks to request Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval to collect information via the CNHGQ from persons who have developed E:\FR\FM\22DEN1.SGM 22DEN1 2 sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 93938 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 246 / Thursday, December 22, 2016 / Notices symptomatic cases of Cyclospora infection during periods in which increased numbers of such cases are reported (typically, during spring and summer months). DATES: Written comments must be received on or before February 21, 2017. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. CDC–2016– 0120 by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Leroy A. Richardson, Information Collection Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE., MS– D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name and Docket Number. All relevant comments received will be posted without change to Regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to Regulations.gov. Please note: All public comment should be submitted through the Federal eRulemaking portal (Regulations.gov) or by U.S. mail to the address listed above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, contact the Information Collection Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE., MS–D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329; phone: 404–639–7570; Email: omb@cdc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), Federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. In addition, the PRA also requires Federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each new proposed collection, each proposed extension of existing collection of information, and each reinstatement of previously approved information collection before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, we are publishing this notice of a proposed data collection as described below. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:40 Dec 21, 2016 Jkt 241001 practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology; and (e) estimates of capital or start-up costs and costs of operation, maintenance, and purchase of services to provide information. Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, disclose or provide information to or for a Federal agency. This includes the time needed to review instructions; to develop, acquire, install and utilize technology and systems for the purpose of collecting, validating and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; to train personnel and to be able to respond to a collection of information, to search data sources, to complete and review the collection of information; and to transmit or otherwise disclose the information. Proposed Project Use of the Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (CNHGQ) during Investigations of Foodborne Disease Clusters and Outbreaks—New—Center for Global Health (CGH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description An estimated 1 in 6 Americans per year become ill with a foodborne disease. Foodborne outbreaks of cyclosporiasis—caused by the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis—have been reported in the United States since the mid-1990s and have been linked to various types of fresh produce. During the 15-year period of 2000–2014, 31 U.S. foodborne outbreaks of cyclosporiasis were reported; the total case count was 1,562. It is likely that more cases (and outbreaks) occurred than were reported; in addition, because of insufficient data, many of the reported cases could not be directly linked to an outbreak or to a particular food vehicle. Collecting the requisite data for the initial hypothesis-generating phase of investigations of multistate foodborne disease outbreaks is associated with multiple challenges, including the need to have high-quality hypothesisgenerating questionnaire(s) that can be PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 used effectively in multijurisdictional investigations. Such a questionnaire was developed in the past for use in the context of foodborne outbreaks caused by bacterial pathogens; that questionnaire is referred to as the Standardized National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (SNHGQ). However, not all of the data elements in the SNHGQ are relevant to the parasite Cyclospora (e.g., questions about consumption of meat and dairy products); on the other hand, additional data elements (besides those in the SNHGQ) are needed to capture information pertinent to Cyclospora and to fresh produce vehicles of infection. Therefore, the Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (CNHGQ) has been developed, by using core data elements from the SNHGQ and incorporating modifications pertinent to Cyclospora. The core data elements from the SNHGQ were developed by a series of working groups comprised of local, state, and federal public health partners. Subject matter experts at CDC have developed the CNHGQ, by modifying the SNHGQ to include and focus on data elements pertinent to Cyclospora/ cyclosporiasis. Input also was solicited from state public health partners. Because relatively few data elements in the SNHGQ needed to be modified, a full vetting process was determined not to be necessary. The CNHGQ has been designed for administration over the telephone by public health officials, to collect data elements from case-patients or their proxies. The data that are collected will be pooled and analyzed at CDC, to generate hypotheses about potential vehicles/sources of infection. CDC requests OMB approval to collect information via the CNHGQ from persons who have developed symptomatic cases of Cyclospora infection during periods in which increased numbers of such cases are reported (typically, during spring and summer months). In part because molecular typing methods are not yet available for C. cayetanensis, it is important to interview all case-patients identified during periods of increased reporting, to help determine if their cases could be part of an outbreak(s). The CNHGQ is not expected to entail substantial burden for respondents. The estimated total annualized burden associated with administering the CNHGQ is 750 hours (approximately 1,000 individuals interviewed x 45 minutes/response). There will be no costs to respondents other than their time. E:\FR\FM\22DEN1.SGM 22DEN1 93939 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 246 / Thursday, December 22, 2016 / Notices ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of responses per respondent Form name Individuals ..................... Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire. 1,000 1 45/60 750 Total ....................... .............................................................................. ........................ ........................ ........................ 750 Leroy A. Richardson, Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2016–30778 Filed 12–21–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice with comment period. AGENCY: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of its continuing efforts to reduce public burden and maximize the utility of government information, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. This notice invites comment on the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). The NNDSS is the nation’s public health surveillance system that monitors the occurrence and spread of diseases and conditions that are nationally notifiable or under national surveillance. DATES: Written comments must be received on or before February 21, 2017. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. CDC–2016– 0119 by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Leroy A. Richardson, Information Collection Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and sradovich on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES 17:40 Dec 21, 2016 Jkt 241001 To request more information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, contact the Information Collection Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE., MS–D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329; phone: 404–639–7570; Email: omb@cdc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), Federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. In addition, the PRA also requires Federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each new proposed collection, each proposed extension of existing collection of information, and each reinstatement of previously approved information collection before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, we are publishing this notice of a proposed data collection as described below. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) ways to minimize the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: [60Day–17–0728; Docket No. CDC–2016– 0119] VerDate Sep<11>2014 Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE., MS– D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name and Docket Number. All relevant comments received will be posted without change to Regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to Regulations.gov. Please note: All public comment should be submitted through the Federal eRulemaking portal (Regulations.gov) or by U.S. mail to the address listed above. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention SUMMARY: Number of respondents Avg. burden per response (in hrs.) Type of respondents PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Total burden (in hrs.) burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology; and (e) estimates of capital or start-up costs and costs of operation, maintenance, and purchase of services to provide information. Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, disclose or provide information to or for a Federal agency. This includes the time needed to review instructions; to develop, acquire, install and utilize technology and systems for the purpose of collecting, validating and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; to train personnel and to be able to respond to a collection of information, to search data sources, to complete and review the collection of information; and to transmit or otherwise disclose the information. Proposed Project National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (OMB Control Number 0920–0728, expires 1/31/ 2019)—Revision—Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services, CSELS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description The Public Health Services Act (42 U.S.C. 241) authorizes CDC to disseminate nationally notifiable condition information. The Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) is based on data collected at the state, territorial and local levels as a result of legislation and regulations in those jurisdictions that require health care providers, medical laboratories, and other entities to submit healthrelated data on reportable conditions to public health departments. These reportable conditions, which include infectious and non-infectious diseases, vary by jurisdiction depending upon each jurisdiction’s health priorities and needs. Infectious disease agents and environmental hazards often cross geographical boundaries. Each year, the E:\FR\FM\22DEN1.SGM 22DEN1

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[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 246 (Thursday, December 22, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 93937-93939]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-30778]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[60Day-17-17IM; Docket No. CDC-2016-0120]


Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and 
Recommendations

AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of 
Health and Human Services (HHS).

ACTION: Notice with comment period.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part 
of its continuing efforts to reduce public burden and maximize the 
utility of government information, invites the general public and other 
Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or 
continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork 
Reduction Act of 1995. This notice invites comment on Use of the 
Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (CNHGQ) 
during Investigations of Foodborne Disease Clusters and Outbreaks. CDC 
seeks to request Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval to 
collect information via the CNHGQ from persons who have developed

[[Page 93938]]

symptomatic cases of Cyclospora infection during periods in which 
increased numbers of such cases are reported (typically, during spring 
and summer months).

DATES: Written comments must be received on or before February 21, 
2017.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. CDC-2016-
0120 by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Regulations.gov. Follow the 
instructions for submitting comments.
     Mail: Leroy A. Richardson, Information Collection Review 
Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road 
NE., MS-D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329.
    Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name 
and Docket Number. All relevant comments received will be posted 
without change to Regulations.gov, including any personal information 
provided. For access to the docket to read background documents or 
comments received, go to Regulations.gov.
    Please note: All public comment should be submitted through the 
Federal eRulemaking portal (Regulations.gov) or by U.S. mail to the 
address listed above.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on the 
proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan 
and instruments, contact the Information Collection Review Office, 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE., MS-
D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329; phone: 404-639-7570; Email: omb@cdc.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
(PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), Federal agencies must obtain approval from 
the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of 
information they conduct or sponsor. In addition, the PRA also requires 
Federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register 
concerning each proposed collection of information, including each new 
proposed collection, each proposed extension of existing collection of 
information, and each reinstatement of previously approved information 
collection before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To 
comply with this requirement, we are publishing this notice of a 
proposed data collection as described below.
    Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of 
the agency, including whether the information shall have practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) ways to 
minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology; and (e) estimates of capital or start-
up costs and costs of operation, maintenance, and purchase of services 
to provide information. Burden means the total time, effort, or 
financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, 
disclose or provide information to or for a Federal agency. This 
includes the time needed to review instructions; to develop, acquire, 
install and utilize technology and systems for the purpose of 
collecting, validating and verifying information, processing and 
maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; to 
train personnel and to be able to respond to a collection of 
information, to search data sources, to complete and review the 
collection of information; and to transmit or otherwise disclose the 
information.

Proposed Project

    Use of the Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating 
Questionnaire (CNHGQ) during Investigations of Foodborne Disease 
Clusters and Outbreaks--New--Center for Global Health (CGH), Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    An estimated 1 in 6 Americans per year become ill with a foodborne 
disease. Foodborne outbreaks of cyclosporiasis--caused by the parasite 
Cyclospora cayetanensis--have been reported in the United States since 
the mid-1990s and have been linked to various types of fresh produce. 
During the 15-year period of 2000-2014, 31 U.S. foodborne outbreaks of 
cyclosporiasis were reported; the total case count was 1,562. It is 
likely that more cases (and outbreaks) occurred than were reported; in 
addition, because of insufficient data, many of the reported cases 
could not be directly linked to an outbreak or to a particular food 
vehicle.
    Collecting the requisite data for the initial hypothesis-generating 
phase of investigations of multistate foodborne disease outbreaks is 
associated with multiple challenges, including the need to have high-
quality hypothesis-generating questionnaire(s) that can be used 
effectively in multijurisdictional investigations. Such a questionnaire 
was developed in the past for use in the context of foodborne outbreaks 
caused by bacterial pathogens; that questionnaire is referred to as the 
Standardized National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (SNHGQ). 
However, not all of the data elements in the SNHGQ are relevant to the 
parasite Cyclospora (e.g., questions about consumption of meat and 
dairy products); on the other hand, additional data elements (besides 
those in the SNHGQ) are needed to capture information pertinent to 
Cyclospora and to fresh produce vehicles of infection. Therefore, the 
Cyclosporiasis National Hypothesis Generating Questionnaire (CNHGQ) has 
been developed, by using core data elements from the SNHGQ and 
incorporating modifications pertinent to Cyclospora.
    The core data elements from the SNHGQ were developed by a series of 
working groups comprised of local, state, and federal public health 
partners. Subject matter experts at CDC have developed the CNHGQ, by 
modifying the SNHGQ to include and focus on data elements pertinent to 
Cyclospora/cyclosporiasis. Input also was solicited from state public 
health partners. Because relatively few data elements in the SNHGQ 
needed to be modified, a full vetting process was determined not to be 
necessary. The CNHGQ has been designed for administration over the 
telephone by public health officials, to collect data elements from 
case-patients or their proxies. The data that are collected will be 
pooled and analyzed at CDC, to generate hypotheses about potential 
vehicles/sources of infection.
    CDC requests OMB approval to collect information via the CNHGQ from 
persons who have developed symptomatic cases of Cyclospora infection 
during periods in which increased numbers of such cases are reported 
(typically, during spring and summer months). In part because molecular 
typing methods are not yet available for C. cayetanensis, it is 
important to interview all case-patients identified during periods of 
increased reporting, to help determine if their cases could be part of 
an outbreak(s).
    The CNHGQ is not expected to entail substantial burden for 
respondents. The estimated total annualized burden associated with 
administering the CNHGQ is 750 hours (approximately 1,000 individuals 
interviewed x 45 minutes/response). There will be no costs to 
respondents other than their time.

[[Page 93939]]



                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     Number of      Avg. burden
     Type of  respondents           Form name        Number of    responses  per   per response    Total burden
                                                    respondents      respondent      (in hrs.)       (in hrs.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individuals...................  Cyclosporiasis             1,000               1           45/60             750
                                 National
                                 Hypothesis
                                 Generating
                                 Questionnaire.
                               ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total.....................  ................  ..............  ..............  ..............             750
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Leroy A. Richardson,
Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific 
Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the 
Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2016-30778 Filed 12-21-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4163-18-P