December 16, 2016 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Results 151 - 157 of 157
Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes
Document Number: 2016-29251
Type: Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 787-8 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of the accumulation of very fine particle deposits in the power control unit (PCU) electro-hydraulic servo valves (EHSVs) used in the flight control system; this accumulation caused degraded performance due to reduced EHSV internal hydraulic supply pressures, resulting in the display of PCU fault status messages from the engine indication and crew alerting system (EICAS). This AD requires installing markers to limit the hydraulic system fluid used to a specific brand, doing hydraulic fluid tests of the hydraulic systems, replacing hydraulic system fluid if necessary, and doing all applicable related investigative and corrective actions. We are issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.
Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes
Document Number: 2016-29249
Type: Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We are superseding Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2014-13-12 for all Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. AD 2014- 13-12 required identifying the part number and serial number of each passenger oxygen container, replacing the oxygen generator manifold of any affected oxygen container with a serviceable manifold, performing an operational check of the manual mask release, and doing corrective actions if necessary. This new AD retains the requirements of AD 2014- 13-12, and requires replacing the oxygen generator manifold of any affected DAe oxygen container with a serviceable manifold. This AD was prompted by reports of silicon particles inside the oxygen generator manifolds, which had chafed from the mask hoses during installation onto the generator outlets. We are issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.
Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Cooking Products
Document Number: 2016-29077
Type: Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Department of Energy
On August 22, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking to amend the test procedure for conventional cooking products. That proposed rulemaking serves as the basis for this final rule. Specifically, this final rule amends DOE's test procedure for conventional electric cooking tops to incorporate by reference the relevant sections from European standard EN 60350-2:2013 ``Household electric cooking appliances Part 2: Hobs Methods for measuring performance'' (EN 60350-2:2013). This final rule also includes methods for testing non-circular electric surface units, electric surface units with flexible concentric cooking zones, and full-surface induction cooking tops based on EN 60350-2:2013. In addition, DOE extends the test methods in EN 60350-2:2013 to measure the energy consumption of gas cooking tops by correlating test equipment diameter to burner input rate, including input rates that exceed 14,000 British thermal units per hour. This final rule also includes methods to calculate annual energy consumption and integrated annual energy consumption for conventional cooking tops based on the water-heating test method and provides updates to the sampling plan requirements. The final rule includes minor technical clarifications to the gas heating value correction and other grammatical changes to the regulatory text in the cooking products test procedure that do not alter the substance of the existing test methods. This final rule also repeals the regulatory provisions establishing the test procedure for conventional ovens under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. DOE has determined that the conventional oven test procedure does not accurately represent consumer use as it favors conventional ovens with low thermal mass and does not capture cooking performance-related benefits due to increased thermal mass of the oven cavity.
Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes
Document Number: 2016-28802
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We are revising an earlier proposal to supersede Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2011-17-09 for all Airbus Model A330-200, -200 Freighter, and -300 series airplanes; and AD 2012-25-12 for all Airbus Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes. The notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) proposed to require revising the maintenance or inspection program, as applicable, to incorporate new or revised airworthiness limitation requirements. The NPRM was prompted by revisions to certain airworthiness limitations items (ALI) documents, which specify more restrictive instructions and/or airworthiness limitations. This action revises the NPRM by proposing to require revising the maintenance or inspection program, as applicable, to incorporate more restrictive, instructions and/or airworthiness limitations that the manufacturer has recently issued. We are proposing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.
Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Airplanes
Document Number: 2016-28669
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We propose to supersede Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2012-22- 15 for all Fokker Services B.V. Model F28 Mark 0070 and Mark 0100 airplanes. AD 2012-22-15 currently requires revising the maintenance program to incorporate the limitations, tasks, thresholds, and intervals specified in certain revised Fokker maintenance review board (MRB) documents. Since we issued AD 2012-22-15, we received new revisions of airworthiness limitations items (ALI) documents, which introduce new and more restrictive maintenance requirements and airworthiness limitations. This proposed AD would require revising the maintenance or inspection program to incorporate new maintenance requirements and airworthiness limitations. We are proposing this AD to prevent the unsafe condition on these products.
Surface Transportation Vulnerability Assessments and Security Plans (VASP)
Document Number: 2016-28300
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Department of Homeland Security, Transportation Security Administration
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is issuing this ANPRM to request public comments on several topics relevant to the development of surface transportation vulnerability assessment and security plan regulations mandated by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (9/11 Act). Based on its regular interaction with stakeholders, TSA assumes many higher-risk railroads (freight and passenger), public transportation agencies, and over-the- road buses (OTRBs) have implemented security programs with security measures similar to those identified by the 9/11 Act's regulatory requirements. In general, TSA is requesting information on three types of issues. First, existing practices, standards, tools, or other resources used or available for conducting vulnerability assessments and developing security plans. Second, information on existing security measures, including whether implemented voluntarily or in response to other regulatory requirements, and the potential impact of additional requirements on operations. Third, information on the scope/cost of current security systems and other measures used to provide security and mitigate vulnerabilities. This information is necessary for TSA to establish the current baseline, estimate cost of implementing the statutory mandate, and develop appropriate performance standards. While TSA will review and consider all comments submitted, TSA invites responses to a number of specific questions posed in the ANPRM. See the Comments Invited section under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.
Security Training for Surface Transportation Employees
Document Number: 2016-28298
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2016-12-16
Agency: Department of Homeland Security, Transportation Security Administration
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is proposing to require security training for employees of higher-risk freight railroad carriers, public transportation agencies (including rail mass transit and bus systems), passenger railroad carriers, and over-the- road bus (OTRB) companies. Owner/operators of these higher-risk railroads, systems, and companies would be required to train employees performing security-sensitive functions, using a curriculum addressing preparedness and how to observe, assess, and respond to terrorist- related threats and/or incidents. As part of this rulemaking, TSA would also expand its current requirements for rail security coordinators and reporting of significant security concerns (currently limited to freight railroads, passenger railroads, and the rail operations of public transportation systems) to include the bus components of higher- risk public transportation systems and higher-risk OTRB companies. TSA also proposes to make the maritime and land transportation provisions of TSA's regulations consistent with other TSA regulations by codifying general responsibility to comply with security requirements; compliance, inspection, and enforcement; and procedures to request alternate measures for compliance. Finally, TSA is adding a definition for Transportation Security-Sensitive Materials (TSSM). Other provisions are being amended or added, as necessary, to implement these additional requirements. While TSA will review and consider all comments submitted, TSA invites responses to a number of specific questions posed in the preamble of the NPRM. See the Comments Invited section under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.