Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 87059-87060 [2016-28947]

Download as PDF asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 232 / Friday, December 2, 2016 / Notices paraphernalia that are used in continuing religious practices by the Hopi and Zuni. Some petroglyphs on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation have also persuaded archeologists of continuities between the earlier identified group and current-day Western Pueblo people. Biological information from the site of Grasshopper Pueblo supports the view that the prehistoric occupants of the Upland Mogollon region had migrated from various locations to the north and west of the region. Hopi and Zuni oral traditions parallel the archeological evidence for migration. Migration figures prominently in Hopi oral tradition, which refers to the ancient sites, pottery, stone tools, petroglyphs, and other artifacts left behind by the ancestors as ‘‘Hopi Footprints.’’ This migration history is complex and detailed, and includes traditions relating specific clans to the Mogollon region. Hopi cultural advisors have also identified medicinal and culinary plants at archeological sites in the region. Their knowledge about these plants was passed down to them from the ancestors who inhabited these ancient sites. Migration is also an important attribute of Zuni oral tradition and includes accounts of Zuni ancestors passing through the Upland Mogollon region. The ancient villages mark the routes of these migrations. Zuni cultural advisors remark that the ancient sites were not abandoned. People returned to these places from time to time, either to reoccupy them or for the purpose of religious pilgrimages—a practice that has continued to the present day. Archeologists have found ceramic evidence at shrines in the Upland Mogollon region that confirms these reports. Zuni cultural advisors have names for plants endemic to the Mogollon region that do not grow on the Zuni Reservation. They also have knowledge about traditional medicinal and ceremonial uses for these resources, which has been passed down to them from their ancestors. Furthermore, Hopi and Zuni cultural advisors have recognized that their ancestors may have been co-resident at some of the sites in this region during their ancestral migrations. There are differing points of view regarding the possible presence of Apache people in the Upland Mogollon region during the time that Grasshopper Pueblo was occupied. Some Apache traditions describe interactions with Ancestral Pueblo people during this time, but according to these stories, Puebloan people and Apache people were regarded as having separate VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:55 Dec 01, 2016 Jkt 241001 identities. The White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, does not claim cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects from this site. As reported by Welch and Ferguson (2005), consultations between the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, and the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico, have indicated that that none of these tribes wish to pursue claims of affiliation with sites on White Mountain Apache Tribal lands. Finally, the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, supports the repatriation of human remains and associated funerary objects from this site and is ready to assist the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, in their reburial. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Arizona State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 3 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 9 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626–2950, by January 3, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 87059 Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, may proceed. The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, that this notice has been published. Dated: November 15, 2016. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–28961 Filed 12–1–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22419; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Peabody Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Peabody Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice by January 3, 2017. ADDRESSES: Professor David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\02DEN1.SGM 02DEN1 87060 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 232 / Friday, December 2, 2016 / Notices Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT. The human remains were removed from the tundra surface near Barrow, North Slope Borough, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government. Attempts to contact the Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope went unanswered. History and Description of the Remains In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 14 individuals were removed from the tundra surface near Barrow in North Slope Borough, AK. The remains were collected and donated to the Peabody Museum of Natural History in 1957. The human remains represent four adult, probable male individuals, eight adult, probable female individuals, and two adult individuals of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The osteological data as well as the burial context support the identification of these individuals as Native Alaskan. The collector’s description of the archaeological context supports an historic date for these burials. The city of Barrow and vicinity is documented as being inhabited by the Inupiat people during the historic era. The Inupiat people in this region are represented by the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government. During consultation, a representative of the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government confirmed the tribe’s cultural affiliation to these human remains. Determinations Made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History Officials of the Peabody Museum of Natural History have determined that: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:55 Dec 01, 2016 Jkt 241001 • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of fourteen individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Professor David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752, by January 3, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government may proceed. The Peabody Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government that this notice has been published. Dated: November 15, 2016. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–28947 Filed 12–1–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR a written request to the Indiana University NAGPRA Office. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Indiana University NAGPRA Office at the address in this notice by January 3, 2017. ADDRESSES: Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405, telephone (812) 856–5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Department of Anthropology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation National Park Service AGENCY: A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Indiana University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, the Jena Band of the Choctaw Indians, and the Mississippi Band of the Choctaw Indians. ACTION: History and Description of the Remains [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22457; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. The Department of Anthropology at Indiana University has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 19 individuals were removed from the Woodward site in Rapides County, LA, and were subsequently delivered to the Department of Anthropology at Indiana University. The collection is listed as being possibly affiliated with the Choctaw and notes indicate it was possibly from the Woodward Forest Nursery area. During the late Historic period, a band of Choctaw individuals lived in Rapides Parish and left a cemetery near the Woodward Forest Nursery. E:\FR\FM\02DEN1.SGM 02DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 232 (Friday, December 2, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 87059-87060]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-28947]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-22419; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Natural 
History, Yale University, New Haven, CT

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Natural History has completed an 
inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there 
is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day 
Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains should submit a written request to the Peabody 
Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, 
Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the 
Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice by 
January 3, 2017.

ADDRESSES: Professor David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of 
Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520-8118, telephone 
(203) 432-3752.

[[Page 87060]]


SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, 
New Haven, CT. The human remains were removed from the tundra surface 
near Barrow, North Slope Borough, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Peabody 
Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional 
Government. Attempts to contact the Inupiat Community of the Arctic 
Slope went unanswered.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 14 individuals 
were removed from the tundra surface near Barrow in North Slope 
Borough, AK. The remains were collected and donated to the Peabody 
Museum of Natural History in 1957. The human remains represent four 
adult, probable male individuals, eight adult, probable female 
individuals, and two adult individuals of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The osteological data as well as the burial context support the 
identification of these individuals as Native Alaskan. The collector's 
description of the archaeological context supports an historic date for 
these burials. The city of Barrow and vicinity is documented as being 
inhabited by the Inupiat people during the historic era. The Inupiat 
people in this region are represented by the Native Village of Barrow 
Inupiat Traditional Government. During consultation, a representative 
of the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government 
confirmed the tribe's cultural affiliation to these human remains.

Determinations Made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History

    Officials of the Peabody Museum of Natural History have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of fourteen individuals 
of Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat 
Traditional Government.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Professor 
David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. 
Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520-8118, telephone (203) 432-3752, by 
January 3, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come 
forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Native Village 
of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government may proceed.
    The Peabody Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: November 15, 2016.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-28947 Filed 12-1-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P