Notice of Inventory Completion: Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 87065-87066 [2016-28945]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 232 / Friday, December 2, 2016 / Notices ancestral to the Mandan. Today, the Arikara, Hidatsa, and Mandan tribes are a part of the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Determinations Made by the Indiana University Notice of Inventory Completion: Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN Officials of Indiana University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 155 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 85 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. Additional Requestors and Disposition asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405, telephone (812) 856–5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu, by January 3, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. Indiana University is responsible for notifying the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. Dated: November 18, 2016. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–28954 Filed 12–1–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:55 Dec 01, 2016 Jkt 241001 National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22454; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Indiana University NAGPRA Office. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Indiana University NAGPRA Office at the address in this notice by January 3, 2017. ADDRESSES: Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405, telephone (812) 856–5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Tipton County, TN. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00049 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 87065 this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Indiana University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation. While the area where the human remains were removed is the aboriginal homeland of the Chickasaw Nation as documented by treaty cession area, the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma has claim to these remains based on cultural affinity, material culture, and physical occupation of the area. History and Description of the Remains In 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from the Bishop site in Tipton County, TN. The 52 associated funerary objects are pottery sherds. This material was received at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology as a gift from Mr. Wiley Wilcox. The Bishop site has been assigned to the Nodena Phase, which is characterized by Mississippian Bell Plain pottery and has been culturally affiliated with the Quapaw. The majority of the pot sherds with this collection are Bell Plain variety. Archaeological material from the Bishop site has already previously been repatriated to the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma. Oral traditions indicate that the Quapaw tribe originated in the Lower Ohio River Valley and eventually moved downstream to reside on both sides of the Mississippi River. The Quapaw maintained a presence in the Central Mississippi valley until their removal to northwest Louisiana in 1824 when their lands in the Territory of Arkansas were ceded to the United States. Determinations Made by Indiana University Officials of the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 52 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human E:\FR\FM\02DEN1.SGM 02DEN1 87066 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 232 / Friday, December 2, 2016 / Notices remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405, telephone (812) 856–5315, email thomajay@ indiana.edu, by January 3, 2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma may proceed. Indiana University is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: November 18, 2016. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–28945 Filed 12–1–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–22417; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District, Huntington, WV National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District (Huntington District), in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Huntington District. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:55 Dec 01, 2016 Jkt 241001 Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Huntington District at the address in this notice by January 3, 2017. ADDRESSES: Mr. Rodney Parker, District Archaeologist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District, 502 Eighth Street, Huntington, WV 25701, telephone (304) 399–5729, email rodney.d.parker@usace.army.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District, Huntington, WV, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Item(s) In 1963, ten cultural items were removed from 15PI11 (the Slone Site), Fishtrap Lake, Pike County, KY. The items were excavated during legally authorized excavations performed by Lee Hanson in 1963, a graduate student at the University of Kentucky. In 1964, Robert Dunnell, and undergraduate at the University, completed the excavation of the Fort Ancient component of the site. Burial 7 at the site was reported to have included the fragmentary skeletal remains of an infant; unmodified faunal remains and pottery sherds were collected with the burial fill. No human remains associated with Burial 7 have been located. The skeletal remains in Burial 12 had completely decayed, but the construction pattern of the grave was distinct enough to permit its identification as a grave without the actual presence of human remains. An engraved stone was collected from the burial pit of Burial 12. The items from these two burials have been housed at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, since their excavation. The ten PO 00000 Frm 00050 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 unassociated funerary objects are one carved soapstone fragment, four ceramic sherds, and five fragments unmodified faunal remains. The funerary objects were determined to be affiliated with the Shawnee based on the physical archeological evidence which indicated a Fort Ancient period occupation at this site from A.D. 1000 to 1700. The Shawnee are generally considered the ‘southerners’ or the southernmost of the Algonquianspeaking tribes, and oral tradition places their homeland along the central Ohio River Valley. The Shawnee are often associated with the Fort Ancient peoples who occupied the Ohio River Valley and have a long association with this territory in which they were first encountered by the Europeans by the mid seventeenth century including areas of southern Ohio, northern Kentucky, and western West Virginia. The location of Fort Ancient archaeological sites within the Huntington District indicates that a strong historical and ethnohistorical link showing the region was occupied by the Shawnees in the early historic period. Based on the geographic, anthropological, linguistic, anthropological, and historical evidence, and information gained during tribal consultation, Huntington District has determined that the unassociated funerary objects from site 15PI11 are culturally affiliated with the Shawnee. The three federally recognized tribes with standing under NAGPRA are the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Shawnee Tribe. Determinations Made by the Huntington District Officials of the Huntington District have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the ten cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Shawnee Tribe. E:\FR\FM\02DEN1.SGM 02DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 232 (Friday, December 2, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 87065-87066]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-28945]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-22454; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Glenn A. Black Laboratory of 
Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana 
University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains should submit a written request to the Indiana 
University NAGPRA Office. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, 
Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the 
Indiana University NAGPRA Office at the address in this notice by 
January 3, 2017.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, 
NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, 
IN 47405, telephone (812) 856-5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Glenn A. Black 
Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Tipton 
County, TN.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Indiana 
University professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation. While the area 
where the human remains were removed is the aboriginal homeland of the 
Chickasaw Nation as documented by treaty cession area, the Quapaw Tribe 
of Oklahoma has claim to these remains based on cultural affinity, 
material culture, and physical occupation of the area.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Bishop site in Tipton County, TN. The 52 
associated funerary objects are pottery sherds. This material was 
received at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology as a gift from 
Mr. Wiley Wilcox.
    The Bishop site has been assigned to the Nodena Phase, which is 
characterized by Mississippian Bell Plain pottery and has been 
culturally affiliated with the Quapaw. The majority of the pot sherds 
with this collection are Bell Plain variety. Archaeological material 
from the Bishop site has already previously been repatriated to the 
Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma.
    Oral traditions indicate that the Quapaw tribe originated in the 
Lower Ohio River Valley and eventually moved downstream to reside on 
both sides of the Mississippi River. The Quapaw maintained a presence 
in the Central Mississippi valley until their removal to northwest 
Louisiana in 1824 when their lands in the Territory of Arkansas were 
ceded to the United States.

Determinations Made by Indiana University

    Officials of the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at 
Indiana University have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of one individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 52 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human

[[Page 87066]]

remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, 
Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405, 
telephone (812) 856-5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu, by January 3, 
2017. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma may proceed.
    Indiana University is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of 
Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 18, 2016.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-28945 Filed 12-1-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P