Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors, Inc. Reciprocating Engines, 70929-70931 [2016-24794]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 199 / Friday, October 14, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD affects 43 helicopters of U.S. Registry. We estimate that operators may incur the following costs to comply with this AD. At an average labor cost of $85 per work-hour, we estimate reviewing and revising the records requires 1 workhour for a cost of about $85 per helicopter and $3,655 for the U.S. fleet. We estimate replacing a bolt that has exceeded its life limit requires 0.5 workhour plus $290 for a replacement bolt, for a total cost of $333 per bolt. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on helicopters identified in this rulemaking action. ehiers on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Regulatory Findings This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent that it justifies making a regulatory distinction; and (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared an economic evaluation of the estimated costs to comply with this AD and placed it in the AD docket. VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:00 Oct 13, 2016 Jkt 241001 List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): ■ 2016–21–01 Bell Helicopter Textron: Amendment 39–18682; Docket No. FAA–2016–6551; Directorate Identifier 2013–SW–070–AD. (a) Applicability This AD applies to Model 430 helicopters, serial number 49001 through 49129, with a main rotor head attachment bolt (bolt) part number (P/N) MS21250–08083 installed, certificated in any category. (b) Unsafe Condition This AD defines the unsafe condition as a bolt remaining in service beyond its fatigue life. This condition could result in failure of a bolt, failure of the main rotor hub and subsequent loss of control of a helicopter. (c) Effective Date This AD becomes effective November 18, 2016. (d) Compliance You are responsible for performing each action required by this AD within the specified compliance time unless it has already been accomplished prior to that time. 70929 Management Group, Rotorcraft Directorate, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy, Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222–5110; email 9-ASW-FTW-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov. (2) For operations conducted under a 14 CFR part 119 operating certificate or under 14 CFR part 91, subpart K, we suggest that you notify your principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office or certificate holding district office, before operating any aircraft complying with this AD through an AMOC. (g) Additional Information (1) Bell Helicopter Alert Service Bulletin 430–12–47, dated November 14, 2012, which is not incorporated by reference, contains additional information about the subject of this final rule. For service information identified in this final rule, contact Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l’Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4; telephone (450) 437–2862 or (800) 363–8023; fax (450) 433–0272; or at http:// www.bellcustomer.com/files/. You may review a copy of the service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy, Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. (2) The subject of this AD is addressed in Transport Canada AD No. CF–2013–26, dated September 24, 2013. You may view the Transport Canada AD on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FAA–2016–6551. (h) Subject Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: 6220 Main Rotor Head. Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on October 3, 2016. Lance T. Gant, Manager, Rotorcraft Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2016–24741 Filed 10–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (e) Required Actions Within 10 hours time-in-service (TIS): (1) Revise the Airworthiness Limitations section of the applicable maintenance manual or Instructions for Continued Airworthiness (ICA) to establish a life limit of 5,000 hours TIS for each bolt P/N MS21250–08083. (2) Determine the number of hours TIS for each bolt and update the helicopter’s historical records. If the hours TIS is unknown, calculate the number of hours TIS by counting the helicopter’s hours TIS beginning January 1, 2009. (3) Remove from service each bolt that has reached or exceeded its life limit. Federal Aviation Administration (f) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Safety Management Group, FAA, may approve AMOCs for this AD. Send your proposal to: Matt Fuller, Senior Aviation Safety Engineer, Safety SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2016–0069; Directorate Identifier 2016–NE–01–AD; Amendment 39– 18685; AD 2016–21–04] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors, Inc. Reciprocating Engines Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) TSIO– 550–K, TSIOF–550–K, TSIO–550–C, TSIOF–550–D, and TSIO–550–N reciprocating engines. This AD was E:\FR\FM\14OCR1.SGM 14OCR1 70930 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 199 / Friday, October 14, 2016 / Rules and Regulations prompted by a report of an uncommanded in-flight shutdown (IFSD) resulting in injuries and significant airplane damage. This AD requires replacing the oil cooler cross fitting assembly. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the oil cooler cross fitting and engine, IFSD, and loss of the airplane. DATES: This AD is effective November 18, 2016. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in this AD as of November 18, 2016. ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, contact Continental Motors, Inc., 2039 Broad Street, Mobile, Alabama 36615; phone: 800–326–0089; Internet: http:// www.continentalmotors.aero. You may view this service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781–238– 7125. ehiers on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2016– 0069; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The address for the Docket Office (phone: 800–647–5527) is Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Hopper, Aerospace Engineer, Atlanta Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 1701 Columbia Avenue, College Park, GA 30337; phone: 404–474–5535; fax: 404– 474–5606; email: scott.hopper@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to certain CMI TSIO–550–K, TSIOF–550–K, TSIO–550–C, TSIOF– 550–D, and TSIO–550–N reciprocating engines. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on March 11, 2016 (81 FR 12833). The NPRM was prompted by a report of an uncommanded IFSD resulting in injuries and significant VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:00 Oct 13, 2016 Jkt 241001 airplane damage. The NPRM proposed to require replacing the oil cooler cross fitting assembly. We are issuing this AD to correct the unsafe condition on these products. Comments We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing this AD. We received no comments on the NPRM or on the determination of the cost to the public. Change to Cost of Compliance We increased our estimate of the cost of the affected parts in this AD from $0 to $261 per engine and increased the number of labor hours to perform the replacement from 1 to 2 hours. This increased the overall estimated cost of compliance from $111,095 to $563,317. Update to Service Information We revised our reference in this AD from CMI Critical Service Bulletin (CSB) CSB15–7, Revision A, dated November 10, 2015 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–7A, dated November 10, 2015) to CMI CSB CSB15–7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–7B) to reflect the latest service information published by CMI. Clarification of Part Number We clarified in this AD that the affected oil cooler cross fitting has a part number AN918–1J or AN918–2J. Conclusion We reviewed the relevant data and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this AD as proposed except for the changes noted above. We have determined that these changes: • Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the NPRM for correcting the unsafe condition; and • Do not add any additional burden upon the public than was already proposed in the NPRM. Relevant Service Information Under 1 CFR part 51 We reviewed CMI CSB CSB15–2, Revision C, dated November 9, 2015 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–2C, dated November 9, 2015), and CMI CSB CSB15–7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–7B, dated April 26, 2016). The CSBs describe detailed procedures for replacing oil cooler cross fittings, nipples, and bushings with a redesigned oil cooler cross fitting. This service information is reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it through their normal course of business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD affects 1,307 engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 2 hours per engine to comply with this AD. The average labor rate is $85 per hour. Parts cost about $261 per engine. Based on these figures, we estimate the total cost of this AD to U.S. operators to be $563,317. Our cost estimate is exclusive of possible warranty coverage. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent that it justifies making a regulatory distinction, and (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. E:\FR\FM\14OCR1.SGM 14OCR1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 199 / Friday, October 14, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: (g) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) The Manager, Atlanta Certification Office, FAA, may approve AMOCs for this AD. Use the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19 to make your request. PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES (h) Related Information For more information about this AD, contact Scott Hopper, Aerospace Engineer, Atlanta Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 1701 Columbia Avenue, College Park, GA 30337; phone: 404–474–5535; fax: 404–474–5606; email: scott.hopper@faa.gov. 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): ■ 2016–21–04 Continental Motors, Inc. (Type Certificate previously held by Teledyne Continental Motors) Reciprocating Engines: Amendment 39–18685; Docket No. FAA–2016–0069; Directorate Identifier 2016–NE–01–AD. (a) Effective Date This AD is effective November 18, 2016. (b) Affected ADs None. (c) Applicability This AD applies to Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) TSIO–550–K, TSIOF–550–K, TSIO–550–C, TSIOF–550–D, and TSIO–550– N reciprocating engines with an engine serial number below 1012296 and an oil cooler cross fitting, part number AN918–1J or AN918–2J, installed. (d) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded in-flight shutdown (IFSD) resulting in injuries and significant airplane damage. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the oil cooler cross fitting and engine, IFSD, and loss of the airplane. ehiers on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES (e) Compliance Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done. (1) Within 12 months or 100 flight hours after the effective date of the AD, whichever occurs first, replace the oil cooler cross fitting, nipple, and bushing. Use the Action Required paragraphs III.1 through III.8 of CMI Critical Service Bulletin (CSB) CSB15–2, Revision C, dated November 9, 2015 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–2C, dated November 9, 2015), or the Action Required paragraphs III.1 through III.8 of CMI CSB CSB15–7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also referred to as CMI CSB15–7B, dated April 26, 2016), to perform the replacement. (2) Reserved. (f) Credit for Previous Actions You may take credit for the replacement that is required by paragraph (e) of this AD, if the replacement was performed before the effective date of this AD using CMI CSB CSB15–2B, dated November 6, 2015 or earlier versions; or CSB CSB15–7A, dated November 10, 2015 or earlier version. VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:00 Oct 13, 2016 Jkt 241001 (i) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. (i) Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) Critical Service Bulletin (CSB) CSB15–2, Revision C, dated November 9, 2015 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–2C, dated November 9, 2015). (ii) CMI CSB CSB15–7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15–7B, dated April 26, 2016). (3) For CMI service information identified in this AD, contact Continental Motors, Inc., 2039 Broad Street, Mobile, Alabama 36615; phone: 800–326–0089; Internet: http:// www.continentalmotors.aero. (4) You may view this service information at FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781–238–7125. (5) You may view this service information at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http:// www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibrlocations.html. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on October 7, 2016. Colleen M. D’Alessandro, Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2016–24794 Filed 10–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 95 [Docket No. 31102; Amdt. No. 529] IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 70931 This amendment adopts miscellaneous amendments to the required IFR (instrument flight rules) altitudes and changeover points for certain Federal airways, jet routes, or direct routes for which a minimum or maximum en route authorized IFR altitude is prescribed. This regulatory action is needed because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System. These changes are designed to provide for the safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace under instrument conditions in the affected areas. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC, November 10, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas J Nichols, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AMCAFS–420), Flight Technologies and Programs Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, 6500 South MacArthur Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK, 73169 (Mail Address: P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125). Telephone: (405) 954–4164. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This amendment to part 95 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (14 CFR part 95) amends, suspends, or revokes IFR altitudes governing the operation of all aircraft in flight over a specified route or any portion of that route, as well as the changeover points (COPs) for Federal airways, jet routes, or direct routes as prescribed in part 95. SUMMARY: The Rule The specified IFR altitudes, when used in conjunction with the prescribed changeover points for those routes, ensure navigation aid coverage that is adequate for safe flight operations and free of frequency interference. The reasons and circumstances that create the need for this amendment involve matters of flight safety and operational efficiency in the National Airspace System, are related to published aeronautical charts that are essential to the user, and provide for the safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace. In addition, those various reasons or circumstances require making this amendment effective before the next scheduled charting and publication date of the flight information to assure its timely availability to the user. The effective date of this amendment reflects those considerations. In view of the close and immediate relationship between these regulatory changes and safety in air commerce, I find that notice and public procedure before adopting this amendment are impracticable and contrary to the public interest and that good cause exists for making the E:\FR\FM\14OCR1.SGM 14OCR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 199 (Friday, October 14, 2016)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 70929-70931]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-24794]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2016-0069; Directorate Identifier 2016-NE-01-AD; 
Amendment 39-18685; AD 2016-21-04]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors, Inc. Reciprocating 
Engines

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain 
Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) TSIO-550-K, TSIOF-550-K, TSIO-550-C, 
TSIOF-550-D, and TSIO-550-N reciprocating engines. This AD was

[[Page 70930]]

prompted by a report of an uncommanded in-flight shutdown (IFSD) 
resulting in injuries and significant airplane damage. This AD requires 
replacing the oil cooler cross fitting assembly. We are issuing this AD 
to prevent failure of the oil cooler cross fitting and engine, IFSD, 
and loss of the airplane.

DATES: This AD is effective November 18, 2016.
    The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by 
reference of certain publications listed in this AD as of November 18, 
2016.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, 
contact Continental Motors, Inc., 2039 Broad Street, Mobile, Alabama 
36615; phone: 800-326-0089; Internet: http://www.continentalmotors.aero. You may view this service information at 
the FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, 
Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at 
the FAA, call 781-238-7125.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA-2016-
0069; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 
5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket 
contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and 
other information. The address for the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-
5527) is Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, 
Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Hopper, Aerospace Engineer, 
Atlanta Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 
1701 Columbia Avenue, College Park, GA 30337; phone: 404-474-5535; fax: 
404-474-5606; email: scott.hopper@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Discussion

    We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR 
part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to certain CMI TSIO-550-K, 
TSIOF-550-K, TSIO-550-C, TSIOF-550-D, and TSIO-550-N reciprocating 
engines. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on March 11, 2016 
(81 FR 12833). The NPRM was prompted by a report of an uncommanded IFSD 
resulting in injuries and significant airplane damage. The NPRM 
proposed to require replacing the oil cooler cross fitting assembly. We 
are issuing this AD to correct the unsafe condition on these products.

Comments

    We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing 
this AD. We received no comments on the NPRM or on the determination of 
the cost to the public.

Change to Cost of Compliance

    We increased our estimate of the cost of the affected parts in this 
AD from $0 to $261 per engine and increased the number of labor hours 
to perform the replacement from 1 to 2 hours. This increased the 
overall estimated cost of compliance from $111,095 to $563,317.

Update to Service Information

    We revised our reference in this AD from CMI Critical Service 
Bulletin (CSB) CSB15-7, Revision A, dated November 10, 2015 (also 
referred to as CMI CSB CSB15-7A, dated November 10, 2015) to CMI CSB 
CSB15-7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also referred to as CMI CSB 
CSB15-7B) to reflect the latest service information published by CMI.

Clarification of Part Number

    We clarified in this AD that the affected oil cooler cross fitting 
has a part number AN918-1J or AN918-2J.

Conclusion

    We reviewed the relevant data and determined that air safety and 
the public interest require adopting this AD as proposed except for the 
changes noted above. We have determined that these changes:
     Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the 
NPRM for correcting the unsafe condition; and
     Do not add any additional burden upon the public than was 
already proposed in the NPRM.

Relevant Service Information Under 1 CFR part 51

    We reviewed CMI CSB CSB15-2, Revision C, dated November 9, 2015 
(also referred to as CMI CSB CSB15-2C, dated November 9, 2015), and CMI 
CSB CSB15-7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also referred to as CMI 
CSB CSB15-7B, dated April 26, 2016). The CSBs describe detailed 
procedures for replacing oil cooler cross fittings, nipples, and 
bushings with a redesigned oil cooler cross fitting. This service 
information is reasonably available because the interested parties have 
access to it through their normal course of business or by the means 
identified in the ADDRESSES section.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that this AD affects 1,307 engines installed on 
airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 2 
hours per engine to comply with this AD. The average labor rate is $85 
per hour. Parts cost about $261 per engine. Based on these figures, we 
estimate the total cost of this AD to U.S. operators to be $563,317. 
Our cost estimate is exclusive of possible warranty coverage.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 
13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, 
on the relationship between the national government and the States, or 
on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various 
levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866,
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
    (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent 
that it justifies making a regulatory distinction, and
    (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

[[Page 70931]]

Adoption of the Amendment

    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13   [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive (AD):

2016-21-04 Continental Motors, Inc. (Type Certificate previously 
held by Teledyne Continental Motors) Reciprocating Engines: 
Amendment 39-18685; Docket No. FAA-2016-0069; Directorate Identifier 
2016-NE-01-AD.

(a) Effective Date

    This AD is effective November 18, 2016.

(b) Affected ADs

    None.

(c) Applicability

    This AD applies to Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) TSIO-550-K, 
TSIOF-550-K, TSIO-550-C, TSIOF-550-D, and TSIO-550-N reciprocating 
engines with an engine serial number below 1012296 and an oil cooler 
cross fitting, part number AN918-1J or AN918-2J, installed.

(d) Unsafe Condition

    This AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded in-flight 
shutdown (IFSD) resulting in injuries and significant airplane 
damage. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the oil cooler 
cross fitting and engine, IFSD, and loss of the airplane.

(e) Compliance

    Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, 
unless already done.
    (1) Within 12 months or 100 flight hours after the effective 
date of the AD, whichever occurs first, replace the oil cooler cross 
fitting, nipple, and bushing. Use the Action Required paragraphs 
III.1 through III.8 of CMI Critical Service Bulletin (CSB) CSB15-2, 
Revision C, dated November 9, 2015 (also referred to as CMI CSB 
CSB15-2C, dated November 9, 2015), or the Action Required paragraphs 
III.1 through III.8 of CMI CSB CSB15-7, Revision B, dated April 26, 
2016 (also referred to as CMI CSB15-7B, dated April 26, 2016), to 
perform the replacement.
    (2) Reserved.

(f) Credit for Previous Actions

    You may take credit for the replacement that is required by 
paragraph (e) of this AD, if the replacement was performed before 
the effective date of this AD using CMI CSB CSB15-2B, dated November 
6, 2015 or earlier versions; or CSB CSB15-7A, dated November 10, 
2015 or earlier version.

(g) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    The Manager, Atlanta Certification Office, FAA, may approve 
AMOCs for this AD. Use the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19 to make 
your request.

(h) Related Information

    For more information about this AD, contact Scott Hopper, 
Aerospace Engineer, Atlanta Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, 
Small Airplane Directorate, 1701 Columbia Avenue, College Park, GA 
30337; phone: 404-474-5535; fax: 404-474-5606; email: 
scott.hopper@faa.gov.

(i) Material Incorporated by Reference

    (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the 
incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed 
in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.
    (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do 
the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise.
    (i) Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) Critical Service Bulletin 
(CSB) CSB15-2, Revision C, dated November 9, 2015 (also referred to 
as CMI CSB CSB15-2C, dated November 9, 2015).
    (ii) CMI CSB CSB15-7, Revision B, dated April 26, 2016 (also 
referred to as CMI CSB CSB15-7B, dated April 26, 2016).
    (3) For CMI service information identified in this AD, contact 
Continental Motors, Inc., 2039 Broad Street, Mobile, Alabama 36615; 
phone: 800-326-0089; Internet: http://www.continentalmotors.aero.
    (4) You may view this service information at FAA, Engine & 
Propeller Directorate, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA. For 
information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 
781-238-7125.
    (5) You may view this service information at the National 
Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the 
availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: 
http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.

    Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on October 7, 2016.
Colleen M. D'Alessandro,
Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 2016-24794 Filed 10-13-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P