Disposal of Consumer Report Information and Records, 63435-63437 [2016-22198]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 179 / Thursday, September 15, 2016 / Proposed Rules List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. The Proposed Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): ■ The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA– 2016–9075; Directorate Identifier 2016– NM–082–AD. (a) Comments Due Date We must receive comments by October 31, 2016. (b) Affected ADs None. (c) Applicability This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 787–8 and 787–9 airplanes, certificated in any category, as identified in Boeing Alert Service Bulletin B787–81205– SB570029–00, Issue 001, dated February 23, 2016. (d) Subject Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 57; Wings. (e) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by a report indicating that a portion of the sealant above the engine pylon between the wing skin and the vapor barrier may have been omitted. We are issuing this AD to detect and correct missing sealant above the engine pylon between the wing skin and the vapor barrier, which can create an unintended leak path for fuel, potentially draining onto the aft fairing heat shield and onto hot engine parts or brakes, which could lead to a major ground fire. rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS (f) Compliance Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done. (g) Inspection and Corrective Actions Within 60 months after the effective date of this AD: Do a general visual inspection for missing sealant in the seam on the outside and inside of the engine struts; and do all applicable corrective actions; in accordance with the Accomplishment Instructions of Boeing Alert Service Bulletin B787–81205– SB570029–00, Issue 001, dated February 23, 2016. Do all applicable corrective actions before further flight. VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:41 Sep 14, 2016 Jkt 238001 (h) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the ACO, send it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (i)(1) of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOCRequests@faa.gov. (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be used for any repair, modification, or alteration required by this AD if it is approved by the Boeing Commercial Airplanes Organization Designation Authorization (ODA) that has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle ACO, to make those findings. To be approved, the repair method, modification deviation, or alteration deviation must meet the certification basis of the airplane, and the approval must specifically refer to this AD. (4) For service information that contains steps that are labeled as Required for Compliance (RC), the provisions of paragraphs (h)(4)(i) and (h)(4)(ii) of this AD apply. (i) The steps labeled as RC, including substeps under an RC step and any figures identified in an RC step, must be done to comply with the AD. If a step or sub-step is labeled ‘‘RC Exempt,’’ then the RC requirement is removed from that step or sub-step. An AMOC is required for any deviations to RC steps, including substeps and identified figures. (ii) Steps not labeled as RC may be deviated from using accepted methods in accordance with the operator’s maintenance or inspection program without obtaining approval of an AMOC, provided the RC steps, including substeps and identified figures, can still be done as specified, and the airplane can be put back in an airworthy condition. (i) Related Information (1) For more information about this AD, contact Sherry Vevea, Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Branch, ANM–140S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA 98057–3356; phone: 425 917 6514; fax: 425 917 6590; email: sherry.vevea@faa.gov. (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, P. O. Box 3707, MC 2H–65, Seattle, WA 98124–2207; telephone 206– 544–5000, extension 1; fax 206–766–5680; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may view this referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425–227–1221. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 63435 Issued in Renton, Washington, on September 6, 2016. Michael Kaszycki, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2016–22101 Filed 9–14–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 682 RIN 3084–AB41 Disposal of Consumer Report Information and Records Federal Trade Commission. Request for public comment. AGENCY: ACTION: The Federal Trade Commission (‘‘FTC’’ or ‘‘The Commission) requests public comment on its rule regarding Disposal of Consumer Report Information and Records (‘‘Disposal Rule’’ or ‘‘Rule’’). The Commission is soliciting comment as part of the FTC’s systematic review of all current Commission regulations and guides. DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 21, 2016. ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper by following the Instructions for Submitting Comments part of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ‘‘Disposal Rule, 16 CFR part 682, Project No. 165410’’ on your comment and file your comment online at https://ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ ftc/disposalrule by following the instructions on the web-based form. If you prefer to file your comment on paper, write ‘‘Disposal Rule, 16 CFR part 682, Project No. 165410’’ on your comment and on the envelope and mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC–5610 (Annex H), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex H), Washington, DC 20024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tiffany George, Division of Privacy and Identity Protection, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20580, (202) 326–3040. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Background The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (‘‘FACTA’’ or ‘‘Act’’) E:\FR\FM\15SEP1.SGM 15SEP1 63436 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 179 / Thursday, September 15, 2016 / Proposed Rules was enacted in 2003. In part, the Act amends the Fair Credit Reporting Act (‘‘FCRA’’) by imposing a requirement that any person that maintains or otherwise possesses consumer information, or any compilation of consumer information, derived from consumer reports for a business purpose, properly dispose of any such information or compilation.1 The Act also required the Commission and other federal agencies to promulgate rules regarding this requirement.2 Further, the Act directed the Commission and other federal agencies to ensure that the rules were consistent with the requirements of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (‘‘GLBA’’).3 Pursuant to the Act’s directive, the Commission promulgated the Disposal Rule in 2004. The Disposal Rule provides that, unless otherwise stated, terms used in the Rule have the same meaning as set forth in the FCRA.4 The Rule defines ‘‘consumer information’’ as any record about an individual, whether in paper, electronic, or other form, that is a consumer report or is derived from a consumer report. Consumer information also means a compilation of such records. Consumer information does not include information that does not identify individuals, such as aggregate information or blind data.5 In addition, ‘‘dispose,’’ ‘‘disposing,’’ or ‘‘disposal’’ is defined as (1) The discarding or abandonment of consumer information, or (2) The sale, donation, or transfer of any medium, including computer equipment, upon which consumer information is stored.6 The Disposal Rule requires that persons over which the FTC has jurisdiction who maintain or otherwise possess consumer information for a business purpose properly dispose of such information by taking reasonable measures to protect against unauthorized access to or use of the information in connection with its disposal.7 It also includes several examples of what the Commission 1 15 U.S.C. 1681w. other agencies are the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Federal banking agencies, and the National Credit Union Administration. Id. 3 Id. The other agencies have incorporated the Disposal Rule requirements into their Safeguards rules and guidelines. See 12 CFR part 30, app. B (Office of the Comptroller of the Currency); 12 CFR part 208, app. D–2 and 12 CFR part 225, app. F (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System); 12 CFR part 364, app. B (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation); 12 CFR part 748, app. A (National Credit Union Administration); 17 CFR 248.30 (Securities and Exchange Commission). 4 16 CFR 682.1(a). 5 16 CFR 682.1(b). 6 16 CFR 682.1(c). 7 16 CFR 682.2(b), 682.3(a). rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS 2 The VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:41 Sep 14, 2016 Jkt 238001 believes constitute reasonable measures to protect consumer information in connection with its disposal.8 These examples are intended to provide covered entities with guidance on how to comply with the Rule but are not intended to be safe harbors or exclusive methods for compliance.9 The Rule uses a flexible ‘‘reasonable measures’’ standard. The FTC realizes that there are few foolproof methods of record destruction and that entities covered by the Rule must consider their own unique circumstances when determining how to comply with the Rule. The Disposal Rule became effective on June 1, 2005. II. Regulatory Review of the Disposal Rule The Commission periodically reviews all of its rules and guides. These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of the agency’s rules and guides, and their regulatory and economic impact. The information obtained assists the Commission in identifying those rules and guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, the Commission solicits comments on, among other things, the economic impact and benefits of the Rule; possible conflict between the Rule and state, local, or other federal laws or regulations; and the effect on the Rule of any technological, economic, or other industry changes. III. Issues for Comment The Commission requests written comment on any or all of the following questions. These questions are designed to assist the public and should not be construed as a limitation on the issues about which public comments may be submitted. The Commission requests that responses to its questions be as specific as possible, including a reference to the question being answered, and refer to empirical data or other evidence upon which the comment is based whenever available and appropriate. A. General Issues 1. Is there a continuing need for specific provisions of the Rule? Why or why not? 2. What benefits has the Rule provided to consumers? What evidence supports the asserted benefits? 3. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to increase its benefits to consumers? 8 16 CFR 682.3(b). 9 Id. PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications? b. How would these modifications affect the costs the Rule imposes on businesses, including small businesses? 4. What significant costs, if any, has the Rule imposed on consumers? What evidence supports the asserted costs? 5. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to reduce any costs imposed on consumers? a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications? b. How would these modifications affect the benefits provided by the Rule? 6. What benefits, if any, has the Rule provided to businesses, including small businesses? What evidence supports the asserted benefits? 7. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to increase its benefits to businesses, including small businesses? a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications? b. How would these modifications affect the costs the Rule imposes on businesses, including small businesses? c. How would these modifications affect the benefits to consumers? 8. What significant costs, if any, including costs of compliance, has the Rule imposed on businesses, including small businesses? What evidence supports the asserted costs? 9. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to reduce the costs imposed on businesses, including small businesses? a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications? b. How would these modifications affect the benefits provided by the Rule? 10. What evidence is available concerning the degree of industry compliance with the Rule? 11. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to account for changes in relevant technology or economic conditions? What evidence supports the proposed modifications? 12. Does the Rule overlap or conflict with other federal, state, or local laws or regulations? If so, how? a. What evidence supports the asserted conflicts? b. With reference to the asserted conflicts, should the Rule be modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not? B. Specific Issues 1. Should the Rule be modified to include more specific and prescriptive requirements for disposing of consumer information? Why or why not? If so, what requirements should be included and what sources should they be drawn from? a. What evidence supports such a modification? E:\FR\FM\15SEP1.SGM 15SEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 179 / Thursday, September 15, 2016 / Proposed Rules rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on businesses, including small businesses? c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers? 2. Should the Rule be modified to delete any of the existing examples or include additional examples to illustrate proper methods for disposing of consumer information? Why or why not? If so, what examples should be included and what sources should they be drawn from? a. What evidence supports such a modification? b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on businesses, including small businesses? c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers? 3. Should the Rule be modified to reference or incorporate any other information destruction standards or frameworks? If so, which standards should be incorporated or referenced and how should they be referenced or incorporated by the Rule? Should such standards be considered safe harbors for compliance with the Rule? a. What evidence supports such a modification? b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on businesses, including small businesses? c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers? 4. Under the current Disposal Rule, ‘‘Consumer information does not include information that does not identify individuals, such as aggregate information or blind data.’’ Should the Rule be modified to change the definition of ‘‘consumer information’’? Should the definition of ‘‘consumer information’’ include information that can be reasonably linked to an individual in light of changes in relevant technology or market practices? Should the Rule be modified to define ‘‘aggregate information’’ or ‘‘blind data’’? a. What evidence supports such a modification? b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on businesses, including small businesses? c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers? IV. Instructions for Submitting Comments You can file a comment online or on paper. For the Commission to consider your comment, we must receive it on or before November 21, 2016. Write ‘‘Disposal Rule, 16 CFR part 682, Project No. 165410’’ on the comment. Your comment, including your name and your state, will be placed on the public VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:41 Sep 14, 2016 Jkt 238001 record of this proceeding, including, to the extent practicable, on the public Commission Web site, at https:// www.ftc.gov/policy/public-comments. As a matter of discretion, the Commission tries to remove individuals’ home contact information from comments before placing them on the Commission Web site. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive personal information, such as a Social Security number, date of birth, driver’s license number or other state identification number or foreign country equivalent, passport number, financial account number, or payment card number. You are also solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive health information, such as medical records or other individually identifiable health information. In addition, do not include any ‘‘[t]rade secret or any commercial or financial information which is . . . privileged or confidential,’’ as discussed in Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and FTC Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2). In particular, do not include competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or customer names. If you want the Commission to give your comment confidential treatment, you must file it in paper form, with a request for confidential treatment, and you must follow the procedure explained in FTC Rule 4.9(c), 16 CFR 4.9(c). In particular, the written request for confidential treatment that accompanies the comment must include the factual and legal basis for the request, and must identify the specific portions of the comments to be withheld from the public record. Your comment will be kept confidential only if the FTC General Counsel grants your request in accordance with the law and the public interest. Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit your comment online. To make sure that the Commission considers your online comment, you must file it at https:// ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/ disposalrule by following the instructions on the web-based form. If this document appears at http:// wwww.regulations.gov, you also may file a comment through that Web site. If you file your comment on paper, write ‘‘Disposal Rule, 16 CFR part 682, Project No. 165410’’ on your comment PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 63437 and on the envelope, and mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC–5610 (Annex H), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex H), Washington, DC 20024. Visit the Commission Web site at https://www.ftc.gov to read this document and the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers permit the collection of public comments to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. The Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments that it receives on or before November 21, 2016. For information on the Commission’s privacy policy, including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, see https://www.ftc.gov/siteinformation/privacy-policy. By direction of the Commission. Donald S. Clark, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2016–22198 Filed 9–14–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6750–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG–2016–0777] RIN 1625–AA08 Special Local Regulation; San Diego Sharkfest Swim; San Diego Bay, CA Coast Guard, DHS. Notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: ACTION: The Coast Guard is temporarily changing the enforcement date and the location of the special local regulation for the annual San Diego Sharkfest Swim event held on the navigable waters of San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. The change of enforcement date and the location for the special local regulation is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the event. This action will restrict vessel traffic in the waters of the San Diego Bay, California, from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on October 2, 2016, from Fifth Avenue Landing to Tidelands Park, Coronado, CA. We invite your comments on this proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\15SEP1.SGM 15SEP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 179 (Thursday, September 15, 2016)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 63435-63437]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-22198]


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FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

16 CFR Part 682

RIN 3084-AB41


Disposal of Consumer Report Information and Records

AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission.

ACTION: Request for public comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``The Commission) 
requests public comment on its rule regarding Disposal of Consumer 
Report Information and Records (``Disposal Rule'' or ``Rule''). The 
Commission is soliciting comment as part of the FTC's systematic review 
of all current Commission regulations and guides.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 21, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper by 
following the Instructions for Submitting Comments part of the 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Disposal Rule, 16 CFR 
part 682, Project No. 165410'' on your comment and file your comment 
online at https://ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/disposalrule by 
following the instructions on the web-based form. If you prefer to file 
your comment on paper, write ``Disposal Rule, 16 CFR part 682, Project 
No. 165410'' on your comment and on the envelope and mail your comment 
to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the 
Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC-5610 (Annex H), 
Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: 
Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 
400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex H), Washington, DC 
20024.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tiffany George, Division of Privacy 
and Identity Protection, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade 
Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20580, (202) 
326-3040.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Background

    The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (``FACTA'' or 
``Act'')

[[Page 63436]]

was enacted in 2003. In part, the Act amends the Fair Credit Reporting 
Act (``FCRA'') by imposing a requirement that any person that maintains 
or otherwise possesses consumer information, or any compilation of 
consumer information, derived from consumer reports for a business 
purpose, properly dispose of any such information or compilation.\1\ 
The Act also required the Commission and other federal agencies to 
promulgate rules regarding this requirement.\2\ Further, the Act 
directed the Commission and other federal agencies to ensure that the 
rules were consistent with the requirements of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley 
Act (``GLBA'').\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ 15 U.S.C. 1681w.
    \2\ The other agencies are the Securities and Exchange 
Commission, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Federal 
banking agencies, and the National Credit Union Administration. Id.
    \3\ Id. The other agencies have incorporated the Disposal Rule 
requirements into their Safeguards rules and guidelines. See 12 CFR 
part 30, app. B (Office of the Comptroller of the Currency); 12 CFR 
part 208, app. D-2 and 12 CFR part 225, app. F (Board of Governors 
of the Federal Reserve System); 12 CFR part 364, app. B (Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation); 12 CFR part 748, app. A (National 
Credit Union Administration); 17 CFR 248.30 (Securities and Exchange 
Commission).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Pursuant to the Act's directive, the Commission promulgated the 
Disposal Rule in 2004. The Disposal Rule provides that, unless 
otherwise stated, terms used in the Rule have the same meaning as set 
forth in the FCRA.\4\ The Rule defines ``consumer information'' as any 
record about an individual, whether in paper, electronic, or other 
form, that is a consumer report or is derived from a consumer report. 
Consumer information also means a compilation of such records. Consumer 
information does not include information that does not identify 
individuals, such as aggregate information or blind data.\5\ In 
addition, ``dispose,'' ``disposing,'' or ``disposal'' is defined as (1) 
The discarding or abandonment of consumer information, or (2) The sale, 
donation, or transfer of any medium, including computer equipment, upon 
which consumer information is stored.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ 16 CFR 682.1(a).
    \5\ 16 CFR 682.1(b).
    \6\ 16 CFR 682.1(c).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Disposal Rule requires that persons over which the FTC has 
jurisdiction who maintain or otherwise possess consumer information for 
a business purpose properly dispose of such information by taking 
reasonable measures to protect against unauthorized access to or use of 
the information in connection with its disposal.\7\ It also includes 
several examples of what the Commission believes constitute reasonable 
measures to protect consumer information in connection with its 
disposal.\8\ These examples are intended to provide covered entities 
with guidance on how to comply with the Rule but are not intended to be 
safe harbors or exclusive methods for compliance.\9\ The Rule uses a 
flexible ``reasonable measures'' standard. The FTC realizes that there 
are few foolproof methods of record destruction and that entities 
covered by the Rule must consider their own unique circumstances when 
determining how to comply with the Rule.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ 16 CFR 682.2(b), 682.3(a).
    \8\ 16 CFR 682.3(b).
    \9\ Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Disposal Rule became effective on June 1, 2005.

II. Regulatory Review of the Disposal Rule

    The Commission periodically reviews all of its rules and guides. 
These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of the 
agency's rules and guides, and their regulatory and economic impact. 
The information obtained assists the Commission in identifying those 
rules and guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, 
the Commission solicits comments on, among other things, the economic 
impact and benefits of the Rule; possible conflict between the Rule and 
state, local, or other federal laws or regulations; and the effect on 
the Rule of any technological, economic, or other industry changes.

III. Issues for Comment

    The Commission requests written comment on any or all of the 
following questions. These questions are designed to assist the public 
and should not be construed as a limitation on the issues about which 
public comments may be submitted. The Commission requests that 
responses to its questions be as specific as possible, including a 
reference to the question being answered, and refer to empirical data 
or other evidence upon which the comment is based whenever available 
and appropriate.

A. General Issues

    1. Is there a continuing need for specific provisions of the Rule? 
Why or why not?
    2. What benefits has the Rule provided to consumers? What evidence 
supports the asserted benefits?
    3. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to 
increase its benefits to consumers?
    a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications?
    b. How would these modifications affect the costs the Rule imposes 
on businesses, including small businesses?
    4. What significant costs, if any, has the Rule imposed on 
consumers? What evidence supports the asserted costs?
    5. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to reduce 
any costs imposed on consumers?
    a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications?
    b. How would these modifications affect the benefits provided by 
the Rule?
    6. What benefits, if any, has the Rule provided to businesses, 
including small businesses? What evidence supports the asserted 
benefits?
    7. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to 
increase its benefits to businesses, including small businesses?
    a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications?
    b. How would these modifications affect the costs the Rule imposes 
on businesses, including small businesses?
    c. How would these modifications affect the benefits to consumers?
    8. What significant costs, if any, including costs of compliance, 
has the Rule imposed on businesses, including small businesses? What 
evidence supports the asserted costs?
    9. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to reduce 
the costs imposed on businesses, including small businesses?
    a. What evidence supports the proposed modifications?
    b. How would these modifications affect the benefits provided by 
the Rule?
    10. What evidence is available concerning the degree of industry 
compliance with the Rule?
    11. What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rule to 
account for changes in relevant technology or economic conditions? What 
evidence supports the proposed modifications?
    12. Does the Rule overlap or conflict with other federal, state, or 
local laws or regulations? If so, how?
    a. What evidence supports the asserted conflicts?
    b. With reference to the asserted conflicts, should the Rule be 
modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not?

B. Specific Issues

    1. Should the Rule be modified to include more specific and 
prescriptive requirements for disposing of consumer information? Why or 
why not? If so, what requirements should be included and what sources 
should they be drawn from?
    a. What evidence supports such a modification?

[[Page 63437]]

    b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on 
businesses, including small businesses?
    c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers?
    2. Should the Rule be modified to delete any of the existing 
examples or include additional examples to illustrate proper methods 
for disposing of consumer information? Why or why not? If so, what 
examples should be included and what sources should they be drawn from?
    a. What evidence supports such a modification?
    b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on 
businesses, including small businesses?
    c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers?
    3. Should the Rule be modified to reference or incorporate any 
other information destruction standards or frameworks? If so, which 
standards should be incorporated or referenced and how should they be 
referenced or incorporated by the Rule? Should such standards be 
considered safe harbors for compliance with the Rule?
    a. What evidence supports such a modification?
    b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on 
businesses, including small businesses?
    c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers?
    4. Under the current Disposal Rule, ``Consumer information does not 
include information that does not identify individuals, such as 
aggregate information or blind data.'' Should the Rule be modified to 
change the definition of ``consumer information''? Should the 
definition of ``consumer information'' include information that can be 
reasonably linked to an individual in light of changes in relevant 
technology or market practices? Should the Rule be modified to define 
``aggregate information'' or ``blind data''?
    a. What evidence supports such a modification?
    b. How would this modification affect the costs the Rule imposes on 
businesses, including small businesses?
    c. How would this modification affect the benefits to consumers?

IV. Instructions for Submitting Comments

    You can file a comment online or on paper. For the Commission to 
consider your comment, we must receive it on or before November 21, 
2016. Write ``Disposal Rule, 16 CFR part 682, Project No. 165410'' on 
the comment. Your comment, including your name and your state, will be 
placed on the public record of this proceeding, including, to the 
extent practicable, on the public Commission Web site, at https://www.ftc.gov/policy/public-comments. As a matter of discretion, the 
Commission tries to remove individuals' home contact information from 
comments before placing them on the Commission Web site. Because your 
comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for making sure 
that your comment does not include any sensitive personal information, 
such as a Social Security number, date of birth, driver's license 
number or other state identification number or foreign country 
equivalent, passport number, financial account number, or payment card 
number. You are also solely responsible for making sure that your 
comment does not include any sensitive health information, such as 
medical records or other individually identifiable health information.
    In addition, do not include any ``[t]rade secret or any commercial 
or financial information which is . . . privileged or confidential,'' 
as discussed in Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and FTC 
Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2). In particular, do not include 
competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, 
inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or 
customer names.
    If you want the Commission to give your comment confidential 
treatment, you must file it in paper form, with a request for 
confidential treatment, and you must follow the procedure explained in 
FTC Rule 4.9(c), 16 CFR 4.9(c). In particular, the written request for 
confidential treatment that accompanies the comment must include the 
factual and legal basis for the request, and must identify the specific 
portions of the comments to be withheld from the public record. Your 
comment will be kept confidential only if the FTC General Counsel 
grants your request in accordance with the law and the public interest.
    Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to 
heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit 
your comment online. To make sure that the Commission considers your 
online comment, you must file it at https://ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/disposalrule by following the instructions on the web-based form. 
If this document appears at http://wwww.regulations.gov, you also may 
file a comment through that Web site.
    If you file your comment on paper, write ``Disposal Rule, 16 CFR 
part 682, Project No. 165410'' on your comment and on the envelope, and 
mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, 
Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC-5610 
(Annex H), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the 
following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 
Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex 
H), Washington, DC 20024.
    Visit the Commission Web site at https://www.ftc.gov to read this 
document and the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws 
that the Commission administers permit the collection of public 
comments to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. The 
Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments that 
it receives on or before November 21, 2016. For information on the 
Commission's privacy policy, including routine uses permitted by the 
Privacy Act, see https://www.ftc.gov/site-information/privacy-policy.

    By direction of the Commission.
Donald S. Clark,
Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2016-22198 Filed 9-14-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 6750-01-P