Notice Announcing the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Protest Module as the Sole CBP-Authorized Method for Filing Electronic Protests, 49685-49686 [2016-17915]

Download as PDF 49685 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 145 / Thursday, July 28, 2016 / Notices ESTIMATE OF RESPONDENT BURDEN [Note: Total burden is annualized over the 3-year clearance period] Number of respondents Instrument Average number of responses per respondent per year Total number of responses Hours per response Total annual burden hours Service Pre-Assessment Form ............................................ Training Feedback Form ...................................................... Training Follow-up Form ...................................................... Technical Assistance Follow-up Form ................................. IECMHC Cumulative Services Assessment Form .............. IECMHC Annual and Quarterly Benchmark Data Collection Forms ........................................................................ 150 112 112 30 17 6 6 4 6 1 900 672 448 180 17 .167 .167 .167 .167 .333 150.30 112.22 74.82 30.06 5.66 17 4 68 1.5 102.00 Totals ............................................................................ 438 27 2,285 ........................ 475.06 Protest Module, or to request an ACE Protest Account in the ACE Portal, contact your assigned client representative. Interested parties without an assigned client representative should direct their questions to Steven Zaccaro at steven.j.zaccaro@cbp.dhs.gov with the subject heading ‘‘ACE Protest Module.’’ Currently, CBP accepts electronic protests submitted through the Automated Broker Interface (ABI) to the Automated Commercial System (ACS), the electronic data interchange system currently authorized by CBP for this purpose. [FR Doc. 2016–17867 Filed 7–27–16; 8:45 am] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: BILLING CODE 4162–20–P Background In an effort to modernize the business processes essential to securing U.S. borders, facilitating the flow of legitimate shipments, and targeting illicit goods pursuant to the Mod Act and the Security and Accountability for Every (SAFE) Port Act of 2006 (Pub. L. 109–347, 120 Stat. 1884), CBP developed the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) to eventually replace ACS. Over the last several years, CBP has tested ACE and provided significant public outreach to ensure that the trade community is fully aware of the transition from ACS to ACE. CBP is now transitioning electronic protest filing from ACS to ACE. Upon the effective date of this notice, ACE will replace ACS as the electronic data interchange system authorized for protest filing. Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 15E57–B, Rockville, Maryland 20857, OR email a copy to summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received by September 26, 2016. Summer King, Statistician. Statutory Authority DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U. S. Customs and Border Protection Notice Announcing the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Protest Module as the Sole CBPAuthorized Method for Filing Electronic Protests U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. AGENCY: This document announces that the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Protest Module will be the sole method authorized by the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for filing electronic protests. This document also announces that CBP will no longer accept protests filed through the Automated Broker Interface (ABI) to the Automated Commercial System (ACS). Upon the effective date of this notice, ACE will replace ACS as the electronic data interchange system authorized for protest filing. DATES: Effective August 29, 2016, the ACE Protest Module will be the sole CBP-authorized method for filing electronic protests. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions related to the ACE Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:44 Jul 27, 2016 Jkt 238001 Section 514 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1514), provides that certain decisions made by CBP can be protested within 180 days of the date of liquidation, i.e., the date on which CBP’s decision becomes final. Section 645 of Subtitle B of Title VI of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 103–182, 107 Stat. 2057, December 8, 1993), commonly known as the Customs Modernization Act, or Mod Act, amended section 514(c)(1) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1514(c)(1)) to permit the transmission of such protests to CBP electronically pursuant to an electronic data interchange system. Current Regulations The CBP regulations governing protests are found in part 174 of Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 174). On January 14, 2011, CBP published a Final Rule in the Federal Register (76 FR 2573) making technical corrections to part 174 and related provisions in Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The rule amended section 174.12(b) to conform to section 514(c)(1) of the Tariff Act of 1930, allowing a protest to be transmitted electronically, using the electronic data interchange system authorized by CBP for that purpose. PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Transition From ACS to ACE ACE Protest Module as the Sole CBPAuthorized Method for the Filing of Electronic Protests This notice announces that the ACE Protest Module will be the sole CBPauthorized method for filing electronic protests. Filers who intend to submit a protest electronically must use the ACE Protest Module. The ACE Protest Module is an internet-based processing module which allows a filer to submit an electronic protest to ACE for processing by CBP. Protest filings will no longer be accepted in ACS. This transition has no effect on filers who intend to submit their protest in paper form, as specified in 19 CFR part 174. E:\FR\FM\28JYN1.SGM 28JYN1 49686 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 145 / Thursday, July 28, 2016 / Notices Dated: July 22, 2016. R. Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection. [FR Doc. 2016–17915 Filed 7–27–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R5–ES–2015–N203]; [50120–1112– 0000–F2] Receipt of an Application for an Incidental Take Permit for Karner Blue Butterfly, From the Slack Chemical Company, and Availability of Proposed Habitat Conservation Plan Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability, receipt of application. AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of an application for an Incidental Take Permit (ITP) and a proposed Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) from the Slack Chemical Company for public review and comment. We received the permit application from the Slack Chemical Company for incidental take of the endangered Karner blue butterfly resulting from the construction of a gravel access road, as well as from proposed mitigation activities over the next 10 years. Our preliminary determination is that the proposed HCP qualifies as low-effect in accordance with our Handbook for Habitat Conservation Planning and Incidental Taking Permitting Process. To make this determination, we used our Low-Effect HCP Screening Form/Environmental Action Statement (EAS), the preliminary version of which is also available for review. We provide this notice to (1) seek public comments on the proposed HCP and application; (2) seek public comments on our preliminary determination that the HCP qualifies as low-effect and is therefore eligible for a categorical exclusion under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); and (3) advise other Federal and State agencies, affected Tribes, and the public of our intent to issue an ITP. DATES: To ensure consideration, we must receive your written comments by August 29, 2016. ADDRESSES: Reviewing documents: You may obtain copies of the proposed HCP and preliminary EAS for review by any of the following methods: Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:44 Jul 27, 2016 Jkt 238001 Internet: New York Field Office Web site, at http://www.fws.gov/northeast/ nyfo/; In-person: Copies will be available for public review during regular business hours at the New York Field Office (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT); U.S. mail: You may request copies by sending a letter to the New York Field Office (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT); or Telephone: Those who do not have access to the Web site or cannot visit our office may request copies by telephone at 607–753–9334. Submitting comments: You may submit written comments by any one of the following methods: Email: FW5ES_NYFO@fws.gov. Please put Slack Chemical HCP in the subject line; or U.S. mail: Noelle Rayman-Metcalf (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Noelle Rayman-Metcalf, by U.S. mail at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, New York Field Office, 3817 Luker Road, Cortland, NY 13045; or via phone at 607–753–9334. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We received an application from the Slack Chemical Company for an ITP for take of the federally listed endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) resulting from the construction of a gravel access road, as well as from proposed mitigation activities. To minimize and mitigate for the incidental take, the Slack Chemical Company will implement a conservation program as described in its proposed HCP. We prepared a preliminary EAS to comply with NEPA. The Service will evaluate whether the proposed action, issuance of an ITP to the Slack Chemical Company, is adequate to support a categorical exclusion. We are requesting comments on the proposed HCP and our preliminary determination that the plan qualifies as low-effect under NEPA. Background Section 9 of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) and its implementing regulations prohibit the ‘‘take’’ of animal species listed as endangered or threatened. Take is defined under the Act as to ‘‘harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect listed animal species, or to attempt to engage in such conduct’’ (16 U.S.C. 1538). However, under section 10(a) of the Act, we may issue permits to authorize incidental take of listed species. ‘‘Incidental take’’ is defined by the Act as take that is incidental to, and not the purpose of, carrying out an PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 otherwise lawful activity. Regulations governing incidental take permits for threatened and endangered species, respectively, are found in the Code of Federal Regulations (October 1, 2006, 50 CFR 17.22; October 1, 2001, 50 CFR 17.32). Proposed Project Slack Chemical Company is seeking a permit for the incidental take of the Karner blue butterfly for a term of 10 years. Incidental take of this species will occur in an approximate 0.10-acre area within a National Grid right-of-way (ROW). Slack Chemical Company proposes to construct a gravel access road through the ROW to access approximately 8 acres for construction of a parking lot for their trucking fleet and a building. The project is located in Grande Industrial Park, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, New York. An additional 4.81 acres of temporary impacts to enhance Karner blue butterfly habitat will occur due to periodic mowing. Proposed covered activities include the new construction of a gravel access road, as well as periodic mowing of occupied habitat of two existing New York State Department of Environmental Conservation management areas, and one National Grid easement area, as well as the seeding of wild blue lupine and other nectar species within a 0.10 acre patch in National Grid’s ROW. The HCP’s proposed conservation strategy is designed to minimize and mitigate the impacts of covered activities on the covered species. The biological goal is to complement the existing conservation efforts in New York State for the butterfly. The proposed action consists of the issuance of an ITP and implementation of the proposed HCP. One alternative to the proposed action was considered in the HCP: No action (i.e., operation of the project without an ITP and without avoidance, minimization, or mitigation of Karner blue butterfly impacts). This alternative was deemed not practicable by Slack Chemical Company because the project would not have the important protections of the ITP and would not have the conservation benefits proposed by the Slack Chemical Company. National Environmental Policy Act We have made a preliminary determination that the Slack Chemical Company’s proposed HCP, including proposed minimization and mitigation measures, will have a minor or negligible effect on the species covered in the plan, and that the plan qualifies E:\FR\FM\28JYN1.SGM 28JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 145 (Thursday, July 28, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 49685-49686]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-17915]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U. S. Customs and Border Protection


Notice Announcing the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) 
Protest Module as the Sole CBP-Authorized Method for Filing Electronic 
Protests

AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland 
Security.

ACTION: General notice.

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SUMMARY: This document announces that the Automated Commercial 
Environment (ACE) Protest Module will be the sole method authorized by 
the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for filing 
electronic protests. This document also announces that CBP will no 
longer accept protests filed through the Automated Broker Interface 
(ABI) to the Automated Commercial System (ACS). Upon the effective date 
of this notice, ACE will replace ACS as the electronic data interchange 
system authorized for protest filing.

DATES: Effective August 29, 2016, the ACE Protest Module will be the 
sole CBP-authorized method for filing electronic protests.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions related to the 
ACE Protest Module, or to request an ACE Protest Account in the ACE 
Portal, contact your assigned client representative. Interested parties 
without an assigned client representative should direct their questions 
to Steven Zaccaro at steven.j.zaccaro@cbp.dhs.gov with the subject 
heading ``ACE Protest Module.''

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

Statutory Authority

    Section 514 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1514), 
provides that certain decisions made by CBP can be protested within 180 
days of the date of liquidation, i.e., the date on which CBP's decision 
becomes final. Section 645 of Subtitle B of Title VI of the North 
American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 103-182, 107 
Stat. 2057, December 8, 1993), commonly known as the Customs 
Modernization Act, or Mod Act, amended section 514(c)(1) of the Tariff 
Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1514(c)(1)) to permit the transmission of such 
protests to CBP electronically pursuant to an electronic data 
interchange system.

Current Regulations

    The CBP regulations governing protests are found in part 174 of 
Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 174).
    On January 14, 2011, CBP published a Final Rule in the Federal 
Register (76 FR 2573) making technical corrections to part 174 and 
related provisions in Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The 
rule amended section 174.12(b) to conform to section 514(c)(1) of the 
Tariff Act of 1930, allowing a protest to be transmitted 
electronically, using the electronic data interchange system authorized 
by CBP for that purpose.
    Currently, CBP accepts electronic protests submitted through the 
Automated Broker Interface (ABI) to the Automated Commercial System 
(ACS), the electronic data interchange system currently authorized by 
CBP for this purpose.

Transition From ACS to ACE

    In an effort to modernize the business processes essential to 
securing U.S. borders, facilitating the flow of legitimate shipments, 
and targeting illicit goods pursuant to the Mod Act and the Security 
and Accountability for Every (SAFE) Port Act of 2006 (Pub. L. 109-347, 
120 Stat. 1884), CBP developed the Automated Commercial Environment 
(ACE) to eventually replace ACS. Over the last several years, CBP has 
tested ACE and provided significant public outreach to ensure that the 
trade community is fully aware of the transition from ACS to ACE. CBP 
is now transitioning electronic protest filing from ACS to ACE. Upon 
the effective date of this notice, ACE will replace ACS as the 
electronic data interchange system authorized for protest filing.

ACE Protest Module as the Sole CBP-Authorized Method for the Filing of 
Electronic Protests

    This notice announces that the ACE Protest Module will be the sole 
CBP-authorized method for filing electronic protests. Filers who intend 
to submit a protest electronically must use the ACE Protest Module. The 
ACE Protest Module is an internet-based processing module which allows 
a filer to submit an electronic protest to ACE for processing by CBP. 
Protest filings will no longer be accepted in ACS. This transition has 
no effect on filers who intend to submit their protest in paper form, 
as specified in 19 CFR part 174.


[[Page 49686]]


    Dated: July 22, 2016.
R. Gil Kerlikowske,
Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
[FR Doc. 2016-17915 Filed 7-27-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111-14-P