Pipeline Safety: Gaseous Carbon Dioxide Pipelines, 41647-41648 [2016-15123]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK3G9T082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 123 / Monday, June 27, 2016 / Notices Recall Report. We continue to estimate that 20 percent of Part 573 reports will involve a change or addition. At 30 minutes per amended report, this totals 86 burden hours per year (854 recalls × .20 = 171 recalls; 171/2 = 86 hours). As to the requirement that manufacturers notify NHTSA in the event of a bankruptcy, we expect this notification to take an estimated 2 hours to draft and submit to NHTSA. We continue to estimate that only 10 manufacturers might submit such a notice to NHTSA each year, so we calculate the total burden at 20 hours (10 MFRs × 2 hours). We continue to estimate that it takes manufacturers an average of 8 hours to draft their notification letters, submit them to NHTSA for review, and then finalize them for mailing to their affected owners and purchasers. We estimate that the 49 CFR part 577 requirements result in 6,832 burden hours annually (8 hours per recall × 854 recalls per year). The estimate associated with the regulation which requires owner notifications within 60 days of filing a Part 573 Safety Recall Report remains must similarly be revised with an increase in recalls. We previously calculated that about 25 percent of past recalls did not include an owner notification mailing within 60 days of the filing of the Part 573 Safety Recall Report. However, recent trends show that only about 10 percent of recalls require an interim owner notification mailing. Under the regulation, manufacturers must send two letters in these cases: An interim notification of the defect or noncompliance within 60 days and a supplemental letter notifying owners and purchasers of the available remedy. Accordingly, we estimate that 680 burden hours are associated with this 60-day interim notification requirement (854 recalls × .10 = 85 recalls; 85 recalls times 8 hours per recall = 680 hours). As for costs associated with notifying owners and purchasers of recalls, we continue to estimate this costs $1.50 per first class mail notification, on average. This cost estimate includes the costs of printing, mailing, as well as the costs vehicle manufacturers may pay to thirdparty vendors to acquire the names and addresses of the current registered owners from state and territory departments of motor vehicles. In reviewing recent recall figures, we determined that an estimated 58.4 million letters are mailed yearly totaling $87,600,000 ($1.50 per letter × 58,400,000 letters). The requirement in 49 CFR part 577 for a manufacturer to notify their affected customers within VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:52 Jun 24, 2016 Jkt 238001 60 days would add an additional $8,760,000 (58,400,000 letters × .10 requiring interim owner notifications = 5,840,000 letters; 5,840,000 × $1.50 = $8,760,000). In total we estimate that the current 49 CFR part 577 requirements cost manufacturers a total of $96,360,000 annually ($87,600,000 owner notification letters + $8,760,000 interim notification letters = $96,360,000). Due to the past burdens associated with the requirement that certain vehicle manufacturers setup VIN Lookup systems for their recalled vehicles, many burden hours have been removed from this information collection as these burdens and costs have already occurred. However, given the recent increase in the number of safety recalls the Agency administers yearly and the volume of products included in those recalls, this information collection burden hour total is increased from previous estimates. The 49 CFR part 573 and 49 CFR part 577 requirements found in today’s rule will require 46,965 hours each year for OMB Control Number 2127–0004, an increase of 827 burden hours. Additionally, manufacturers impacted by 49 CFR part 573 and 49 CFR part 577 requirements will incur a recurring annual cost estimated at $96,630,000 total. Estimated Number of Respondents— NHTSA receives reports of defect or noncompliance from roughly 275 manufacturers per year. Accordingly, we estimate that there will be approximately 275 manufacturers per year filing defect or noncompliance reports and completing the other information collection responsibilities associated with those filings. In summary, we estimate that there will be a total of 275 respondents per year associated with OMB No. 2127– 0004. Gregory K. Rea, Associate Administrator for Enforcement. [FR Doc. 2016–15112 Filed 6–24–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket ID PHMSA–2016–0049] Pipeline Safety: Gaseous Carbon Dioxide Pipelines Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00140 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 41647 PHMSA is seeking public comment on a PHMSA-authored report titled: ‘‘Background for Regulating the Transportation of Carbon Dioxide in a Gaseous State,’’ which is available in the docket at PHMSA–2016–0049. The report evaluates existing and potential future gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) pipelines and outlines PHMSA’s approach for establishing minimum pipeline safety standards for the transportation of carbon dioxide in a gaseous state to fulfill the requirements of section 15 of the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011 (the Act). The Act requires the Secretary of Transportation to ‘‘prescribe minimum safety standards for the transportation of carbon dioxide by pipeline in a gaseous state.’’ PHMSA is seeking to better understand the possible effects of the regulatory scenarios presented within the report, as well as the locations and extent of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines, and is requesting feedback on the validity and applicability of these effects and the location and extent of these pipelines. As PHMSA does not currently regulate these pipelines, its ability to reach out and locate operators of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines has been limited and it is unclear if PHMSA’s current information is comprehensive. DATES: The public comment period for this notice ends July 27, 2016. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by the Docket ID PHMSA– 2016–0049 by any of the following methods: • E-Gov Web site: http:// www.regulations.gov. This site allows the public to enter comments on any Federal Register notice issued by any agency. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 1–202–493–2251. • Mail: Docket Management System, U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590. Hand Delivery: DOT Docket Management System, Room W12–140, on the ground floor of the West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Instructions: Identify the Docket ID at the beginning of your comments. If you submit your comments by mail, submit two copies. If you wish to receive confirmation that PHMSA has received your comments, include a selfaddressed stamped postcard. Internet users may submit comments at http:// www.regulations.gov. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27JNN1.SGM 27JNN1 41648 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 123 / Monday, June 27, 2016 / Notices mstockstill on DSK3G9T082PROD with NOTICES Note: Comments will be posted without changes or edits to http:// www.regulations.gov including any personal information provided. Privacy Act Statement: Anyone may search the electronic form of all comments received for any of our dockets. You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kenneth Lee, Director, Engineering and Research Division, at 202–366–2694 or Kenneth.lee@dot.gov about the subject matter in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 15 of the Act requires the Secretary of Transportation to ‘‘prescribe minimum safety standards for the transportation of carbon dioxide by pipeline in a gaseous phase.’’ The Act requires that in ‘‘establishing the standards, the Secretary shall consider whether applying the minimum safety standards in part 195 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, as in effect on the date of enactment of this paragraph, for the transportation of carbon dioxide in a liquid state to the transportation of carbon dioxide in a gaseous state would ensure safety.’’ Further, the Act limited this authority, stating: ‘‘Nothing in this subsection authorizes the Secretary to regulate piping or equipment used in the production, extraction, recovery, lifting, stabilization, separation, or treatment of carbon dioxide or the preparation of carbon dioxide for transportation by pipeline at production, refining, or manufacturing facilities.’’ After carefully reviewing the available information with regard to gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines, PHMSA has been unable to identify specific gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines or pipeline operators that would potentially be subject to future regulation per section 15 of the Act. For instance, in PHMSA’s aforementioned report, a 78-mile, lowpressure gaseous carbon dioxide pipeline was identified as being located within a gas gathering field. In that instance, the applicability of future regulations could be unclear. PHMSA’s report outlines much of the information gathered and available to PHMSA, which appears to support the likelihood that a majority of the carbon dioxide transported over distances would be in the supercritical fluid state, thereby subjecting these lines to the existing part 195 regulations, where applicable. PHMSA is seeking public comment to better understand the possible effects of the regulatory scenarios presented within the report, information VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:52 Jun 24, 2016 Jkt 238001 considered within the report, conclusions that could be drawn from the report, information missing from the report, and to better understand the locations and extent of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines (whether existing or planned). Since PHMSA does not currently regulate these pipelines, its ability to reach out and locate potentially affected operators has been limited. PHMSA welcomes views and updates on the necessity for and approach to regulations for gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines per section 15 of the Act. Some areas of interest include: 1. Comments and suggestions with respect to the information included within the report, including comments on gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines and their regulation in general, as well as any conclusions readers can draw from the information presented. 2. Identifying gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines or pipeline operators not already identified in the report that would potentially be subject to regulation if they are regulated as outlined in the report per the requirements of section 15 of the Act. Include details, if available, such as pipeline location and length. 3. Identifying and discussing likely locations for the future construction of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines not already discussed in the report that would potentially be subject to regulation if regulated as outlined in the report per the requirements of section 15 of the Act. 4. Comments on the two potential options for regulating gaseous carbon dioxide outlined in the report. These options would: • Regulate the transport of gaseous CO2 entirely under part 192, or • Regulate the transport under part 192, where appropriate, with reference to applicable sections of part 195. If a particular regulatory approach is more appropriate or preferable, please provide supporting examples and reasons why. If against either approach, please provide supporting examples and reasons for being against the approach. 5. The report identifies industry projections for carbon dioxide pipeline need and growth. Please discuss whether these projections are consistent and accurate with current data. If they have changed, please discuss how they have changed. 6. Please comment on any technical standards addressing gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines that PHMSA could consider incorporating into any potential regulations. 7. If PHMSA pursues one of the regulatory scenarios presented within PO 00000 Frm 00141 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the report, and as stated in Area #4 above, would a simpler approach be adequate and responsible at this time? Could PHMSA make a change to the scope of part 192 to include gaseous carbon dioxide without any further technical differentiations within the regulations or without referencing the regulations for carbon dioxide in the supercritical state per existing part 195 regulations? Issued in Washington, DC, on June 22, 2016, under authority delegated in 49 CFR 1.97. Alan K. Mayberry, Acting Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety. [FR Doc. 2016–15123 Filed 6–24–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA–2016–0066 (Notice No. 2016–10)] Hazardous Materials: Information Collection Activities Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, PHMSA invites comments on an information collection pertaining to hazardous materials transportation for which PHMSA intends to request renewal from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before August 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by the docket number (PHMSA–2016–0066) by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 1–202–493–2251. • Mail: Docket Operations, U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building, Ground Floor, Room W12– 140, Routing Symbol M–30, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: To Docket Operations, Room W12–140 on the ground floor of the West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27JNN1.SGM 27JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 123 (Monday, June 27, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 41647-41648]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-15123]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

[Docket ID PHMSA-2016-0049]


Pipeline Safety: Gaseous Carbon Dioxide Pipelines

AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), 
DOT.

ACTION: Notice; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: PHMSA is seeking public comment on a PHMSA-authored report 
titled: ``Background for Regulating the Transportation of Carbon 
Dioxide in a Gaseous State,'' which is available in the docket at 
PHMSA-2016-0049. The report evaluates existing and potential future 
gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) pipelines and outlines PHMSA's approach 
for establishing minimum pipeline safety standards for the 
transportation of carbon dioxide in a gaseous state to fulfill the 
requirements of section 15 of the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory 
Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011 (the Act). The Act requires the 
Secretary of Transportation to ``prescribe minimum safety standards for 
the transportation of carbon dioxide by pipeline in a gaseous state.'' 
PHMSA is seeking to better understand the possible effects of the 
regulatory scenarios presented within the report, as well as the 
locations and extent of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines, and is 
requesting feedback on the validity and applicability of these effects 
and the location and extent of these pipelines. As PHMSA does not 
currently regulate these pipelines, its ability to reach out and locate 
operators of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines has been limited and it 
is unclear if PHMSA's current information is comprehensive.

DATES: The public comment period for this notice ends July 27, 2016.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by the Docket ID PHMSA-
2016-0049 by any of the following methods:
     E-Gov Web site: http://www.regulations.gov. This site 
allows the public to enter comments on any Federal Register notice 
issued by any agency. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
     Fax: 1-202-493-2251.
     Mail: Docket Management System, U.S. Department of 
Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room W12-140, 
Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: DOT Docket Management System, Room W12-140, on the 
ground floor of the West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., 
Washington, DC between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays.
    Instructions: Identify the Docket ID at the beginning of your 
comments. If you submit your comments by mail, submit two copies. If 
you wish to receive confirmation that PHMSA has received your comments, 
include a self-addressed stamped postcard. Internet users may submit 
comments at http://www.regulations.gov.


[[Page 41648]]


    Note:  Comments will be posted without changes or edits to 
http://www.regulations.gov including any personal information 
provided.

    Privacy Act Statement: Anyone may search the electronic form of all 
comments received for any of our dockets. You may review DOT's complete 
Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published April 11, 2000 
(65 FR 19477).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kenneth Lee, Director, Engineering and 
Research Division, at 202-366-2694 or Kenneth.lee@dot.gov about the 
subject matter in this notice.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 15 of the Act requires the Secretary 
of Transportation to ``prescribe minimum safety standards for the 
transportation of carbon dioxide by pipeline in a gaseous phase.''
    The Act requires that in ``establishing the standards, the 
Secretary shall consider whether applying the minimum safety standards 
in part 195 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, as in effect on 
the date of enactment of this paragraph, for the transportation of 
carbon dioxide in a liquid state to the transportation of carbon 
dioxide in a gaseous state would ensure safety.'' Further, the Act 
limited this authority, stating: ``Nothing in this subsection 
authorizes the Secretary to regulate piping or equipment used in the 
production, extraction, recovery, lifting, stabilization, separation, 
or treatment of carbon dioxide or the preparation of carbon dioxide for 
transportation by pipeline at production, refining, or manufacturing 
facilities.''
    After carefully reviewing the available information with regard to 
gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines, PHMSA has been unable to identify 
specific gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines or pipeline operators that 
would potentially be subject to future regulation per section 15 of the 
Act. For instance, in PHMSA's aforementioned report, a 78-mile, low-
pressure gaseous carbon dioxide pipeline was identified as being 
located within a gas gathering field. In that instance, the 
applicability of future regulations could be unclear. PHMSA's report 
outlines much of the information gathered and available to PHMSA, which 
appears to support the likelihood that a majority of the carbon dioxide 
transported over distances would be in the supercritical fluid state, 
thereby subjecting these lines to the existing part 195 regulations, 
where applicable.
    PHMSA is seeking public comment to better understand the possible 
effects of the regulatory scenarios presented within the report, 
information considered within the report, conclusions that could be 
drawn from the report, information missing from the report, and to 
better understand the locations and extent of gaseous carbon dioxide 
pipelines (whether existing or planned). Since PHMSA does not currently 
regulate these pipelines, its ability to reach out and locate 
potentially affected operators has been limited. PHMSA welcomes views 
and updates on the necessity for and approach to regulations for 
gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines per section 15 of the Act. Some areas 
of interest include:
    1. Comments and suggestions with respect to the information 
included within the report, including comments on gaseous carbon 
dioxide pipelines and their regulation in general, as well as any 
conclusions readers can draw from the information presented.
    2. Identifying gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines or pipeline 
operators not already identified in the report that would potentially 
be subject to regulation if they are regulated as outlined in the 
report per the requirements of section 15 of the Act. Include details, 
if available, such as pipeline location and length.
    3. Identifying and discussing likely locations for the future 
construction of gaseous carbon dioxide pipelines not already discussed 
in the report that would potentially be subject to regulation if 
regulated as outlined in the report per the requirements of section 15 
of the Act.
    4. Comments on the two potential options for regulating gaseous 
carbon dioxide outlined in the report. These options would:
     Regulate the transport of gaseous CO2 entirely under part 
192, or
     Regulate the transport under part 192, where appropriate, 
with reference to applicable sections of part 195.
    If a particular regulatory approach is more appropriate or 
preferable, please provide supporting examples and reasons why. If 
against either approach, please provide supporting examples and reasons 
for being against the approach.
    5. The report identifies industry projections for carbon dioxide 
pipeline need and growth. Please discuss whether these projections are 
consistent and accurate with current data. If they have changed, please 
discuss how they have changed.
    6. Please comment on any technical standards addressing gaseous 
carbon dioxide pipelines that PHMSA could consider incorporating into 
any potential regulations.
    7. If PHMSA pursues one of the regulatory scenarios presented 
within the report, and as stated in Area #4 above, would a simpler 
approach be adequate and responsible at this time? Could PHMSA make a 
change to the scope of part 192 to include gaseous carbon dioxide 
without any further technical differentiations within the regulations 
or without referencing the regulations for carbon dioxide in the 
supercritical state per existing part 195 regulations?

    Issued in Washington, DC, on June 22, 2016, under authority 
delegated in 49 CFR 1.97.
Alan K. Mayberry,
Acting Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety.
[FR Doc. 2016-15123 Filed 6-24-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-60-P