Pipeline Safety: Public Workshop on Underground Natural Gas Storage Safety, 41371-41373 [2016-14953]

Download as PDF sradovich on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 122 / Friday, June 24, 2016 / Notices mechanism, does not pose an unacceptable risk to motor vehicle safety. AML believes that compared to other motor vehicles, AML’s vehicles are rarely used to transport children. With the exception of the Rapide and Rapide S models, all Aston Martin vehicles are two-door sports cars. Moreover, AML states that the doublelocking mechanism in the subject vehicles poses no greater risk to children than the child safety locks expressly found to be permitted by FMVSS No. 206. (c) AML stated its belief that there is little risk that any adults will be locked in its vehicles. (d) AML stated that in the event a driver were to inadvertently lock a passenger in one of the subject vehicles, the passenger would be able to sound the horn, which would remain functional, allowing the passenger to alert the driver and passers-by. (e) AML also stated that many of the subject vehicles have motion sensors that would detect the presence of someone in the vehicle as soon as that person moved, and an alarm would sound, which is audible outside the vehicle. Thus, deterring inadvertent lock-ins of both adults and children and would alert passers-by of any passengers locked in the subject vehicles. (f) AML stated its belief that if an adult were locked in a vehicle, he or she could alert passers-by and would probably be able to contact the driver via mobile communication devices that, in fact, are ubiquitous today and certainly are very likely to be in the possession of the average AML vehicle passenger. AML also stated that they have not received any complaints regarding the subject noncompliance. AML additionally informed NHTSA that they have corrected the noncompliance in vehicles manufactured from production date December 9, 2015 and will correct the noncompliance in any unsold noncompliant vehicles prior to sale. In summation, AML believes that the described noncompliances are inconsequential to motor vehicle safety, and that its petition, to exempt AML from providing notification of the noncompliances as required by 49 U.S.C. 30118 and remedying the noncompliance as required by 49 U.S.C. 30120 should be granted. NHTSA’S Decision NHTSA’s Analysis: NHTSA does not find AML’s rationale that the subject noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety persuasive. AML made several assumptions regarding the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:43 Jun 23, 2016 Jkt 238001 actions that passengers could take in the event of being double-locked in the subject vehicles (e.g., a passenger will be able to disengage the double-lock by using the key fob; AML’s vehicles are rarely used to transport children; in the event a driver were to inadvertently lock a passenger in one of the subject vehicles, the passenger would be able to sound the horn to alert the driver and passers-by; many of the subject vehicles have motion sensors that would detect the presence of someone in the vehicle, if that person moved, and sound an alarm alerting the driver or passers-by; someone trapped in the vehicle would probably be able to contact the driver via mobile communication devices, etc.), but offered no specific solution to lower the risk of being trapped in a car, save complying with the rule, as AML has been doing since December 2015. In February 2007, NHTSA provided a specific solution towards lowering the risk of a passenger being trapped in a motor vehicle when it published a final rule 1 to amend FMVSS No. 206. Among the final rule updates, Paragraphs S4.3 and S4.3.1, required a lock release/ engagement device located inside the vehicle. NHTSA also reaffirmed that new requirement for a lock release/ engagement device inside the vehicle in an interpretation letter to Mr. Thomas Betzer from Keykert, USA. In that interpretation, NHTSA addressed whether double-locked doors (doors that can only be unlocked using a key) would be allowed under the rule as amended in February 2007 (the current rule) in a system similar to AML’s in that once the driver would activate the anti-theft alarm with a key, the doors would be double-locked. Specifically, NHTSA interpreted that double-lock systems are no longer allowed because they interfere with the interior door lock release device. The interpretation also makes it clear that in the December 15, 2004, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and the February 6, 2007, final rule, that NHTSA sought to require interior door locks to ‘‘be capable of being unlocked from the interior of the vehicle by means of a lock release device that has an operating means and a lock release/ engagement device located within the interior of the vehicle.’’ NHTSA has examined certain real world situations involving individuals trapped in motor vehicles, while infrequent, are consequential to motor vehicle safety. Such scenarios include vehicle fires, vehicles entering bodies of water, and individuals trapped in hot vehicles. Vehicles with double locked 1 72 PO 00000 FR 5385, February 6, 2007. Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 41371 doors in emergency situations such as those examined, would have consequential effects on motor vehicle safety. Based on its analysis of AML’s petition, NHTSA has determined that AML has failed to make a case that having double locked doors in a vehicle that is involved in an emergency scenario in which the occupants of the subject vehicles are unable to access the key fob to open the doors and are unable to be seen or heard is inconsequential to safety. NHTSA’s Decision: In consideration of the foregoing, NHTSA finds that AML has not met its burden of persuasion that the FMVSS No. 206 noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety. Accordingly, AML’s petition is hereby denied and AML is obligated to provide notification of, and a free remedy for, that noncompliance under 49 U.S.C. 30118 and 30120. Authority: 49 U.S.C. 30118, 30120: Delegations of authority at 49 CFR 1.95 and 501.8. Gregory K. Rea, Associate Administrator for Enforcement. [FR Doc. 2016–14964 Filed 6–23–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA–2016–0023] Pipeline Safety: Public Workshop on Underground Natural Gas Storage Safety Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. AGENCY: This notice announces a public meeting to solicit input and obtain background information concerning underground natural gas storage safety. PHMSA and the National Association of Pipeline Safety Representatives (NAPSR) are cosponsoring this one-day workshop. The workshop will bring federal and state regulators, emergency responders, industry, and interested members of the public together to participate in understanding and shaping the future for maintaining the safety of underground natural gas storage facilities. PHMSA and NAPSR recognize that the October, 2015, Southern California Gas Company’s (SoCal Gas) Aliso Canyon underground natural gas storage SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24JNN1.SGM 24JNN1 41372 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 122 / Friday, June 24, 2016 / Notices facility leak on Well SS25 located in the Porter Ranch area near Los Angeles, California, has drawn concerns regarding natural gas storage well safety and the environmental effects of an incident. Currently, throughout the United States, approximately 400 interstate and intrastate underground natural gas storage facilities are operating with more than four trillion cubic feet of natural gas working capacity. The public workshop will be held on July 14, 2016. Name badge pick up and on-site registration will be available starting at 7:30 a.m., with the workshop taking place from 8:00 a.m. until approximately 4:30 p.m. mountain time. Online preregistration for the workshop is available until July 10, 2016. Refer to the meeting Web site for the latest information about the meeting including agenda and the webcast. http://primis.phmsa.dot.gov/meetings/ MtgHome.mtg?mtg=115. Presentations and a recording of proceedings will be available within 30 days after the event. ADDRESSES: The workshop will be held at the Renaissance Boulder Flatiron Hotel located at 500 Flatiron Boulevard, Broomfield, Colorado 80021. The hotel can be contacted at 1–303–464–8400. Registration: Members of the public may attend this free workshop. Please note that the public workshop will also be webcast for those who cannot attend in person. To help assure that adequate space is provided, attendees, both in person and by webcast, should register in advance at the PHMSA public meeting Web site at: http:// primis.phmsa.dot.gov/meetings/ MtgHome.mtg?mtg=115. Onsite registration will also be available for those attending in person. Presentations will also be available online at the meeting page Web site within 30 days following the meeting. Comments: Members of the public may submit written comments either before or after the workshop. Comments should reference Docket No.: PHMSA– 2016–0023. Comments may be submitted in the following ways: • E-Gov Web site: http:// www.regulations.gov. This site allows the public to enter comments on any Federal Register notice issued by any agency. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 1–202–493–2251. • Mail: Docket Management System, U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: DOT Docket Management System, Room W12–140, on the ground floor of the West sradovich on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES DATES: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:43 Jun 23, 2016 Jkt 238001 Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Instructions: Identify the docket number (PHMSA–2016–0023) at the beginning of your comments. If you submit your comments by mail, submit two copies. If you wish to receive confirmation that PHMSA has received your comments, include a selfaddressed stamped postcard. Internet users may submit comments at http:// www.regulations.gov. Note: Comments will be posted without changes or edits to http:// www.regulations.gov including any personal information provided. Please see the Privacy Act Statement below for additional information. Privacy Act Statement Anyone may search the electronic form of all comments received for any of our dockets. You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published April 11, 2000, (65 FR 19476) or visit http:// dms.dot.gov. Information on Services for Individuals With Disabilities For information on facilities or services for individuals with disabilities, or to request special assistance at the meeting, please contact Kenneth Lee, Engineering and Research Division, at (202) 366–2694 or kenneth.lee@dot.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kenneth Lee, Engineering and Research Division, at 202–366–2694 or kenneth.lee@dot.gov about the subject matter in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PHMSA and NAPSR recognize that many of the existing underground natural gas storage facilities across the country have wells that have similar characteristics to the SoCal Gas Well SS25. Many, like Well SS25, are over 50 years old. They may flow through both the tubing and production casing with no subsurface safety valve or isolation zone with completion fluid to offset the high pressure effects of a possible casing corrosion leak. Many were originally constructed using production techniques such as having pipe sections that were joined by threaded couplings, not girth welds. They typically do not have a corrosion resistant internal or external protective coating. The workshop will have discussions on the aging effects on well safety including safety practices in well design, operations, and maintenance measures including downhole assessments and PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the type of preventative and mitigative measures to implement. Underground natural gas storage wells have operating pressures from about 200 pounds per square inch (psi) to 4,500 psi. By comparison, the maximum U.S. pipeline pressures are a maximum of about 2,000 psi and most are below 1,000 psi. Unlike line pipe, which for natural gas pipeline operations, has a design factor of 0.72 or less, most wells were not installed with consistent standards such as design safety factors to contain the well pressure. On February 5, 2016, (81 FR 6334) PHMSA issued Advisory Bulletin ADB– 2016–02. The advisory bulletin recommended that operators of underground natural gas storage facilities review their operating, maintenance, and emergency response activities to ensure that the integrity of underground natural gas storage facilities is properly maintained. This bulletin informed operators about recommended practices and urged operators to take all necessary actions to prevent and mitigate breach of integrity, leaks, or failures at their underground natural gas storage facilities and to ensure the safety of the public and operating personnel and to protect the environment. Operators were advised to: (1) Verify that the pressure required to inject intended natural gas volumes does not exceed the design pressure limits of the reservoir, wells, wellheads, piping, casing, tubing, or associated facilities; (2) Monitor all wells for the presence of annular gas or liquids on a periodic basis; (3) Inspect the wellhead assembly and attached pipelines for each of the wells used; (4) Conduct periodic functional tests of all surface and subsurface safety valve systems and wellhead pipeline isolation valve(s) for proper function and ability to shut-off or isolate the well and remediate improperly functioning valves; (5) Perform risk assessments in a manner that reviews, at a minimum, the API RP 1171 criteria to evaluate the need for subsurface safety valves on new, removed, or replaced tubing strings or production casing; (6) Conduct ongoing assessments for the verification and demonstration of the mechanical integrity of each well and related piping and equipment; (7) Develop and implement a corrosion monitoring and integrity evaluation program for piping, wellhead, casing, and tubing including the usage of the appropriate well log evaluations; E:\FR\FM\24JNN1.SGM 24JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 122 / Friday, June 24, 2016 / Notices sradovich on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES (8) Develop and implement procedures for the evaluation of well and attendant storage facilities that include analysis of facility flow erosion, hydrate potential, individual facility component capacity and fluid disposal capability at intended gas flow rates and pressures, and analysis of the specific impacts that the intended operating pressure range could have on the corrosive potential of fluids in the system; (9) Identify potential threats and hazards associated with operation of the underground storage facility; (10) Perform ongoing verification and demonstration of the integrity of the underground storage reservoir or cavern using appropriate monitoring techniques for integrity changes such as the monitoring of pressure and periodic pressure surveys, inventory (injection and withdrawal of all products), product levels, cavern subsidence, and the findings from adjacent production and water wells, and observation wells; (11) Ensure that emergency procedures are reviewed, conducted, and updated at least annually; and (12) Ensure records of the processes, procedures, assessments, reassessments, and mitigation measures are maintained for the life of the storage well. The Aliso Canyon incident has highlighted the concern about the current lack of minimum federal regulations related to the downhole operation of underground natural gas storage wells. The full extent of the damage, both to people and the environment, caused by the Aliso Canyon incident will not be known until much later. This workshop is a forum for PHMSA to collect input regarding safety concerns of the public and the challenges industry faces in conducting daily operations, maintenance, integrity verification, well monitoring, threat and hazard identification, assessments, remediation, site security, emergency response and preparedness, and recordkeeping. Issued in Washington, DC, on June 20, 2016, under authority delegated in 49 CFR 1.97. Alan K. Mayberry, Acting Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety. [FR Doc. 2016–14953 Filed 6–23–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:43 Jun 23, 2016 Jkt 238001 DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Agency Information Collection Activities: Information Collection Renewal; Comment Request; Real Estate Lending and Appraisals Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comment. AGENCY: The OCC, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on a continuing information collection, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA). In accordance with the requirements of the PRA, the OCC may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. The OCC is soliciting comment concerning renewal of its information collection titled, ‘‘Real Estate Lending and Appraisals.’’ DATES: Comments must be received by August 23, 2016. ADDRESSES: Because paper mail in the Washington, DC area and at the OCC is subject to delay, commenters are encouraged to submit comments by email, if possible. Comments may be sent to: Legislative and Regulatory Activities Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Attention: 1557–0190, 400 7th Street SW., Suite 3E–218, Mail Stop 9W–11, Washington, DC 20219. In addition, comments may be sent by fax to (571) 465–4326 or by electronic mail to prainfo@occ.treas.gov. You may personally inspect and photocopy comments at the OCC, 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219. For security reasons, the OCC requires that visitors make an appointment to inspect comments. You may do so by calling (202) 649–6700 or, for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, TTY, (202) 649–5597. Upon arrival, visitors will be required to present valid government-issued photo identification and submit to security screening in order to inspect and photocopy comments. All comments received, including attachments and other supporting materials, are part of the public record and subject to public disclosure. Do not include any information in your comment or supporting materials that SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00087 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 41373 you consider confidential or inappropriate for public disclosure. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shaquita Merritt, OCC Clearance Officer, (202) 649–5490 or, for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, TTY, (202) 649–5597, Legislative and Regulatory Activities Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street SW., Suite 3E–218, Mail Stop 9W–11, Washington, DC 20219. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), Federal agencies must obtain approval from the OMB for each collection of information that they conduct or sponsor. ‘‘Collection of information’’ is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) to include agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)) requires Federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, the OCC is publishing notice of the proposed collection of information set forth in this document. Title: Real Estate Lending and Appraisals (12 CFR 34, 160, 164, 190). OMB Control No.: 1557–0190. Type of Review: Extension, without revision, of a currently approved collection. Description: Twelve CFR parts 34 and 160 contain reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Twelve CFR part 34, subpart B (Adjustable-Rate Mortgages (ARM)), subpart E (Other Real Estate Owned (OREO)), and part 160 contain reporting requirements. Twelve CFR part 34, subpart C (Appraisal Requirements), subpart D (Real Estate Lending Standards), and parts 160 and 164 contain recordkeeping requirements. Twelve CFR 190.4(h) contains a disclosure requirement concerning Federallyrelated residential manufactured housing loans. Twelve CFR part 34, subpart B, section 34.22(a) requires that for ARM loans, the loan documentation must specify an index or combination of indices to which changes in the interest rate will be linked. Sections 34.22(b) and 160.35(d)(3) provide notice procedures to be used when seeking to use an alternative index. Twelve CFR 34.44 and 164.4 provide minimum standards for the performance of real estate appraisals, including the E:\FR\FM\24JNN1.SGM 24JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 122 (Friday, June 24, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 41371-41373]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-14953]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

[Docket No. PHMSA-2016-0023]


Pipeline Safety: Public Workshop on Underground Natural Gas 
Storage Safety

AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), 
DOT.

ACTION: Notice of public meeting.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting to solicit input and 
obtain background information concerning underground natural gas 
storage safety. PHMSA and the National Association of Pipeline Safety 
Representatives (NAPSR) are co-sponsoring this one-day workshop. The 
workshop will bring federal and state regulators, emergency responders, 
industry, and interested members of the public together to participate 
in understanding and shaping the future for maintaining the safety of 
underground natural gas storage facilities.
    PHMSA and NAPSR recognize that the October, 2015, Southern 
California Gas Company's (SoCal Gas) Aliso Canyon underground natural 
gas storage

[[Page 41372]]

facility leak on Well SS25 located in the Porter Ranch area near Los 
Angeles, California, has drawn concerns regarding natural gas storage 
well safety and the environmental effects of an incident. Currently, 
throughout the United States, approximately 400 interstate and 
intrastate underground natural gas storage facilities are operating 
with more than four trillion cubic feet of natural gas working 
capacity.

DATES: The public workshop will be held on July 14, 2016. Name badge 
pick up and on-site registration will be available starting at 7:30 
a.m., with the workshop taking place from 8:00 a.m. until approximately 
4:30 p.m. mountain time. Online preregistration for the workshop is 
available until July 10, 2016. Refer to the meeting Web site for the 
latest information about the meeting including agenda and the webcast. 
http://primis.phmsa.dot.gov/meetings/MtgHome.mtg?mtg=115. Presentations 
and a recording of proceedings will be available within 30 days after 
the event.

ADDRESSES: The workshop will be held at the Renaissance Boulder 
Flatiron Hotel located at 500 Flatiron Boulevard, Broomfield, Colorado 
80021. The hotel can be contacted at 1-303-464-8400.
    Registration: Members of the public may attend this free workshop. 
Please note that the public workshop will also be webcast for those who 
cannot attend in person. To help assure that adequate space is 
provided, attendees, both in person and by webcast, should register in 
advance at the PHMSA public meeting Web site at: http://primis.phmsa.dot.gov/meetings/MtgHome.mtg?mtg=115. Onsite registration 
will also be available for those attending in person. Presentations 
will also be available online at the meeting page Web site within 30 
days following the meeting.
    Comments: Members of the public may submit written comments either 
before or after the workshop. Comments should reference Docket No.: 
PHMSA-2016-0023. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:
     E-Gov Web site: http://www.regulations.gov. This site 
allows the public to enter comments on any Federal Register notice 
issued by any agency. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
     Fax: 1-202-493-2251.
     Mail: Docket Management System, U.S. Department of 
Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room W12-140, 
Washington, DC 20590.
     Hand Delivery: DOT Docket Management System, Room W12-140, 
on the ground floor of the West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., 
Washington, DC between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays.
    Instructions: Identify the docket number (PHMSA-2016-0023) at the 
beginning of your comments. If you submit your comments by mail, submit 
two copies. If you wish to receive confirmation that PHMSA has received 
your comments, include a self-addressed stamped postcard. Internet 
users may submit comments at http://www.regulations.gov.

    Note:  Comments will be posted without changes or edits to 
http://www.regulations.gov including any personal information 
provided. Please see the Privacy Act Statement below for additional 
information.

Privacy Act Statement

    Anyone may search the electronic form of all comments received for 
any of our dockets. You may review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement 
in the Federal Register published April 11, 2000, (65 FR 19476) or 
visit http://dms.dot.gov.

Information on Services for Individuals With Disabilities

    For information on facilities or services for individuals with 
disabilities, or to request special assistance at the meeting, please 
contact Kenneth Lee, Engineering and Research Division, at (202) 366-
2694 or kenneth.lee@dot.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kenneth Lee, Engineering and Research 
Division, at 202-366-2694 or kenneth.lee@dot.gov about the subject 
matter in this notice.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PHMSA and NAPSR recognize that many of the 
existing underground natural gas storage facilities across the country 
have wells that have similar characteristics to the SoCal Gas Well 
SS25. Many, like Well SS25, are over 50 years old. They may flow 
through both the tubing and production casing with no subsurface safety 
valve or isolation zone with completion fluid to offset the high 
pressure effects of a possible casing corrosion leak. Many were 
originally constructed using production techniques such as having pipe 
sections that were joined by threaded couplings, not girth welds. They 
typically do not have a corrosion resistant internal or external 
protective coating. The workshop will have discussions on the aging 
effects on well safety including safety practices in well design, 
operations, and maintenance measures including downhole assessments and 
the type of preventative and mitigative measures to implement. 
Underground natural gas storage wells have operating pressures from 
about 200 pounds per square inch (psi) to 4,500 psi. By comparison, the 
maximum U.S. pipeline pressures are a maximum of about 2,000 psi and 
most are below 1,000 psi. Unlike line pipe, which for natural gas 
pipeline operations, has a design factor of 0.72 or less, most wells 
were not installed with consistent standards such as design safety 
factors to contain the well pressure.
    On February 5, 2016, (81 FR 6334) PHMSA issued Advisory Bulletin 
ADB-2016-02. The advisory bulletin recommended that operators of 
underground natural gas storage facilities review their operating, 
maintenance, and emergency response activities to ensure that the 
integrity of underground natural gas storage facilities is properly 
maintained. This bulletin informed operators about recommended 
practices and urged operators to take all necessary actions to prevent 
and mitigate breach of integrity, leaks, or failures at their 
underground natural gas storage facilities and to ensure the safety of 
the public and operating personnel and to protect the environment. 
Operators were advised to:
    (1) Verify that the pressure required to inject intended natural 
gas volumes does not exceed the design pressure limits of the 
reservoir, wells, wellheads, piping, casing, tubing, or associated 
facilities;
    (2) Monitor all wells for the presence of annular gas or liquids on 
a periodic basis;
    (3) Inspect the wellhead assembly and attached pipelines for each 
of the wells used;
    (4) Conduct periodic functional tests of all surface and subsurface 
safety valve systems and wellhead pipeline isolation valve(s) for 
proper function and ability to shut-off or isolate the well and 
remediate improperly functioning valves;
    (5) Perform risk assessments in a manner that reviews, at a 
minimum, the API RP 1171 criteria to evaluate the need for subsurface 
safety valves on new, removed, or replaced tubing strings or production 
casing;
    (6) Conduct ongoing assessments for the verification and 
demonstration of the mechanical integrity of each well and related 
piping and equipment;
    (7) Develop and implement a corrosion monitoring and integrity 
evaluation program for piping, wellhead, casing, and tubing including 
the usage of the appropriate well log evaluations;

[[Page 41373]]

    (8) Develop and implement procedures for the evaluation of well and 
attendant storage facilities that include analysis of facility flow 
erosion, hydrate potential, individual facility component capacity and 
fluid disposal capability at intended gas flow rates and pressures, and 
analysis of the specific impacts that the intended operating pressure 
range could have on the corrosive potential of fluids in the system;
    (9) Identify potential threats and hazards associated with 
operation of the underground storage facility;
    (10) Perform ongoing verification and demonstration of the 
integrity of the underground storage reservoir or cavern using 
appropriate monitoring techniques for integrity changes such as the 
monitoring of pressure and periodic pressure surveys, inventory 
(injection and withdrawal of all products), product levels, cavern 
subsidence, and the findings from adjacent production and water wells, 
and observation wells;
    (11) Ensure that emergency procedures are reviewed, conducted, and 
updated at least annually; and
    (12) Ensure records of the processes, procedures, assessments, 
reassessments, and mitigation measures are maintained for the life of 
the storage well.
    The Aliso Canyon incident has highlighted the concern about the 
current lack of minimum federal regulations related to the downhole 
operation of underground natural gas storage wells. The full extent of 
the damage, both to people and the environment, caused by the Aliso 
Canyon incident will not be known until much later.
    This workshop is a forum for PHMSA to collect input regarding 
safety concerns of the public and the challenges industry faces in 
conducting daily operations, maintenance, integrity verification, well 
monitoring, threat and hazard identification, assessments, remediation, 
site security, emergency response and preparedness, and recordkeeping.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on June 20, 2016, under authority 
delegated in 49 CFR 1.97.
Alan K. Mayberry,
Acting Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety.
[FR Doc. 2016-14953 Filed 6-23-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-60-P