Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Herring River Restoration Project, Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts, 40346-40347 [2016-14570]

Download as PDF 40346 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 119 / Tuesday, June 21, 2016 / Notices with Mr. Fischer. You will receive a reply during normal hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The closure affects public lands including and surrounding Skinny Dipper Hot Springs, located approximately 4 miles east of Banks, Idaho. The affected public lands are: all public land north of Idaho State Highway 17, also known as the BanksLowman Highway, in Lot 3; Section 25, T. 9 N., R. 3 E., Boise Meridian, Boise County, Idaho, containing approximately 41.58 acres. The closure is necessary to allow the BLM to rehabilitate and restore natural conditions damaged by unauthorized use and development around the hot springs. The BLM will post closure signs at main access points to the closed area and the area used for parking located adjacent to the highway. This closure order will be posted in the Boise District BLM office. Maps of the affected area and other documents associated with this closure are available at 3948 Development Avenue, Boise, Idaho 83705 and online at https:// www.blm.gov/id. Exemptions: The following persons are exempt from this order: Federal, State, and local officers and employees in the performance of their official duties; members of organized rescue or fire-fighting forces in the performance of their official duties; and persons with written authorization from the BLM’s Four Rivers Field Office. Enforcement: Any person who violates this closure may be tried before a United States Magistrate and fined in accordance with 18 U.S.C. 3571, imprisoned no more than 12 months under 43 U.S.C. 1733(a) and 43 CFR 8560.0–7, or both. In accordance with 43 CFR 8365.1–7, State or local officials may also impose penalties for violations of Idaho law. Authority: 43 CFR 8364.1. Tate Fischer, BLM Four Rivers Field Manager. [FR Doc. 2016–14575 Filed 6–20–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–GG–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES National Park Service [NPS–NER–CACO–21002; PPWONRADE PMP00IE05.YP0000] Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Herring River Restoration Project, Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:37 Jun 20, 2016 Jkt 238001 ACTION: Notice of Availability. The National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Herring River Restoration Project in Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts. The FEIS provides a systematic analysis of alternative approaches to restore the Herring River estuary to a more productive and natural condition after a century of diking and draining. DATES: The NPS will execute a Record of Decision not sooner than 30 days after the date of publication of the NOA in the Federal Register by the Environmental Protection Agency. ADDRESSES: Electronic versions of the complete document are available online at https://www.nps.gov/caco/ and https:// parkplanning.nps.gov/herring_river. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: George E. Price, Jr., Superintendent, Cape Cod National Seashore, 99 Marconi Site Road, Wellfleet, MA 02267; telephone (508) 771–2144. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Herring River Restoration Project is a joint project of the Cape Cod National Seashore, the Town of Wellfleet, the Town of Truro, the Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Natural Resource Conservation Service. The purpose of this project is to restore selfsustaining coastal habitats on a large portion of the 1,100-acre Herring River estuary in Wellfleet and Truro, Massachusetts, where wetland resources and natural ecosystem functions have been severely damaged by 100 years of tidal restriction and salt marsh drainage. The goal is to balance tidal restoration objectives with flood control by allowing the highest tide range practicable while also ensuring flood proofing and protection of vulnerable properties. The Herring River is the largest estuary on outer Cape Cod, encompassing more than 1,100 acres of degraded wetlands in a complex network of five valleys: The Herring River, Mill Creek, Pole Dike Creek, Bound Brook, and Duck Harbor. The Chequessett Neck Road dike was built in 1908 at the mouth of the Herring River to restrict natural tidal flows. Ditches were constructed to drain the normally saturated flood plain soil. The once extensive salt marshes have been transformed into stands of invasive plants, shrubby thickets, and forests. The old salt marsh peat, deprived of the tides, has decomposed and compressed, SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00088 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 sinking the surface of the flood plain as much as three feet. The decomposition of peat has released sulfuric acid that kills fish and other aquatic life, and low summertime dissolved oxygen has also harmed aquatic life. The FEIS analyzes three action alternatives and the no action alternative, as described below: Alternative A would leave in place the current tide control structure at Chequessett Neck Road and continue management of the estuary without restoration. Alternative B would employ an adaptive management strategy to restore tides in the lower reach of the Herring River up to a maximum high tide of approximately six feet. At this tide level flood mitigation of sensitive properties can be achieved without a secondary dike at Mill Creek. Alternative C would employ an adaptive management strategy to restore tides up to the maximum Chequessett Neck Road dike capacity (10 foot vertical tide gate opening) with a new dike at Mill Creek that blocks all tidal influence. This alternative would maximize restoration in all sub-basins except Mill Creek. Mill Creek would remain unrestored, but no new flood proofing measures would be needed in Mill Creek. Alternative D would employ an adaptive management strategy to restore tides up to the maximum Chequessett Neck Road dike capacity (10 foot vertical tide gate opening) with a new dike at Mill Creek and Pole Dike Creek. Mill Creek and Pole Dike Creek tides would be controlled by these secondary structures to the maximum levels that can be achieved after flood proofing several low-lying properties. Tidal restoration would be maximized in all other sub-basins. For Alternatives B and D, two options are considered for mitigating project impacts to the Chequessett Yacht & Country Club (CYCC) golf course, a private golf course in Mill Creek: (1) Raise low-lying fairways a minimum of two feet above proposed inundation levels, or (2) relocate low-lying fairways to an undeveloped upland area owned by CYCC. Under all Action Alternatives, there is the potential for the restoration of natural tidal flow to result in impacts to private properties. Any such impacts would be addressed through mitigation measures such as raising or relocating affected buildings, driveways or wells, building berms to protect structures, and/or limiting water levels across entire sub-basins. The cost of these impact mitigation measures will be borne by the Project. Water surface E:\FR\FM\21JNN1.SGM 21JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 119 / Tuesday, June 21, 2016 / Notices elevations within any sub-basin will not be increased until the necessary impact mitigation is in place. Alternative D, with the option to raise existing low-lying fairways a minimum of two feet above proposed inundation levels, has been identified as the NPS Preferred Alternative. This alternative best fulfills the restoration objectives of the project while mitigating adverse impacts to developed properties. In response to agency and public comment, several aspects of the alternatives have been updated in chapter 2 of the FEIS. Key updates include adding a tide control structure at the Pole Dike Creek Road and refining options for preventing tidal flow impacts to High Toss Road. Also, design details have progressed on other key project components, including the proposed new Chequessett Neck Road dike and Mill Creek dikes. Relevant updates have been added to the alternatives description, including information about staging area locations and canoe/kayak access. Updates have also been made to key parts of Chapters 3 and 4, including a revised vegetation analysis that allows improved estimates of impacts to special status species habitat, updated information about newly-listed federal species (Northern Long-eared Bat and Red Knot), and dismissal of changes to FEMA flood insurance maps. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. Dated: June 2, 2016. Michael A. Caldwell, Regional Director, National Park Service, Northeast Region. [FR Doc. 2016–14570 Filed 6–20–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–WV–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. U.S.-Chile FTA–103–029] Probable Economic Effect of Certain Modifications to the U.S.-Chile FTA Rules of Origin United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of investigation and notice of opportunity to provide written comments. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES AGENCY: Following receipt on May 24, 2016, of a request from the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), under authority delegated by the President and pursuant to section 103(a) of the United StatesChile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (the Act) (19 U.S.C. 3805 note), the Commission instituted investigation No. U.S.-Chile FTA–103– SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:37 Jun 20, 2016 Jkt 238001 029, Probable Economic Effect of Certain Modifications to the U.S.-Chile FTA Rules of Origin. DATES: July 11, 2016: Deadline for filing written submissions. August 24, 2016: Transmittal of Commission report to USTR. ADDRESSES: All Commission offices, including the Commission’s hearing rooms, are located in the United States International Trade Commission Building, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC. All written submissions should be addressed to the Secretary, United States International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://www.usitc.gov/secretary/ edis.htm. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Project leader Laura Rodriguez (202– 205–3499 or laura.rodriguez@usitc.gov) for information specific to this investigation. For information on the legal aspects of this investigation, contact William Gearhart of the Commission’s Office of the General Counsel (202–205–3091 or william.gearhart@usitc.gov). The media should contact Margaret O’Laughlin, Office of External Relations (202–205– 1819 or margaret.olaughlin@usitc.gov). Hearing-impaired individuals may obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal at 202–205–1810. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server (https://www.usitc.gov). Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background: In his request letter (received May 24, 2016), the USTR stated that U.S. negotiators have recently reached agreement in principle with representatives of the government of Chile on modifications to the FTA rules of origin. He said that the proposed modifications are the result of determinations that U.S. and Chilean producers are unable to produce rayon filament yarns in commercial quantities in a timely manner. The USTR noted that section 202(o)(2)(B)(i) of the Act authorizes the President, subject to the consultation and layover requirements of section 103(a) of the Act, to proclaim such modifications to the rules of origin provisions as are necessary to implement an agreement with Chile pursuant to Article 3.20.5 of the Agreement. He noted that one of the PO 00000 Frm 00089 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40347 requirements set out in section 103(a) of the Act is that the President obtain advice regarding the proposed action from the U.S. International Trade Commission. In the request letter, the USTR asked that the Commission provide advice on the probable economic effect of the modifications on U.S. trade under the FTA, total U.S. trade, and on domestic producers of the affected articles. He asked that the Commission provide its advice at the earliest possible date but not later than three months of receipt of the request. He also asked that the Commission issue, as soon as possible thereafter, a public version of its report with any confidential business information deleted. The products identified in the proposal are certain woven fabrics of artificial filament yarn provided for in subheadings 5408.22– 5408.23 of the U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule. The request letter and the proposed modification are available on the Commission’s Web site at https:// www.usitc.gov/research_and_analysis/ what_we_are_working_on.htm. As requested, the Commission will provide its advice to USTR by August 24, 2016. Written Submissions: No public hearing is planned. However, interested parties are invited to file written submissions. All written submissions should be addressed to the Secretary, and should be received not later than 5:15 p.m., July 11, 2016. All written submissions must conform with the provisions of section 201.8 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 201.8). Section 201.8 and the Commission’s Handbook on Filing Procedures require that interested parties file documents electronically on or before the filing deadline and submit eight (8) true paper copies by 12:00 p.m. eastern time on the next business day. In the event that confidential treatment of a document is requested, interested parties must file, at the same time as the eight paper copies, at least four (4) additional true paper copies in which the confidential information must be deleted (see the following paragraph for further information regarding confidential business information). Persons with questions regarding electronic filing should contact the Office of the Secretary, Docket Services Division (202–205–1802). Confidential Business Information: Any submissions that contain confidential business information must also conform with the requirements of section 201.6 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 201.6). Section 201.6 of the rules requires that the cover of the document and the individual pages be clearly E:\FR\FM\21JNN1.SGM 21JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 119 (Tuesday, June 21, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 40346-40347]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-14570]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-NER-CACO-21002; PPWONRADE PMP00IE05.YP0000]


Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Herring River 
Restoration Project, Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of Availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of 
a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Herring River 
Restoration Project in Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts. The 
FEIS provides a systematic analysis of alternative approaches to 
restore the Herring River estuary to a more productive and natural 
condition after a century of diking and draining.

DATES: The NPS will execute a Record of Decision not sooner than 30 
days after the date of publication of the NOA in the Federal Register 
by the Environmental Protection Agency.

ADDRESSES: Electronic versions of the complete document are available 
online at https://www.nps.gov/caco/ and https://parkplanning.nps.gov/herring_river.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: George E. Price, Jr., Superintendent, 
Cape Cod National Seashore, 99 Marconi Site Road, Wellfleet, MA 02267; 
telephone (508) 771-2144.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Herring River Restoration Project is a 
joint project of the Cape Cod National Seashore, the Town of Wellfleet, 
the Town of Truro, the Massachusetts Division of Ecological 
Restoration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration, and the Natural Resource Conservation 
Service. The purpose of this project is to restore self-sustaining 
coastal habitats on a large portion of the 1,100-acre Herring River 
estuary in Wellfleet and Truro, Massachusetts, where wetland resources 
and natural ecosystem functions have been severely damaged by 100 years 
of tidal restriction and salt marsh drainage. The goal is to balance 
tidal restoration objectives with flood control by allowing the highest 
tide range practicable while also ensuring flood proofing and 
protection of vulnerable properties.
    The Herring River is the largest estuary on outer Cape Cod, 
encompassing more than 1,100 acres of degraded wetlands in a complex 
network of five valleys: The Herring River, Mill Creek, Pole Dike 
Creek, Bound Brook, and Duck Harbor. The Chequessett Neck Road dike was 
built in 1908 at the mouth of the Herring River to restrict natural 
tidal flows. Ditches were constructed to drain the normally saturated 
flood plain soil. The once extensive salt marshes have been transformed 
into stands of invasive plants, shrubby thickets, and forests. The old 
salt marsh peat, deprived of the tides, has decomposed and compressed, 
sinking the surface of the flood plain as much as three feet. The 
decomposition of peat has released sulfuric acid that kills fish and 
other aquatic life, and low summertime dissolved oxygen has also harmed 
aquatic life.
    The FEIS analyzes three action alternatives and the no action 
alternative, as described below:
    Alternative A would leave in place the current tide control 
structure at Chequessett Neck Road and continue management of the 
estuary without restoration.
    Alternative B would employ an adaptive management strategy to 
restore tides in the lower reach of the Herring River up to a maximum 
high tide of approximately six feet. At this tide level flood 
mitigation of sensitive properties can be achieved without a secondary 
dike at Mill Creek.
    Alternative C would employ an adaptive management strategy to 
restore tides up to the maximum Chequessett Neck Road dike capacity (10 
foot vertical tide gate opening) with a new dike at Mill Creek that 
blocks all tidal influence. This alternative would maximize restoration 
in all sub-basins except Mill Creek. Mill Creek would remain 
unrestored, but no new flood proofing measures would be needed in Mill 
Creek.
    Alternative D would employ an adaptive management strategy to 
restore tides up to the maximum Chequessett Neck Road dike capacity (10 
foot vertical tide gate opening) with a new dike at Mill Creek and Pole 
Dike Creek. Mill Creek and Pole Dike Creek tides would be controlled by 
these secondary structures to the maximum levels that can be achieved 
after flood proofing several low-lying properties. Tidal restoration 
would be maximized in all other sub-basins.
    For Alternatives B and D, two options are considered for mitigating 
project impacts to the Chequessett Yacht & Country Club (CYCC) golf 
course, a private golf course in Mill Creek: (1) Raise low-lying 
fairways a minimum of two feet above proposed inundation levels, or (2) 
relocate low-lying fairways to an undeveloped upland area owned by 
CYCC.
    Under all Action Alternatives, there is the potential for the 
restoration of natural tidal flow to result in impacts to private 
properties. Any such impacts would be addressed through mitigation 
measures such as raising or relocating affected buildings, driveways or 
wells, building berms to protect structures, and/or limiting water 
levels across entire sub-basins. The cost of these impact mitigation 
measures will be borne by the Project. Water surface

[[Page 40347]]

elevations within any sub-basin will not be increased until the 
necessary impact mitigation is in place.
    Alternative D, with the option to raise existing low-lying fairways 
a minimum of two feet above proposed inundation levels, has been 
identified as the NPS Preferred Alternative. This alternative best 
fulfills the restoration objectives of the project while mitigating 
adverse impacts to developed properties.
    In response to agency and public comment, several aspects of the 
alternatives have been updated in chapter 2 of the FEIS. Key updates 
include adding a tide control structure at the Pole Dike Creek Road and 
refining options for preventing tidal flow impacts to High Toss Road. 
Also, design details have progressed on other key project components, 
including the proposed new Chequessett Neck Road dike and Mill Creek 
dikes. Relevant updates have been added to the alternatives 
description, including information about staging area locations and 
canoe/kayak access. Updates have also been made to key parts of 
Chapters 3 and 4, including a revised vegetation analysis that allows 
improved estimates of impacts to special status species habitat, 
updated information about newly-listed federal species (Northern Long-
eared Bat and Red Knot), and dismissal of changes to FEMA flood 
insurance maps.

    Authority:  42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.

    Dated: June 2, 2016.
Michael A. Caldwell,
Regional Director, National Park Service, Northeast Region.
[FR Doc. 2016-14570 Filed 6-20-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4310-WV-P