Interagency Working Group on the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act, 35747-35749 [2016-13110]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 107 / Friday, June 3, 2016 / Notices Level B harassment were provided in Table 3 of this document. Based on the analysis contained herein of the likely effects of the specified activity on marine mammals and their habitat, and taking into consideration the implementation of the mitigation and monitoring measures, NMFS determined that small numbers of marine mammals will be taken relative to the populations of the affected species or stocks. See Table 3 for the authorized take numbers of marine mammals. with the Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations and NOAA Administrative Order (NAO) 216–6. NMFS prepared and signed a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) determining that preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was not required. The FONSI was signed on May 26, 2016 prior to the issuance of the IHA for the City of San Diego’s sand quality study activities from June 2016 to June 2017. A copy of the EA and FONSI is available upon request (see ADDRESSES). Impact on Availability of Affected Species or Stock for Taking for Subsistence Uses Section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA requires NMFS to determine that the authorization will not have an unmitigable adverse effect on the availability of marine mammal species or stocks for subsistence use. There are not relevant subsistence uses of marine mammals implicated by this action. Therefore, NMFS has determined that the total taking of affected species or stocks would not have an unmitigable adverse impact on the availability of such species or stocks for subsistence purposes. Authorization mstockstill on DSK3G9T082PROD with NOTICES Endangered Species Act NMFS (Permits and Conservation Division) has determined that an ESA section 7 consultation for the issuance of an IHA under section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA for this activity is not necessary for the Guadalupe fur seal. This species is rare at Children’s Pool Beach. Due to the fact that sightings have occurred in the area, and due to the declaration of a UME for this species in the area, ESA consultation was considered. However, it was determined that the sand sampling activities would have no potential to affect the Guadalupe fur seal because these activities would not occur if this species were present at Children’s Pool Beach. No other ESA-listed species are expected to occur in the proposed project area. National Environmental Policy Act To meet NMFS’s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA; 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) requirements for the issuance of an IHA to the City of San Diego, NMFS prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) titled Draft Environmental Assessment of the Issuance of an Incidental Harassment Authorization to the City of San Diego to Take Marine Mammals by Harassment Incidental to Sand Quality Study Activities at the Children’s Pool Beach in La Jolla, California to comply VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:20 Jun 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 NMFS has issued an IHA to the City of San Diego for conducting sand quality study activities at the Children’s Pool Beach in La Jolla, CA, provided the previously mentioned mitigation, monitoring, and reporting requirements are incorporated. Dated: May 27, 2016. Donna S. Wieting, Director, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 2016–13171 Filed 6–2–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–22–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Interagency Working Group on the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. AGENCY: Notices; publication of report and plan summary. ACTION: The National Ocean Service (NOS) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) publishes this notice to announce the publication of a detailed outline summarizing the intent of the Great Lakes Plan on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Hypoxia. Notice is also hereby given of the publication of ‘‘HABs and Hypoxia Comprehensive Research Plan and Action Strategy: An Interagency Report.’’ SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caitlin Gould (Caitlin.gould@noaa.gov, 240–533–0290) or Stacey DeGrasse (Stacey.Degrasse@fda.hhs.gov, 240– 402–1470) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 35747 I. Background HABS and hypoxia can have detrimental impacts to human and animal health, local and regional economies, and long-term national security. In response, the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act of 2014 (HABHRCA) establishes a national program and Federal interagency task force to advance the understanding of HABs and hypoxia events, and to respond to, detect, predict, control, and mitigate these events to the greatest extent practicable. Section 8 of the HABHRCA requires NOAA, as the lead federal agency of the task force and Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA (IWG–HABHRCA), to develop and submit to Congress a plan for reducing, mitigating, and controlling HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes, and publish a summary of the plan in the Federal Register prior to submission. The plan builds upon the Great Lakes HABs and Hypoxia Integrated Assessment contained in ‘‘HABs and Hypoxia Comprehensive Research Plan and Action Strategy: An Interagency Report’’, referenced herein, and builds upon the work of the International Joint Commission (e.g., reports entitled A Balanced Diet for Lake Erie: Reducing Phosphorous Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms and Human Health Effects from Harmful Algal Blooms: a Synthesis) and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (e.g. Annex Four). The Plan also addresses key aspects of Federal Activities to better understand and address HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes. Those efforts include establishing HAB and hypoxia forecast products through comprehensive monitoring integrated with satellite coverage and modeling of coastal, and freshwater zones; and developing and deploying lower cost, easy to use, and real-time sensors for early detection of hypoxia and HAB cells and toxins. The Plan further reflects significant engagement between IWG–HABHRCA agencies and a wide variety of stakeholders. Stakeholder engagement provides the IWG with information and perspective that enhances Federal data collection efforts. II. Summary of the Great Lakes Plan on Harmful Blooms and Hypoxia The IWG–HABHRCA is producing the Great Lakes Plan on Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia: An Interagency Report (hereafter: The ‘‘Plan’’), which will assess the current state of the science on causes and impacts of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and E:\FR\FM\03JNN1.SGM 03JNN1 35748 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 107 / Friday, June 3, 2016 / Notices hypoxia in the Great Lakes, highlight progress to date and current challenges, and propose next actions. An overview of the current state of science in the Plan will discuss challenges and recommendations related to HABs and hypoxia, addressing improving scientific understanding; prediction, modeling, and monitoring; mitigating the causes and impacts; social science; and engagement, communications, and outreach. Throughout, the report will consider prevention, control, and mitigation as related to HABs and hypoxia in the region. It will also discuss Federal progress and successes. Scientific Understanding: Requirements for Understanding, Verifying, and Characterizing HABs and Hypoxia The section on improving scientific understanding will synthesize existing knowledge regarding bloom toxicity and the detection and mapping of HAB and hypoxia extent. It also will review causes of HABs and hypoxia, including the role of phosphorus and nitrogen, invasive species, herbicides, climate change, and other environmental drivers, as well as how these factors influence the duration and intensity of HAB and hypoxia events. It also will review questions related to the timing of events and causes of HAB toxicity. mstockstill on DSK3G9T082PROD with NOTICES Monitoring Expanded and coordinated monitoring and data aggregation efforts, as well as advances in monitoring technologies, can help answer pressing questions at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The report will discuss how scientific understanding and nutrient mitigation strategies for HABs and hypoxia can be improved with additional environmental monitoring. It also will discuss how partnerships between agencies and non-Federal groups play a role in enhancing the efficiency of monitoring efforts. Modeling The prediction and modeling section will discuss the methods and technology that are being developed to provide advanced warnings of HAB and hypoxic events, forecast recovery efforts related to nutrient abatement, and raise awareness of HABs and hypoxia in order to reduce risk to public health. Methods and technology discussed in the report will include data, calibration, and validation needs related to HAB and hypoxia models. Impacts and Assessments Mitigating the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia will encompass best VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:20 Jun 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 management practices (BMPs) for addressing HABs and hypoxia, as well as BMPs during HAB and hypoxic events to minimize potential human health and socioeconomic risk. Mitigation challenges will include, but are not limited to, implementing new programs that reduce nutrient inputs, along with monitoring and modeling to determine BMP effectiveness. Sections discussing challenges related to socioeconomics, engagement, communications, and outreach of these issues in the region will include information on health impacts for humans, the aquatic ecosystem, pets, and wildlife, as well as information on cost-benefit analyses, valuation of ecosystem services, and risk assessment. It will also discuss how to better communicate between Federal agencies and with non-Federal stakeholders. Space Administration (NASA), United States Navy, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Science Foundation (NSF), United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Park Service (NPS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), United States Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). Timeline and Budget Recommendations for actions in each of the themes will be included in the report. The specific timeline and budgetary requirements for the deployment of future assets are subject to the availability of appropriations. This report will consider HAB and hypoxic events that occur throughout the Great Lakes, such as those in Lake Erie’s western basin and Sandusky Bay, Lake Huron’s Saginaw Bay, and Lake Michigan’s Green Bay. Stakeholder engagement and consultation will play a significant role in informing the content of the report; the IWG is soliciting input from academics, agricultural interests, industry, state and international agencies, and other stakeholder groups. To ensure that the Plan is technically sound and costeffective, interagency collaborations and other partnerships will be identified as possible opportunities for leveraging resources, including areas of expertise, workforce, funding, or equipment. The Plan will refer to existing reports for information, such as the International Joint Commission’s A Balanced Diet for Lake Erie: Reducing Phosphorous Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms, and Annex Four of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The Plan will expand upon relevant topics as they relate to current challenges and recommendations for future efforts. Other Information Stakeholders are invited to submit questions and provide input related to concerns and successes pertaining to HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes region. The IWG–HABHRCA continues to seek general and technical feedback on topics including: • Regional, Great Lakes-specific priorities for: Æ Ecological, economic, and social research on the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia; Æ Approaches to improving monitoring and early warnings, scientific understanding, prediction and modeling, and socioeconomics of these events; and Æ Mitigating the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia. • Communication and information dissemination methods that state, tribal, local, and international governments and organizations may undertake to educate and inform the public concerning HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes; and • Perceived needs for handling Great Lakes HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations. Inquiries and comments may be submitted via email (IWG– HABHRCA@noaa.gov) or via U.S. mail to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC–4, #8237, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910. Technical feedback in the form of brief annotated bibliographic entries would be welcome. The Interagency Working Group will gladly accept public input at any time; however, only those that are received on or before May 15, 2016, will be considered when the Interagency Working Group finalizes the plan. Other Information The IWG–HABHRCA is comprised of representatives from NOAA, United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), United States Geological Survey (USGS), National Aeronautics and Other Information Paperwork Reduction Act: Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person is required to respond to, nor shall any person be subject to a penalty for failure to comply with a collection of information subject to the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act, unless that collection PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\03JNN1.SGM 03JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 107 / Friday, June 3, 2016 / Notices displays a currently valid OMB Control Number. Dated: May 26, 2016. Mary C. Erickson, Director, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. [FR Doc. 2016–13110 Filed 6–2–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–JE–P COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. AGENCY: This action adds services to the Procurement List that will be provided by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. DATES: Effective July 3, 2016. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 715, Arlington, Virginia, 22202–4149. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603–7740, Fax: (703) 603–0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: mstockstill on DSK3G9T082PROD with NOTICES Additions On October 30, 2015 (80 FR 66880) and April 29, 2016 (81 FR 25652), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notices of proposed additions to the Procurement List. After consideration of the material presented to it concerning capability of qualified nonprofit agencies to provide the services and impact of the additions on the current or most recent contractors, the Committee has determined that the services listed below are suitable for procurement by the Federal Government under 41 U.S.C. 8501–8506 and 41 CFR 51–2.4. Regulatory Flexibility Act Certification I certify that the following action will not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities. The major factors considered for this certification were: 1. The action will not result in any additional reporting, recordkeeping or other compliance requirements for small entities other than the small organizations that will provide the services to the Government. VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:20 Jun 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 2. The action will result in authorizing small entities to provide the services to the Government. 3. There are no known regulatory alternatives which would accomplish the objectives of the Javits-WagnerO’Day Act (41 U.S.C. 8501–8506) in connection with the services proposed for addition to the Procurement List. End of Certification Accordingly, the following services are added to the Procurement List: Services: Service Type: Laundry Service. Mandatory for: Virginia Army National Guard, Central Issue Facility, Defense Supply Center Richmond, Warehouse 15, Richmond, VA. Mandatory Source(s) of Supply: Rappahannock Goodwill Industries, Inc., Fredericksburg, VA. Contracting Activity: Dept of the Army, W7N5 USPFO ACTIVITY VA ARNG, Blackstone, VA. Service Type: Furniture Design, Configuration and Installation Service. Mandatory for: US Department of the Interior, Stewart Lee Udall, Department of the Interior Building, 1849 C St. & South Interior Building, 1951 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC. Mandatory Source(s) of Supply: Industries for the Blind, Inc., West Allis, WI, Contracting Activity: Office of Policy, Management, and Budget, NBC Acquisition Services Directorate, Herndon, VA. Barry S. Lineback, Director, Business Operations. [FR Doc. 2016–13127 Filed 6–2–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6353–01–P COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to and deletions from the Procurement List. AGENCY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities, and deletes products and services previously furnished by such agencies. DATES: Comments must be received on or before: July 3, 2016. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 715, Arlington, Virginia, 22202–4149. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 35749 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603–7740, Fax: (703) 603–0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This notice is published pursuant to 41 U.S.C. 8503 (a)(2) and 41 CFR 51–2.3. Its purpose is to provide interested persons an opportunity to submit comments on the proposed actions. Additions If the Committee approves the proposed additions, the entities of the Federal Government identified in this notice will be required to procure the products and services listed below from nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. The following products and services are proposed for addition to the Procurement List for production by the nonprofit agencies listed: Products: NSN(s)—Product Name(s) MR 10732—Hershey’s Lava Cake Maker, Shipper 20732 MR 10733—Reese’s Lava Cake Maker, Shipper 20732 MR 10738—Holder, Pot Lid and Utensil, Includes Shipper 20738 MR 10739—Herb Stripper, Includes Shipper 20739 Mandatory Source(s) of Supply: WinstonSalem Industries for the Blind, Inc., Winston-Salem, NC. Mandatory for: The requirements of military commissaries and exchanges in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 51, 51–6.4. Contracting Activity: Defense Commissary Agency. Distribution: C-List. Services: Service Type: Custodial and Related Service. Mandatory for: GSA PBS Region 1, Thomas P. O’Neill, Jr. Federal Office Building, 10 Causeway Street, Boston, MA. Mandatory Source(s) of Supply: Work, Incorporated, Dorchester, MA. Contracting Activity: GSA PBS Region 1, Boston, MA. Service Type: Base Supply Center. Mandatory for: US Army, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 503 Robert Grant Avenue, Silver Spring, MD. Mandatory Source(s) of Supply: Industries for the Blind, Inc., West Allis, WI. Contracting Activity: Dept of the Army, W4PZ USA MED RSCH ACQUIS ACT, Fort Detrick, MD. Deletions The following products and services are proposed for deletion from the Procurement List: Products: NSN(s)—Product Name(s) MR 305—Melamine Dinner Plate E:\FR\FM\03JNN1.SGM 03JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 107 (Friday, June 3, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 35747-35749]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-13110]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


Interagency Working Group on the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia 
Research and Control Amendments Act

AGENCY: National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce.

ACTION: Notices; publication of report and plan summary.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The National Ocean Service (NOS) of the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) publishes this notice to announce the 
publication of a detailed outline summarizing the intent of the Great 
Lakes Plan on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Hypoxia.
    Notice is also hereby given of the publication of ``HABs and 
Hypoxia Comprehensive Research Plan and Action Strategy: An Interagency 
Report.''

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caitlin Gould (Caitlin.gould@noaa.gov, 
240-533-0290) or Stacey DeGrasse (Stacey.Degrasse@fda.hhs.gov, 240-402-
1470)

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Background

    HABS and hypoxia can have detrimental impacts to human and animal 
health, local and regional economies, and long-term national security. 
In response, the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control 
Amendments Act of 2014 (HABHRCA) establishes a national program and 
Federal interagency task force to advance the understanding of HABs and 
hypoxia events, and to respond to, detect, predict, control, and 
mitigate these events to the greatest extent practicable.
    Section 8 of the HABHRCA requires NOAA, as the lead federal agency 
of the task force and Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA (IWG-
HABHRCA), to develop and submit to Congress a plan for reducing, 
mitigating, and controlling HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes, and 
publish a summary of the plan in the Federal Register prior to 
submission. The plan builds upon the Great Lakes HABs and Hypoxia 
Integrated Assessment contained in ``HABs and Hypoxia Comprehensive 
Research Plan and Action Strategy: An Interagency Report'', referenced 
herein, and builds upon the work of the International Joint Commission 
(e.g., reports entitled A Balanced Diet for Lake Erie: Reducing 
Phosphorous Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms and Human Health Effects 
from Harmful Algal Blooms: a Synthesis) and the Great Lakes Water 
Quality Agreement (e.g. Annex Four). The Plan also addresses key 
aspects of Federal Activities to better understand and address HABs and 
hypoxia in the Great Lakes. Those efforts include establishing HAB and 
hypoxia forecast products through comprehensive monitoring integrated 
with satellite coverage and modeling of coastal, and freshwater zones; 
and developing and deploying lower cost, easy to use, and real-time 
sensors for early detection of hypoxia and HAB cells and toxins. The 
Plan further reflects significant engagement between IWG-HABHRCA 
agencies and a wide variety of stakeholders. Stakeholder engagement 
provides the IWG with information and perspective that enhances Federal 
data collection efforts.

II. Summary of the Great Lakes Plan on Harmful Blooms and Hypoxia

    The IWG-HABHRCA is producing the Great Lakes Plan on Harmful Algal 
Blooms and Hypoxia: An Interagency Report (hereafter: The ``Plan''), 
which will assess the current state of the science on causes and 
impacts of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and

[[Page 35748]]

hypoxia in the Great Lakes, highlight progress to date and current 
challenges, and propose next actions.
    An overview of the current state of science in the Plan will 
discuss challenges and recommendations related to HABs and hypoxia, 
addressing improving scientific understanding; prediction, modeling, 
and monitoring; mitigating the causes and impacts; social science; and 
engagement, communications, and outreach. Throughout, the report will 
consider prevention, control, and mitigation as related to HABs and 
hypoxia in the region. It will also discuss Federal progress and 
successes.

Scientific Understanding: Requirements for Understanding, Verifying, 
and Characterizing HABs and Hypoxia

    The section on improving scientific understanding will synthesize 
existing knowledge regarding bloom toxicity and the detection and 
mapping of HAB and hypoxia extent. It also will review causes of HABs 
and hypoxia, including the role of phosphorus and nitrogen, invasive 
species, herbicides, climate change, and other environmental drivers, 
as well as how these factors influence the duration and intensity of 
HAB and hypoxia events. It also will review questions related to the 
timing of events and causes of HAB toxicity.

Monitoring

    Expanded and coordinated monitoring and data aggregation efforts, 
as well as advances in monitoring technologies, can help answer 
pressing questions at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The 
report will discuss how scientific understanding and nutrient 
mitigation strategies for HABs and hypoxia can be improved with 
additional environmental monitoring. It also will discuss how 
partnerships between agencies and non-Federal groups play a role in 
enhancing the efficiency of monitoring efforts.

Modeling

    The prediction and modeling section will discuss the methods and 
technology that are being developed to provide advanced warnings of HAB 
and hypoxic events, forecast recovery efforts related to nutrient 
abatement, and raise awareness of HABs and hypoxia in order to reduce 
risk to public health. Methods and technology discussed in the report 
will include data, calibration, and validation needs related to HAB and 
hypoxia models.

Impacts and Assessments

    Mitigating the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia will 
encompass best management practices (BMPs) for addressing HABs and 
hypoxia, as well as BMPs during HAB and hypoxic events to minimize 
potential human health and socioeconomic risk. Mitigation challenges 
will include, but are not limited to, implementing new programs that 
reduce nutrient inputs, along with monitoring and modeling to determine 
BMP effectiveness.
    Sections discussing challenges related to socioeconomics, 
engagement, communications, and outreach of these issues in the region 
will include information on health impacts for humans, the aquatic 
ecosystem, pets, and wildlife, as well as information on cost-benefit 
analyses, valuation of ecosystem services, and risk assessment. It will 
also discuss how to better communicate between Federal agencies and 
with non-Federal stakeholders.

Timeline and Budget

    Recommendations for actions in each of the themes will be included 
in the report. The specific timeline and budgetary requirements for the 
deployment of future assets are subject to the availability of 
appropriations.
    This report will consider HAB and hypoxic events that occur 
throughout the Great Lakes, such as those in Lake Erie's western basin 
and Sandusky Bay, Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay, and Lake Michigan's Green 
Bay. Stakeholder engagement and consultation will play a significant 
role in informing the content of the report; the IWG is soliciting 
input from academics, agricultural interests, industry, state and 
international agencies, and other stakeholder groups. To ensure that 
the Plan is technically sound and cost-effective, interagency 
collaborations and other partnerships will be identified as possible 
opportunities for leveraging resources, including areas of expertise, 
workforce, funding, or equipment. The Plan will refer to existing 
reports for information, such as the International Joint Commission's A 
Balanced Diet for Lake Erie: Reducing Phosphorous Loadings and Harmful 
Algal Blooms, and Annex Four of the Great Lakes Water Quality 
Agreement. The Plan will expand upon relevant topics as they relate to 
current challenges and recommendations for future efforts.

Other Information

    The IWG-HABHRCA is comprised of representatives from NOAA, United 
States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), 
United States Geological Survey (USGS), National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), United States Navy, National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Science Foundation 
(NSF), United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Park 
Service (NPS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), United States 
Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 
(BOEM).

Other Information

    Stakeholders are invited to submit questions and provide input 
related to concerns and successes pertaining to HABs and hypoxia in the 
Great Lakes region. The IWG-HABHRCA continues to seek general and 
technical feedback on topics including:
     Regional, Great Lakes-specific priorities for:
    [cir] Ecological, economic, and social research on the causes and 
impacts of HABs and hypoxia;
    [cir] Approaches to improving monitoring and early warnings, 
scientific understanding, prediction and modeling, and socioeconomics 
of these events; and
    [cir] Mitigating the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia.
     Communication and information dissemination methods that 
state, tribal, local, and international governments and organizations 
may undertake to educate and inform the public concerning HABs and 
hypoxia in the Great Lakes; and
     Perceived needs for handling Great Lakes HAB and hypoxia 
events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations.
    Inquiries and comments may be submitted via email (IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov) or via U.S. mail to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National 
Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8237, 1305 East-West 
Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910. Technical feedback in the form of 
brief annotated bibliographic entries would be welcome. The Interagency 
Working Group will gladly accept public input at any time; however, 
only those that are received on or before May 15, 2016, will be 
considered when the Interagency Working Group finalizes the plan.

Other Information

    Paperwork Reduction Act: Notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, no person is required to respond to, nor shall any person be 
subject to a penalty for failure to comply with a collection of 
information subject to the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 
unless that collection

[[Page 35749]]

displays a currently valid OMB Control Number.

    Dated: May 26, 2016.
Mary C. Erickson,
Director, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Ocean 
Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
[FR Doc. 2016-13110 Filed 6-2-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3510-JE-P