Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program Amendment IV, 26471-26484 [2016-10319]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations 2016 from 10 p.m. until 10:45 p.m. and on each Saturday between May 28, 2016 through September 3, 2016 from 10 p.m. until 10:45 p.m. and each Wednesday from June 1, 2016 through August 31, 2016 at 9:15 p.m. until 10 p.m. Additionally, this safety zone will also be enforced on May 27, 2016 from 9 p.m. until 10:30 p.m., on June 10, 2016 from 9:15 p.m. until 10 p.m., on July 4, 2016 from 9:15 p.m. until 10 p.m., on July 28, 2016, July 29, 2016, September 10, 2016, and October 29, 2016 from 9:15 p.m. until 10:30 p.m., and on December 31, 2016 from 11:45 p.m. until 12:30 a.m. on January 1, 2017. This safety zone encompasses all waters of Lake Michigan within Chicago Harbor bounded by coordinates beginning at 41°53′26.5″ N, 087°35′26.5″ W; then south to 41°53′7.6″ N, 087°35′26.3″ W; then west to 41°53′7.6″ N, 087°36′23.2″ W; then north to 41°53′26.5″ N, 087°36′24.6″ W; then east back to the point of origin (NAD 83). During the enforcement period, no vessel may transit this regulated area without approval from the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan (COTP) or a COTP designated representative. Vessels and persons granted permission to enter the safety zone shall obey all lawful orders or directions of the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan, or his or her onscene representative. This notice of enforcement is issued under authority of 33 CFR 165.931 and 5 U.S.C.552 (a). In addition to this notice in the Federal Register, the Coast Guard will provide the maritime community with advance notification of this enforcement period via Broadcast Notice to Mariners or Local Notice to Mariners. The Captain of the Port Lake Michigan or a designated on-scene representative may be contacted via Channel 16, VHF–FM. Dated: April 21, 2016. A.B. Cocanour, Captain, U.S. Coast Guard, Captain of the Port Lake Michigan. [FR Doc. 2016–10304 Filed 5–2–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES [EPA–HQ–OPP–2006–0766; FRL–9944–87] Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program Amendment IV Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 This final rule revises the current pesticide tolerance crop grouping regulations, which allow the establishment of tolerances for multiple related crops based on data from a representative set of crops. This rule creates five new crop groups, three new and two revised commodity definitions and revises the regulations on the interaction of crop group tolerances with processed food, meat, milk, and egg tolerances. These revisions will promote greater use of crop groupings for tolerance-setting purposes, both domestically and in countries that export food to the United States. This is the fourth in a series of planned crop group updates. DATES: This final rule is effective July 5, 2016. ADDRESSES: The docket for this action, identified by docket identification (ID) number EPA–HQ–OPP–2006–0766, is available at http://www.regulations.gov or at the Office of Pesticide Programs Regulatory Public Docket (OPP Docket) in the Environmental Protection Agency Docket Center (EPA/DC), West William Jefferson Clinton Bldg., Rm. 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001. The Public Reading Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 566–1744, and the telephone number for the OPP Docket is (703) 305–5805. Please review the visitor instructions and additional information about the docket available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For general information contact: ´ Rame Cromwell, Field and External Affairs Division (7506P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001; telephone number: (703) 308–9068; email address: cromwell.rame@epa.gov. For technical information contact: Barbara Madden, Registration Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460–001; telephone number: (703) 305–6463; email address: madden.barbara@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Does this action apply to me? You may be potentially affected by this action if you are an agricultural producer or food manufacturer. The following list of North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide to help readers determine whether this PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 26471 document applies to them. Potentially affected entities may include: • Crop production (NAICS code 111). • Animal production (NAICS code 112). • Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). • Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532). II. Background A. What action is the Agency taking? This final rule revises EPA’s regulations governing crop group tolerances for pesticides. Specifically, this rule creates five new crop groups, three new and two revised commodity definitions, and revises the regulations on the interaction of crop group tolerances with processed food, meat, milk, and egg tolerances. This final rule is the fourth in a series of crop group updates expected to be promulgated in the next several years. B. What is the agency’s authority for taking this action? This rule is issued under the authority of section 408(e)(1)(C) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), which authorizes EPA to establish ‘‘general procedures and requirements to implement (section 408).’’ 21 U.S.C. 346a(e)(1)(C). Under FFDCA section 408, EPA establishes tolerances for pesticide chemical residues in or on food, where there is a reasonable certainty that no harm will result from aggregate exposure to the pesticide chemical residue. A tolerance is the maximum permissible residue level established for a pesticide in raw agricultural produce and processed foods. The crop group regulations currently in 40 CFR 180.40 and 180.41 enable the establishment of tolerances for a crop group based on residue data for certain crops that are representative of the group. III. The Proposed Rule EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register on November 14, 2014 (79 FR 68153) (FRL– 9918–40). Written comments were received from seven parties in response to the proposal: Three private citizens, the University of Hawaii, the Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation, the Minor Crop Farmer Alliance, and the Interregional Research Project Number (IR–4). IV. Response to Comments In this unit, EPA describes the major provisions of the proposed rule, the comments received on each provision, EPA’s responses to those comments, and E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 26472 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES EPA’s determination regarding the final rule. A. Crop Group 4–16: Leafy Vegetable Group 1. Revise the proposed crop group name. EPA is adopting its proposal to expand ‘‘Crop Group 4: Leafy Vegetables (Except Brassica Vegetables) Group’’ to both add and remove commodities and to restructure the group. EPA revises the name of the new crop group to ‘‘Crop Group 4–16: Leafy Vegetable Group.’’ Although the new crop group was proposed as ‘‘Crop Group 4–14: Leafy Vegetable Group’’, this change is needed in order to reflect the correct year of establishment, which is 2016. The final rule retains the pre-existing Crop Group 4 as described in Unit VI. 2. Add new commodities. The final rule expands the leafy vegetable crop group from the existing 27 commodities to 62 commodities in Crop Group 4–16: Leafy Vegetable Group. 3. Revise representative commodities for new crop group. The final rule retains the proposed four representative commodities for Crop Group 4–16: Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard greens, and spinach. EPA received an anonymous comment to make lettuce a separate subgroup under Crop Group 4–16 and adopt other crops as representative crops for Crop Group 4–16. The commenter indicated that lettuce is intolerant of most herbicides and proposed that lettuce be established as a separate subgroup and other crops be adopted as better representative commodities for the crop group. However, the commenter did not provide any additional information or suggest what alternative crop would be more appropriate as the representative crop. To address this comment, EPA reviewed data for all commodities included in the proposed Crop Group 4– 16, including the commodities that would be appropriate for inclusion in Leafy Green subgroup 4–16A and Brassica Leafy Greens subgroup 4–16B. EPA has determined that lettuce would continue to be appropriately included in Crop Group 4 with the other vegetables based on similarities in the plant morphology; cultural practices; similar pest problems; the similar edible food portions and lack of livestock feed portions; potential to result in similar dietary exposure to pesticide residues; similarities in geographical locations and processing techniques; and the established tolerances for commodities currently within subgroup 4A (Ref. 1). Similarly, the Agency is including lettuce in subgroup 4–16A based on similarities in plant morphology; VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 cultural practices; pest problems; the edible food portions and lack of livestock feed portions; potential to result in similar dietary exposure to pesticide residues; and similarities in geographical locations and processing techniques; and the established tolerances for commodities currently within subgroup 4A (Ref. 1). EPA expects that all proposed members of the crop subgroup 4–16A will generally have similar residue levels based on these similarities and has determined that it is appropriate to include the proposed commodities, including lettuce, in Crop Group 4–16 and subgroup 4–16A. In determining the appropriate representative commodities for this crop group and subgroup, the Agency considered which commodities are most likely to contain the highest residues; to be the highest produced and/or consumed; and to be similar in morphology, growth habit, pest problems, and edible portion to the related commodities within a group or subgroup. EPA determined that head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard greens, and spinach are the appropriate representatives for the crop group, because these commodities account for >95% of the total leafy vegetable harvested acres reported in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Census of Agriculture and are also the highest consumed commodities on a per capita basis in the group. These commodities have a long regulatory history as being representative commodities for Crop Groups 4 and 5 (Ref. 1). 4. New subgroups. The final rule retains the proposed addition of two subgroups to the revised Crop Group 4– 16. i. Leafy greens subgroup 4–16A. (Representative commodities- Head lettuce, Leaf lettuce, and Spinach). Forty-two commodities are included in this subgroup. ii. Brassica leafy greens subgroup 4– 16B. (Representative commodityMustard greens). Twenty commodities are included in this subgroup. B. Crop Group 5–16: Head and Stem Brassica Vegetable Group EPA proposed to remove commodities and to restructure existing Crop Group 5, as Brassica (Cole) Leafy Vegetables Crop Group 5–16. EPA received no comments on this proposal and therefore is adopting the proposed changes as final with one minor modification. EPA is revising the name of the new crop group to ‘‘Crop Group 5–16: Head and Stem Brassica Vegetable Group.’’ Although the new crop group PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 was proposed as ‘‘Crop Group 5–14: Head and Stem Brassica Vegetable Group’’, this change is needed to reflect the correct year of establishment, which is 2016. 1. Revise existing commodities. The final rule revises Crop Group 5–16 to include five commodities. 2. Revise representative commodities. The final rule revises the representative commodities for Crop Group 5–16 by designating Broccoli or Cauliflower, and Cabbage as the representative commodities. 3. Remove subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposal not to include subgroups in Crop Group 5–16. EPA received no comments on this provision and adopts its proposal without change. C. New Crop Group 22: Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Group EPA received no comments on the addition of this new Crop Group and adopts its proposal without change. 1. Commodities. The final rule adopts 19 commodities to the new Crop Group 22. 2. Representative Commodities. The final rule adopts the proposed Asparagus and Celery as representative commodities. 3. New Subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposed two subgroups to the new Crop Group 22. i. Stalk and stem vegetable subgroup 22A. (Representative commodityAsparagus). Twelve commodities are included in this subgroup. ii. Leaf petiole vegetable subgroup 22B. (Representative commodityCelery). Seven commodities are included in this subgroup. 4. Amendment to Definitions and Interpretations. In conjunction with new Crop Group 22, EPA is adopting two new commodity definitions that were proposed for Fern, edible and Palm hearts to be added to § 180.1(g), as specified in this final rule. No comments were submitted on this provision, and EPA adopts its proposal without change. D. New Crop Group 23: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel Group EPA received three comments to the proposed Crop Group 23. The Agency received one comment about the proposed representative commodity for Crop subgroup 23A, which is addressed in Unit IV D.2, and another comment about a commodity definition for guava, which is addressed in Unit IV D.4. Additionally, EPA received a comment ´ from IR–4 requesting that Achachairu (Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana) Zappi) be added to the proposed E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Crop subgroup 24B. After reviewing the comment and considering available information, EPA determined that it would be appropriate to include ´ Achachairu in Subtropical Fruit, medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup 23B; this is addressed in Unit IV D.3. The Agency also received a comment on the name ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical’’ being removed from the proposed subgroups titled ‘‘small fruit, edible peel subgroup 23A’’, ’’ medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup 23B’’, and ‘‘palm fruit, edible peel subgroup 23C’’. According to the commenter, these names could result in misunderstanding of what commodities are included in the adopted Crop Group 23. EPA agrees with the commenter that removal of the names ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical’’ from the adopted subgroups could result in misunderstandings and has changed the subgroup names as follows: ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, small fruit, edible peel subgroup 23A’’; ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup 23B’’; and ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, palm fruit, edible peel subgroup 23C’’. EPA is adopting its proposal with these changes to the subgroup names. 1. Commodities. The final rule adopts 109 commodities to the new Crop Group 23. 2. Representative Commodities. The final rule adopts the proposed Olive, Fig, Guava, and Date as representative commodities after consideration of one comment received concerning the representative commodity for Crop subgroup 23A, Olive. An anonymous commenter provided, in part, the following comment: ‘‘Having only a cool, subtropical fruit crop, i.e., olive, as the representative for numerous tropical fruit crops . . . will make conducting residue trials for these crops unlikely since these crops are not adapted to nor grown in cool, Mediterranean-like climates but in tropical regions.’’ The commenter recommended that the EPA find a different representative commodity for subgroup 23A and suggested that wax jambu or perhaps Costa Rican guava would be good choices. In response, EPA notes that there should not be a need to conduct residue trials for the other crops in the subgroup because the basis for crop grouping is that data for the representative commodity can be used to establish tolerances for the other commodities in the subgroup. Additionally, representative commodities are selected based on commodities most likely to contain the highest residues; to be the highest VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 produced and/or consumed; to be similar in morphology, growth habit, pest problems and edible portion to the related commodities within a group or subgroup; and to have production in the United States. EPA determined olive is the appropriate representative for subgroup 23A for several reasons. First, in general, the smaller the fruit, the larger the ratio of surface area to weight; therefore, pesticide deposits on olives are expected to be higher than on wax jambu or Costa Rican guava. Because of their size, olives are expected to have a higher residue than wax jambu or Costa Rican guava. Second, olives account for most of the harvested U.S. acres for the members of subgroup 23A, whereas (as noted by the commenter) wax jambu and Costa Rican guava are primarily grown outside of the United States. Finally, the commodities in subgroup 23A are similar in fruit surface area, edible portions, and cultural practices. 3. New Subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposed three subgroups to the new Crop Group 23. i. Tropical and Subtropical, small fruit, edible peel subgroup 23A. (Representative commodity—Olive). Fifty-six commodities are included in this subgroup. ii. Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup 23B. (Representative commodities—Fig and Guava). Forty-four commodities are included in this subgroup after consideration of one comment received concerning the addition of a commodity. EPA received a comment from IR–4 ´ requesting that Achachairu (Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana) Zappi) be added to the proposed Crop subgroup 24B. After reviewing the comment and considering available information, EPA ´ determined that the peel for Achachairu is edible and is used in fruit drinks. Therefore, EPA determined that it would be appropriate to include ´ Achachairu in the Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup 23B. USDA APHIS ´ indicates Achachairu is already being legally imported into the U.S., and therefore, being a member of the crop group will help avoid tolerance and import issues with this crop. iii. Tropical and Subtropical, Palm fruit, edible peel subgroup 23C. (Representative commodity—Date). Nine commodities are included in this subgroup. 4. Amendment to Definitions and Interpretations. IR–4 originally petitioned the EPA to develop a new crop definition for guava to include many of the closely related genus (Psidium), species and varieties. EPA PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 26473 did not propose such a definition in the proposed rule and concluded that a guava definition was not necessary because it is one of the proposed representative commodities for crop subgroup 23B, ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup’’. In conjunction with new Crop Group 23, EPA received a comment to the proposed rule from IR–4 that stated, in part: ‘‘. . . IR–4 believes that this definition [for guava] is necessary because both fig and guava are required as representative commodities for Crop Subgroup 23B and all of the related guava varieties and subspecies would not be covered except with a subgroup tolerance.’’ Upon review of the comment from IR– 4, EPA agrees that a commodity definition for guava will be helpful to provide additional information on the closely related species and varieties of guava that are included for the commodity. Therefore, in conjunction with new Crop Group 23 and Crop Subgroup 23B, EPA is adopting a commodity definition for Guava to be added to § 180.1(g). No additional comments were submitted on this provision, and EPA adopts its proposal with the changes noted in the previous discussion. E. Crop Group 24: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel Group EPA received several comments to the proposed Crop Group 24, which are individually addressed in this unit. The Agency received a comment objecting to ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical’’ being removed from the proposed subgroups titled ‘‘Small Fruit, inedible peel subgroup 24A’’; ‘‘medium to large fruit, smooth, inedible peel subgroup 24B’’; ‘‘medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup 24C’’; ‘‘Inedible Peel, cactus subgroup 24D’’; and ‘‘Inedible Peel, vine subgroup 24E’’. The commenter stated these names could result in misunderstanding of which commodities are included in the adopted Crop Group 24. EPA agrees with the commenter that removal of the names ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical’’ from the adopted subgroups as proposed, could result in misunderstanding. For clarity the subgroups will be named as follows: ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, small fruit, inedible peel subgroup 24A’’; ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, smooth, inedible peel subgroup 24B’’; ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup 24C’’; ‘‘Tropical and Subtropical, inedible peel, cactus subgroup 24D’’; and ‘‘Tropical and E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES 26474 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Subtropical, inedible peel, vine subgroup 24E’’. 1. Commodities. The final rule adopts 104 commodities to the new Crop Group 24. 2. Representative Commodities. The final rule adopts the proposed Atemoya or Sugar apple; Avocado; Pomegranate or Banana; Dragon fruit; Prickly pear, fruit; Lychee; Passionfruit; and Pineapple as representative commodities. 3. New Subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposed five subgroups to the new Crop Group 24. i. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, inedible peel subgroup 24A. (Representative commodity—Lychee). Nineteen commodities are included in the subgroup. EPA received a comment from the University of Hawaii, requesting removal of Longan from subgroup 24C and placing it in Crop subgroup 24A. The request is based on the size and texture of the fruit although it is similar to lychee, the adopted representative commodity for subgroup 24A. EPA agrees with the commenter to move Longan from Crop subgroup 24C to Crop subgroup 24A. Therefore, nineteen commodities are now in subgroup 24A. ii. Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, smooth, inedible peel subgroup 24B. (Representative commodities—Avocado, plus Pomegranate or Banana) Forty-two commodities are included in this subgroup. iii. Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup 24C. (Representative commodities—Pineapple, plus atemoya or sugar apple). 26 commodities are included in this subgroup. As stated previously, the final rule moves Longan from the proposed Crop subgroup 24C to Crop subgroup 24A. Therefore, there are now 26 commodities included in this subgroup. iv. Tropical and Subtropical, Inedible peel, cactus subgroup 24D. (Representative commodities—Dragon fruit and Prickly pear fruit). Nine commodities are included in this subgroup. v. Tropical and Subtropical, Inedible peel, vine subgroup 24E. (Representative commodity—Passionfruit). Eight commodities are included in this subgroup. No additional comments were submitted on this provision, and EPA adopts its proposal without change. F. Other Changes No comments were submitted on the proposed ‘‘other changes’’ provisions, VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 and EPA adopts its proposal without change. G. Other Comments EPA received one comment from the Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation requesting that EPA ensure the opportunity for some other orphan crops grown in Hawaii to be listed in future crop groupings scenarios. Those crops of concern are coffee (Coffea arabica), tea (Camellia sinensis), awa/ kava (Piper methysticum), moringa (Moringa oleifera), and noni (Morinda citrifolia). The primary reasons for the on-going crop grouping effort is to include as many orphan crops into groups, as appropriate, to facilitate trade and to provide tools for producers of minor and specialty crops. EPA is making every effort to include all appropriate commodities into crop groups. The crop groups discussed in this document are based on five petitions developed by the International Crop Grouping Consulting Committee (ICGCC) workgroup and submitted to EPA by IR–4. EPA encourages the Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation to participate in the ICGCC to ensure all commodities important to their growers are considered. Additionally, just as with this action, there will be an opportunity to provide comments on any future proposed crop groups. One commenter disagreed with placing Kei apple (Dovyalis caffra) and Sapote, white (Casimiroa edulis) in Crop Group 24. The commenter believes the edible peel of the fruit should place the fruits in Crop Group 23. EPA does not agree that Crop Group 23 is appropriate for these two commodities. Kei apples are small, petalless, and clustered in the leaf axils. The aromatic fruit is oblate or nearly round and long, with bright yellow, smooth but minutely downy, somewhat tough skin. Aromatic fruit is also mealy, apricot-textured, juicy, and has highly acid flesh. Most people consider the fruit too acidic for eating out-of-hand even when fully ripe. The skin for Sapote, white is thin, papery, smooth, inedible, and covered with a very thin waxy bloom. The skin should be thickly peeled to remove the bitter flesh underneath. Fruit can also be halved and the pulp can be scooped out. V. The Final Rule After fully considering all comments, EPA is amending the names of a few commodities, and adopting changes to its proposal as discussed in Unit IV. EPA is otherwise finalizing the rule as proposed, and based on the rationales set forth in the proposed rule. PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 VI. Implementation When an existing crop group is amended in a manner that expands or contracts its coverage of commodities, EPA will retain the pre-existing crop group in § 180.41; insert the revised crop group immediately after the preexisting crop group in § 180.41; and title the revised crop group in a way that clearly differentiates it from the preexisting crop group. The revised crop group will retain roughly the same name and number as the pre-existing group, except the number will be followed by a hyphen and the final digits of the year established (e.g., Crop Group 4–16). EPA will initially retain pre-existing crop groups that have been superseded by revised crop groups. EPA will not establish new tolerances under the preexisting groups. Further, EPA plans to eventually convert tolerances for any pre-existing crop group to tolerances with coverage under the revised crop group. This conversion will occur through the registration review process and in the course of evaluating new uses for a pesticide registration. EPA requests that petitioners for tolerances address crop grouping in their petitions. For existing petitions for which a Notice of Filing has been published, the Agency will attempt to conform these petitions to this rule. VII. International Considerations In the proposed rule, EPA described other related activities involving active participation by its North American Free Trade Agreement partners, Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency and the government of Mexico, IR–4, and the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues. The goals of these activities remain minimizing differences within and among the United States and Codex groups and to develop representative commodities for each group that will be acceptable on an international basis, which in turn could lead to the increased harmonization of tolerances and MRL recommendations. VIII. References The following is a listing of the documents that are specifically referenced in this document. The docket includes these documents and other information considered by EPA, including documents that are referenced within the documents that are included in the docket, even if the referenced document is not physically located in the docket. For assistance in locating these other documents, please consult the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations 1. EPA. Bernard A. Schneider, Ph.D. Selection of Representative Commodities and Processed Commodities. July 24, 2014. Docket ID number EPA–HQ–OPP– 2006–0766. 2. EPA. Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program; Proposed Expansion; Proposed rule. Federal Register May 23, 2007 (77 FR 28920) (FRL–8126–1). 3. EPA. Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program; Final rule. Federal Register December 7, 2007 (72 FR 69150) (FRL– 8343–1). IX. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Additional information about these statutes and Executive Orders can be found at http://www2.epa.gov/lawsregulations/laws-and-executive-orders. Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review and Executive Order 13563: Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review This action is not a significant regulatory action and was therefore not submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review for review under Executive Orders 12866, October 4, 1993 (58 FR 51735) and 13563, January 21, 2011 (76 FR 3821). EPA prepared an analysis of the potential costs and benefits associated with the first proposed rule issued in this series of updates (Ref. 2). This analysis, entitled ‘‘Economic Analysis Proposed Expansion of Crop Grouping Program,’’ is available in the docket. Because the costs and benefits of each update to the crop grouping rule are essentially the same, and generally involve reductions in regulatory burdens and costs, EPA believes the May 23, 2007 economic analysis continues to be applicable. This was discussed in Unit V. of the proposed rule for Group IV, and EPA did not receive any comments on the analysis or EPA’s findings. B. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) This action does not impose any new information collection requirements that would require additional review or approval by OMB under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. However, this action is expected to reduce paperwork burdens associated with submissions for tolerance related actions. For example, it may reduce the number of residue chemistry studies required to establish a tolerance for a crop within these groups because instead of testing each crop, only the representative crops would need to be tested under a crop grouping scheme. C. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) I certify that this action will not have a significant economic impact on a VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 substantial number of small entities under the RFA, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq. In making this determination, the impact of concern is any significant adverse economic impact on small entities. An agency may certify that a rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities if the rule relieves regulatory burden, has no net burden or otherwise has a positive economic effect on the small entities subject to the rule. This action provides regulatory relief and regulatory flexibility. The new crop groups ease the process for an entity to request and for EPA to set pesticide tolerances on greater numbers of crops. Pesticides will be more widely available to growers for use on crops, particularly specialty crops. This action is not expected to have any adverse impact on any entities, regardless of size. D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) This action does not contain an unfunded federal mandate of $100 million or more as described in UMRA, 2 U.S.C. 1531–1538, and does not significantly or uniquely affect small governments. Accordingly, this action is not subject to the requirements of UMRA, 2 U.S.C. 1501 et seq. E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism This action does not have federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132, August 10, 1999 (64 FR 43255). It will not have substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. Thus, Executive Order 13132 does not apply to this action. F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments This action does not have tribal implications as specified in Executive Order 13175, November 9, 2000 (65 FR 67249). This action will not have any effect on tribal governments, on the relationship between the Federal Government and the Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this action. G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children From Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks EPA interprets Executive Order 13045, April 23, 1997 (62 FR 19885) as PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 26475 applying only to those regulatory actions that concern environmental health or safety risks that the EPA has reason to believe may disproportionately affect children, per the definition of ‘‘covered regulatory action’’ in section 2–202 of the Executive Order. This action is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it does not concern an environmental health risk or safety risk. H. Executive Order 13211: Actions That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use This action is not subject to Executive Order 13211, May 22, 2001 (66 FR 28355), because it is not a significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866. I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA) This rulemaking does not involve technical standards that would require the consideration of voluntary consensus standards pursuant to NTTAA section 12(d), 15 U.S.C. 272 note. J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations This action does not involve special consideration of environmental justice related issues as specified in Executive Order 12898, February 16, 1994 (59 FR 7629). This action does not address human health or environmental risks or otherwise have any disproportionate high and adverse human health or environmental effects on minority, lowincome or indigenous populations. IX. Congressional Review Act This action is subject to the CRA, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., and EPA will submit a rule report to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the United States. This action is not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 180 Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, Commodities, Pesticides and pests. Dated: April 22, 2016. James Jones, Assistant Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. Therefore, 40 CFR chapter I is amended as follows: PART 180—[AMENDED] 1. The authority citation for part 180 continues to read as follows: ■ E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 26476 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Authority: 21 U.S.C. 321 (q), 346a and 371. 2. In § 180.1: i. Revise the entries for ‘‘Broccoli’’ and ‘‘Sugar apple’’ in the table in paragraph (g). ■ ■ ii. Add in alphabetical order the entries ‘‘Fern, edible, fiddlehead’’, ‘‘Guava’’, and ‘‘Palm hearts’’ to the table in paragraph (g). ■ A The additions and revisions read as follows: § 180.1 * Definitions and interpretations. * * (g) * * * * * B * * * * Broccoli ............................... Broccoli, Chinese broccoli (gai lon, white flowering broccoli). * * * * * * * * * * Fern, edible, fiddlehead ...... Fern, edible, fiddlehead including: Black lady fern, Deparia japonica (Thunb.) M. Kato; Bracken fern, Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn; Broad buckler fern, Dryopteris dilatata (Hoffm.) A. Gray; Cinnamon fern, Osmundastrum cinnamomeum (L.) C. Presl; Lady fern, Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth ex Mert.; Leather fern, Acrostichum aureum L.; Mother fern, Diplazium proliferum (Lam.) Thouars; Ostrich fern, Matteuccia struthiopteris (L.) Tod.; Vegetable fern, Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Sw.; Zenmai fern, Osmuda japonica Thunb. * * * * * * * Guava ................................. Guava (Psidium guajava L.); Guava, cattley (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine); Guava, Para (Psidium acutangulum DC.); Guava, purple strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum); Guava, strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. littorale (Raddi) Fosberg); Guava, yellow strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum forma lucidum O. Deg.) * * * * * * * Palm hearts ........................ Palm hearts, various species, including: African fan palm, Borassus aethiopum Mart.; Cabbage palm, Euterpe oleracea Mart.; Cabbage palmetto, Sabal palmetto (Walter) Schult. & Schult. f.; Coconut, Cocos nucifera L.; Palmyra palm, Borassus flabellifera L.; Peach Palm, Bactris gasipaes Kunth; Royal palm, Roystonea oleracea (Jacq.) O.F. Cook; Salak palm, Salacca zalacca (Gaertn.) Voss; Saw palmetto, Serenoa repens (W. Bartram) Small; Wine palm, Raphia spp. * * * * * * * Sugar apple ........................ Annona squamosa L. and its hybrid atemoya (Annona cherimola Mill X A. squamosa L.) Also includes true custard apple (Annona reticulata L.). * * * * * * * * 3. In § 180.40, revise paragraphs (e) and (f) to read as follows: ■ § 180.40 Tolerances for crop groups. Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES * * * * * (e) Since a group tolerance reflects maximum residues likely to occur on all individual crops within a group, the proposed or registered patterns of use for all crops in the group or subgroup must be similar before a group tolerance is established. The pattern of use consists of the amount of pesticide applied, the number of times applied, the timing of the first application, the interval between applications, and the interval between the last application and harvest. The pattern of use will also include the type of application; for example, soil or foliar application, or application by ground or aerial equipment. Additionally, since a group tolerance reflects maximum residues likely to occur on all individual foods within a group, food processing practices must be similar for all crops in the group or subgroup if the processing practice has the potential to result in residues in a processed commodity at a VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 * * higher concentration than the raw agricultural commodity. (f)(1) General. EPA will not establish a crop group for a pesticide unless all tolerances made necessary by the presence of pesticide residues in the crop group commodities have been issued or are being issued simultaneously with the crop group tolerance. For purposes of paragraph (f)(1): (i) Necessary tolerances for residues resulting from crop group tolerances include: (A) Tolerances for processed food, including processed animal feed, to the extent needed under FFDCA section 408(a)(2). (B) Tolerances for raw commodities not covered by the crop group tolerance that are derivative of commodities in the group. (C) Tolerances for meat, milk, or egg products that may contain residues as a result of livestock’s consumption of animal feed containing pesticide residues to the extent needed under § 180.6(b). (ii) Notwithstanding the foregoing, a tolerance is not considered necessary for processed food, derivative raw commodities, or meat, milk, and eggs if PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 * * the precursor raw commodities are grown solely for sale as raw commodities and are completely segregated from commodities grown for the purpose of producing processed foods, derivative raw commodities, and commodities, or fractions thereof, that are used as animal feed. (2) Processed commodity and related raw commodity crop group tolerances. EPA may establish crop group tolerances for processed commodities or fractions of commodities (e.g., bran and flour from the Cereal Grains Group), including processed fractions used as animal feed (e.g., pomace from the Pome Fruit Group), produced from crops in the crop groups in § 180.41. EPA may establish crop group tolerances for raw commodities or fractions of commodities, including fractions used as animal feed, derived from commodities covered by the crop groups in § 180.41 (e.g., aspirated grain dust associated with the Cereal Grains Group). Crop group tolerances on processed foods and derivative raw commodities may be based on data on representative commodities for associated crop group. Paragraphs (c), (d), (e), (g), and (h) of § 180.40 apply to E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 26477 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations group tolerances authorized by paragraph (f)(2). (3) Representative crops. Unless indicated otherwise in §§ 180.40 and 180.41, the processed food and feed forms of the representative crops for a crop group are considered to be representative of the processed food and feed forms and any derivative raw commodities not covered by the crop group, that are produced from any of the raw agricultural commodities covered by the crop group tolerance. Additionally, unless indicated otherwise in §§ 180.40 and 180.41, representative commodities for such crop groups are selected taking into consideration whether their use as animal feed will result in residues in or on meat, milk, and/or eggs at a level representative of the residues that would result from use of the other commodities or byproducts in the crop group as an animal feed. (4) Data. Processing data on representative crops are required prior to establishment of a group tolerance if the processing of the representative commodity has the potential to result in residues in a processed commodity at a higher concentration than in the representative commodity. Residue data are required on raw commodities derived from the crops in the crop group tolerance but not directly covered by the tolerance. Animal feeding studies with a representative crop are required if the representative crop is used as a significant animal feed. * * * * * ■ 4. In § 180.41: ■ i. Revise paragraph (b). ■ ii. Redesignate paragraphs (c)(6) through (28) as paragraphs (c)(7) through (29), respectively. ■ iii. Add a new paragraph (c)(6). ■ iv. Redesignate newly redesignated paragraphs (c)(8) through (29) as paragraphs (c)(9) through (30), respectively. ■ v. Add a new paragraph (c)(8). ■ vi. Revise newly redesignated paragraphs (c)(25)(ii), (c)(26)(ii), and (c)(27)(ii) introductory text. vii. Add paragraphs (c)(31), (32), and (33). The additions and revisions read as follows: ■ § 180.41 Crop group tables. * * * * * (b) Commodities not listed are not considered as included in the groups for the purposes of paragraph (b), and individual tolerances must be established. Miscellaneous commodities intentionally not included in any group include globe artichoke, hops, peanut, and water chestnut. (c) * * * (6) Crop Group 4–16. Leafy Vegetable Group. (i) Representative commodities. Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard greens, and spinach. (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 4–16. TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 4–16: LEAFY VEGETABLE GROUP Related crop subgroups Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES Commodities Amaranth, Chinese (Amaranthus tricolor L.) ................................................................................................................................. Amaranth, leafy (Amaranthus spp.) ............................................................................................................................................... Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) ........................................................................................................................................................... Aster, Indian (Kalimeris indica (L.) Sch. Bip.) ............................................................................................................................... Blackjack (Bidens pilosa L.) .......................................................................................................................................................... Broccoli, Chinese (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra (L.H. Bailey) Musil) .................................................................................. Broccoli raab (Brassica ruvo L.H. Bailey) ..................................................................................................................................... Cabbage, abyssinian (Brassica carinata A. Braun) ...................................................................................................................... Cabbage, Chinese, bok choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis (L.) Hanelt) ................................................................................ Cabbage, seakale (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC.) .......................................................................................................... Cat’s whiskers (Cleome gynandra L.) ........................................................................................................................................... Cham-chwi (Doellingeria scabra (Thunb.) Nees) .......................................................................................................................... Cham-na-mul (Pimpinella calycina Maxim) ................................................................................................................................... Chervil, fresh leaves (Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.) ............................................................................................................. Chipilin (Crotalaria longirostrata Hook & Arn) ............................................................................................................................... Chrysanthemum, garland (Glebionis coronaria (L.) Cass. ex Spach. Glebionis spp.) ................................................................. Cilantro, fresh leaves (Coriandrum sativum L.) ............................................................................................................................. Collards (Brassica oleracea L. var. viridis L.) ............................................................................................................................... Corn salad (Valerianella spp.) ....................................................................................................................................................... Cosmos (Cosmos caudatus Kunth) ............................................................................................................................................... Cress, garden (Lepidium sativum L.) ............................................................................................................................................ Cress, upland (Barbarea vulgaris W.T. Aiton) .............................................................................................................................. Dandelion, leaves (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg. Aggr.) ......................................................................................................... Dang-gwi, leaves (Angelica gigas Nakai) ...................................................................................................................................... Dillweed (Anethum graveolens L.) ................................................................................................................................................ Dock (Rumex patientia L.) ............................................................................................................................................................. Dol-nam-mul (Sedum sarmentosum Bunge) ................................................................................................................................. Ebolo (Crassocephalum crepidioides (Benth.) S. Moore) ............................................................................................................. Endive (Cichorium endivia L.) ....................................................................................................................................................... Escarole (Cichorium endivia L.) .................................................................................................................................................... Fameflower (Talinum fruticosum (L.) Juss.) .................................................................................................................................. Feather cockscomb (Glinus oppositifolius (L.) Aug. DC.) ............................................................................................................. Good King Henry (Chenopodium bonus-henricus L.) ................................................................................................................... Hanover salad (Brassica napus var. pabularia (DC.) Rchb.) ........................................................................................................ Huauzontle (Chenopodium berlandieri Moq.) ................................................................................................................................ Jute, leaves (Corchorus spp.) ....................................................................................................................................................... Kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. Sabellica L.) ................................................................................................................................ Lettuce, bitter (Launaea cornuta (Hochst. ex Oliv. & Hiern) C. Jeffrey) ....................................................................................... Lettuce, head (Lactuca sativa L.; including Lactuca sativa var. capitata L.) ................................................................................ Lettuce, leaf (Lactuca sativa L.; including Lactuca sativa var. longifolia Lam.; Lactuca sativa var. crispa L.) ............................ Maca, leaves (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) ....................................................................................................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16B 4–16B 4–16B 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 26478 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 4–16: LEAFY VEGETABLE GROUP—Continued Related crop subgroups Commodities Mizuna (Brassica rapa L. subsp. nipposinica (L.H. Bailey) Hanelt) .............................................................................................. Mustard greens (Brassica juncea subsp., including Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. subsp. integrifolia (H. West) Thell., Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. var. tsatsai (T.L. Mao) Gladis) ..................................................................................................................... Orach (Atriplex hortensis L.) .......................................................................................................................................................... Parsley, fresh leaves (Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Fuss; Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum Danert) ............................. Plantain, buckthorn (Plantago lanceolata L.) ................................................................................................................................ Primrose, English (Primula vulgaris Huds.) ................................................................................................................................... Purslane, garden (Portulaca oleracea L.) ..................................................................................................................................... Purslane, winter (Claytonia perfoliata Donn ex Willd.) .................................................................................................................. Radicchio (Cichorium intybus L.) ................................................................................................................................................... Radish, leaves (Raphanus sativus L. var sativus, including Raphanus sativus L. var. mougri H. W. J. Helm (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis Pers) .................................................................................................................................................. Rape greens (Brassica napus L. var. napus, including Brassica rapa subsp. trilocularis (Roxb.) Hanelt; Brassica rapa subsp. dichotoma (Roxb.) Hanelt; Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera Met) ................................................................................................. Rocket, wild (Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.) ................................................................................................................................... Shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik) ................................................................................................................ Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Spinach, Malabar (Basella alba L.) ............................................................................................................................................... Spinach, New Zealand (Tetragonia tetragonioides (Pall.) Kuntze) ............................................................................................... Spinach, tanier (Xanthosoma brasiliense (Desf.) Engl.) ............................................................................................................... Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) ................................................................................................................................. Turnip greens (Brassica rapa L. ssp. rapa) .................................................................................................................................. Violet, Chinese, leaves (Asystasia gangetica (L.) T. Anderson) ................................................................................................... Watercress (Nasturtium officinale W.T. Aiton) .............................................................................................................................. Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. (iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 4–16, specifies the representative commodities for each 4–16B 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16B 4–16B 4–16B 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16A 4–16B 4–16A 4–16B subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup. TABLE 2—CROP GROUP 4–16: SUBGROUP LISTING Representative commodities Commodities Crop Subgroup 4–16A. Leafy greens subgroup Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, and spinach ..... Amaranth, Chinese; amaranth, leafy; aster, Indian; blackjack; cat’s whiskers; cham-chwi; cham-namul; chervil, fresh leaves; chipilin; chrysanthemum, garland; cilantro, fresh leaves; corn salad; cosmos; dandelion, leaves; dang-gwi, leaves; dillweed; dock; dol-nam-mul; ebolo; endive; escarole; fameflower; feather cockscomb; Good King Henry; huauzontle; jute, leaves; lettuce, bitter; lettuce, head; lettuce, leaf; orach; parsley, fresh leaves; plantain, buckhorn; primrose, English; purslane, garden; purslane, winter; radicchio; spinach; spinach, Malabar; spinach, New Zealand; spinach, tanier; Swiss chard; violet, Chinese, leaves; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Crop Subgroup 4–16B. Brassica leafy greens subgroup Mustard greens .......................................... Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES * Arugula; broccoli, Chinese; broccoli raab; cabbage, abyssinian; cabbage, Chinese, bok choy; cabbage, seakale; collards; cress, garden; cress, upland; hanover salad; kale; maca, leaves; mizuna; mustard greens; radish, leaves; rape greens; rocket, wild; shepherd’s purse; turnip greens; watercress; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. * * * * (8) Crop Group 5–16. Brassica Head and Stem Vegetable Group. (i) Representative commodities. Broccoli or cauliflower and cabbage. (ii) Commodities. The following List 1 contains all commodities included in Crop Group 5–16. VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 LIST 1—CROP GROUP 5–16: BRASSICA HEAD AND STEM VEGETABLE GROUP LIST 1—CROP GROUP 5–16: BRASSICA HEAD AND STEM VEGETABLE GROUP—Continued Commodities Commodities Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck) Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera (DC.) Zenker) Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) Cabbage, Chinese, napa (Brassica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis (Lour.) Hanelt) Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L) Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 * * * * * (25) * * * (ii) Commodities. The commodities included in Crop Group 16 are: Forage, E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations fodder, stover, and straw of all commodities included in the group cereal grains group. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, hay, stover, or straw, if data on the representative commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, fodder, stover, or straw. (26) * * * (ii) Commodities. The commodities included in Crop Group 17 are: Forage, fodder, stover, and hay of any grass, Gramineae/Poaceae family (either green or cured) except sugarcane and those included in the cereal grains group, that will be fed to or grazed by livestock, all pasture and range grasses and grasses grown for hay or silage. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, stover, or hay, if data on the representative commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, fodder, stover, or hay. (27) * * * (ii) Commodities. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, straw, or hay, if data on the representative commodities indicate 26479 differences in the levels of residues on forage, fodder, straw, or hay. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 18: * * * * * (31) Crop Group 22. Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Vegetable Group. (i) Representative commodities. Asparagus and celery. (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 22. TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 22: STALK, STEM AND LEAF PETIOLE VEGETABLE GROUP Related crop subgroups Commodities Agave (Agave spp.) ............................................................................................................................................................................. Aloe vera (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f.) ....................................................................................................................................................... Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) ................................................................................................................................................... Bamboo, shoots (Arundinaria spp.; Bambusa spp., Chimonobambusa spp.; Dendrocalamus spp., Fargesia spp.; Gigantochloa spp., Nastus elatus; Phyllostachys spp.; Thyrsostachys spp.) ........................................................................................................ Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L.) ....................................................................................................................................................... Celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce (Mill.) Pers.) ............................................................................................................................. Celery, Chinese (Apium graveolens L. var. secalinum (Alef.) Mansf.) ............................................................................................... Celtuce (Lactuca sativa var. angustana L.H. Bailey) .......................................................................................................................... Fennel, Florence, fresh leaves and stalk (Foeniculum vulgare subsp. vulgare var. azoricum (Mill.) Thell.) ..................................... Fern, edible, fiddlehead ....................................................................................................................................................................... Fuki (Petasites japonicus (Siebold & Zucc.) Maxim.) ......................................................................................................................... Kale, sea (Crambe maritima L.) .......................................................................................................................................................... Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea L. var gongylodes L.) ............................................................................................................................. Palm hearts (various species) ............................................................................................................................................................. Prickly pear, pads (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill., Opuntia spp.) ........................................................................................................ Prickly pear, Texas, pads (Opuntia engelmannii Salm-Dyck ex Engelm. var. lindheimeri (Engelm.) B.D. Parfitt & Pinkav) ............ Rhubarb (Rheum x rhabarbarum L.) ................................................................................................................................................... Udo (Aralia cordata Thunb. ) ............................................................................................................................................................... Zuiki (Colocasia gigantea (Blume) Hook. f.) ....................................................................................................................................... Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. (iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 22, specifies the representative commodities for each 22A 22A 22A 22A 22B 22B 22B 22A 22A 22A 22B 22A 22A 22A 22A 22A 22B 22B 22B subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup. TABLE 2—CROP GROUP 22: SUBGROUP LISTING Representative commodities Commodities Crop Subgroup 22A. Stalk and stem vegetable subgroup Asparagus .................................................. Agave; aloe vera; asparagus; bamboo, shoots; celtuce; fennel, florence, fresh leaves and stalk; fern, edible, fiddlehead; kale, sea; kohlrabi; palm hearts; prickly pear, pads; prickly pear, Texas, pads; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Crop Subgroup 22B. Leaf petiole vegetable subgroup Celery ......................................................... Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES (32) Crop Group 23. Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel Group. Cardoon; celery; celery, Chinese; fuki; rhubarb; udo; zuiki; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. (i) Representative commodities. Date, fig, guava, and olive. (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 23. TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 23: TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL FRUIT, EDIBLE PEEL GROUP Related crop subgroups Commodities Acaı (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) ............................................................................................................................................................. ¸ ´ Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) ................................................................................................................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 23C 23A 26480 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 23: TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL FRUIT, EDIBLE PEEL GROUP—Continued Related crop subgroups Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES Commodities ´ Achachairu (Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana) Zappi) ............................................................................................................. African plum (Vitex doniana Sweet) .................................................................................................................................................... Agritos (Berberis trifoliolata Moric.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Almondette (Buchanania lanzan Spreng.) ........................................................................................................................................... Ambarella (Spondias dulcis Sol. ex Parkinson) .................................................................................................................................. Apak palm (Brahea dulcis (Kunth) Mart.) ............................................................................................................................................ Appleberry (Billardiera scandens Sm.) ................................................................................................................................................ ´ Araza (Eugenia stipitata McVaugh) ..................................................................................................................................................... Arbutus berry (Arbutus unedo L.) ........................................................................................................................................................ Babaco (Vasconcellea x heilbornii (V.M. Badillo) V.M. Badillo) .......................................................................................................... Bacaba palm (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.) .......................................................................................................................................... Bacaba-de-leque (Oenocarpus distichus Mart.) .................................................................................................................................. Bayberry, red (Morella rubra Lour.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Bignay (Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng.) ............................................................................................................................................. Bilimbi (Averrhoa bilimbi L.) ................................................................................................................................................................. ´ Borojo (Borojoa patinoi Cuatrec.) ........................................................................................................................................................ Breadnut (Brosimum alicastrum Sw.) .................................................................................................................................................. Cabeluda (Plinia glomerata (O. Berg) Amshoff) ................................................................................................................................. Cajou, fruit (Anacardium giganteum Hance ex Engl.) ......................................................................................................................... ´ Cambuca (Marlierea edulis Nied.) ....................................................................................................................................................... Carandas-plum (Carissa edulis Vahl) .................................................................................................................................................. Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) ................................................................................................................................................................ Cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.) ........................................................................................................................................ Ceylon iron wood (Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard) ................................................................................................................... Ceylon olive (Elaeocarpus serratus L.) ............................................................................................................................................... Cherry-of-the-Rio-Grande (Eugenia aggregata (Vell.) Kiaersk.) ......................................................................................................... Chinese olive, black (Canarium tramdenum C.D. Dai & Yakovlev) .................................................................................................... Chinese olive, white (Canarium album (Lour.) Raeusch.) .................................................................................................................. Chirauli-nut (Buchanania latifolia Roxb.) ............................................................................................................................................. Ciruela verde (Bunchosia armeniaca (Cav.) DC.) ............................................................................................................................... Cocoplum (Chrysobalanus icaco L.) ................................................................................................................................................... Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) ............................................................................................................................................................... Davidson’s plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell.) ................................................................................................................................ Desert-date (Balanites aegyptiacus (L.) Delile) ................................................................................................................................... Doum palm coconut (Hyphaene thebaica (L.) Mart.) .......................................................................................................................... False sandalwood (Ximenia americana L.) ......................................................................................................................................... Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret) .......................................................................................................................................... Fig (Ficus carica L.) ............................................................................................................................................................................. Fragrant manjack (Cordia dichotoma G. Forst.) ................................................................................................................................. Gooseberry, abyssinian (Dovyalis abyssinica (A. Rich.) Warb.) ......................................................................................................... Gooseberry, Ceylon (Dovyalis hebecarpa (Gardner) Warb.) .............................................................................................................. Gooseberry, Indian (Phyllanthus emblica L.) ...................................................................................................................................... Gooseberry, otaheite (Phyllanthus acidus (L.) Skeels) ....................................................................................................................... Governor’s plum (Flacourtia indica (Burm. F.) Merr.) ......................................................................................................................... Grumichama (Eugenia brasiliensis Lam) ............................................................................................................................................ Guabiroba (Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg) ............................................................................................................................. Guava (Psidium guajava L.) ................................................................................................................................................................ Guava berry (Myrciaria floribunda (H. West ex Willd.) O. Berg) ........................................................................................................ Guava, Brazilian (Psidium guineense Sw.) ......................................................................................................................................... Guava, cattley (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine) .................................................................................................................................... Guava, Costa Rican (Psidium friedrichsthalianum (O. Berg) Nied.) ................................................................................................... Guava, Para (Psidium acutangulum DC.) ........................................................................................................................................... Guava, purple strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum) ....................................................................................... Guava, strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. littorale (Raddi) Fosberg) ............................................................................... Guava, yellow strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum forma lucidum O. Deg.) ................................................. Guayabillo (Psidium sartorianum (O. Berg) Nied.) .............................................................................................................................. Illawarra plum (Podocarpus elatus R. Br. Ex Endl.) ........................................................................................................................... ´ Imbe (Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson) ............................................................................................................................................ Imbu (Spondias tuberosa Arruda ex Kost.) ......................................................................................................................................... Indian-plum (Flacourtia jangomas (Lour.). basionym) ......................................................................................................................... Jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O. Berg) ................................................................................................................................ Jamaica-cherry (Muntingia calabura L.) .............................................................................................................................................. Jambolan (Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels) ............................................................................................................................................ Jelly palm (Butia capitata (Mart.) Becc.) ............................................................................................................................................. Jujube, Indian (Ziziphus mauritiana Lam.) .......................................................................................................................................... Kaffir-plum (Harpephyllum caffrum Bernh. Ex C. Krauss) .................................................................................................................. Kakadu plum (Terminalia latipes Benth. subsp. psilocarpa Pedley) ................................................................................................... Kapundung (Baccaurea racemosa (Reinw.) Mull. Arg.) ...................................................................................................................... Karanda (Carissa carandas L.) ........................................................................................................................................................... Kwai muk (Artocarpus hypargyreus Hance ex Benth.) ....................................................................................................................... Lemon aspen (Acronychia acidula F. Muell) ....................................................................................................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 23B 23A 23A 23A 23B 23C 23A 23B 23A 23B 23C 23C 23A 23A 23B 23B 23A 23A 23B 23B 23A 23B 23B 23A 23A 23A 23A 23A 23A 23B 23A 23C 23B 23A 23C 23A 23B 23B 23A 23A 23A 23B 23A 23A 23A 23A 23B 23A 23A 23B 23A 23B 23B 23B 23B 23A 23A 23B 23B 23A 23B 23A 23A 23C 23B 23A 23A 23A 23A 23B 23A 26481 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 23: TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL FRUIT, EDIBLE PEEL GROUP—Continued Related crop subgroups Commodities Mangaba (Hancornia speciosa Gomes) .............................................................................................................................................. Marian plum (Bouea macrophylla Griff.) ............................................................................................................................................. Mombin, malayan (Spondias pinnata (J. Koenig ex L. f.) Kurz) ......................................................................................................... Mombin, purple (Spondias purpurea L.) .............................................................................................................................................. Mombin, yellow (Spondias mombin L.) ............................................................................................................................................... Monkeyfruit (Artocarpus lacucha Buch. Ham.) .................................................................................................................................... Monos plum (Pseudanamomis umbellulifera (Kunth) Kausel) ............................................................................................................ Mountain cherry (Bunchosia cornifolia Kunth) .................................................................................................................................... Nance (Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth) ............................................................................................................................................ Natal plum (Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A. DC.) ................................................................................................................................ Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) ................................................................................................................................................................... Olive (Olea europaea L. subsp. europaea) ......................................................................................................................................... Papaya, mountain (Vasconcellea pubescens A. DC.) ........................................................................................................................ ´ Pataua (Oenocarpus bataua Mart.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Peach palm, fruit (Bactris gasipaes Kunth var. gasipaes) .................................................................................................................. Persimmon, black (Diospyros texana Scheele) .................................................................................................................................. Persimmon, Japanese (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) ................................................................................................................................. Pitomba (Eugenia luschnathiana Klotzsch ex O. Berg) ...................................................................................................................... Plum-of-Martinique (Flacourtia inermis Roxb.) .................................................................................................................................... Pomerac (Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry) ................................................................................................................. Rambai (Baccaurea motleyana (Mull. Arg.) Mull. Arg.) ...................................................................................................................... Rose apple (Syzygium jambos (L.) Alston) ......................................................................................................................................... Rukam (Flacourtia rukam Zoll. & Moritizi) ........................................................................................................................................... Rumberry (Myrciaria dubia (Kunth) McVaugh Myrtaceae) .................................................................................................................. Sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L.) ................................................................................................................................................. Sentul (Sandoricum koetjape (Burm. F.) Merr.) .................................................................................................................................. Sete-capotes (Campomanesia guazumifolia (Cambess.) O. Berg) .................................................................................................... Silver aspen (Acronychia wilcoxian (F. Muell.) T.G. Hartley) ............................................................................................................. Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) ........................................................................................................................................................ Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) .................................................................................................................................................. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) ........................................................................................................................................................ Uvalha (Eugenia pyriformis Cambess ) ............................................................................................................................................... Water apple (Syzygium aqueum (Burm. F.) Alston) ........................................................................................................................... Water pear (Syzygium guineense (Willd.) DC) ................................................................................................................................... Water berry (Syzygium cordatum Hochst. Ex C. Krauss) ................................................................................................................... Wax jambu (Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry) .................................................................................................. Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. (iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 23, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and 23B 23B 23B 23B 23A 23B 23A 23A 23B 23B 23B 23A 23B 23C 23C 23A 23B 23A 23A 23B 23B 23B 23A 23A 23A 23B 23A 23A 23B 23B 23B 23B 23A 23A 23A 23A lists all the commodities included in each subgroup. TABLE 2—CROP GROUP 23: SUBGROUP LISTING Representative commodities Commodities Crop Subgroup 23A. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, edible peel subgroup Olive ........................................................... Acerola; African plum; agritos; almondette; appleberry; arbutus berry; bayberry, red; bignay; breadnut; cabeluda; carandas-plum; Ceylon iron wood; Ceylon olive; cherry-of-the-Rio-Grande; Chinese olive, black; Chinese olive, white; chirauli-nut; cocoplum; desert-date; false sandalwood; fragant manjack; gooseberry, abyssinian; gooseberry, Ceylon; gooseberry, otaheite; governor’s plum; grumichama; guabiroba; guava berry; guava, Brazilian; guava, Costa Rican; guayabillo; illawarra plum; Indian-plum; Jamaica-cherry; jambolan; kaffir-plum; kakadu plum; kapundung; karanda; lemon aspen; mombin, yellow; monos plum; mountain cherry; olive; persimmon, black; pitomba; plum-of-Martinique; rukam; rumberry; sea grape; sete-capotes; silver aspen; water apple; water pear; water berry; wax jambu; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Crop Subgroup 23B. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES Fig and guava ............................................ VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 ´ ´ ´ ´ Achachairu; ambarella; araza; babaco; bilimbi; borojo; cajou, fruit; cambuca; carob; cashew apple; ciruela verde; davidson’s plum; feijoa; fig; gooseberry, Indian; guava; guava, cattley; guava, Para; ´ guava, purple strawberry; guava, strawberry; guava, yellow strawberry; imbe; imbu; jaboticaba; jujube, Indian; kwai muk; mangaba; Marian plum; mombin, Malayan; mombin, purple; monkeyfruit; nance; natal plum; noni; papaya, mountain; persimmon, Japanese; pomerac; rambai; rose apple; sentul; starfruit; Surinam cherry; tamarind; uvalha; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 26482 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 2—CROP GROUP 23: SUBGROUP LISTING—Continued Representative commodities Commodities Crop Subgroup 23C. Tropical and Subtropical, Palm fruit, edible peel subgroup ´ Acaı; apak palm; bacaba palm; bacaba-de-leque; date; doum palm coconut; jelly palm; pataua; ¸ ´ peach palm, fruit; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Date ........................................................... (33) Crop Group 24. Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel Group. (i) Representative commodities. Atemoya or sugar apple, avocado, banana or pomegranate, dragon fruit, lychee, passionfruit, pineapple, and prickly pear, fruit. (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 24. TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 24: TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL FRUIT, INEDIBLE PEEL GROUP Related crop subgroups Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES Commodities Abiu (Pouteria caimito (Ruiz & Pav.) Radlk) ....................................................................................................................................... Aisen (Boscia senegalensis (Pers.) Lam.) .......................................................................................................................................... Akee apple (Blighia sapida K.D. Koenig) ............................................................................................................................................ Atemoya (Annona cherimola Mill. X A. squamosa L.) ........................................................................................................................ Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) ...................................................................................................................................................... Avocado, Guatemalan (Persea americana Mill. var. guatemalensis) ................................................................................................. Avocado, Mexican (Persea americana Mill. var. drymifolia (Schltdl. & Cham.) S.F. Blak) ................................................................ Avocado, West Indian (Persea americana var. americana) ............................................................................................................... Bacury (Platonia insignis Mart.) ........................................................................................................................................................... ˆ Bael fruit (Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa) .............................................................................................................................................. Banana (Musa spp.) ............................................................................................................................................................................ Banana, dwarf (Musa hybrids; Musa acuminata Colla) ...................................................................................................................... Binjai (Mangifera caesia Jack) ............................................................................................................................................................ Biriba (Annona mucosa Jacq.) ............................................................................................................................................................ Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg) ............................................................................................................................. Burmese grape (Baccaurea ramiflora Lour.) ....................................................................................................................................... Canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth) Baehni) ............................................................................................................................... Cat’s-eyes (Dimocarpus longan Lour. subsp. malesianus Leenh.) .................................................................................................... Champedak (Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr.) ................................................................................................................................ Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) ................................................................................................................................................... ´ Cupuacu (Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd. Ex Spreng.) K. Schum.) .................................................................................................. Custard apple (Annona reticulata L.) .................................................................................................................................................. Dragon fruit (Hylocereus undatus (Haw.) Britton & Rose) .................................................................................................................. Durian (Durio zibethinus L.) ................................................................................................................................................................. Elephant-apple (Limonia acidissima L.) .............................................................................................................................................. Etambe (Mangifera zeylanica (Blume) Hook. F.) ................................................................................................................................ Granadilla (Passiflora ligularis Juss.) .................................................................................................................................................. Granadilla, giant (Passiflora quadrangularis L.) .................................................................................................................................. Ilama (Annona macroprophyllata Donn. Sm.) ..................................................................................................................................... ´ Inga (Inga vera Willd. subsp. affinis (DC.) T.D. Penn.) ...................................................................................................................... Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) ........................................................................................................................................... ´ Jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril L.) .......................................................................................................................................................... Karuka (Pandanus julianettii Martelli) .................................................................................................................................................. Kei apple (Dovyalis caffra (Hook. F. & Harv.) Warb.) ......................................................................................................................... ˆ Langsat (Lansium domesticum Correa) .............................................................................................................................................. Lanjut (Mangifera lagenifera Griff.) ...................................................................................................................................................... Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma (Ruiz & Pav.) Kuntze) ............................................................................................................................... Lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) ........................................................................................................................................................... Mabolo (Diospyros blancoi A. DC.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Madras-thorn (Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth.) .......................................................................................................................... Mammy-apple (Mammea americana L.) ............................................................................................................................................. Manduro (Balanites maughamii Sprague) ........................................................................................................................................... Mango (Mangifera indica L.) ................................................................................................................................................................ Mango, horse (Mangifera foetida Lour.) .............................................................................................................................................. Mango, Saipan (Mangifera odorata Griff.) ........................................................................................................................................... Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. ) .............................................................................................................................................. Marang (Artocarpus odoratissimus Blanco) ........................................................................................................................................ Marmaladebox (Genipa americana L.) ................................................................................................................................................ Matisia (Matisia cordata Humb. & Bonpl.) ........................................................................................................................................... Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.) ............................................................................................................................................... Mongongo, fruit (Schinziophyton rautanenii (Schinz) Radcl.-Sm) ...................................................................................................... Monkey-bread-tree (Adansonia digitata L.) ......................................................................................................................................... Monstera (Monstera deliciosa Liebm.) ................................................................................................................................................ Nicobar-breadfruit (Pandanus leram Jones ex Fontana) .................................................................................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 24B 24A 24B 24C 24B 24B 24B 24B 24B 24A 24B 24B 24B 24C 24C 24A 24B 24A 24C 24C 24B 24C 24D 24C 24C 24B 24E 24E 24C 24A 24C 24B 24C 24B 24B 24B 24A 24B 24A 24B 24A 24C 24A 24B 24B 24B 24B 24C 24C 24A 24A 24A 24C 24E 24C 26483 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 1—CROP GROUP 24: TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL FRUIT, INEDIBLE PEEL GROUP—Continued Related crop subgroups Commodities Paho (Mangifera altissima Blanco) ...................................................................................................................................................... Pandanus (Pandanus utilis Bory) ........................................................................................................................................................ Papaya (Carica papaya L.) .................................................................................................................................................................. Passionflower, winged-stem (Passiflora alata Curtis) ......................................................................................................................... Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis Sims) ................................................................................................................................................... Passionfruit, banana (Passiflora tripartita var. mollissima (Kunth) Holm-Niels. & P. Jorg.) ............................................................... Passionfruit, purple (Passiflora edulis Sims forma edulis) .................................................................................................................. Passionfruit, yellow (Passiflora edulis Sims forma flavicarpa O. Deg.) .............................................................................................. Pawpaw, common (Asimina triloba (L.) Dunal) ................................................................................................................................... Pawpaw, small-flower (Asimina parviflora (Michx.) Dunal) ................................................................................................................. Pelipisan (Mangifera casturi Kosterm.) ............................................................................................................................................... Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess) ............................................................................................................................................... Pequia (Caryocar villosum (Aubl.) Pers.) ............................................................................................................................................ Persimmon, American (Diospyros virginiana L.) ................................................................................................................................. Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) ............................................................................................................................................. Pitahaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus (F.A.C. Weber) Britton & Rose) ...................................................................................................... Pitaya (Hylocereus sp. including H. megalanthus (H. ocamponis and H. polychizus) ....................................................................... Pitaya, amarilla (Hylocereus triangularis Britton & Rose) ................................................................................................................... Pitaya, roja (Hylocereus ocamponis (Salm-Dyck) Britton & Rose) ..................................................................................................... Pitaya, yellow (Hylocereus megalanthus (K. Schum. ex Vaupel) Ralf Bauer) ................................................................................... Plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.) ............................................................................................................................................................ Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) .................................................................................................................................................... Poshte (Annona liebmanniana Baill.) .................................................................................................................................................. Prickly pear, fruit (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill.) ................................................................................................................................ Prickly pear, Texas, fruit (Opuntia engelmannii Salm-Dyck ex Engelm. var. lindheimeri (Engelm.) B.D. Parfitt & Pinkav) .............. Pulasan (Nephelium ramboutan-ake (Labill.) Leenh.) ......................................................................................................................... Quandong (Santalum acuminatum (R. Br.) DC.) ................................................................................................................................ Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) ................................................................................................................................................. Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea (Engelm.) Britton & Rose) ................................................................................................................... Sapodilla (Manilkara zapota (L.) P. Royen) ........................................................................................................................................ Sapote, black (Diospyros digyna Jacq.) .............................................................................................................................................. Sapote, green (Pouteria viridis (Pittier) Cronquist) ............................................................................................................................. Sapote, mamey (Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore & Stearn) ....................................................................................................... Sapote, white (Casimiroa edulis La Llave & Lex) ............................................................................................................................... Sataw (Parkia speciosa Hassk.) .......................................................................................................................................................... Satinleaf (Chrysophyllum oliviforme L.) ............................................................................................................................................... Screw-pine (Pandanus tectorius Parkinson) ....................................................................................................................................... Sierra Leone-tamarind (Dialium guineense Willd.) .............................................................................................................................. ´ Soncoya (Annona purpurea Moc. & Sesse ex Dunal) ........................................................................................................................ Soursop (Annona muricata L.) ............................................................................................................................................................ Spanish lime (Melicoccus bijugatus Jacq.) ......................................................................................................................................... Star apple (Chrysophyllum cainito L.) ................................................................................................................................................. Sugar apple (Annona squamosa L.) ................................................................................................................................................... Sun sapote (Licania platypus (Hemsl.) Fritsch) .................................................................................................................................. Tamarind-of-the-Indies (Vangueria madagascariensis J.F. Gmel.) .................................................................................................... Velvet tamarind (Dialium indum L.) ..................................................................................................................................................... Wampi (Clausena lansium (Lour.) Skeels) .......................................................................................................................................... White star apple (Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don) ............................................................................................................................. ¨ Wild loquat (Uapaca kirkiana Mull. Arg.) ............................................................................................................................................. Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. (iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 24, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and 24B 24C 24B 24E 24E 24E 24E 24E 24B 24A 24B 24B 24B 24B 24C 24D 24D 24D 24D 24D 24B 24B 24B 24D 24D 24C 24B 24C 24D 24C 24B 24B 24C 24B 24B 24A 24B 24A 24C 24C 24A 24B 24C 24C 24B 24A 24A 24A 24B lists all the commodities included in each subgroup. TABLE 2—CROP GROUP 24: SUBGROUP LISTING Representative commodities Commodities Crop Subgroup 24A. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, inedible peel subgroup Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES Lychee ....................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 ´ Aisen; bael fruit; Burmese grape; cat’s-eyes; inga; longan; lychee; madras-thorn; manduro; matisia; mesquite; mongongo, fruit; pawpaw, small-flower; satinleaf; Sierra Leone-tamarind; Spanish lime; velvet tamarind; wampi; white star apple; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1 26484 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 2—CROP GROUP 24: SUBGROUP LISTING—Continued Representative commodities Commodities Crop Subgroup 24B. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, smooth, inedible peel subgroup Avocado, plus pomegranate or banana .... Abiu; akee apple; avocado; avocado, Guatemalan; avocado, Mexican; avocado, West Indian; ´ ´ bacury; banana; banana, dwarf; binjai; canistel; cupuacu; etambe; jatoba; kei apple; langsat; lanjut; lucuma; mabolo; mango; mango, horse; mango, Saipan; mangosteen; paho; papaya; pawpaw, common; pelipisan; pequi; pequia; persimmon, American; plantain; pomegranate; poshte; quandong; sapote, black; sapote, green; sapote, white; sataw; screw-pine; star apple; tamarind-of-the-Indies; wild loquat; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Crop Subgroup 24C. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup Pineapple, plus atemoya or sugar apple ... Atemoya; biriba; breadfruit; champedak; cherimoya; custard apple; durian; elephant-apple; ilama; jackfruit; karuka; mammy-apple; marang; marmaladebox; monkey-bread tree; nicobar-breadfruit; pandanus; pineapple; pulasan; rambutan; sapodilla; sapote, mamey; soncoya; soursop; sugar apple; sun sapote; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Crop Subgroup 24D. Tropical and Subtropical, Cactus, inedible peel subgroup Dragon fruit and Prickly pear fruit ............. Dragon fruit; pitahaya; pitaya; pitaya, amarilla; pitaya, roja; pitaya, yellow; prickly pear, fruit; prickly pear, Texas, fruit; saguaro; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. Crop Subgroup 24E. Tropical and Subtropical, Vine, inedible peel subgroup Passionfruit ................................................ Granadilla; granadilla, giant; monstera; passionflower, winged-stem; passionfruit; passionfruit, banana; passionfruit, purple; passionfruit, yellow; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities. [FR Doc. 2016–10319 Filed 5–2–16; 8:45 am] Lhorne on DSK30JT082PROD with RULES BILLING CODE 6560–50–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:43 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 9990 E:\FR\FM\03MYR1.SGM 03MYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 85 (Tuesday, May 3, 2016)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 26471-26484]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-10319]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 180

[EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0766; FRL-9944-87]


Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program Amendment IV

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This final rule revises the current pesticide tolerance crop 
grouping regulations, which allow the establishment of tolerances for 
multiple related crops based on data from a representative set of 
crops. This rule creates five new crop groups, three new and two 
revised commodity definitions and revises the regulations on the 
interaction of crop group tolerances with processed food, meat, milk, 
and egg tolerances. These revisions will promote greater use of crop 
groupings for tolerance-setting purposes, both domestically and in 
countries that export food to the United States. This is the fourth in 
a series of planned crop group updates.

DATES: This final rule is effective July 5, 2016.

ADDRESSES: The docket for this action, identified by docket 
identification (ID) number EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0766, is available at http://www.regulations.gov or at the Office of Pesticide Programs Regulatory 
Public Docket (OPP Docket) in the Environmental Protection Agency 
Docket Center (EPA/DC), West William Jefferson Clinton Bldg., Rm. 3334, 
1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001. The Public 
Reading Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public 
Reading Room is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the OPP 
Docket is (703) 305-5805. Please review the visitor instructions and 
additional information about the docket available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 
    For general information contact: Ram[eacute] Cromwell, Field and 
External Affairs Division (7506P), Office of Pesticide Programs, 
Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., 
Washington, DC 20460-0001; telephone number: (703) 308-9068; email 
address: cromwell.rame@epa.gov.
    For technical information contact: Barbara Madden, Registration 
Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental 
Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-
001; telephone number: (703) 305-6463; email address: 
madden.barbara@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Does this action apply to me?

    You may be potentially affected by this action if you are an 
agricultural producer or food manufacturer. The following list of North 
American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes is not intended 
to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide to help readers determine 
whether this document applies to them. Potentially affected entities 
may include:
     Crop production (NAICS code 111).
     Animal production (NAICS code 112).
     Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311).
     Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532).

II. Background

A. What action is the Agency taking?

    This final rule revises EPA's regulations governing crop group 
tolerances for pesticides. Specifically, this rule creates five new 
crop groups, three new and two revised commodity definitions, and 
revises the regulations on the interaction of crop group tolerances 
with processed food, meat, milk, and egg tolerances. This final rule is 
the fourth in a series of crop group updates expected to be promulgated 
in the next several years.

B. What is the agency's authority for taking this action?

    This rule is issued under the authority of section 408(e)(1)(C) of 
the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), which authorizes EPA 
to establish ``general procedures and requirements to implement 
(section 408).'' 21 U.S.C. 346a(e)(1)(C). Under FFDCA section 408, EPA 
establishes tolerances for pesticide chemical residues in or on food, 
where there is a reasonable certainty that no harm will result from 
aggregate exposure to the pesticide chemical residue. A tolerance is 
the maximum permissible residue level established for a pesticide in 
raw agricultural produce and processed foods. The crop group 
regulations currently in 40 CFR 180.40 and 180.41 enable the 
establishment of tolerances for a crop group based on residue data for 
certain crops that are representative of the group.

III. The Proposed Rule

    EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal 
Register on November 14, 2014 (79 FR 68153) (FRL-9918-40). Written 
comments were received from seven parties in response to the proposal: 
Three private citizens, the University of Hawaii, the Hawaii Farm 
Bureau Federation, the Minor Crop Farmer Alliance, and the 
Interregional Research Project Number (IR-4).

IV. Response to Comments

    In this unit, EPA describes the major provisions of the proposed 
rule, the comments received on each provision, EPA's responses to those 
comments, and

[[Page 26472]]

EPA's determination regarding the final rule.

A. Crop Group 4-16: Leafy Vegetable Group

    1. Revise the proposed crop group name. EPA is adopting its 
proposal to expand ``Crop Group 4: Leafy Vegetables (Except Brassica 
Vegetables) Group'' to both add and remove commodities and to 
restructure the group. EPA revises the name of the new crop group to 
``Crop Group 4-16: Leafy Vegetable Group.'' Although the new crop group 
was proposed as ``Crop Group 4-14: Leafy Vegetable Group'', this change 
is needed in order to reflect the correct year of establishment, which 
is 2016. The final rule retains the pre-existing Crop Group 4 as 
described in Unit VI.
    2. Add new commodities. The final rule expands the leafy vegetable 
crop group from the existing 27 commodities to 62 commodities in Crop 
Group 4-16: Leafy Vegetable Group.
    3. Revise representative commodities for new crop group. The final 
rule retains the proposed four representative commodities for Crop 
Group 4-16: Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard greens, and spinach.
    EPA received an anonymous comment to make lettuce a separate 
subgroup under Crop Group 4-16 and adopt other crops as representative 
crops for Crop Group 4-16. The commenter indicated that lettuce is 
intolerant of most herbicides and proposed that lettuce be established 
as a separate subgroup and other crops be adopted as better 
representative commodities for the crop group. However, the commenter 
did not provide any additional information or suggest what alternative 
crop would be more appropriate as the representative crop. To address 
this comment, EPA reviewed data for all commodities included in the 
proposed Crop Group 4-16, including the commodities that would be 
appropriate for inclusion in Leafy Green subgroup 4-16A and Brassica 
Leafy Greens subgroup 4-16B. EPA has determined that lettuce would 
continue to be appropriately included in Crop Group 4 with the other 
vegetables based on similarities in the plant morphology; cultural 
practices; similar pest problems; the similar edible food portions and 
lack of livestock feed portions; potential to result in similar dietary 
exposure to pesticide residues; similarities in geographical locations 
and processing techniques; and the established tolerances for 
commodities currently within subgroup 4A (Ref. 1). Similarly, the 
Agency is including lettuce in subgroup 4-16A based on similarities in 
plant morphology; cultural practices; pest problems; the edible food 
portions and lack of livestock feed portions; potential to result in 
similar dietary exposure to pesticide residues; and similarities in 
geographical locations and processing techniques; and the established 
tolerances for commodities currently within subgroup 4A (Ref. 1). EPA 
expects that all proposed members of the crop subgroup 4-16A will 
generally have similar residue levels based on these similarities and 
has determined that it is appropriate to include the proposed 
commodities, including lettuce, in Crop Group 4-16 and subgroup 4-16A.
    In determining the appropriate representative commodities for this 
crop group and subgroup, the Agency considered which commodities are 
most likely to contain the highest residues; to be the highest produced 
and/or consumed; and to be similar in morphology, growth habit, pest 
problems, and edible portion to the related commodities within a group 
or subgroup. EPA determined that head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard 
greens, and spinach are the appropriate representatives for the crop 
group, because these commodities account for >95% of the total leafy 
vegetable harvested acres reported in the United States Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) Census of Agriculture and are also the highest 
consumed commodities on a per capita basis in the group. These 
commodities have a long regulatory history as being representative 
commodities for Crop Groups 4 and 5 (Ref. 1).
    4. New subgroups. The final rule retains the proposed addition of 
two subgroups to the revised Crop Group 4-16.
    i. Leafy greens subgroup 4-16A. (Representative commodities- Head 
lettuce, Leaf lettuce, and Spinach). Forty-two commodities are included 
in this subgroup.
    ii. Brassica leafy greens subgroup 4-16B. (Representative 
commodity- Mustard greens). Twenty commodities are included in this 
subgroup.

B. Crop Group 5-16: Head and Stem Brassica Vegetable Group

    EPA proposed to remove commodities and to restructure existing Crop 
Group 5, as Brassica (Cole) Leafy Vegetables Crop Group 5-16. EPA 
received no comments on this proposal and therefore is adopting the 
proposed changes as final with one minor modification. EPA is revising 
the name of the new crop group to ``Crop Group 5-16: Head and Stem 
Brassica Vegetable Group.'' Although the new crop group was proposed as 
``Crop Group 5-14: Head and Stem Brassica Vegetable Group'', this 
change is needed to reflect the correct year of establishment, which is 
2016.
    1. Revise existing commodities. The final rule revises Crop Group 
5-16 to include five commodities.
    2. Revise representative commodities. The final rule revises the 
representative commodities for Crop Group 5-16 by designating Broccoli 
or Cauliflower, and Cabbage as the representative commodities.
    3. Remove subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposal not to 
include subgroups in Crop Group 5-16.
    EPA received no comments on this provision and adopts its proposal 
without change.

C. New Crop Group 22: Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Group

    EPA received no comments on the addition of this new Crop Group and 
adopts its proposal without change.
    1. Commodities. The final rule adopts 19 commodities to the new 
Crop Group 22.
    2. Representative Commodities. The final rule adopts the proposed 
Asparagus and Celery as representative commodities.
    3. New Subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposed two subgroups 
to the new Crop Group 22.
    i. Stalk and stem vegetable subgroup 22A. (Representative 
commodity-Asparagus). Twelve commodities are included in this subgroup.
    ii. Leaf petiole vegetable subgroup 22B. (Representative commodity- 
Celery). Seven commodities are included in this subgroup.
    4. Amendment to Definitions and Interpretations. In conjunction 
with new Crop Group 22, EPA is adopting two new commodity definitions 
that were proposed for Fern, edible and Palm hearts to be added to 
Sec.  180.1(g), as specified in this final rule.
    No comments were submitted on this provision, and EPA adopts its 
proposal without change.

D. New Crop Group 23: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel Group

    EPA received three comments to the proposed Crop Group 23. The 
Agency received one comment about the proposed representative commodity 
for Crop subgroup 23A, which is addressed in Unit IV D.2, and another 
comment about a commodity definition for guava, which is addressed in 
Unit IV D.4. Additionally, EPA received a comment from IR-4 requesting 
that Achachair[uacute] (Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana) Zappi) 
be added to the proposed

[[Page 26473]]

Crop subgroup 24B. After reviewing the comment and considering 
available information, EPA determined that it would be appropriate to 
include Achachair[uacute] in Subtropical Fruit, medium to large fruit, 
edible peel subgroup 23B; this is addressed in Unit IV D.3.
    The Agency also received a comment on the name ``Tropical and 
Subtropical'' being removed from the proposed subgroups titled ``small 
fruit, edible peel subgroup 23A'', '' medium to large fruit, edible 
peel subgroup 23B'', and ``palm fruit, edible peel subgroup 23C''. 
According to the commenter, these names could result in 
misunderstanding of what commodities are included in the adopted Crop 
Group 23.
    EPA agrees with the commenter that removal of the names ``Tropical 
and Subtropical'' from the adopted subgroups could result in 
misunderstandings and has changed the subgroup names as follows: 
``Tropical and Subtropical, small fruit, edible peel subgroup 23A''; 
``Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup 
23B''; and ``Tropical and Subtropical, palm fruit, edible peel subgroup 
23C''. EPA is adopting its proposal with these changes to the subgroup 
names.
    1. Commodities. The final rule adopts 109 commodities to the new 
Crop Group 23.
    2. Representative Commodities. The final rule adopts the proposed 
Olive, Fig, Guava, and Date as representative commodities after 
consideration of one comment received concerning the representative 
commodity for Crop subgroup 23A, Olive.
    An anonymous commenter provided, in part, the following comment: 
``Having only a cool, subtropical fruit crop, i.e., olive, as the 
representative for numerous tropical fruit crops . . . will make 
conducting residue trials for these crops unlikely since these crops 
are not adapted to nor grown in cool, Mediterranean-like climates but 
in tropical regions.'' The commenter recommended that the EPA find a 
different representative commodity for subgroup 23A and suggested that 
wax jambu or perhaps Costa Rican guava would be good choices. In 
response, EPA notes that there should not be a need to conduct residue 
trials for the other crops in the subgroup because the basis for crop 
grouping is that data for the representative commodity can be used to 
establish tolerances for the other commodities in the subgroup. 
Additionally, representative commodities are selected based on 
commodities most likely to contain the highest residues; to be the 
highest produced and/or consumed; to be similar in morphology, growth 
habit, pest problems and edible portion to the related commodities 
within a group or subgroup; and to have production in the United 
States. EPA determined olive is the appropriate representative for 
subgroup 23A for several reasons. First, in general, the smaller the 
fruit, the larger the ratio of surface area to weight; therefore, 
pesticide deposits on olives are expected to be higher than on wax 
jambu or Costa Rican guava. Because of their size, olives are expected 
to have a higher residue than wax jambu or Costa Rican guava. Second, 
olives account for most of the harvested U.S. acres for the members of 
subgroup 23A, whereas (as noted by the commenter) wax jambu and Costa 
Rican guava are primarily grown outside of the United States. Finally, 
the commodities in subgroup 23A are similar in fruit surface area, 
edible portions, and cultural practices.
    3. New Subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposed three 
subgroups to the new Crop Group 23.
    i. Tropical and Subtropical, small fruit, edible peel subgroup 23A. 
(Representative commodity--Olive). Fifty-six commodities are included 
in this subgroup.
    ii. Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, edible peel 
subgroup 23B. (Representative commodities--Fig and Guava). Forty-four 
commodities are included in this subgroup after consideration of one 
comment received concerning the addition of a commodity.
    EPA received a comment from IR-4 requesting that Achachair[uacute] 
(Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana) Zappi) be added to the 
proposed Crop subgroup 24B. After reviewing the comment and considering 
available information, EPA determined that the peel for 
Achachair[uacute] is edible and is used in fruit drinks. Therefore, EPA 
determined that it would be appropriate to include Achachair[uacute] in 
the Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, medium to large fruit, edible peel 
subgroup 23B. USDA APHIS indicates Achachair[uacute] is already being 
legally imported into the U.S., and therefore, being a member of the 
crop group will help avoid tolerance and import issues with this crop.
    iii. Tropical and Subtropical, Palm fruit, edible peel subgroup 
23C. (Representative commodity--Date). Nine commodities are included in 
this subgroup.
    4. Amendment to Definitions and Interpretations. IR-4 originally 
petitioned the EPA to develop a new crop definition for guava to 
include many of the closely related genus (Psidium), species and 
varieties. EPA did not propose such a definition in the proposed rule 
and concluded that a guava definition was not necessary because it is 
one of the proposed representative commodities for crop subgroup 23B, 
``Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, edible peel 
subgroup''. In conjunction with new Crop Group 23, EPA received a 
comment to the proposed rule from IR-4 that stated, in part: ``. . . 
IR-4 believes that this definition [for guava] is necessary because 
both fig and guava are required as representative commodities for Crop 
Subgroup 23B and all of the related guava varieties and subspecies 
would not be covered except with a subgroup tolerance.''
    Upon review of the comment from IR-4, EPA agrees that a commodity 
definition for guava will be helpful to provide additional information 
on the closely related species and varieties of guava that are included 
for the commodity. Therefore, in conjunction with new Crop Group 23 and 
Crop Subgroup 23B, EPA is adopting a commodity definition for Guava to 
be added to Sec.  180.1(g).
    No additional comments were submitted on this provision, and EPA 
adopts its proposal with the changes noted in the previous discussion.

E. Crop Group 24: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel Group

    EPA received several comments to the proposed Crop Group 24, which 
are individually addressed in this unit.
    The Agency received a comment objecting to ``Tropical and 
Subtropical'' being removed from the proposed subgroups titled ``Small 
Fruit, inedible peel subgroup 24A''; ``medium to large fruit, smooth, 
inedible peel subgroup 24B''; ``medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, 
inedible peel subgroup 24C''; ``Inedible Peel, cactus subgroup 24D''; 
and ``Inedible Peel, vine subgroup 24E''. The commenter stated these 
names could result in misunderstanding of which commodities are 
included in the adopted Crop Group 24.
    EPA agrees with the commenter that removal of the names ``Tropical 
and Subtropical'' from the adopted subgroups as proposed, could result 
in misunderstanding. For clarity the subgroups will be named as 
follows: ``Tropical and Subtropical, small fruit, inedible peel 
subgroup 24A''; ``Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, 
smooth, inedible peel subgroup 24B''; ``Tropical and Subtropical, 
medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup 24C''; 
``Tropical and Subtropical, inedible peel, cactus subgroup 24D''; and 
``Tropical and

[[Page 26474]]

Subtropical, inedible peel, vine subgroup 24E''.
    1. Commodities. The final rule adopts 104 commodities to the new 
Crop Group 24.
    2. Representative Commodities. The final rule adopts the proposed 
Atemoya or Sugar apple; Avocado; Pomegranate or Banana; Dragon fruit; 
Prickly pear, fruit; Lychee; Passionfruit; and Pineapple as 
representative commodities.
    3. New Subgroups. The final rule adopts the proposed five subgroups 
to the new Crop Group 24.
    i. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, inedible peel subgroup 
24A. (Representative commodity--Lychee). Nineteen commodities are 
included in the subgroup.
    EPA received a comment from the University of Hawaii, requesting 
removal of Longan from subgroup 24C and placing it in Crop subgroup 
24A. The request is based on the size and texture of the fruit although 
it is similar to lychee, the adopted representative commodity for 
subgroup 24A.
    EPA agrees with the commenter to move Longan from Crop subgroup 24C 
to Crop subgroup 24A. Therefore, nineteen commodities are now in 
subgroup 24A.
    ii. Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, smooth, 
inedible peel subgroup 24B. (Representative commodities--Avocado, plus 
Pomegranate or Banana) Forty-two commodities are included in this 
subgroup.
    iii. Tropical and Subtropical, medium to large fruit, rough or 
hairy, inedible peel subgroup 24C. (Representative commodities--
Pineapple, plus atemoya or sugar apple). 26 commodities are included in 
this subgroup.
    As stated previously, the final rule moves Longan from the proposed 
Crop subgroup 24C to Crop subgroup 24A. Therefore, there are now 26 
commodities included in this subgroup.
    iv. Tropical and Subtropical, Inedible peel, cactus subgroup 24D. 
(Representative commodities--Dragon fruit and Prickly pear fruit). Nine 
commodities are included in this subgroup.
    v. Tropical and Subtropical, Inedible peel, vine subgroup 24E. 
(Representative commodity--Passionfruit). Eight commodities are 
included in this subgroup.
    No additional comments were submitted on this provision, and EPA 
adopts its proposal without change.

F. Other Changes

    No comments were submitted on the proposed ``other changes'' 
provisions, and EPA adopts its proposal without change.

G. Other Comments

    EPA received one comment from the Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation 
requesting that EPA ensure the opportunity for some other orphan crops 
grown in Hawaii to be listed in future crop groupings scenarios. Those 
crops of concern are coffee (Coffea arabica), tea (Camellia sinensis), 
awa/kava (Piper methysticum), moringa (Moringa oleifera), and noni 
(Morinda citrifolia).
    The primary reasons for the on-going crop grouping effort is to 
include as many orphan crops into groups, as appropriate, to facilitate 
trade and to provide tools for producers of minor and specialty crops. 
EPA is making every effort to include all appropriate commodities into 
crop groups. The crop groups discussed in this document are based on 
five petitions developed by the International Crop Grouping Consulting 
Committee (ICGCC) workgroup and submitted to EPA by IR-4. EPA 
encourages the Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation to participate in the 
ICGCC to ensure all commodities important to their growers are 
considered. Additionally, just as with this action, there will be an 
opportunity to provide comments on any future proposed crop groups.
    One commenter disagreed with placing Kei apple (Dovyalis caffra) 
and Sapote, white (Casimiroa edulis) in Crop Group 24. The commenter 
believes the edible peel of the fruit should place the fruits in Crop 
Group 23. EPA does not agree that Crop Group 23 is appropriate for 
these two commodities. Kei apples are small, petalless, and clustered 
in the leaf axils. The aromatic fruit is oblate or nearly round and 
long, with bright yellow, smooth but minutely downy, somewhat tough 
skin. Aromatic fruit is also mealy, apricot-textured, juicy, and has 
highly acid flesh. Most people consider the fruit too acidic for eating 
out-of-hand even when fully ripe. The skin for Sapote, white is thin, 
papery, smooth, inedible, and covered with a very thin waxy bloom. The 
skin should be thickly peeled to remove the bitter flesh underneath. 
Fruit can also be halved and the pulp can be scooped out.

 V. The Final Rule

    After fully considering all comments, EPA is amending the names of 
a few commodities, and adopting changes to its proposal as discussed in 
Unit IV. EPA is otherwise finalizing the rule as proposed, and based on 
the rationales set forth in the proposed rule.

VI. Implementation

    When an existing crop group is amended in a manner that expands or 
contracts its coverage of commodities, EPA will retain the pre-existing 
crop group in Sec.  180.41; insert the revised crop group immediately 
after the pre-existing crop group in Sec.  180.41; and title the 
revised crop group in a way that clearly differentiates it from the 
pre-existing crop group.
    The revised crop group will retain roughly the same name and number 
as the pre-existing group, except the number will be followed by a 
hyphen and the final digits of the year established (e.g., Crop Group 
4-16).
    EPA will initially retain pre-existing crop groups that have been 
superseded by revised crop groups. EPA will not establish new 
tolerances under the pre-existing groups. Further, EPA plans to 
eventually convert tolerances for any pre-existing crop group to 
tolerances with coverage under the revised crop group. This conversion 
will occur through the registration review process and in the course of 
evaluating new uses for a pesticide registration. EPA requests that 
petitioners for tolerances address crop grouping in their petitions. 
For existing petitions for which a Notice of Filing has been published, 
the Agency will attempt to conform these petitions to this rule.

VII. International Considerations

    In the proposed rule, EPA described other related activities 
involving active participation by its North American Free Trade 
Agreement partners, Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency and the 
government of Mexico, IR-4, and the Codex Committee on Pesticide 
Residues. The goals of these activities remain minimizing differences 
within and among the United States and Codex groups and to develop 
representative commodities for each group that will be acceptable on an 
international basis, which in turn could lead to the increased 
harmonization of tolerances and MRL recommendations.

VIII. References

    The following is a listing of the documents that are specifically 
referenced in this document. The docket includes these documents and 
other information considered by EPA, including documents that are 
referenced within the documents that are included in the docket, even 
if the referenced document is not physically located in the docket. For 
assistance in locating these other documents, please consult the person 
listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.


[[Page 26475]]


1. EPA. Bernard A. Schneider, Ph.D. Selection of Representative 
Commodities and Processed Commodities. July 24, 2014. Docket ID 
number EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0766.
2. EPA. Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program; Proposed 
Expansion; Proposed rule. Federal Register May 23, 2007 (77 FR 
28920) (FRL-8126-1).
3. EPA. Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program; Final rule. 
Federal Register December 7, 2007 (72 FR 69150) (FRL-8343-1).

IX. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

    Additional information about these statutes and Executive Orders 
can be found at http://www2.epa.gov/laws-regulations/laws-and-executive-orders.

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review and Executive 
Order 13563: Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review

    This action is not a significant regulatory action and was 
therefore not submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
for review for review under Executive Orders 12866, October 4, 1993 (58 
FR 51735) and 13563, January 21, 2011 (76 FR 3821).
    EPA prepared an analysis of the potential costs and benefits 
associated with the first proposed rule issued in this series of 
updates (Ref. 2). This analysis, entitled ``Economic Analysis Proposed 
Expansion of Crop Grouping Program,'' is available in the docket. 
Because the costs and benefits of each update to the crop grouping rule 
are essentially the same, and generally involve reductions in 
regulatory burdens and costs, EPA believes the May 23, 2007 economic 
analysis continues to be applicable. This was discussed in Unit V. of 
the proposed rule for Group IV, and EPA did not receive any comments on 
the analysis or EPA's findings.

B. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA)

    This action does not impose any new information collection 
requirements that would require additional review or approval by OMB 
under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. However, this action is expected 
to reduce paperwork burdens associated with submissions for tolerance 
related actions. For example, it may reduce the number of residue 
chemistry studies required to establish a tolerance for a crop within 
these groups because instead of testing each crop, only the 
representative crops would need to be tested under a crop grouping 
scheme.

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA)

    I certify that this action will not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities under the RFA, 5 
U.S.C. 601 et seq. In making this determination, the impact of concern 
is any significant adverse economic impact on small entities. An agency 
may certify that a rule will not have a significant economic impact on 
a substantial number of small entities if the rule relieves regulatory 
burden, has no net burden or otherwise has a positive economic effect 
on the small entities subject to the rule.
    This action provides regulatory relief and regulatory flexibility. 
The new crop groups ease the process for an entity to request and for 
EPA to set pesticide tolerances on greater numbers of crops. Pesticides 
will be more widely available to growers for use on crops, particularly 
specialty crops. This action is not expected to have any adverse impact 
on any entities, regardless of size.

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA)

    This action does not contain an unfunded federal mandate of $100 
million or more as described in UMRA, 2 U.S.C. 1531-1538, and does not 
significantly or uniquely affect small governments. Accordingly, this 
action is not subject to the requirements of UMRA, 2 U.S.C. 1501 et 
seq.

E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism

    This action does not have federalism implications as specified in 
Executive Order 13132, August 10, 1999 (64 FR 43255). It will not have 
substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between 
the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government. Thus, 
Executive Order 13132 does not apply to this action.

F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian 
Tribal Governments

    This action does not have tribal implications as specified in 
Executive Order 13175, November 9, 2000 (65 FR 67249). This action will 
not have any effect on tribal governments, on the relationship between 
the Federal Government and the Indian tribes, or on the distribution of 
power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian 
tribes. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this action.

G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children From Environmental 
Health Risks and Safety Risks

    EPA interprets Executive Order 13045, April 23, 1997 (62 FR 19885) 
as applying only to those regulatory actions that concern environmental 
health or safety risks that the EPA has reason to believe may 
disproportionately affect children, per the definition of ``covered 
regulatory action'' in section 2-202 of the Executive Order. This 
action is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it does not 
concern an environmental health risk or safety risk.

H. Executive Order 13211: Actions That Significantly Affect Energy 
Supply, Distribution, or Use

    This action is not subject to Executive Order 13211, May 22, 2001 
(66 FR 28355), because it is not a significant regulatory action under 
Executive Order 12866.

I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA)

    This rulemaking does not involve technical standards that would 
require the consideration of voluntary consensus standards pursuant to 
NTTAA section 12(d), 15 U.S.C. 272 note.

J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental 
Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations

    This action does not involve special consideration of environmental 
justice related issues as specified in Executive Order 12898, February 
16, 1994 (59 FR 7629). This action does not address human health or 
environmental risks or otherwise have any disproportionate high and 
adverse human health or environmental effects on minority, low-income 
or indigenous populations.

IX. Congressional Review Act

    This action is subject to the CRA, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., and EPA 
will submit a rule report to each House of the Congress and to the 
Comptroller General of the United States. This action is not a ``major 
rule'' as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 180

    Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, 
Commodities, Pesticides and pests.

    Dated: April 22, 2016.
James Jones,
Assistant Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution 
Prevention.
    Therefore, 40 CFR chapter I is amended as follows:

PART 180--[AMENDED]

0
1. The authority citation for part 180 continues to read as follows:


[[Page 26476]]


    Authority: 21 U.S.C. 321 (q), 346a and 371.



0
2. In Sec.  180.1:
0
i. Revise the entries for ``Broccoli'' and ``Sugar apple'' in the table 
in paragraph (g).
0
ii. Add in alphabetical order the entries ``Fern, edible, fiddlehead'', 
``Guava'', and ``Palm hearts'' to the table in paragraph (g).
    The additions and revisions read as follows:


Sec.  180.1  Definitions and interpretations.

* * * * *
    (g) * * *

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          A                                                        B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Broccoli............................................  Broccoli, Chinese broccoli (gai lon, white flowering
                                                       broccoli).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Fern, edible, fiddlehead............................  Fern, edible, fiddlehead including: Black lady fern,
                                                       Deparia japonica (Thunb.) M. Kato; Bracken fern,
                                                       Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn; Broad buckler fern,
                                                       Dryopteris dilatata (Hoffm.) A. Gray; Cinnamon fern,
                                                       Osmundastrum cinnamomeum (L.) C. Presl; Lady fern,
                                                       Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth ex Mert.; Leather fern,
                                                       Acrostichum aureum L.; Mother fern, Diplazium proliferum
                                                       (Lam.) Thouars; Ostrich fern, Matteuccia struthiopteris
                                                       (L.) Tod.; Vegetable fern, Diplazium esculentum (Retz.)
                                                       Sw.; Zenmai fern, Osmuda japonica Thunb.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Guava...............................................  Guava (Psidium guajava L.); Guava, cattley (Psidium
                                                       cattleyanum Sabine); Guava, Para (Psidium acutangulum
                                                       DC.); Guava, purple strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum
                                                       Sabine var. cattleyanum); Guava, strawberry (Psidium
                                                       cattleyanum Sabine var. littorale (Raddi) Fosberg);
                                                       Guava, yellow strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var.
                                                       cattleyanum forma lucidum O. Deg.)
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Palm hearts.........................................  Palm hearts, various species, including: African fan palm,
                                                       Borassus aethiopum Mart.; Cabbage palm, Euterpe oleracea
                                                       Mart.; Cabbage palmetto, Sabal palmetto (Walter) Schult.
                                                       & Schult. f.; Coconut, Cocos nucifera L.; Palmyra palm,
                                                       Borassus flabellifera L.; Peach Palm, Bactris gasipaes
                                                       Kunth; Royal palm, Roystonea oleracea (Jacq.) O.F. Cook;
                                                       Salak palm, Salacca zalacca (Gaertn.) Voss; Saw palmetto,
                                                       Serenoa repens (W. Bartram) Small; Wine palm, Raphia spp.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sugar apple.........................................  Annona squamosa L. and its hybrid atemoya (Annona
                                                       cherimola Mill X A. squamosa L.) Also includes true
                                                       custard apple (Annona reticulata L.).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *

0
3. In Sec.  180.40, revise paragraphs (e) and (f) to read as follows:


Sec.  180.40  Tolerances for crop groups.

* * * * *
    (e) Since a group tolerance reflects maximum residues likely to 
occur on all individual crops within a group, the proposed or 
registered patterns of use for all crops in the group or subgroup must 
be similar before a group tolerance is established. The pattern of use 
consists of the amount of pesticide applied, the number of times 
applied, the timing of the first application, the interval between 
applications, and the interval between the last application and 
harvest. The pattern of use will also include the type of application; 
for example, soil or foliar application, or application by ground or 
aerial equipment. Additionally, since a group tolerance reflects 
maximum residues likely to occur on all individual foods within a 
group, food processing practices must be similar for all crops in the 
group or subgroup if the processing practice has the potential to 
result in residues in a processed commodity at a higher concentration 
than the raw agricultural commodity.
    (f)(1) General. EPA will not establish a crop group for a pesticide 
unless all tolerances made necessary by the presence of pesticide 
residues in the crop group commodities have been issued or are being 
issued simultaneously with the crop group tolerance. For purposes of 
paragraph (f)(1):
    (i) Necessary tolerances for residues resulting from crop group 
tolerances include:
    (A) Tolerances for processed food, including processed animal feed, 
to the extent needed under FFDCA section 408(a)(2).
    (B) Tolerances for raw commodities not covered by the crop group 
tolerance that are derivative of commodities in the group.
    (C) Tolerances for meat, milk, or egg products that may contain 
residues as a result of livestock's consumption of animal feed 
containing pesticide residues to the extent needed under Sec.  
180.6(b).
    (ii) Notwithstanding the foregoing, a tolerance is not considered 
necessary for processed food, derivative raw commodities, or meat, 
milk, and eggs if the precursor raw commodities are grown solely for 
sale as raw commodities and are completely segregated from commodities 
grown for the purpose of producing processed foods, derivative raw 
commodities, and commodities, or fractions thereof, that are used as 
animal feed.
    (2) Processed commodity and related raw commodity crop group 
tolerances. EPA may establish crop group tolerances for processed 
commodities or fractions of commodities (e.g., bran and flour from the 
Cereal Grains Group), including processed fractions used as animal feed 
(e.g., pomace from the Pome Fruit Group), produced from crops in the 
crop groups in Sec.  180.41. EPA may establish crop group tolerances 
for raw commodities or fractions of commodities, including fractions 
used as animal feed, derived from commodities covered by the crop 
groups in Sec.  180.41 (e.g., aspirated grain dust associated with the 
Cereal Grains Group). Crop group tolerances on processed foods and 
derivative raw commodities may be based on data on representative 
commodities for associated crop group. Paragraphs (c), (d), (e), (g), 
and (h) of Sec.  180.40 apply to

[[Page 26477]]

group tolerances authorized by paragraph (f)(2).
    (3) Representative crops. Unless indicated otherwise in Sec. Sec.  
180.40 and 180.41, the processed food and feed forms of the 
representative crops for a crop group are considered to be 
representative of the processed food and feed forms and any derivative 
raw commodities not covered by the crop group, that are produced from 
any of the raw agricultural commodities covered by the crop group 
tolerance. Additionally, unless indicated otherwise in Sec. Sec.  
180.40 and 180.41, representative commodities for such crop groups are 
selected taking into consideration whether their use as animal feed 
will result in residues in or on meat, milk, and/or eggs at a level 
representative of the residues that would result from use of the other 
commodities or byproducts in the crop group as an animal feed.
    (4) Data. Processing data on representative crops are required 
prior to establishment of a group tolerance if the processing of the 
representative commodity has the potential to result in residues in a 
processed commodity at a higher concentration than in the 
representative commodity. Residue data are required on raw commodities 
derived from the crops in the crop group tolerance but not directly 
covered by the tolerance. Animal feeding studies with a representative 
crop are required if the representative crop is used as a significant 
animal feed.
* * * * *

0
4. In Sec.  180.41:
0
i. Revise paragraph (b).
0
ii. Redesignate paragraphs (c)(6) through (28) as paragraphs (c)(7) 
through (29), respectively.
0
iii. Add a new paragraph (c)(6).
0
iv. Redesignate newly redesignated paragraphs (c)(8) through (29) as 
paragraphs (c)(9) through (30), respectively.
0
v. Add a new paragraph (c)(8).
0
vi. Revise newly redesignated paragraphs (c)(25)(ii), (c)(26)(ii), and 
(c)(27)(ii) introductory text.
0
vii. Add paragraphs (c)(31), (32), and (33).
    The additions and revisions read as follows:


Sec.  180.41  Crop group tables.

* * * * *
    (b) Commodities not listed are not considered as included in the 
groups for the purposes of paragraph (b), and individual tolerances 
must be established. Miscellaneous commodities intentionally not 
included in any group include globe artichoke, hops, peanut, and water 
chestnut.
    (c) * * *
    (6) Crop Group 4-16. Leafy Vegetable Group.
    (i) Representative commodities. Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard 
greens, and spinach.
    (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities 
included in Crop Group 4-16.

             Table 1--Crop Group 4-16: Leafy Vegetable Group
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Related crop
                     Commodities                           subgroups
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Amaranth, Chinese (Amaranthus tricolor L.)...........              4-16A
Amaranth, leafy (Amaranthus spp.)....................              4-16A
Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.).........................              4-16B
Aster, Indian (Kalimeris indica (L.) Sch. Bip.)......              4-16A
Blackjack (Bidens pilosa L.).........................              4-16A
Broccoli, Chinese (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra               4-16B
 (L.H. Bailey) Musil)................................
Broccoli raab (Brassica ruvo L.H. Bailey)............              4-16B
Cabbage, abyssinian (Brassica carinata A. Braun).....              4-16B
Cabbage, Chinese, bok choy (Brassica rapa subsp.                   4-16B
 chinensis (L.) Hanelt)..............................
Cabbage, seakale (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata                4-16B
 DC.)................................................
Cat's whiskers (Cleome gynandra L.)..................              4-16A
Cham-chwi (Doellingeria scabra (Thunb.) Nees)........              4-16A
Cham-na-mul (Pimpinella calycina Maxim)..............              4-16A
Chervil, fresh leaves (Anthriscus cerefolium (L.)                  4-16A
 Hoffm.).............................................
Chipilin (Crotalaria longirostrata Hook & Arn).......              4-16A
Chrysanthemum, garland (Glebionis coronaria (L.)                   4-16A
 Cass. ex Spach. Glebionis spp.).....................
Cilantro, fresh leaves (Coriandrum sativum L.).......              4-16A
Collards (Brassica oleracea L. var. viridis L.)......              4-16B
Corn salad (Valerianella spp.).......................              4-16A
Cosmos (Cosmos caudatus Kunth).......................              4-16A
Cress, garden (Lepidium sativum L.)..................              4-16B
Cress, upland (Barbarea vulgaris W.T. Aiton).........              4-16B
Dandelion, leaves (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg.                 4-16A
 Aggr.)..............................................
Dang-gwi, leaves (Angelica gigas Nakai)..............              4-16A
Dillweed (Anethum graveolens L.).....................              4-16A
Dock (Rumex patientia L.)............................              4-16A
Dol-nam-mul (Sedum sarmentosum Bunge)................              4-16A
Ebolo (Crassocephalum crepidioides (Benth.) S. Moore)              4-16A
Endive (Cichorium endivia L.)........................              4-16A
Escarole (Cichorium endivia L.)......................              4-16A
Fameflower (Talinum fruticosum (L.) Juss.)...........              4-16A
Feather cockscomb (Glinus oppositifolius (L.) Aug.                 4-16A
 DC.)................................................
Good King Henry (Chenopodium bonus-henricus L.)......              4-16A
Hanover salad (Brassica napus var. pabularia (DC.)                 4-16B
 Rchb.)..............................................
Huauzontle (Chenopodium berlandieri Moq.)............              4-16A
Jute, leaves (Corchorus spp.)........................              4-16A
Kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. Sabellica L.)........              4-16B
Lettuce, bitter (Launaea cornuta (Hochst. ex Oliv. &               4-16A
 Hiern) C. Jeffrey)..................................
Lettuce, head (Lactuca sativa L.; including Lactuca                4-16A
 sativa var. capitata L.)............................
Lettuce, leaf (Lactuca sativa L.; including Lactuca                4-16A
 sativa var. longifolia Lam.; Lactuca sativa var.
 crispa L.)..........................................
Maca, leaves (Lepidium meyenii Walp.)................              4-16B

[[Page 26478]]

 
Mizuna (Brassica rapa L. subsp. nipposinica (L.H.                  4-16B
 Bailey) Hanelt).....................................
Mustard greens (Brassica juncea subsp., including                  4-16B
 Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. subsp. integrifolia (H.
 West) Thell., Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. var.
 tsatsai (T.L. Mao) Gladis)..........................
Orach (Atriplex hortensis L.)........................              4-16A
Parsley, fresh leaves (Petroselinum crispum (Mill.)                4-16A
 Fuss; Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum Danert)
Plantain, buckthorn (Plantago lanceolata L.).........              4-16A
Primrose, English (Primula vulgaris Huds.)...........              4-16A
Purslane, garden (Portulaca oleracea L.).............              4-16A
Purslane, winter (Claytonia perfoliata Donn ex                     4-16A
 Willd.).............................................
Radicchio (Cichorium intybus L.).....................              4-16A
Radish, leaves (Raphanus sativus L. var sativus,                   4-16B
 including Raphanus sativus L. var. mougri H. W. J.
 Helm (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis Pers).....
Rape greens (Brassica napus L. var. napus, including               4-16B
 Brassica rapa subsp. trilocularis (Roxb.) Hanelt;
 Brassica rapa subsp. dichotoma (Roxb.) Hanelt;
 Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera Met)..................
Rocket, wild (Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.)........              4-16B
Shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik)              4-16B
Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).......................              4-16A
Spinach, Malabar (Basella alba L.)...................              4-16A
Spinach, New Zealand (Tetragonia tetragonioides                    4-16A
 (Pall.) Kuntze).....................................
Spinach, tanier (Xanthosoma brasiliense (Desf.)                    4-16A
 Engl.)..............................................
Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris).........              4-16A
Turnip greens (Brassica rapa L. ssp. rapa)...........              4-16B
Violet, Chinese, leaves (Asystasia gangetica (L.) T.               4-16A
 Anderson)...........................................
Watercress (Nasturtium officinale W.T. Aiton)........              4-16B
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these
 commodities.........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop 
subgroups for Crop Group 4-16, specifies the representative commodities 
for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each 
subgroup.

                                   Table 2--Crop Group 4-16: Subgroup Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Representative commodities                                      Commodities
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                   Crop Subgroup 4-16A. Leafy greens subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, and spinach..........................  Amaranth, Chinese; amaranth, leafy; aster,
                                                                    Indian; blackjack; cat's whiskers; cham-
                                                                    chwi; cham-na-mul; chervil, fresh leaves;
                                                                    chipilin; chrysanthemum, garland; cilantro,
                                                                    fresh leaves; corn salad; cosmos; dandelion,
                                                                    leaves; dang-gwi, leaves; dillweed; dock;
                                                                    dol-nam-mul; ebolo; endive; escarole;
                                                                    fameflower; feather cockscomb; Good King
                                                                    Henry; huauzontle; jute, leaves; lettuce,
                                                                    bitter; lettuce, head; lettuce, leaf; orach;
                                                                    parsley, fresh leaves; plantain, buckhorn;
                                                                    primrose, English; purslane, garden;
                                                                    purslane, winter; radicchio; spinach;
                                                                    spinach, Malabar; spinach, New Zealand;
                                                                    spinach, tanier; Swiss chard; violet,
                                                                    Chinese, leaves; cultivars, varieties, and
                                                                    hybrids of these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                               Crop Subgroup 4-16B. Brassica leafy greens subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mustard greens...................................................  Arugula; broccoli, Chinese; broccoli raab;
                                                                    cabbage, abyssinian; cabbage, Chinese, bok
                                                                    choy; cabbage, seakale; collards; cress,
                                                                    garden; cress, upland; hanover salad; kale;
                                                                    maca, leaves; mizuna; mustard greens;
                                                                    radish, leaves; rape greens; rocket, wild;
                                                                    shepherd's purse; turnip greens; watercress;
                                                                    cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these
                                                                    commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *
    (8) Crop Group 5-16. Brassica Head and Stem Vegetable Group.
    (i) Representative commodities. Broccoli or cauliflower and 
cabbage.
    (ii) Commodities. The following List 1 contains all commodities 
included in Crop Group 5-16.

     List 1--Crop Group 5-16: Brassica Head and Stem Vegetable Group
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             Commodities
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck)
Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera (DC.) Zenker)
Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.)
Cabbage, Chinese, napa (Brassica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis (Lour.)
 Hanelt)
Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L)
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *
    (25) * * *
    (ii) Commodities. The commodities included in Crop Group 16 are: 
Forage,

[[Page 26479]]

fodder, stover, and straw of all commodities included in the group 
cereal grains group. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on 
forage, fodder, hay, stover, or straw, if data on the representative 
commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, 
fodder, stover, or straw.
    (26) * * *
    (ii) Commodities. The commodities included in Crop Group 17 are: 
Forage, fodder, stover, and hay of any grass, Gramineae/Poaceae family 
(either green or cured) except sugarcane and those included in the 
cereal grains group, that will be fed to or grazed by livestock, all 
pasture and range grasses and grasses grown for hay or silage. EPA may 
establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, stover, or hay, 
if data on the representative commodities indicate differences in the 
levels of residues on forage, fodder, stover, or hay.
    (27) * * *
    (ii) Commodities. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on 
forage, fodder, straw, or hay, if data on the representative 
commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, 
fodder, straw, or hay. The following is a list of all the commodities 
included in Crop Group 18:
* * * * *
    (31) Crop Group 22. Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Vegetable Group.
    (i) Representative commodities. Asparagus and celery.
    (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities 
included in Crop Group 22.

  Table 1--Crop Group 22: Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Vegetable Group
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Related crop
                       Commodities                           subgroups
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agave (Agave spp.)......................................             22A
Aloe vera (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f.)......................             22A
Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.)....................             22A
Bamboo, shoots (Arundinaria spp.; Bambusa spp.,                      22A
 Chimonobambusa spp.; Dendrocalamus spp., Fargesia spp.;
 Gigantochloa spp., Nastus elatus; Phyllostachys spp.;
 Thyrsostachys spp.)....................................
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L.).........................             22B
Celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce (Mill.) Pers.)......             22B
Celery, Chinese (Apium graveolens L. var. secalinum                  22B
 (Alef.) Mansf.)........................................
Celtuce (Lactuca sativa var. angustana L.H. Bailey).....             22A
Fennel, Florence, fresh leaves and stalk (Foeniculum                 22A
 vulgare subsp. vulgare var. azoricum (Mill.) Thell.)...
Fern, edible, fiddlehead................................             22A
Fuki (Petasites japonicus (Siebold & Zucc.) Maxim.).....             22B
Kale, sea (Crambe maritima L.)..........................             22A
Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea L. var gongylodes L.).......             22A
Palm hearts (various species)...........................             22A
Prickly pear, pads (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill.,                 22A
 Opuntia spp.)..........................................
Prickly pear, Texas, pads (Opuntia engelmannii Salm-Dyck             22A
 ex Engelm. var. lindheimeri (Engelm.) B.D. Parfitt &
 Pinkav)................................................
Rhubarb (Rheum x rhabarbarum L.)........................             22B
Udo (Aralia cordata Thunb. )............................             22B
Zuiki (Colocasia gigantea (Blume) Hook. f.).............             22B
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities..
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop 
subgroups for Crop Group 22, specifies the representative commodities 
for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each 
subgroup.

                                    Table 2--Crop Group 22: Subgroup Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Representative commodities                                      Commodities
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Crop Subgroup 22A. Stalk and stem vegetable subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Asparagus........................................................  Agave; aloe vera; asparagus; bamboo, shoots;
                                                                    celtuce; fennel, florence, fresh leaves and
                                                                    stalk; fern, edible, fiddlehead; kale, sea;
                                                                    kohlrabi; palm hearts; prickly pear, pads;
                                                                    prickly pear, Texas, pads; cultivars,
                                                                    varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                               Crop Subgroup 22B. Leaf petiole vegetable subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Celery...........................................................  Cardoon; celery; celery, Chinese; fuki;
                                                                    rhubarb; udo; zuiki; cultivars, varieties,
                                                                    and hybrids of these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (32) Crop Group 23. Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel 
Group.
    (i) Representative commodities. Date, fig, guava, and olive.
    (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities 
included in Crop Group 23.

   Table 1--Crop Group 23: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel
                                  Group
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Related crop
                       Commodities                           subgroups
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A[ccedil]a[iacute] (Euterpe oleracea Mart.).............             23C
Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.)......................             23A

[[Page 26480]]

 
Achachair[uacute] (Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. &                   23B
 Triana) Zappi).........................................
African plum (Vitex doniana Sweet)......................             23A
Agritos (Berberis trifoliolata Moric.)..................             23A
Almondette (Buchanania lanzan Spreng.)..................             23A
Ambarella (Spondias dulcis Sol. ex Parkinson)...........             23B
Apak palm (Brahea dulcis (Kunth) Mart.).................             23C
Appleberry (Billardiera scandens Sm.)...................             23A
Araz[aacute] (Eugenia stipitata McVaugh)................             23B
Arbutus berry (Arbutus unedo L.)........................             23A
Babaco (Vasconcellea x heilbornii (V.M. Badillo) V.M.                23B
 Badillo)...............................................
Bacaba palm (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.)...................             23C
Bacaba-de-leque (Oenocarpus distichus Mart.)............             23C
Bayberry, red (Morella rubra Lour.).....................             23A
Bignay (Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng.)..................             23A
Bilimbi (Averrhoa bilimbi L.)...........................             23B
Boroj[oacute] (Borojoa patinoi Cuatrec.)................             23B
Breadnut (Brosimum alicastrum Sw.)......................             23A
Cabeluda (Plinia glomerata (O. Berg) Amshoff)...........             23A
Cajou, fruit (Anacardium giganteum Hance ex Engl.)......             23B
Cambuc[aacute] (Marlierea edulis Nied.).................             23B
Carandas-plum (Carissa edulis Vahl).....................             23A
Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.)............................             23B
Cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.)................             23B
Ceylon iron wood (Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard)....             23A
Ceylon olive (Elaeocarpus serratus L.)..................             23A
Cherry-of-the-Rio-Grande (Eugenia aggregata (Vell.)                  23A
 Kiaersk.)..............................................
Chinese olive, black (Canarium tramdenum C.D. Dai &                  23A
 Yakovlev)..............................................
Chinese olive, white (Canarium album (Lour.) Raeusch.)..             23A
Chirauli-nut (Buchanania latifolia Roxb.)...............             23A
Ciruela verde (Bunchosia armeniaca (Cav.) DC.)..........             23B
Cocoplum (Chrysobalanus icaco L.).......................             23A
Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.)...........................             23C
Davidson's plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell.).........             23B
Desert-date (Balanites aegyptiacus (L.) Delile).........             23A
Doum palm coconut (Hyphaene thebaica (L.) Mart.)........             23C
False sandalwood (Ximenia americana L.).................             23A
Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret)...............             23B
Fig (Ficus carica L.)...................................             23B
Fragrant manjack (Cordia dichotoma G. Forst.)...........             23A
Gooseberry, abyssinian (Dovyalis abyssinica (A. Rich.)               23A
 Warb.).................................................
Gooseberry, Ceylon (Dovyalis hebecarpa (Gardner) Warb.).             23A
Gooseberry, Indian (Phyllanthus emblica L.).............             23B
Gooseberry, otaheite (Phyllanthus acidus (L.) Skeels)...             23A
Governor's plum (Flacourtia indica (Burm. F.) Merr.)....             23A
Grumichama (Eugenia brasiliensis Lam)...................             23A
Guabiroba (Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg)............             23A
Guava (Psidium guajava L.)..............................             23B
Guava berry (Myrciaria floribunda (H. West ex Willd.) O.             23A
 Berg)..................................................
Guava, Brazilian (Psidium guineense Sw.)................             23A
Guava, cattley (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine).............             23B
Guava, Costa Rican (Psidium friedrichsthalianum (O.                  23A
 Berg) Nied.)...........................................
Guava, Para (Psidium acutangulum DC.)...................             23B
Guava, purple strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine                 23B
 var. cattleyanum)......................................
Guava, strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var.                   23B
 littorale (Raddi) Fosberg).............................
Guava, yellow strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine                 23B
 var. cattleyanum forma lucidum O. Deg.)................
Guayabillo (Psidium sartorianum (O. Berg) Nied.)........             23A
Illawarra plum (Podocarpus elatus R. Br. Ex Endl.)......             23A
Imb[eacute] (Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson).........             23B
Imbu (Spondias tuberosa Arruda ex Kost.)................             23B
Indian-plum (Flacourtia jangomas (Lour.). basionym).....             23A
Jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O. Berg).......             23B
Jamaica-cherry (Muntingia calabura L.)..................             23A
Jambolan (Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels)..................             23A
Jelly palm (Butia capitata (Mart.) Becc.)...............             23C
Jujube, Indian (Ziziphus mauritiana Lam.)...............             23B
Kaffir-plum (Harpephyllum caffrum Bernh. Ex C. Krauss)..             23A
Kakadu plum (Terminalia latipes Benth. subsp. psilocarpa             23A
 Pedley)................................................
Kapundung (Baccaurea racemosa (Reinw.) Mull. Arg.)......             23A
Karanda (Carissa carandas L.)...........................             23A
Kwai muk (Artocarpus hypargyreus Hance ex Benth.).......             23B
Lemon aspen (Acronychia acidula F. Muell)...............             23A

[[Page 26481]]

 
Mangaba (Hancornia speciosa Gomes)......................             23B
Marian plum (Bouea macrophylla Griff.)..................             23B
Mombin, malayan (Spondias pinnata (J. Koenig ex L. f.)               23B
 Kurz)..................................................
Mombin, purple (Spondias purpurea L.)...................             23B
Mombin, yellow (Spondias mombin L.).....................             23A
Monkeyfruit (Artocarpus lacucha Buch. Ham.).............             23B
Monos plum (Pseudanamomis umbellulifera (Kunth) Kausel).             23A
Mountain cherry (Bunchosia cornifolia Kunth)............             23A
Nance (Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth)................             23B
Natal plum (Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A. DC.)..........             23B
Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.)............................             23B
Olive (Olea europaea L. subsp. europaea)................             23A
Papaya, mountain (Vasconcellea pubescens A. DC.)........             23B
Patau[aacute] (Oenocarpus bataua Mart.).................             23C
Peach palm, fruit (Bactris gasipaes Kunth var. gasipaes)             23C
Persimmon, black (Diospyros texana Scheele).............             23A
Persimmon, Japanese (Diospyros kaki Thunb.).............             23B
Pitomba (Eugenia luschnathiana Klotzsch ex O. Berg).....             23A
Plum-of-Martinique (Flacourtia inermis Roxb.)...........             23A
Pomerac (Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry)...             23B
Rambai (Baccaurea motleyana (Mull. Arg.) Mull. Arg.)....             23B
Rose apple (Syzygium jambos (L.) Alston)................             23B
Rukam (Flacourtia rukam Zoll. & Moritizi)...............             23A
Rumberry (Myrciaria dubia (Kunth) McVaugh Myrtaceae)....             23A
Sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L.)...................             23A
Sentul (Sandoricum koetjape (Burm. F.) Merr.)...........             23B
Sete-capotes (Campomanesia guazumifolia (Cambess.) O.                23A
 Berg)..................................................
Silver aspen (Acronychia wilcoxian (F. Muell.) T.G.                  23A
 Hartley)...............................................
Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.).......................             23B
Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.)....................             23B
Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.).........................             23B
Uvalha (Eugenia pyriformis Cambess )....................             23B
Water apple (Syzygium aqueum (Burm. F.) Alston).........             23A
Water pear (Syzygium guineense (Willd.) DC).............             23A
Water berry (Syzygium cordatum Hochst. Ex C. Krauss)....             23A
Wax jambu (Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M.                23A
 Perry).................................................
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities..
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups 
for Crop Group 23, specifies the representative commodities for each 
subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

                                    Table 2--Crop Group 23: Subgroup Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Representative commodities                                      Commodities
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Crop Subgroup 23A. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, edible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Olive............................................................  Acerola; African plum; agritos; almondette;
                                                                    appleberry; arbutus berry; bayberry, red;
                                                                    bignay; breadnut; cabeluda; carandas-plum;
                                                                    Ceylon iron wood; Ceylon olive; cherry-of-
                                                                    the-Rio-Grande; Chinese olive, black;
                                                                    Chinese olive, white; chirauli-nut;
                                                                    cocoplum; desert-date; false sandalwood;
                                                                    fragant manjack; gooseberry, abyssinian;
                                                                    gooseberry, Ceylon; gooseberry, otaheite;
                                                                    governor's plum; grumichama; guabiroba;
                                                                    guava berry; guava, Brazilian; guava, Costa
                                                                    Rican; guayabillo; illawarra plum; Indian-
                                                                    plum; Jamaica-cherry; jambolan; kaffir-plum;
                                                                    kakadu plum; kapundung; karanda; lemon
                                                                    aspen; mombin, yellow; monos plum; mountain
                                                                    cherry; olive; persimmon, black; pitomba;
                                                                    plum-of-Martinique; rukam; rumberry; sea
                                                                    grape; sete-capotes; silver aspen; water
                                                                    apple; water pear; water berry; wax jambu;
                                                                    cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these
                                                                    commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Crop Subgroup 23B. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fig and guava....................................................  Achachair[uacute]; ambarella; araz[aacute];
                                                                    babaco; bilimbi; boroj[oacute]; cajou,
                                                                    fruit; cambuc[aacute]; carob; cashew apple;
                                                                    ciruela verde; davidson's plum; feijoa; fig;
                                                                    gooseberry, Indian; guava; guava, cattley;
                                                                    guava, Para; guava, purple strawberry;
                                                                    guava, strawberry; guava, yellow strawberry;
                                                                    imb[eacute]; imbu; jaboticaba; jujube,
                                                                    Indian; kwai muk; mangaba; Marian plum;
                                                                    mombin, Malayan; mombin, purple;
                                                                    monkeyfruit; nance; natal plum; noni;
                                                                    papaya, mountain; persimmon, Japanese;
                                                                    pomerac; rambai; rose apple; sentul;
                                                                    starfruit; Surinam cherry; tamarind; uvalha;
                                                                    cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these
                                                                    commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 26482]]

 
                  Crop Subgroup 23C. Tropical and Subtropical, Palm fruit, edible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.............................................................  A[ccedil]a[iacute]; apak palm; bacaba palm;
                                                                    bacaba-de-leque; date; doum palm coconut;
                                                                    jelly palm; patau[aacute]; peach palm,
                                                                    fruit; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of
                                                                    these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (33) Crop Group 24. Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel 
Group.
    (i) Representative commodities. Atemoya or sugar apple, avocado, 
banana or pomegranate, dragon fruit, lychee, passionfruit, pineapple, 
and prickly pear, fruit.
    (ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities 
included in Crop Group 24.

  Table 1--Crop Group 24: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel
                                  Group
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Related crop
                       Commodities                           subgroups
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Abiu (Pouteria caimito (Ruiz & Pav.) Radlk).............             24B
Aisen (Boscia senegalensis (Pers.) Lam.)................             24A
Akee apple (Blighia sapida K.D. Koenig).................             24B
Atemoya (Annona cherimola Mill. X A. squamosa L.).......             24C
Avocado (Persea americana Mill.)........................             24B
Avocado, Guatemalan (Persea americana Mill. var.                     24B
 guatemalensis).........................................
Avocado, Mexican (Persea americana Mill. var. drymifolia             24B
 (Schltdl. & Cham.) S.F. Blak)..........................
Avocado, West Indian (Persea americana var. americana)..             24B
Bacury (Platonia insignis Mart.)........................             24B
Bael fruit (Aegle marmelos (L.) Corr[ecirc]a)...........             24A
Banana (Musa spp.)......................................             24B
Banana, dwarf (Musa hybrids; Musa acuminata Colla)......             24B
Binjai (Mangifera caesia Jack)..........................             24B
Biriba (Annona mucosa Jacq.)............................             24C
Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg).....             24C
Burmese grape (Baccaurea ramiflora Lour.)...............             24A
Canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth) Baehni)..........             24B
Cat's-eyes (Dimocarpus longan Lour. subsp. malesianus                24A
 Leenh.)................................................
Champedak (Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr.)...........             24C
Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.)......................             24C
Cupuac[uacute] (Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd. Ex                    24B
 Spreng.) K. Schum.)....................................
Custard apple (Annona reticulata L.)....................             24C
Dragon fruit (Hylocereus undatus (Haw.) Britton & Rose).             24D
Durian (Durio zibethinus L.)............................             24C
Elephant-apple (Limonia acidissima L.)..................             24C
Etambe (Mangifera zeylanica (Blume) Hook. F.)...........             24B
Granadilla (Passiflora ligularis Juss.).................             24E
Granadilla, giant (Passiflora quadrangularis L.)........             24E
Ilama (Annona macroprophyllata Donn. Sm.)...............             24C
Ing[aacute] (Inga vera Willd. subsp. affinis (DC.) T.D.              24A
 Penn.).................................................
Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.)...............             24C
Jatob[aacute] (Hymenaea courbaril L.)...................             24B
Karuka (Pandanus julianettii Martelli)..................             24C
Kei apple (Dovyalis caffra (Hook. F. & Harv.) Warb.)....             24B
Langsat (Lansium domesticum Corr[ecirc]a)...............             24B
Lanjut (Mangifera lagenifera Griff.)....................             24B
Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.)........................             24A
Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma (Ruiz & Pav.) Kuntze)...........             24B
Lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.).........................             24A
Mabolo (Diospyros blancoi A. DC.).......................             24B
Madras-thorn (Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth.)......             24A
Mammy-apple (Mammea americana L.).......................             24C
Manduro (Balanites maughamii Sprague)...................             24A
Mango (Mangifera indica L.).............................             24B
Mango, horse (Mangifera foetida Lour.)..................             24B
Mango, Saipan (Mangifera odorata Griff.)................             24B
Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. )....................             24B
Marang (Artocarpus odoratissimus Blanco)................             24C
Marmaladebox (Genipa americana L.)......................             24C
Matisia (Matisia cordata Humb. & Bonpl.)................             24A
Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.).................             24A
Mongongo, fruit (Schinziophyton rautanenii (Schinz)                  24A
 Radcl.-Sm).............................................
Monkey-bread-tree (Adansonia digitata L.)...............             24C
Monstera (Monstera deliciosa Liebm.)....................             24E
Nicobar-breadfruit (Pandanus leram Jones ex Fontana)....             24C

[[Page 26483]]

 
Paho (Mangifera altissima Blanco).......................             24B
Pandanus (Pandanus utilis Bory).........................             24C
Papaya (Carica papaya L.)...............................             24B
Passionflower, winged-stem (Passiflora alata Curtis)....             24E
Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis Sims)...................             24E
Passionfruit, banana (Passiflora tripartita var.                     24E
 mollissima (Kunth) Holm-Niels. & P. Jorg.).............
Passionfruit, purple (Passiflora edulis Sims forma                   24E
 edulis)................................................
Passionfruit, yellow (Passiflora edulis Sims forma                   24E
 flavicarpa O. Deg.)....................................
Pawpaw, common (Asimina triloba (L.) Dunal).............             24B
Pawpaw, small-flower (Asimina parviflora (Michx.) Dunal)             24A
Pelipisan (Mangifera casturi Kosterm.)..................             24B
Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess)....................             24B
Pequia (Caryocar villosum (Aubl.) Pers.)................             24B
Persimmon, American (Diospyros virginiana L.)...........             24B
Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.)...................             24C
Pitahaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus (F.A.C. Weber) Britton &             24D
 Rose)..................................................
Pitaya (Hylocereus sp. including H. megalanthus (H.                  24D
 ocamponis and H. polychizus)...........................
Pitaya, amarilla (Hylocereus triangularis Britton &                  24D
 Rose)..................................................
Pitaya, roja (Hylocereus ocamponis (Salm-Dyck) Britton &             24D
 Rose)..................................................
Pitaya, yellow (Hylocereus megalanthus (K. Schum. ex                 24D
 Vaupel) Ralf Bauer)....................................
Plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.)..........................             24B
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.)........................             24B
Poshte (Annona liebmanniana Baill.).....................             24B
Prickly pear, fruit (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill.)...             24D
Prickly pear, Texas, fruit (Opuntia engelmannii Salm-                24D
 Dyck ex Engelm. var. lindheimeri (Engelm.) B.D. Parfitt
 & Pinkav)..............................................
Pulasan (Nephelium ramboutan-ake (Labill.) Leenh.)......             24C
Quandong (Santalum acuminatum (R. Br.) DC.).............             24B
Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.).......................             24C
Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea (Engelm.) Britton & Rose)...             24D
Sapodilla (Manilkara zapota (L.) P. Royen)..............             24C
Sapote, black (Diospyros digyna Jacq.)..................             24B
Sapote, green (Pouteria viridis (Pittier) Cronquist)....             24B
Sapote, mamey (Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore &                  24C
 Stearn)................................................
Sapote, white (Casimiroa edulis La Llave & Lex).........             24B
Sataw (Parkia speciosa Hassk.)..........................             24B
Satinleaf (Chrysophyllum oliviforme L.).................             24A
Screw-pine (Pandanus tectorius Parkinson)...............             24B
Sierra Leone-tamarind (Dialium guineense Willd.)........             24A
Soncoya (Annona purpurea Moc. & Sess[eacute] ex Dunal)..             24C
Soursop (Annona muricata L.)............................             24C
Spanish lime (Melicoccus bijugatus Jacq.)...............             24A
Star apple (Chrysophyllum cainito L.)...................             24B
Sugar apple (Annona squamosa L.)........................             24C
Sun sapote (Licania platypus (Hemsl.) Fritsch)..........             24C
Tamarind-of-the-Indies (Vangueria madagascariensis J.F.              24B
 Gmel.).................................................
Velvet tamarind (Dialium indum L.)......................             24A
Wampi (Clausena lansium (Lour.) Skeels).................             24A
White star apple (Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don).........             24A
Wild loquat (Uapaca kirkiana M[uuml]ll. Arg.)...........             24B
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities..
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups 
for Crop Group 24, specifies the representative commodities for each 
subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

                                    Table 2--Crop Group 24: Subgroup Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Representative commodities                                      Commodities
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Crop Subgroup 24A. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, inedible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lychee...........................................................  Aisen; bael fruit; Burmese grape; cat's-eyes;
                                                                    ing[aacute]; longan; lychee; madras-thorn;
                                                                    manduro; matisia; mesquite; mongongo, fruit;
                                                                    pawpaw, small-flower; satinleaf; Sierra
                                                                    Leone-tamarind; Spanish lime; velvet
                                                                    tamarind; wampi; white star apple;
                                                                    cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these
                                                                    commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 26484]]

 
       Crop Subgroup 24B. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, smooth, inedible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Avocado, plus pomegranate or banana..............................  Abiu; akee apple; avocado; avocado,
                                                                    Guatemalan; avocado, Mexican; avocado, West
                                                                    Indian; bacury; banana; banana, dwarf;
                                                                    binjai; canistel; cupuac[uacute]; etambe;
                                                                    jatob[aacute]; kei apple; langsat; lanjut;
                                                                    lucuma; mabolo; mango; mango, horse; mango,
                                                                    Saipan; mangosteen; paho; papaya; pawpaw,
                                                                    common; pelipisan; pequi; pequia; persimmon,
                                                                    American; plantain; pomegranate; poshte;
                                                                    quandong; sapote, black; sapote, green;
                                                                    sapote, white; sataw; screw-pine; star
                                                                    apple; tamarind-of-the-Indies; wild loquat;
                                                                    cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these
                                                                    commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Crop Subgroup 24C. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pineapple, plus atemoya or sugar apple...........................  Atemoya; biriba; breadfruit; champedak;
                                                                    cherimoya; custard apple; durian; elephant-
                                                                    apple; ilama; jackfruit; karuka; mammy-
                                                                    apple; marang; marmaladebox; monkey-bread
                                                                    tree; nicobar-breadfruit; pandanus;
                                                                    pineapple; pulasan; rambutan; sapodilla;
                                                                    sapote, mamey; soncoya; soursop; sugar
                                                                    apple; sun sapote; cultivars, varieties, and
                                                                    hybrids of these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Crop Subgroup 24D. Tropical and Subtropical, Cactus, inedible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dragon fruit and Prickly pear fruit..............................  Dragon fruit; pitahaya; pitaya; pitaya,
                                                                    amarilla; pitaya, roja; pitaya, yellow;
                                                                    prickly pear, fruit; prickly pear, Texas,
                                                                    fruit; saguaro; cultivars, varieties, and
                                                                    hybrids of these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Crop Subgroup 24E. Tropical and Subtropical, Vine, inedible peel subgroup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Passionfruit.....................................................  Granadilla; granadilla, giant; monstera;
                                                                    passionflower, winged-stem; passionfruit;
                                                                    passionfruit, banana; passionfruit, purple;
                                                                    passionfruit, yellow; cultivars, varieties,
                                                                    and hybrids of these commodities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[FR Doc. 2016-10319 Filed 5-2-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-P