Draft Report on Strengthening the Medicolegal Death Investigation System: Improving Data Systems, 26591 [2016-10308]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2016 / Notices reasonable accommodation will be made on a case-by-case basis. * * * * * Members of the public may request to receive this information electronically. If you would like to be added to the distribution, please contact the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of the Secretary, Washington, DC 20555 (301– 415–1969), or email Brenda.Akstulewicz@nrc.gov or Patricia.Jimenez@nrc.gov. Dated: April 28, 2016. Denise McGovern, Policy Coordinator, Office of the Secretary. [FR Doc. 2016–10373 Filed 4–29–16; 11:15 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Draft Report on Strengthening the Medicolegal Death Investigation System: Improving Data Systems Notice of request for public comment. ACTION: The nation’s approximately 2,400 medical examiner and coroner (ME/C) jurisdictions investigate nearly 500,000 deaths each year and perform post-mortem examinations and/or autopsies to determine the cause of death. While the function and organization of these offices vary by state, medical examiners and coroners typically investigate deaths that are sudden and unexpected, deaths that have no attending physician, and all suspicious and violent deaths. Strengthening the ME/C system is critical for improving the accuracy and reliability of these death investigations and will benefit public health and safety programs, law enforcement investigations, and the development of interventions to prevent deaths nationwide. The National Science and Technology Council’s Fast Track Action Committee on Strengthening the Medicolegal Death Investigation System was chartered in July 2015 to make strategic policy recommendations at the Federal level on how to address issues related to accessing and working with data generated by ME/C offices. Importantly, these policy recommendations will not only strengthen medicolegal death investigations, but would also enhance public health and the integrity of the criminal justice system, and further public health and medical research. The Committee is seeking input on a series of specific questions, as well as general feedback on the content of the report. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:53 May 02, 2016 Jkt 238001 Responses must be received by May 27, 2016 to be considered. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods: • Web form: https:// www.whitehouse.gov/webform/ Medicolegal-Death-InvestigationSystem-Public-Comment • Fax: (202) 456–6027, Attn: Eleanor Celeste. • Mail: Attn: Eleanor Celeste, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20504. Instructions: Response to this Request for Public Comment is voluntary. Responses exceeding 1,000 words will not be considered. Please reference page numbers in your response, as appropriate. Submission via web form is preferred. Responses to this Request for Public Comment may be posted online without change online. The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) therefore requests that no business proprietary information, copyrighted information, or personally identifiable information be submitted in response to this request. Please note that the U.S. Government will not pay for response preparation, or for the use of any information contained in the response. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eleanor Celeste, (202) 456–4444, Science@ostp.eop.gov, OSTP. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 2009 National Research Council report ‘‘Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward’’ described the current Medicolegal Death Investigation System (MDIS) as fragmented, inconsistent, and of insufficient quality for the needs of health, consumer safety, and law enforcement officials. The report identified a number of specific problems with the current system. Many Federal agencies rely on the data generated by the MDIS to further their missions, and therefore share an interest in ensuring that these data are accurate, reliable, and readily accessible. In 2015, OSTP established under the National Science and Technology Council a Fast-Track Action Committee on Strengthening the Medicolegal Death Investigation System (FTAC–SMDIS) to identify and recommend strategic policy measures that can be implemented by Federal agencies in coordination with State and local agencies to improve the quality, uniformity, and availability of MDIS data in order to maximize the utility of these data for Federal purposes. More than 12 Federal departments, agencies, and components of the DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 26591 Executive Office of the President comprised the FTAC–SMDIS. Together the group identified current uses of MDIS data by Federal agencies, existing barriers to accessing and working with these data, data quality issues, and opportunities for addressing those challenges. The group developed a report detailing specific recommendations on actions the Federal government as well as State, local, and Tribal entities can take on priority issues to improve data systems for the MDIS. SMDIS–FTAC now is seeking public comment on this report (available at: https:// www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ microsites/ostp/NSTC/strengthening_ the_medicolegal_death_investigation_ system_draft_for_public_comment_ 4_21.pdf) in advance of finalizing the document for publication. The Committee is seeking specific input on the following questions, as well as general feedback on the content of the report. • Are there scientific and technical issues surrounding data quality and access within the MDI System that the FTAC should be aware of and include in its report? • Are there additional recommendations to improve data systems that would be impactful to the MDI System, based on the scientific and technical literature? Ted Wackler, Deputy Chief of Staff and Assistant Director. [FR Doc. 2016–10308 Filed 5–2–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3270–F6–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34–77721; File No. SR– BatsBZX–2016–11] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Bats BZX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Extend the Pilot Period for the Exchange’s Supplemental Competitive Liquidity Provider Program April 27, 2016. Pursuant to section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the ‘‘Act’’),1 and Rule 19b–4 thereunder,2 notice is hereby given that on April 22, 2016, Bats BZX Exchange, Inc. (the ‘‘Exchange’’ or ‘‘BZX’’) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’) the proposed rule change as described in Items I and II 1 15 2 17 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). CFR 240.19b–4. E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1

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[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 85 (Tuesday, May 3, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Page 26591]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-10308]


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OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY


Draft Report on Strengthening the Medicolegal Death Investigation 
System: Improving Data Systems

ACTION: Notice of request for public comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The nation's approximately 2,400 medical examiner and coroner 
(ME/C) jurisdictions investigate nearly 500,000 deaths each year and 
perform post-mortem examinations and/or autopsies to determine the 
cause of death. While the function and organization of these offices 
vary by state, medical examiners and coroners typically investigate 
deaths that are sudden and unexpected, deaths that have no attending 
physician, and all suspicious and violent deaths. Strengthening the ME/
C system is critical for improving the accuracy and reliability of 
these death investigations and will benefit public health and safety 
programs, law enforcement investigations, and the development of 
interventions to prevent deaths nationwide.
    The National Science and Technology Council's Fast Track Action 
Committee on Strengthening the Medicolegal Death Investigation System 
was chartered in July 2015 to make strategic policy recommendations at 
the Federal level on how to address issues related to accessing and 
working with data generated by ME/C offices. Importantly, these policy 
recommendations will not only strengthen medicolegal death 
investigations, but would also enhance public health and the integrity 
of the criminal justice system, and further public health and medical 
research. The Committee is seeking input on a series of specific 
questions, as well as general feedback on the content of the report.

DATES: Responses must be received by May 27, 2016 to be considered.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods:
     Web form: https://www.whitehouse.gov/webform/Medicolegal-Death-Investigation-System-Public-Comment
     Fax: (202) 456-6027, Attn: Eleanor Celeste.
     Mail: Attn: Eleanor Celeste, Office of Science and 
Technology Policy, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 
Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20504.
    Instructions: Response to this Request for Public Comment is 
voluntary. Responses exceeding 1,000 words will not be considered. 
Please reference page numbers in your response, as appropriate. 
Submission via web form is preferred. Responses to this Request for 
Public Comment may be posted online without change online. The Office 
of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) therefore requests that no 
business proprietary information, copyrighted information, or 
personally identifiable information be submitted in response to this 
request. Please note that the U.S. Government will not pay for response 
preparation, or for the use of any information contained in the 
response.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eleanor Celeste, (202) 456-4444, 
Science@ostp.eop.gov, OSTP.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 2009 National Research Council report 
``Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward'' 
described the current Medicolegal Death Investigation System (MDIS) as 
fragmented, inconsistent, and of insufficient quality for the needs of 
health, consumer safety, and law enforcement officials. The report 
identified a number of specific problems with the current system.
    Many Federal agencies rely on the data generated by the MDIS to 
further their missions, and therefore share an interest in ensuring 
that these data are accurate, reliable, and readily accessible. In 
2015, OSTP established under the National Science and Technology 
Council a Fast-Track Action Committee on Strengthening the Medicolegal 
Death Investigation System (FTAC-SMDIS) to identify and recommend 
strategic policy measures that can be implemented by Federal agencies 
in coordination with State and local agencies to improve the quality, 
uniformity, and availability of MDIS data in order to maximize the 
utility of these data for Federal purposes.
    More than 12 Federal departments, agencies, and components of the 
Executive Office of the President comprised the FTAC-SMDIS. Together 
the group identified current uses of MDIS data by Federal agencies, 
existing barriers to accessing and working with these data, data 
quality issues, and opportunities for addressing those challenges. The 
group developed a report detailing specific recommendations on actions 
the Federal government as well as State, local, and Tribal entities can 
take on priority issues to improve data systems for the MDIS. SMDIS-
FTAC now is seeking public comment on this report (available at: 
https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/NSTC/strengthening_the_medicolegal_death_investigation_system_draft_for_public_comment_4_21.pdf) in advance of finalizing the document for 
publication. The Committee is seeking specific input on the following 
questions, as well as general feedback on the content of the report.
     Are there scientific and technical issues surrounding data 
quality and access within the MDI System that the FTAC should be aware 
of and include in its report?
     Are there additional recommendations to improve data 
systems that would be impactful to the MDI System, based on the 
scientific and technical literature?

Ted Wackler,
Deputy Chief of Staff and Assistant Director.
[FR Doc. 2016-10308 Filed 5-2-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3270-F6-P