Hazardous Materials: ICAO Lithium Ion Battery Prohibition Safety Advisory Notice, 20443-20444 [2016-07936]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 67 / Thursday, April 7, 2016 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Bianca Carr, U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room W23–453, Washington, DC 20590. Telephone 202– 366–9309, Email Bianca.carr@dot.gov. As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel KARINA JEAN is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ‘‘Private Vessel Charters, Passengers Only.’’ Geographic Region: ‘‘Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (excluding waters in Southeastern Alaska and waters north of a line between Gore Point to Cape Suckling [including the North Gulf Coast and Prince William Sound]).’’ The complete application is given in DOT docket MARAD–2016–0031 at http://www.regulations.gov. Interested parties may comment on the effect this action may have on U.S. vessel builders or businesses in the U.S. that use U.S.flag vessels. If MARAD determines, in accordance with 46 U.S.C. 12121 and MARAD’s regulations at 46 CFR part 388, that the issuance of the waiver will have an unduly adverse effect on a U.S.vessel builder or a business that uses U.S.-flag vessels in that business, a waiver will not be granted. Comments should refer to the docket number of this notice and the vessel name in order for MARAD to properly consider the comments. Comments should also state the commenter’s interest in the waiver application, and address the waiver criteria given in § 388.4 of MARAD’s regulations at 46 CFR part 388. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Privacy Act Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477–78). By Order of the Maritime Administrator. Dated: March 22, 2016. T. Mitchell Hudson, Jr., Secretary, Maritime Administration. [FR Doc. 2016–07995 Filed 4–6–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–81–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:35 Apr 06, 2016 Jkt 238001 Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA–2016–0014; Notice No. 2016–05] Hazardous Materials: ICAO Lithium Ion Battery Prohibition Safety Advisory Notice Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Safety advisory notice. AGENCY: PHMSA is issuing this safety advisory notice to inform persons engaged in the transport of lithium batteries in commerce of recent actions taken by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to enhance the safe transport of lithium batteries by air. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kevin A. Leary, Standards and Rulemaking Division, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, telephone: (202) 366– 8553. SUMMARY: This safety advisory notice is to inform persons engaged in the transport of lithium batteries in commerce of recent actions taken by the ICAO to enhance the safe transport of lithium batteries by air. According to the International Coordinating Council of Aerospace Industries Association (ICCAIA), Boeing, and other aircraft manufacturers, the fire suppression capabilities of an aircraft may be exceeded in a situation where heat and flames generated from thermal runaway in a single package of lithium ion batteries spreads to adjacent packages, potentially leading to a catastrophic loss of the aircraft because of a fire that cannot be contained or suppressed.1 Testing by the Federal Aviation Administration’s William J. Hughes Technical Center (FAA Tech Center) supports the ICCAIA’s and aircraft manufacturers’ assessments.2 A fundamental concern highlighted by the FAA Tech Center’s research is that the cargo compartment fire protection standards are not designed to address the unique hazards associated with the transport of lithium batteries. Safety concerns include: • The potential for propagation of thermal runaway between cells or batteries in a package and between adjacent packages of batteries; SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1 http://www.icao.int/safety/DangerousGoods/ DGPWG15/DGPWG.15.WP.004.5.en.pdf. 2 http://www.fire.tc.faa.gov. PO 00000 Frm 00125 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 20443 • The potential for uncontrolled lithium battery fires to overwhelm the capability of existing aircraft cargo fire protection systems, leading to a catastrophic failure of the airframe; and • The potential for venting of combustible gases from lithium ion cells in thermal runaway, which could collect in an enclosed environment and cause an explosion even in the presence of a suppression agent. Specifically, test data from the FAA Tech Center demonstrates that: (1) The ignition of the unburned flammable gases associated with a lithium cell or battery fire could lead to a catastrophic explosion; (2) the current design of the Halon 1301 fire suppression system in a Class C cargo compartment in passenger airplanes is incapable of preventing such an explosion; and (3) the ignition of a mixture of flammable gases could produce an over pressure, which would dislodge pressure relief panels, allow leakage of Halon from the associated cargo compartment, and compromise the ability of fire suppression systems to function as intended. As a result, smoke and fire can spread to adjacent compartments and potentially compromise the entire aircraft. Based on this information and in conjunction with recommendations developed at the ICAO Multidisciplinary Lithium Battery Transport Coordination Meeting(s), the ICAO amended the 2015–2016 edition of the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO TI) concerning the transport of lithium ion cells and batteries. These amendments, effective April 1, 2016, include: • A prohibition on the transport of lithium ion cells and batteries as cargo aboard passenger carrying aircraft (this prohibition applies to lithium cells and batteries (UN3480) not contained in or packed with equipment when transported as cargo and does not include batteries contained in personal electronic devices carried by passengers or crew); • A requirement for lithium ion cells and batteries to be shipped at a state of charge of no more than 30 percent of their rated capacity on cargo aircraft (forbidden on passenger); and • A limit on the number of packages of both lithium ion and lithium metal batteries that may be offered for transportation on cargo aircraft under current provisions for small cells and batteries to not more than one package per consignment or overpack. Representatives from the FAA and PHMSA participate in meetings of the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel—the E:\FR\FM\07APN1.SGM 07APN1 20444 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 67 / Thursday, April 7, 2016 / Notices international body responsible for the ICAO TI. In consultation with the FAA and other relevant government agencies, PHMSA works to periodically harmonize the provisions of the domestic hazardous materials regulations (HMR; 49 CFR parts 171– 180) with international regulatory approaches, including the ICAO TI. In coordination with the FAA, PHMSA is considering additional actions, including appropriate amendments to the HMR to address these enhanced safety measures adopted by ICAO. For additional information see: • FAA SAFO 16001 3 issued on January 19, 2016. • Addendum No. 3 4 to the Technical Instructions (2015/2016 Edition) issued on January 15, 2016. • Addendum No. 4 5 to the Technical Instructions (2015/2016 Edition) issued on February 23, 2016. Issued in Washington, DC on April 1, 2016. William S. Schoonover, Deputy Associate Administrator, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. [FR Doc. 2016–07936 Filed 4–6–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P Office of Foreign Assets Control Sanctions Action Pursuant to Executive Order 13664 Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing updated identifying information for one individual whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13664, ‘‘Blocking Property of Certain Persons With Respect to South Sudan,’’ who was previously designated and added to OFAC’s list of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons (SDN List). DATES: OFAC’s actions described in this notice were effective April 4, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The Department of the Treasury’s Office of mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: 3 https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_ industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/safo/all_ safos/media/2016/SAFO16001.pdf. 4 http://www.icao.int/safety/DangerousGoods/ AddendumCorrigendum%20to%20the%20 Technical%20Instructions/Doc%209284-20152016.ADD-3.pdf. 5 http://www.icao.int/safety/DangerousGoods/ AddendumCorrigendum%20to%20the%20 Technical%20Instructions/Doc%209284-20152016.ADD-4.en.pdf. 16:35 Apr 06, 2016 Jkt 238001 Electronic and Facsimile Availability The SDN List and additional information concerning OFAC sanctions programs are available from OFAC’s Web site (www.treasury.gov/ofac). Certain general information pertaining to OFAC’s sanctions programs is also available via facsimile through a 24hour fax-on-demand service, tel.: 202– 622–0077. Notice of OFAC Actions On April 4, 2016, OFAC updated the identifying information for one previously designated individual whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to E.O. 13664. The updated identifying information for the individual is as follows: JOK RIAK, Gabriel (a.k.a. JOK, Gabriel; a.k.a. MAKOL, Gabriel Jok Riak; a.k.a. MAKOL, Jok Riak; a.k.a. RIAK, Jock; a.k.a. RIAK, Jok), Wau, Western Bahr El Ghazal State, South Sudan; Unity State, South Sudan; DOB 1966; POB Bor, South Sudan; alt. POB Bor, Sudan; nationality South Sudan; Lieutenant General; Sector One Commander (individual) [SOUTH SUDAN]. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY VerDate Sep<11>2014 Foreign Assets Control: Assistant Director for Licensing, tel.: 202–622– 2480, Assistant Director for Regulatory Affairs, tel.: 202–622–4855, Assistant Director for Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, tel.: 202–622–2490; or the Department of the Treasury’s Office of the Chief Counsel (Foreign Assets Control), Office of the General Counsel, tel.: 202–622–2410. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated: April 4, 2016. Andrea Gacki, Acting Director, Office of Foreign Assets Control. [FR Doc. 2016–07989 Filed 4–6–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–AL–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing the names of seven entities whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act) (21 U.S.C. 1901–1908, 8 U.S.C. 1182). Additionally, OFAC is publishing additions to the identifying information for five individuals and one entity SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00126 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 previously designated pursuant to the Kingpin Act. DATES: The designations by the Acting Director of OFAC of the seven entities identified in this notice pursuant to section 805(b) of the Kingpin Act are effective on April 4, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Assistant Director, Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC 20220 Tel: (202) 622–2490. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Electronic and Facsimile Availability This document and additional information concerning OFAC are available on OFAC’s Web site at http:// www.treasury.gov/ofac or via facsimile through a 24-hour fax-on-demand service at (202) 622–0077. Background The Kingpin Act became law on December 3, 1999. The Kingpin Act provides a statutory framework for the imposition of sanctions against significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis, with the objective of denying their businesses and agents access to the U.S. financial system and the benefits of trade and transactions involving U.S. companies and individuals. The Kingpin Act blocks all property and interests in property, subject to U.S. jurisdiction, owned or controlled by significant foreign narcotics traffickers as identified by the President. In addition, the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Attorney General, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of State, and the Secretary of Homeland Security, may designate and block the property and interests in property, subject to U.S. jurisdiction, of persons who are found to be: (1) Materially assisting in, or providing financial or technological support for or to, or providing goods or services in support of, the international narcotics trafficking activities of a person designated pursuant to the Kingpin Act; (2) owned, controlled, or directed by, or acting for or on behalf of, a person designated pursuant to the Kingpin Act; or (3) playing a significant role in international narcotics trafficking. On April 4, 2016, the Acting Director of OFAC designated the following seven entities whose property and interests in E:\FR\FM\07APN1.SGM 07APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 67 (Thursday, April 7, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 20443-20444]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-07936]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

[Docket No. PHMSA-2016-0014; Notice No. 2016-05]


Hazardous Materials: ICAO Lithium Ion Battery Prohibition Safety 
Advisory Notice

AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), 
DOT.

ACTION: Safety advisory notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: PHMSA is issuing this safety advisory notice to inform persons 
engaged in the transport of lithium batteries in commerce of recent 
actions taken by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) 
to enhance the safe transport of lithium batteries by air.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kevin A. Leary, Standards and 
Rulemaking Division, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration, telephone: (202) 366-8553.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This safety advisory notice is to inform 
persons engaged in the transport of lithium batteries in commerce of 
recent actions taken by the ICAO to enhance the safe transport of 
lithium batteries by air. According to the International Coordinating 
Council of Aerospace Industries Association (ICCAIA), Boeing, and other 
aircraft manufacturers, the fire suppression capabilities of an 
aircraft may be exceeded in a situation where heat and flames generated 
from thermal runaway in a single package of lithium ion batteries 
spreads to adjacent packages, potentially leading to a catastrophic 
loss of the aircraft because of a fire that cannot be contained or 
suppressed.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ http://www.icao.int/safety/DangerousGoods/DGPWG15/DGPWG.15.WP.004.5.en.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Testing by the Federal Aviation Administration's William J. Hughes 
Technical Center (FAA Tech Center) supports the ICCAIA's and aircraft 
manufacturers' assessments.\2\ A fundamental concern highlighted by the 
FAA Tech Center's research is that the cargo compartment fire 
protection standards are not designed to address the unique hazards 
associated with the transport of lithium batteries. Safety concerns 
include:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ http://www.fire.tc.faa.gov.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The potential for propagation of thermal runaway between 
cells or batteries in a package and between adjacent packages of 
batteries;
     The potential for uncontrolled lithium battery fires to 
overwhelm the capability of existing aircraft cargo fire protection 
systems, leading to a catastrophic failure of the airframe; and
     The potential for venting of combustible gases from 
lithium ion cells in thermal runaway, which could collect in an 
enclosed environment and cause an explosion even in the presence of a 
suppression agent.
    Specifically, test data from the FAA Tech Center demonstrates that: 
(1) The ignition of the unburned flammable gases associated with a 
lithium cell or battery fire could lead to a catastrophic explosion; 
(2) the current design of the Halon 1301 fire suppression system in a 
Class C cargo compartment in passenger airplanes is incapable of 
preventing such an explosion; and (3) the ignition of a mixture of 
flammable gases could produce an over pressure, which would dislodge 
pressure relief panels, allow leakage of Halon from the associated 
cargo compartment, and compromise the ability of fire suppression 
systems to function as intended. As a result, smoke and fire can spread 
to adjacent compartments and potentially compromise the entire 
aircraft.
    Based on this information and in conjunction with recommendations 
developed at the ICAO Multidisciplinary Lithium Battery Transport 
Coordination Meeting(s), the ICAO amended the 2015-2016 edition of the 
Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air 
(ICAO TI) concerning the transport of lithium ion cells and batteries. 
These amendments, effective April 1, 2016, include:
     A prohibition on the transport of lithium ion cells and 
batteries as cargo aboard passenger carrying aircraft (this prohibition 
applies to lithium cells and batteries (UN3480) not contained in or 
packed with equipment when transported as cargo and does not include 
batteries contained in personal electronic devices carried by 
passengers or crew);
     A requirement for lithium ion cells and batteries to be 
shipped at a state of charge of no more than 30 percent of their rated 
capacity on cargo aircraft (forbidden on passenger); and
     A limit on the number of packages of both lithium ion and 
lithium metal batteries that may be offered for transportation on cargo 
aircraft under current provisions for small cells and batteries to not 
more than one package per consignment or overpack.
    Representatives from the FAA and PHMSA participate in meetings of 
the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel--the

[[Page 20444]]

international body responsible for the ICAO TI. In consultation with 
the FAA and other relevant government agencies, PHMSA works to 
periodically harmonize the provisions of the domestic hazardous 
materials regulations (HMR; 49 CFR parts 171-180) with international 
regulatory approaches, including the ICAO TI. In coordination with the 
FAA, PHMSA is considering additional actions, including appropriate 
amendments to the HMR to address these enhanced safety measures adopted 
by ICAO.
    For additional information see:
     FAA SAFO 16001 \3\ issued on January 19, 2016.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/safo/all_safos/media/2016/SAFO16001.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Addendum No. 3 \4\ to the Technical Instructions (2015/
2016 Edition) issued on January 15, 2016.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ http://www.icao.int/safety/DangerousGoods/AddendumCorrigendum%20to%20the%20Technical%20Instructions/Doc%209284-2015-2016.ADD-3.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Addendum No. 4 \5\ to the Technical Instructions (2015/
2016 Edition) issued on February 23, 2016.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ http://www.icao.int/safety/DangerousGoods/AddendumCorrigendum%20to%20the%20Technical%20Instructions/Doc%209284-2015-2016.ADD-4.en.pdf.

    Issued in Washington, DC on April 1, 2016.
William S. Schoonover,
Deputy Associate Administrator, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration.
[FR Doc. 2016-07936 Filed 4-6-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-60-P