Notice of Inventory Completion: Catalina Island Museum, Avalon, CA, 19636-19638 [2016-07764]

Download as PDF asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 19636 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 65 / Tuesday, April 5, 2016 / Notices human remains was identified as an adult female of Native American ancestry based on metric and nonmetric traits. The other human remains were too fragmentary to identify further. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Renton’s Mine streambed in Los Angeles County, CA. The human remains were found eroding from the streambed by Buzzy Vickers, and donated to the Catalina Island Museum in 1977 (accessioned as 77.030). There is no date associated with the human remains, but they were found near a known prehistoric archeological site. Fragmentary human remains of an adult female of Native American origin were identified through osteological analysis. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The sites detailed in this notice have been identified by consultation to be within the traditional territories of the Gabrielino (Tongva) with ancestral ties to the Chumash island people. Archeological and ethnohistoric evidence shows that these contact Takic-speaking peoples lived on the southern Channel Islands by at least 5,000 B.C. Island Tongva and Chumash groups have strong ancestral ties through marriage and trade. Analysis of historical records from missions in the Greater Los Angeles area demonstrate kinship ties between these two communities made stronger while in the mission system. The present-day Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians traces an earlier shared group identity with the Gabrielino (Tongva) people that inhabited the Channel Islands during the Middle period and through contact. Associated funerary objects are consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Gabrielino (Tongva) and Chumash people. The material culture of earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned above are characterized by archeologists as having passed through stages over the past 5,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same populations, and do not represent population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the pre-contact period until historic times. Native consultants explicitly state that population mixing, which did occur, would not alter the continuity of the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:18 Apr 04, 2016 Jkt 238001 shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity through time can be traced for all sites listed above with present-day Gabrielino (Tongva) and Chumash people. Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians tribal members descend from the Channel Islands and specifically represent an ancestral tie to the Gabrielino (Tongva) and Catalina Island by preponderance of the evidence. Pimu that this notice has been published. Dated: March 10, 2016. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–07763 Filed 4–4–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Determinations Made by the Catalina Island Museum [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20590; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Officials of the Catalina Island Museum have determined that: Notice of Inventory Completion: Catalina Island Museum, Avalon, CA • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 164 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 563 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Michael DeMarsche, Ph.D., Catalina Island Museum, 1 Casino Way, Casino Building, P.O. Box 366, Avalon, CA 90704, telephone (310) 510–2416, email director@ catalinamuseum.org, by May 5, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California. The Catalina Island Museum is responsible for notifying the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation); Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California; and the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of California Tribe; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council; San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians; and the Traditional Council of PO 00000 Frm 00088 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Catalina Island Museum has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Catalina Island Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Catalina Island Museum at the address in this notice by May 5, 2016. ADDRESSES: Michael DeMarsche, Ph.D., Catalina Island Museum, 1 Casino Way, Casino Building, P.O. Box 366, Avalon, CA 90704, telephone (310) 510–2416, email director@catalinamuseum.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Catalina Island Museum, Avalon, CA. The human remains were removed from Los Angeles, Santa Barbara Counties, CA and potentially Solano, Placer, and Sacramento Counties, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\05APN1.SGM 05APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 65 / Tuesday, April 5, 2016 / Notices responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Catalina Island Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California; United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California; Wilton Rancheria, California; Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, California (previously listed as the Rumsey Indian Rancheria of Wintun Indians of California, and the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: the Ti’at Society and the Traditional Council of Pimu. History and Description of the Remains In October 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Avalon, Los Angeles County, CA. Collection 61.322 consists of a human crania and mandible that were donated by the Santa Catalina Island Co. The human remains were found along with a notecard that stated, ‘‘found in patio of Pavilion Lodge, Avalon, Calif. October 11, 1960.’’ There is no information to assume they were excavated from the property. Collection 61.323 consists of an incomplete set of human remains donated by the Santa Catalina Island Co. that also may have been removed from the Pavilion Lodge Hotel in Avalon. There is no information to assume they were excavated from the property. The three adults (2 female and 1 male) were identified as Native American based on osteological metric and non-metric analysis. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is an abalone shell found with the human remains identified as #61.323. At an unknown time, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from an unknown location, presumably Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles, CA. This collection of human remains was found within the Catalina Island Museum’s human remains collection when it returned from University of California Santa Barbara in 2010. Unfortunately no documentation could be located to further our understanding of the location and date acquired. There were three bags of human remains with only VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:18 Apr 04, 2016 Jkt 238001 the date, 8.2.93 identified on each bag. No comparison has been found so far. The human remains were identified as two adults of indeterminate sex and were identified as Native American based on osteological metric and nonmetric analysis. One individual shows evidence of burning. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Possibly in 1907, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Channel Islands, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara Counties, CA. This collection was donated to the Catalina Island Museum by Loring L. Bigelow in 2009. Loring Bigelow acquired the human remains from his father Lewis Bigelow who had received the human remains as a gift in 1907 from Orrin Weston, brother of Ben Weston (a Catalina Island rancher-sheep grazer). At that time Orrin Weston stated that he picked up the human remains on one of the Channel Islands while touring on their yacht. The human remains were identified as two adults, one male and one female, of Native American ancestry based on osteological metric and nonmetric analysis. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. From 1915 to 1928, human remains representing, at minimum, 194 individuals were removed from San Nicolas Island, Santa Catalina Island, and San Clemente Islands in Los Angeles County, CA, from San Miguel Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, as well as purchased from a number of shell mounds located within the Sacramento Valley including Kings Mound, Johnston’s Mound, Auburn Mound, and Vacaville Mound located in Solano, Placer, and Sacramento Counties. The Glidden Collection was purchased by the Catalina Museum Society in 1962, and became the foundation for the Catalina Island Museum’s archeological collections. Based on photographs and journals, now held within the Catalina Island Museum’s archives, hundreds of burials and thousands of objects were removed by Glidden from Santa Catalina, San Clemente, San Nicolas, and San Miguel Islands between 1919 and 1928. A majority of the collection was amassed under the sponsorship of the Gustav Heye Foundation located in New York. After the patronage with the Heye Foundation ended by 1923, Glidden built his own museum. A portion of the Museum of the American Indian of the Channel Islands opened in Avalon in 1926, with the human remains and cultural materials not sent to the Heye Foundation or to Chicago’s Field PO 00000 Frm 00089 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 19637 Museum. Glidden continued to add to his collections through additional excavations on Catalina Island. Glidden also added to his collection by purchasing human remains and other objects from dealers located around the country, with documentation identifying several as coming from a number of mounds from Sacramento Valley. The cultural affiliation of the human remains and cultural items from the Glidden collection has been complicated at best. Although Glidden used a basic sequential numbering system to briefly describe his finds in his excavation journals, these numbers were not transferred to the human remains, objects or photos that he took. As a result, linking the physical human remains and burial objects to its original provenience is impossible. We can only surmise that these items could be affiliated with Tongva or Chumash based on the locations of the island within each tribal territory. However, invoices and letters particularly between Glidden and Smith’s Coin and Curio Company located in Sacramento, identifies that Glidden ordered, paid for, and received human remains and artifacts. In his letters to Glidden, proprietor Carl Smith states that the human remains and other items came from a number of shell mounds located within the Sacramento Valley including Kings Mound, Johnston’s Mound, Auburn Mound, and Vacaville Mound. There are no marks or data that identify provenience with specific human remains or items within the Glidden Collection. Further complicating the situation, correspondence between Glidden and potential collectors shows that Glidden sold some of his collections. During osteological analysis of the human remains, numerous nonNative American ethnicities have been identified including individuals of European, African, and Asian descent. Human remains of non-native ancestry are not included in this notice. There are a minimum of 194 individuals that can be identified to Native American ancestry based on metric and nonmetric analysis, including 176 adults (of which 89 can be distinguished as female and 82 male) and 18 sub-adults, of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At the time of the excavation and removal of these human remains, the land from which the human remains were removed was not the tribal land of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization. In 2015, the Catalina Island Museum consulted with all Indian tribes who are recognized as E:\FR\FM\05APN1.SGM 05APN1 19638 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 65 / Tuesday, April 5, 2016 / Notices aboriginal to the area from which these Native American human remains were removed. These tribes are Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria, Wilton Rancheria, California, and Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, California. Since none of the human remains can be individually distinguished as being from a particular community, the Catalina Island Museum agreed to transfer control of the human remains to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the Catalina Island Museum Officials of the Catalina Island Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American ancestry based on metric and non-metric osteological analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 201 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(2)(i), the disposition of the human remains may be to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Michael DeMarsche, Ph.D., Catalina Island Museum, 1 Casino Way, Casino Building, P.O. Box 366, Avalon, CA 90704, telephone (310) 510–2416, email director@ catalinamuseum.org, by May 5, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed. The Catalina Island Museum is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria, Wilton Rancheria, California, and Yocha Dehe VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:18 Apr 04, 2016 Jkt 238001 Wintun Nation, California that this notice has been published. Dated: March 10, 2016. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–07764 Filed 4–4–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Public Disclosure Bureau of Reclamation National Park Service [RR02013000, XXXR5537F3, RX.19871110.1000000] Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Adoption of a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Page, Arizona Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension. AGENCY: The Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Reclamation and the National Park Service, is extending the public comment period for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Adoption of a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam to Monday, May 9, 2016. The Notice of Availability and Notice of Public Meetings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement was published in the Federal Register on January 8, 2016 (81 FR 963). The public comment period for the Draft EIS was originally scheduled to end on Thursday, April 7, 2016. DATES: Comments on the Draft EIS will be accepted until close of business on Monday, May 9, 2016. ADDRESSES: You may submit written comments by the following methods: • Web site: http:// parkplanning.nps.gov/LTEMPEIS. • Mail: Glen Canyon Dam LTEMP Draft EIS, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue—EVS/240, Argonne, Illinois 60439. Comments will not be accepted by facsimile, email, or in any other way than those specified above. Bulk comments in any format (hard copy or electronic) submitted on behalf of others will not be accepted. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Katrina Grantz, Chief, Adaptive Management Group, Bureau of Reclamation, kgrantz@usbr.gov, 801– SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00090 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 524–3635; or Mr. Rob Billerbeck, National Park Service, Rob_P_ Billerbeck@nps.gov, 303–987–6789. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In response to several requests for an extension, the Bureau of Reclamation and the National Park Service are extending the close of the public comment period for the Draft EIS to Monday, May 9, 2016. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: March 30, 2016. Jennifer Gimbel, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary—Water and Science. Michael Bean, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary—Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 2016–07761 Filed 4–4–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4332–90–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 701–TA–533 (Final)] Polyethylene Terephthalate Resin From Oman; Termination of Investigation United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: On March 14, 2016, the Department of Commerce published notice in the Federal Register of a negative final determination of subsidies in connection with the subject investigation concerning polyethylene terephthalate resin from Oman (81 FR 13321). Accordingly, the countervailing duty investigation concerning polyethylene terephthalate resin from Oman (Investigation No. 701–TA–533 (Final)) is terminated. DATES: Effective Date: March 14, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joanna Lo (202–205–1888), Office of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. Hearingimpaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\05APN1.SGM 05APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 65 (Tuesday, April 5, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 19636-19638]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-07764]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-20590; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Catalina Island Museum, Avalon, 
CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Catalina Island Museum has completed an inventory of human 
remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural 
affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe 
or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish 
to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request to the Catalina Island Museum. If no additional 
requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to 
the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this 
notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to the Catalina 
Island Museum at the address in this notice by May 5, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Michael DeMarsche, Ph.D., Catalina Island Museum, 1 Casino 
Way, Casino Building, P.O. Box 366, Avalon, CA 90704, telephone (310) 
510-2416, email director@catalinamuseum.org.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Catalina Island Museum, Avalon, CA. The human 
remains were removed from Los Angeles, Santa Barbara Counties, CA and 
potentially Solano, Placer, and Sacramento Counties, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative

[[Page 19637]]

responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 
10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility 
of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the 
Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not 
responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Catalina 
Island Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives 
of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California; United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn 
Rancheria of California; Wilton Rancheria, California; Yocha Dehe 
Wintun Nation, California (previously listed as the Rumsey Indian 
Rancheria of Wintun Indians of California, and the following 
nonfederally recognized Indian groups: the Ti'at Society and the 
Traditional Council of Pimu.

History and Description of the Remains

    In October 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from Avalon, Los Angeles County, CA. 
Collection 61.322 consists of a human crania and mandible that were 
donated by the Santa Catalina Island Co. The human remains were found 
along with a notecard that stated, ``found in patio of Pavilion Lodge, 
Avalon, Calif. October 11, 1960.'' There is no information to assume 
they were excavated from the property. Collection 61.323 consists of an 
incomplete set of human remains donated by the Santa Catalina Island 
Co. that also may have been removed from the Pavilion Lodge Hotel in 
Avalon. There is no information to assume they were excavated from the 
property. The three adults (2 female and 1 male) were identified as 
Native American based on osteological metric and non-metric analysis. 
No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary 
object is an abalone shell found with the human remains identified as 
#61.323.
    At an unknown time, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from an unknown location, presumably Santa 
Catalina Island, Los Angeles, CA. This collection of human remains was 
found within the Catalina Island Museum's human remains collection when 
it returned from University of California Santa Barbara in 2010. 
Unfortunately no documentation could be located to further our 
understanding of the location and date acquired. There were three bags 
of human remains with only the date, 8.2.93 identified on each bag. No 
comparison has been found so far. The human remains were identified as 
two adults of indeterminate sex and were identified as Native American 
based on osteological metric and non-metric analysis. One individual 
shows evidence of burning. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Possibly in 1907, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from the Channel Islands, Los Angeles and 
Santa Barbara Counties, CA. This collection was donated to the Catalina 
Island Museum by Loring L. Bigelow in 2009. Loring Bigelow acquired the 
human remains from his father Lewis Bigelow who had received the human 
remains as a gift in 1907 from Orrin Weston, brother of Ben Weston (a 
Catalina Island rancher-sheep grazer). At that time Orrin Weston stated 
that he picked up the human remains on one of the Channel Islands while 
touring on their yacht. The human remains were identified as two 
adults, one male and one female, of Native American ancestry based on 
osteological metric and non-metric analysis. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    From 1915 to 1928, human remains representing, at minimum, 194 
individuals were removed from San Nicolas Island, Santa Catalina 
Island, and San Clemente Islands in Los Angeles County, CA, from San 
Miguel Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, as well as purchased from a 
number of shell mounds located within the Sacramento Valley including 
Kings Mound, Johnston's Mound, Auburn Mound, and Vacaville Mound 
located in Solano, Placer, and Sacramento Counties. The Glidden 
Collection was purchased by the Catalina Museum Society in 1962, and 
became the foundation for the Catalina Island Museum's archeological 
collections. Based on photographs and journals, now held within the 
Catalina Island Museum's archives, hundreds of burials and thousands of 
objects were removed by Glidden from Santa Catalina, San Clemente, San 
Nicolas, and San Miguel Islands between 1919 and 1928. A majority of 
the collection was amassed under the sponsorship of the Gustav Heye 
Foundation located in New York. After the patronage with the Heye 
Foundation ended by 1923, Glidden built his own museum. A portion of 
the Museum of the American Indian of the Channel Islands opened in 
Avalon in 1926, with the human remains and cultural materials not sent 
to the Heye Foundation or to Chicago's Field Museum. Glidden continued 
to add to his collections through additional excavations on Catalina 
Island. Glidden also added to his collection by purchasing human 
remains and other objects from dealers located around the country, with 
documentation identifying several as coming from a number of mounds 
from Sacramento Valley. The cultural affiliation of the human remains 
and cultural items from the Glidden collection has been complicated at 
best. Although Glidden used a basic sequential numbering system to 
briefly describe his finds in his excavation journals, these numbers 
were not transferred to the human remains, objects or photos that he 
took. As a result, linking the physical human remains and burial 
objects to its original provenience is impossible. We can only surmise 
that these items could be affiliated with Tongva or Chumash based on 
the locations of the island within each tribal territory. However, 
invoices and letters particularly between Glidden and Smith's Coin and 
Curio Company located in Sacramento, identifies that Glidden ordered, 
paid for, and received human remains and artifacts. In his letters to 
Glidden, proprietor Carl Smith states that the human remains and other 
items came from a number of shell mounds located within the Sacramento 
Valley including Kings Mound, Johnston's Mound, Auburn Mound, and 
Vacaville Mound. There are no marks or data that identify provenience 
with specific human remains or items within the Glidden Collection. 
Further complicating the situation, correspondence between Glidden and 
potential collectors shows that Glidden sold some of his collections. 
During osteological analysis of the human remains, numerous non-Native 
American ethnicities have been identified including individuals of 
European, African, and Asian descent. Human remains of non-native 
ancestry are not included in this notice. There are a minimum of 194 
individuals that can be identified to Native American ancestry based on 
metric and non-metric analysis, including 176 adults (of which 89 can 
be distinguished as female and 82 male) and 18 sub-adults, of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    At the time of the excavation and removal of these human remains, 
the land from which the human remains were removed was not the tribal 
land of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization. In 2015, the 
Catalina Island Museum consulted with all Indian tribes who are 
recognized as

[[Page 19638]]

aboriginal to the area from which these Native American human remains 
were removed. These tribes are Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission 
Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, United Auburn Indian 
Community of the Auburn Rancheria, Wilton Rancheria, California, and 
Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, California. Since none of the human remains 
can be individually distinguished as being from a particular community, 
the Catalina Island Museum agreed to transfer control of the human 
remains to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California.

Determinations Made by the Catalina Island Museum

    Officials of the Catalina Island Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American ancestry based on metric and non-
metric osteological analysis.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 201 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian tribe.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(2)(i), the disposition of the 
human remains may be to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of 
the Santa Ynez Reservation, California.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains should submit a written request with information 
in support of the request to Michael DeMarsche, Ph.D., Catalina Island 
Museum, 1 Casino Way, Casino Building, P.O. Box 366, Avalon, CA 90704, 
telephone (310) 510-2416, email director@catalinamuseum.org, by May 5, 
2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash 
Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed.
    The Catalina Island Museum is responsible for notifying the Santa 
Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California, United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria, 
Wilton Rancheria, California, and Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, California 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 10, 2016.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-07764 Filed 4-4-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-50-P