National Poison Prevention Week, 2016, 15609-15612 [2016-06793]

Download as PDF Vol. 81 Wednesday, No. 56 March 23, 2016 Part II The President asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with D0 Proclamation 9407—National Poison Prevention Week, 2016 VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:21 Mar 22, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\23MRD0.SGM 23MRD0 asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with D0 VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:21 Mar 22, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\23MRD0.SGM 23MRD0 15611 Presidential Documents Federal Register Vol. 81, No. 56 Wednesday, March 23, 2016 Title 3— Proclamation 9407 of March 18, 2016 The President National Poison Prevention Week, 2016 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As the leading cause of accidental injury death in the United States, poisonings can harm people of all ages and from all walks of life. More than 90 percent of poisonings occur inside the home, and most are treatable and preventable. During National Poison Prevention Week, we work to ensure the safety of our homes and communities by learning of the dangers of poison and striving to prevent poisonings. The most common sources of poisoning in young children are items typically found at home, including cleaning, cosmetic, and personal care products, as well as over-the-counter and prescription medications. Although children are more likely to be poisoned, adults—who are most commonly poisoned by cleaning products, or by the improper use of sedatives, antidepressants, pain relievers, or prescription drugs—are far more likely to die from poison exposure. With diligence and caution, these tragedies can be avoided. Make sure household products are kept in their original bottles and away from children, and never mix such products together. Some poisonous materials and vapors are harder to identify, including carbon monoxide—a colorless and odorless, yet very dangerous, gas. Everyone should have carbon monoxide detectors in their home, use them properly, and get them tested regularly. Medications should always be kept out of the reach of children, and whether prescription or over-the-counter, all drugs should be taken safely and in accordance with guidance on the label or as prescribed and instructed by healthcare professionals. To learn more about keeping you and your family safe from poison, visit www.PoisonHelp.HRSA.gov, and for more information on how to safely dispose of drugs, including by participating in the National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on April 30, visit www.DEAdiversion.USDOJ.gov. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with D0 We can all play a role in preventing poisoning tragedies from occurring. Every individual can take steps on their own to make their homes safer and to learn of appropriate actions to take in the event of a poisoning incident. If you believe someone has been poisoned, immediately call the Poison Help line at 1–800–222–1222. By coming together to secure potentially-toxic materials in our homes and communities and by educating our friends and family on methods of prevention, we can help ensure no person is deprived of a full and healthy life due to poisoning. To encourage Americans to learn more about the dangers of accidental poisonings and to take appropriate preventative measures, the Congress, by joint resolution approved September 26, 1961, as amended (75 Stat. 681) has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the third week of March each year as ‘‘National Poison Prevention Week.’’ NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim March 20 through March 26, 2016, as National Poison Prevention Week. I call upon all Americans to observe this week by taking actions to protect their families from hazardous household materials and misuse of prescription medicines. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:21 Mar 22, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\23MRD0.SGM 23MRD0 15612 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 56 / Wednesday, March 23, 2016 / Presidential Documents IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth. [FR Doc. 2016–06793 Filed 3–22–16; 11:15 am] VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:21 Mar 22, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\23MRD0.SGM 23MRD0 OB#1.EPS</GPH> asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with D0 Billing code 3295–F6–P

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 56 (Wednesday, March 23, 2016)]
[Presidential Documents]
[Pages 15609-15612]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-06793]



[[Page 15609]]

Vol. 81

Wednesday,

No. 56

March 23, 2016

Part II





The President





-----------------------------------------------------------------------



Proclamation 9407--National Poison Prevention Week, 2016


                        Presidential Documents 



Federal Register / Vol. 81 , No. 56 / Wednesday, March 23, 2016 / 
Presidential Documents

___________________________________________________________________

Title 3--
The President

[[Page 15611]]

                Proclamation 9407 of March 18, 2016

                
National Poison Prevention Week, 2016

                By the President of the United States of America

                A Proclamation

                As the leading cause of accidental injury death in the 
                United States, poisonings can harm people of all ages 
                and from all walks of life. More than 90 percent of 
                poisonings occur inside the home, and most are 
                treatable and preventable. During National Poison 
                Prevention Week, we work to ensure the safety of our 
                homes and communities by learning of the dangers of 
                poison and striving to prevent poisonings.

                The most common sources of poisoning in young children 
                are items typically found at home, including cleaning, 
                cosmetic, and personal care products, as well as over-
                the-counter and prescription medications. Although 
                children are more likely to be poisoned, adults--who 
                are most commonly poisoned by cleaning products, or by 
                the improper use of sedatives, antidepressants, pain 
                relievers, or prescription drugs--are far more likely 
                to die from poison exposure.

                With diligence and caution, these tragedies can be 
                avoided. Make sure household products are kept in their 
                original bottles and away from children, and never mix 
                such products together. Some poisonous materials and 
                vapors are harder to identify, including carbon 
                monoxide--a colorless and odorless, yet very dangerous, 
                gas. Everyone should have carbon monoxide detectors in 
                their home, use them properly, and get them tested 
                regularly. Medications should always be kept out of the 
                reach of children, and whether prescription or over-
                the-counter, all drugs should be taken safely and in 
                accordance with guidance on the label or as prescribed 
                and instructed by healthcare professionals. To learn 
                more about keeping you and your family safe from 
                poison, visit www.PoisonHelp.HRSA.gov, and for more 
                information on how to safely dispose of drugs, 
                including by participating in the National Prescription 
                Drug Take-Back Day on April 30, visit 
                www.DEAdiversion.USDOJ.gov.

                We can all play a role in preventing poisoning 
                tragedies from occurring. Every individual can take 
                steps on their own to make their homes safer and to 
                learn of appropriate actions to take in the event of a 
                poisoning incident. If you believe someone has been 
                poisoned, immediately call the Poison Help line at 1-
                800-222-1222. By coming together to secure potentially-
                toxic materials in our homes and communities and by 
                educating our friends and family on methods of 
                prevention, we can help ensure no person is deprived of 
                a full and healthy life due to poisoning.

                To encourage Americans to learn more about the dangers 
                of accidental poisonings and to take appropriate 
                preventative measures, the Congress, by joint 
                resolution approved September 26, 1961, as amended (75 
                Stat. 681) has authorized and requested the President 
                to issue a proclamation designating the third week of 
                March each year as ``National Poison Prevention Week.''

                NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the 
                United States of America, do hereby proclaim March 20 
                through March 26, 2016, as National Poison Prevention 
                Week. I call upon all Americans to observe this week by 
                taking actions to protect their families from hazardous 
                household materials and misuse of prescription 
                medicines.

[[Page 15612]]

                IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
                eighteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord two 
                thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United 
                States of America the two hundred and fortieth.
                
                
                    (Presidential Sig.)

[FR Doc. 2016-06793
Filed 3-22-16; 11:15 am]
Billing code 3295-F6-P