Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery Plan for the Central California Distinct Population Segment of the California Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma californiense), 12930-12931 [2016-05492]

Download as PDF 12930 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 48 / Friday, March 11, 2016 / Notices (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) The accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (3) Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. HUD encourages not only program participants but interested persons to submit comments regarding the information collection requirements in this proposal. Comments must be received by May 10, 2016 to www.regulations.gov as provided under the ADDRESSES section of this notice. Comments must refer to the proposal by name and docket number (FR–5173–N– 02). Following consideration of public comments submitted in response to this notice, HUD will submit for further public comment, for a period of 30 days, a version of the Assessment Tool that reflects consideration of the public comments received in response to this notice. Dated: March 7, 2016. George D. Williams, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy, Legislative Initiatives and Outreach. [FR Doc. 2016–05521 Filed 3–10–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4210–67–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R8–ES–2015–N229; FXES11130000– 156–FF08E00000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery Plan for the Central California Distinct Population Segment of the California Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma californiense) Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the Draft Recovery Plan for the Central California Distinct Population Segment of the California SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:17 Mar 10, 2016 Jkt 238001 tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) (Central California tiger salamander) for public review and comment. This draft recovery plan includes delisting objectives and criteria, and specific actions necessary to remove the species from the Federal Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. DATES: We must receive any comments on this revised draft recovery plan on or before May 10, 2016. ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of this draft recovery plan from our Web site at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/ species/recovery-plans.html. Alternatively, you may contact the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2800 Cottage Way, Suite W–2605, Sacramento, CA 95825 (telephone 916– 414–6700). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jennifer Norris, Field Supervisor, at the above street address or telephone number (see ADDRESSES). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Recovery of endangered or threatened animals and plants to the point where they are again secure, self-sustaining members of their ecosystems is a primary goal of our endangered species program and the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Recovery means improvement of the status of listed species to the point at which listing is no longer appropriate under the criteria specified in section 4(a)(1) of the Act. The Act requires the development of recovery plans for listed species, unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. The Central California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) was federally listed as a threatened species on August 4, 2004 (69 FR 47212). Central California tiger salamanders are endemic to the San Joaquin-Sacramento River valleys, bordering foothills, and coastal valleys of Central California and inhabit primarily annual grasslands and open woodlands. California tiger salamanders spend the majority of their lives underground in small mammal burrows, although ponds play an equally important role because they are required for breeding. Breeding sites are typically fish-free ephemeral ponds that fill during winter and dry by summer. Historically, California tiger salamanders utilized vernal pools as breeding sites, but the species now also commonly breeds in livestock ponds. PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 The loss and subsequent fragmentation of habitat is the primary threat to the Central California tiger salamander. Habitat loss has primarily occurred from urban expansion and agricultural conversion. Habitat fragmentation restricts dispersal and isolates populations of the Central California tiger salamander, thereby increasing the likelihood of inbreeding, decreasing fitness, and reducing genetic diversity. In addition to habitat loss, Central California tiger salamanders are subject to the cumulative effects of a number of other existing and potential threats, including: Hybridization with non-native barred tiger salamanders, road mortality, climate change, contaminants, disease, and predation by non-native species. Recovery Plan Goals The purpose of a recovery plan is to provide a framework for the recovery of species so that protection under the Act is no longer necessary. A recovery plan includes scientific information about the species and provides criteria that enable us to gauge whether downlisting or delisting the species is warranted. Furthermore, recovery plans help guide our recovery efforts by describing actions we consider necessary for each species’ conservation and by estimating time and costs for implementing needed recovery measures. The goal of this draft recovery plan is to improve the status of Central California tiger salamander so that it can be delisted. To meet the recovery goal of delisting, the following objectives have been identified: 1. Secure self-sustaining populations of Central California tiger salamander throughout their full range, ensuring conservation of genetic variability and diverse habitat types (e.g., variation in elevation and precipitation). 2. Ameliorate or eliminate the threats that caused the species to be listed, and any future threats. 3. Restore and conserve a healthy ecosystem supportive of Central California tiger salamander populations. The strategy to recover the Central California tiger salamander focuses on alleviating the threat of habitat loss and fragmentation in order to increase population resiliency (ensure a large enough population to withstand stochastic events) and redundancy (a sufficient number of populations to ensure the species can withstand catastrophic events). Recovery of this species can be achieved by addressing the conservation of remaining aquatic and upland habitat that provides essential connectivity, reduces fragmentation, and sufficiently buffers E:\FR\FM\11MRN1.SGM 11MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 48 / Friday, March 11, 2016 / Notices against encroaching development and intensive agricultural land uses. Appropriate management of these areas will also reduce mortality by addressing non-habitat related threats, including those from non-native and hybrid tiger salamanders, other non-native species, contaminants, disease, and road mortality. Research and monitoring should be undertaken to determine the extent of known threats, identify new threats, and reduce them to the extent possible. As the Central California tiger salamander meets delisting criteria, we will review its status and consider it for removal from the Federal Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey [GX16ED00CPN00] Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Comments on the Earth Explorer User Registration Service U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a new information collection, Earth Explorer User Registration Service. AGENCY: We invite written comments on the draft recovery plan. All comments received by the date specified in DATES will be considered in development of a final recovery plan for the Central California tiger salamander. You may submit written comments and information by mail or in person to the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office (see ADDRESSES). We (the U.S. Geological Survey) are notifying the public that we have submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) the information collection request (ICR) described below. To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) and as part of our continuing efforts to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, we invite the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on this ICR. DATES: To ensure that your comments on this ICR are considered, we must receive them on or before April 11, 2016. Public Availability of Comments ADDRESSES: Public Comments Solicited Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority We developed this draft recovery plan under the authority of section 4(f) of the Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). We publish this notice under section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Alexandra Pitts, Acting Regional Director, Pacific Southwest Region. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [FR Doc. 2016–05492 Filed 3–10–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P SUMMARY: Please submit written comments on this information collection directly to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention: Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior, via email: (OIRA_SUBMISSION@omb.eop.gov); or by fax (202) 395–5806; and identify your submission with ‘OMB Control Number 1028–NEW Earth Explorer User Registration Service’. Please also forward a copy of your comments and suggestions on this information collection to the Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Geological Survey, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive MS 807, Reston, VA 20192 (mail); (703) 648–7195 (fax); or gs-info_collections@ usgs.gov (email). Please reference ‘OMB Information Collection 1028–NEW: Earth Explorer User Registration Service’ in all correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ryan Longhenry, Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 47914 252nd St., Sioux Falls, SD 57198 (mail); 605– 594–6179 (phone); or rlonghenry@ usgs.gov (email). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The USGS proposes to collect general demographic information about public users that download products from the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:56 Mar 10, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00074 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 12931 USGS using Earth Explorer (EE) application. This information is used to help address reports to Congress, OMB and DOI management with planning public uses of Landsat and other remote sensing data. The most common uses of these data are used to justify the maintenance and the free distribution of the USGS land remote sensing data. EE also stores information about users that download source code products, Global Visualization Viewer (GloVis) for example. The information collected in the database includes the names, affiliations, addresses, email address and telephone numbers of individuals. The information is gathered to facilitate the reporting of demographic data for use of the EE Application. Demographic data is also used to make decisions on future functional requirements within the system. Earth Explorer is a Web application that enables users to find, preview, and download or order digital data published by the U.S. Geological Survey. There are more than 300 USGS Datasets available from the site. To download or order products from EE, users must register with the EE system. The information is stored on an internal encrypted database. The data is provided by the customer and utilized to notify the customer of data ready for download. If downloads are unsuccessful, the customer is contacted to provide updated information. In addition, EE requires certain fields to be completed such as name, address, city and zip code before an account can be established and an order can be submitted. EE does not derive new data and does not create new data through aggregation. Personal information is not used as search criteria. Access to the information uses the least privileged access methodology. Authorized individuals with specifically granted access to the Privacy Act data can retrieve only by account number or order number Personal data is encrypted while stored in the Database. II. Data OMB Control Number: 1028–NEW. Title: Earth Explorer User Registration Service. Type of Request: Approval of new information collection. Respondent Obligation: Required to obtain or retain a benefit. Frequency of Collection: The information is collected at the time of registration and is only updated by the individual. Updates to the information are accomplished by the individual when they feel the need to update. Occasions’ that user might want to E:\FR\FM\11MRN1.SGM 11MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 48 (Friday, March 11, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 12930-12931]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-05492]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R8-ES-2015-N229; FXES11130000-156-FF08E00000]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery 
Plan for the Central California Distinct Population Segment of the 
California Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma californiense)

AGENCY:  Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION:  Notice of document availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY:  We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the 
availability of the Draft Recovery Plan for the Central California 
Distinct Population Segment of the California tiger salamander 
(Ambystoma californiense) (Central California tiger salamander) for 
public review and comment. This draft recovery plan includes delisting 
objectives and criteria, and specific actions necessary to remove the 
species from the Federal Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife 
and Plants.

DATES: We must receive any comments on this revised draft recovery plan 
on or before May 10, 2016.

ADDRESSES:  You may obtain a copy of this draft recovery plan from our 
Web site at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/recovery-plans.html. 
Alternatively, you may contact the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office, 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2800 Cottage Way, Suite W-2605, 
Sacramento, CA 95825 (telephone 916-414-6700).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Jennifer Norris, Field Supervisor, at 
the above street address or telephone number (see ADDRESSES).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    Recovery of endangered or threatened animals and plants to the 
point where they are again secure, self-sustaining members of their 
ecosystems is a primary goal of our endangered species program and the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et 
seq.). Recovery means improvement of the status of listed species to 
the point at which listing is no longer appropriate under the criteria 
specified in section 4(a)(1) of the Act. The Act requires the 
development of recovery plans for listed species, unless such a plan 
would not promote the conservation of a particular species.
    The Central California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) 
was federally listed as a threatened species on August 4, 2004 (69 FR 
47212). Central California tiger salamanders are endemic to the San 
Joaquin-Sacramento River valleys, bordering foothills, and coastal 
valleys of Central California and inhabit primarily annual grasslands 
and open woodlands. California tiger salamanders spend the majority of 
their lives underground in small mammal burrows, although ponds play an 
equally important role because they are required for breeding. Breeding 
sites are typically fish-free ephemeral ponds that fill during winter 
and dry by summer. Historically, California tiger salamanders utilized 
vernal pools as breeding sites, but the species now also commonly 
breeds in livestock ponds.
    The loss and subsequent fragmentation of habitat is the primary 
threat to the Central California tiger salamander. Habitat loss has 
primarily occurred from urban expansion and agricultural conversion. 
Habitat fragmentation restricts dispersal and isolates populations of 
the Central California tiger salamander, thereby increasing the 
likelihood of inbreeding, decreasing fitness, and reducing genetic 
diversity. In addition to habitat loss, Central California tiger 
salamanders are subject to the cumulative effects of a number of other 
existing and potential threats, including: Hybridization with non-
native barred tiger salamanders, road mortality, climate change, 
contaminants, disease, and predation by non-native species.

Recovery Plan Goals

    The purpose of a recovery plan is to provide a framework for the 
recovery of species so that protection under the Act is no longer 
necessary. A recovery plan includes scientific information about the 
species and provides criteria that enable us to gauge whether 
downlisting or delisting the species is warranted. Furthermore, 
recovery plans help guide our recovery efforts by describing actions we 
consider necessary for each species' conservation and by estimating 
time and costs for implementing needed recovery measures.
    The goal of this draft recovery plan is to improve the status of 
Central California tiger salamander so that it can be delisted. To meet 
the recovery goal of delisting, the following objectives have been 
identified:
    1. Secure self-sustaining populations of Central California tiger 
salamander throughout their full range, ensuring conservation of 
genetic variability and diverse habitat types (e.g., variation in 
elevation and precipitation).
    2. Ameliorate or eliminate the threats that caused the species to 
be listed, and any future threats.
    3. Restore and conserve a healthy ecosystem supportive of Central 
California tiger salamander populations.
    The strategy to recover the Central California tiger salamander 
focuses on alleviating the threat of habitat loss and fragmentation in 
order to increase population resiliency (ensure a large enough 
population to withstand stochastic events) and redundancy (a sufficient 
number of populations to ensure the species can withstand catastrophic 
events). Recovery of this species can be achieved by addressing the 
conservation of remaining aquatic and upland habitat that provides 
essential connectivity, reduces fragmentation, and sufficiently buffers

[[Page 12931]]

against encroaching development and intensive agricultural land uses. 
Appropriate management of these areas will also reduce mortality by 
addressing non-habitat related threats, including those from non-native 
and hybrid tiger salamanders, other non-native species, contaminants, 
disease, and road mortality. Research and monitoring should be 
undertaken to determine the extent of known threats, identify new 
threats, and reduce them to the extent possible. As the Central 
California tiger salamander meets delisting criteria, we will review 
its status and consider it for removal from the Federal Lists of 
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants.

Public Comments Solicited

    We invite written comments on the draft recovery plan. All comments 
received by the date specified in DATES will be considered in 
development of a final recovery plan for the Central California tiger 
salamander. You may submit written comments and information by mail or 
in person to the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office (see ADDRESSES).

Public Availability of Comments

    Before including your address, phone number, email address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

Authority

    We developed this draft recovery plan under the authority of 
section 4(f) of the Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). We publish this notice 
under section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended 
(16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.).

Alexandra Pitts,
Acting Regional Director, Pacific Southwest Region.
[FR Doc. 2016-05492 Filed 3-10-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4333-15-P