Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County; Revisions To Establish Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Programs, 12595-12599 [2016-05162]

Download as PDF jstallworth on DSK7TPTVN1PROD with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 47 / Thursday, March 10, 2016 / Rules and Regulations application of those requirements would be inconsistent with the CAA; and • Does not provide EPA with the discretionary authority to address, as appropriate, disproportionate human health or environmental effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). In addition, the SIP is not approved to apply on any Indian reservation land or in any other area where EPA or an Indian tribe has demonstrated that a tribe has jurisdiction. In those areas of Indian country, the rule does not have tribal implications and will not impose substantial direct costs on tribal governments or preempt tribal law as specified by Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the United States. EPA will submit a report containing this action and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. A major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. This action is not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). Under section 307(b)(1) of the CAA, petitions for judicial review of this action must be filed in the United States Court of Appeals for the appropriate circuit by May 9, 2016. Filing a petition for reconsideration by the Administrator of this final rule does not affect the finality of this action for the purposes of judicial review nor does it extend the time within which a petition for judicial review may be filed, and shall not postpone the effectiveness of such rule or action. Parties with objections to this direct final rule are encouraged to file a comment in response to the parallel notice of proposed rulemaking for this action published in the proposed rules section of today’s Federal Register, rather than file an immediate petition for judicial review of this direct final rule, so that EPA can withdraw this direct final rule and address the comment in the proposed rulemaking. This action may not be challenged later in proceedings to enforce its requirements. (See section 307(b)(2).) VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:38 Mar 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 12595 List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Carbon monoxide, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County. These revisions establish Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Programs. The EPA is approving these revisions pursuant to section 110 and section 507(a) of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Dated: February 22, 2016. Robert A. Kaplan, Acting Regional Administrator, Region 5. This rule is effective on May 9, 2016 without further notice unless EPA receives relevant adverse comments by April 11, 2016. If EPA receives such comments, EPA will publish a timely withdrawal in the Federal Register informing the public that the rule will not take effect. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket No. EPA–R06– OAR–2014–0642, at http:// www.regulations.gov or via email to walser.john@epa.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Once submitted, comments cannot be edited or removed from Regulations.gov. The EPA may publish any comment received to its public docket. Do not submit electronically any information you consider to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Multimedia submissions (audio, video, etc.) must be accompanied by a written comment. The written comment is considered the official comment and should include discussion of all points you wish to make. The EPA will generally not consider comments or comment contents located outside of the primary submission (i.e. on the web, cloud, or other file sharing system). For additional submission methods, please contact John Walser, 214–665–7128, walser.john@epa.gov. For the full EPA public comment policy, information about CBI or multimedia submissions, and general guidance on making effective comments, please visit http:// www2.epa.gov/dockets/commentingepa-dockets. Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the www.regulations.gov index and in hard copy at EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Suite 700, Dallas, Texas. While all documents in the docket are listed in the index, some information may be publicly available only at the hard copy location (e.g., copyrighted material), and some may not be publicly available at either location (e.g., CBI). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. John Walser (6PD–L), (214) 665–7128, walser.john@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Throughout this document, ‘‘we,’’ ‘‘us,’’ and ‘‘our’’ means EPA. 40 CFR part 52 is amended as follows: PART 52—APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS 1. The authority citation for part 52 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. 2. Section 52.1885 is amended by adding paragraph (mm) to read as follows: ■ § 52.1885 Control Strategy: Ozone. * * * * * (mm) On July 18, 2014, Ohio submitted 2008 volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen emission inventories for the ClevelandAkron-Lorain and Columbus ozone nonattainment areas and for the Ohio portion of the Cincinnati, OhioKentucky-Indiana ozone nonattainment areas as revisions to the Ohio state implementation plan. The documented emission inventories are approved as a revision of the state’s implementation plan, meeting emission inventory requirements for the 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standard. [FR Doc. 2016–05273 Filed 3–9–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA–R06–OAR–2014–0642; FRL–9943–43– Region 6] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County; Revisions To Establish Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Programs Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. AGENCY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is approving revisions to the New Mexico State Implementation Plan (SIP) for both the State and SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 DATES: E:\FR\FM\10MRR1.SGM 10MRR1 12596 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 47 / Thursday, March 10, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Table of Contents I. Background A. What is a SIP? B. Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP) II. Overview of the November 5 and November 16, 1992 State Submittals A. New Mexico B. Albuquerque C. General III. Plan Requirements and Our Evaluation A. Small Business Assistance Program B. Ombudsman C. Compliance Assistance Panel (CAP) D. Eligibility E. Section 110(l) IV. Final Action V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Background jstallworth on DSK7TPTVN1PROD with RULES A. What is a SIP? Section 110 of the CAA requires states to develop air pollution regulations and control strategies to ensure that air quality meets the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) established by EPA. The NAAQS are established under section 109 of the CAA and currently address six criteria pollutants: Carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, lead, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide. A SIP is a set of air pollution regulations, control strategies, other means or techniques, and technical analyses developed by the state, to ensure that air quality in the state meets the NAAQS. It is required by section 110 and other provisions of the CAA. A SIP protects air quality primarily by addressing air pollution at its point of origin. SIPs can be extensive, containing state regulations or other enforceable documents, and supporting information such as city and county ordinances, monitoring networks, and modeling demonstrations. Each state must submit any SIP revision to EPA for approval and incorporation into the federally-enforceable SIP. The New Mexico SIP includes a variety of control strategies, including the regulations that outline general provisions applicable to and implemented by the Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County Air Quality Control Board (AQCB). B. Small Business Assistance Program Implementation of the provisions of the CAA, as amended in 1990, requires regulation of many small businesses so that areas may attain and maintain the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) and reduce the emissions of air toxics. Small businesses frequently lack the technical expertise and financial resources necessary to evaluate state regulations and to determine the appropriate mechanisms for compliance. Congress anticipated the VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:38 Mar 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 impact of these requirements on small businesses and, accordingly, required in CAA section 507 that each state submit a SIP revision with plans for establishing a Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Program (Program). A key Program requirement outlined in CAA section 507(a), is the establishment of a Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP) to provide technical and compliance assistance to small businesses. In January 1992, the EPA issued ‘‘Guidelines for the Implementation of Section 507 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments,’’ in order to delineate the Federal and State roles in meeting the new statutory provisions, and as a tool to provide further guidance to states on submitting acceptable SIP revisions. That guidance described the SBAP as the ‘‘core’’ of a state’s Program, because the SBAP is, ‘‘where the actual assistance to small businesses occurs.’’ 1 II. Overview of the November 5 and November 16, 1992 State Submittals A. New Mexico On November 5, 1992, the Governor of New Mexico submitted revisions to the New Mexico SIP to establish the Program. The submittal was adopted by the Environmental Improvement Board (EIB) on October 9, 1992, consistent with the public notice requirements of CAA section 110(l). The revisions established a Program for the State of New Mexico, excluding Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County. The November 5, 1992 revisions to the SIP were in the form of a narrative commitment for full implementation of the Program by November 15, 1994 and a commitment to coincide with the effective date of the State’s operating permit program. The Ombudsman (Director of Strategic Initiatives and Special Projects) is located in the Office of the NMED Secretary and was appointed before November 15, 1994, to represent the interests of small businesses, as they relate to the implementation of Section 507(a)(3) of the CAA. In addition to designating a State Ombudsman to satisfy CAA section 507(a)(3), the State submitted its plans for the creation of a state SBAP. The State explained that the technical component of the SBAP would consist of state technical experts who would respond to requests for assistance from small businesses. The state explained that these technical staff would be 1 U.S. EPA, ‘‘Guidelines for the Implementation of Section 507 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments’’ (January 1992) at vii. PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 located in the Air Quality Bureau’s Planning Section, and would respond to permitting and compliance questions. As part of the SBAP, New Mexico’s submission detailed the adequate mechanisms and procedures that would satisfy the remaining requirements of CAA section 507(a)(1)–(2), (4)–(7). B. Albuquerque On November 16, 1992, The Governor of New Mexico submitted revisions to the New Mexico SIP for Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County. The submittal was adopted by the Air Quality Control Board on October 7, 1992, consistent with the public notice requirements of CAA section 110(l). The revisions establish the Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Program for Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County. The November 16, 1992 revisions to the SIP were in the form of a narrative commitment for full implementation of the SBAP by November 15, 1994 and a commitment to coincide with the effective date of the State’s operating permit program. The Small Business Ombudsman is in the office of the Albuquerque Environmental Health Director (AEHD). The establishment of a SBAP for providing technical and compliance assistance to small businesses was committed to be in the AEHD Air Pollution Control Division’s Planning Section to give small businesses correct technical, permitting and compliance information for all applicable CAA requirements. C. General In an August 28, 2015 letter, the State of New Mexico withdrew the elements of the 1992 SIP pertaining to the Compliance Assistance Panel (CAP), a requirement of CAA section 507(e) that EPA has historically viewed as a required component of the Program. Since the New Mexico legislature created one CAP for both the State and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County, the withdrawal, therefore, applies to both the State and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County.2 Through an administrative oversight, these SIP revisions were not acted upon when submitted. EPA is now moving forward to take action on these revisions as part of our national SIP backlog reduction efforts. 2 August 28, 2015 Letter from Ryan Flynn, Secretary, State of New Mexico Environment Department, to Ron Curry, Regional Administrator for EPA Region 6, to withdraw the CAP from the 1992 SIP submittal. E:\FR\FM\10MRR1.SGM 10MRR1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 47 / Thursday, March 10, 2016 / Rules and Regulations III. Plan Requirements and Our Evaluation Section 507 of the CAA describes three broad sets of requirements: (1) The establishment of a Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP) to provide technical and compliance assistance to small businesses; (2) the establishment of a State Small Business Ombudsman to represent the interests of small business in the regulatory process; and (3) the creation of a Compliance Advisory Panel (CAP) ‘‘on the State level’’ to determine and report on the overall effectiveness of the SBAP. jstallworth on DSK7TPTVN1PROD with RULES A. Small Business Assistance Program The overarching purpose of establishing an SBAP is to provide technical and compliance assistance to small businesses. As interpreted by EPA, CAA section 507(a) sets forth six requirements which must be met by the State in order to have an approvable SBAP.3 The first SBAP requirement is for the State to establish adequate mechanisms for developing, collecting and coordinating information concerning compliance methods and technologies for small business stationary sources, and programs to encourage lawful cooperation among such sources and other persons to further compliance with the CAA.4 The second SBAP requirement is that the State establish adequate mechanisms for assisting small business stationary sources with pollution prevention and accidental release detection and prevention, including providing information concerning alternative technologies, process changes, products and methods of operation that help reduce air pollution.5 The third SBAP requirement is to develop a compliance and technical assistance program for small business stationary sources which assists small businesses in determining applicable requirements and in receiving permits under the Act in a timely and efficient manner.6 The fourth SBAP requirement is to develop adequate mechanisms to assure that small business stationary sources receive notice of their rights under the CAA in such manner and form as to assure reasonably adequate time for such sources to evaluate compliance 3 Notably, section 507(a) sets forth seven requirements, in subsections (1)–(7). The third of these, section 507(a)(3), requires the establishment of an Ombudsman Office—a key Program element. The Ombudsman requirement of section 507(a)(3) is discussed in the next section. 4 See CAA section 507(a)(1). 5 See id. section 507(a)(2). 6 See id. section 507(a)(4). VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:38 Mar 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 methods or final regulation or standards issued under the Act.7 The fifth SBAP requirement is to develop adequate mechanisms for informing small business stationary sources of their obligation under the CAA, including mechanisms for referring such sources to qualified auditors or, at the option of the State, for providing audits of operations of such sources to determine compliance with the CAA.8 The sixth SBAP requirement is to develop procedures for consideration of requests from a small business stationary source for modification of: (A) Any work practice or technological method of compliance; or (B) the schedule of milestones for implementing such work practice or method of compliance preceding any applicable compliance date based on the technological and financial capability of any such small business stationary source.9 The SIP narratives for both the State and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County discuss how their respective SBAPs meet the above requirements, and include further information about how each entity expects to implement and maintain their Programs. Further explanation of our analysis of the adequacy of the submissions with respect to the SBAP requirements can be found in the TSD for this action. B. Ombudsman Section 507(a) also requires states to establish a State Small Business Ombudsman to represent the interests of small businesses in the regulatory process. CAA section 507(a)(3) requires the designation of a State office to serve as the Ombudsman for small business stationary sources. The State has met this requirement by appointing an Ombudsman in the Office of the NMED Secretary in 1992. Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County met this requirement by committing to appoint an Ombudsman in the Office of the Albuquerque Environmental Health Department before the November 15, 1994 statutory deadline. C. Compliance Advisory Panel (CAP) In addition to the SBAP and Ombudsman, CAA section 507 envisions the creation of a Compliance Advisory Panel (CAP) ‘‘on the State level’’ to, among other things, evaluate and report on the overall effectiveness of the SBAP.10 Congress narrowly 7 See id. section 507(a)(5). id. section 507(a)(6). 9 See id. section 507(a)(7). 10 See id. section 507(e)(1). 8 See PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 12597 prescribed the membership of the CAP, including which state officials would be responsible for appointing members representing various interests.11 At the time of the submittal in 1992, the New Mexico program included a statewide CAP that met these stringent requirements, and which New Mexico believed was a required Program element because of EPA’s 1992 Program Guidance. Since that time, however, and after having a CAP in place for over 10 years, the State did not continue to operate a CAP. As mentioned previously, the State withdrew the portions of its SIP submission regarding the CAP in a letter dated August 28, 2015, a copy of which may be found in the docket for this action. Although EPA has historically viewed the CAP as a necessary component of a Program, the Agency no longer believes that to be the case. In CAA section 507(a), Congress directed that EPA ‘‘shall approve’’ a Program if it meets the criteria outlined in section 507(a)(1)–(7). The requirement for the creation of a CAP, located in section 507(e), is not one of those criteria. This distinguishes the CAP from the requirements to designate a state office to serve as Ombudsman or to establish an SBAP, which are criteria for Program approval in CAA section 507(a). Although a State may submit a CAP for inclusion as a component of its Program—and indeed, EPA still believes that CAPs serve an important role in the continued operational success of a Program—Congress, in locating the CAP requirement in section 507(e), envisioned that the requirement to create a CAP would be severable from the Program requirements outlined in section 507(a). Accordingly, New Mexico’s withdrawal of the CAP portion of its SIP submission does not prevent EPA from acting on the remainder of the submission. EPA believes that New Mexico, including Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County, continues to operate a robust SBAP providing the required services to eligible small businesses. Before taking an action that, as here, differs from past guidance or practice, EPA’s internal practices direct Regional Offices to follow a SIP consistency process to ensure consistency in across regional actions. The SIP consistency process was established in 1995 as part of the delegation to Regional Administrators of SIPs and SIP revision approval/disapprovals actions.12 11 See id. section 507(e)(2). Memorandum from William L. Wehrum, Acting Assistant Administrator, to Air Division Directors, Regions I–X (September 7, 2005) 12 See Continued E:\FR\FM\10MRR1.SGM 10MRR1 12598 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 47 / Thursday, March 10, 2016 / Rules and Regulations Pursuant to 40 CFR 56.6(b) and the SIP consistency guidelines, EPA Region 6 followed this process. Pursuant to the SIP consistency process, EPA Region 6 consulted with all other EPA regional offices, the Office of Air and Radiation, and the Office of General Counsel. Region 6 received no objections to this shift in approach. EPA is approving the New Mexico and Albuquerque Small Business Assistance Programs as revised with the withdrawal of the element relating to the CAP. Approval in the SIP will support state and local efforts to maintain their respective Programs. D. Eligibility While not a required Program element, it is also important that the SIP establishes criteria and procedures for determining the eligibility of a source to receive assistance under the Program. Section 507(c)(1) of the CAA defines the term ‘‘small business stationary source’’ as a stationary source that: (a) Is owned or operated by a person who employs 100 or fewer individuals; (b) Is a small business concern as defined in the Small Business Act; (c) Is not a major stationary source; (d) Does not emit 50 tons per year (tpy) or more of any regulated pollutant; and (e) Emits less than 75 tpy of all regulated pollutants. The State of New Mexico has established a mechanism for ascertaining the eligibility of a source to receive assistance under the Program, including an evaluation of a source’s eligibility using the criteria in section 507(c)(1) of the CAA. This mechanism is described in the state’s narrative SIP revision. The State has also provided for exclusion from the small business stationary source definition, after consultation with the EPA and the Small Business Administration Administrator and after providing notice and opportunity for public hearing, of any category or subcategory of sources that the State determines to have sufficient technical and financial capabilities to meet the requirements of the CAA. jstallworth on DSK7TPTVN1PROD with RULES E. Section 110(l) Section 110(l) of the Act provides that a SIP revision must be adopted by a State after reasonable notice and public hearing. The submitted revisions address the City of Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County and the State of New Mexico’s Small Business Assistance (outlining the process). A copy of that memorandum is included in the docket. VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:38 Mar 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 Programs, as discussed in Section II of this preamble. Additionally, CAA section 110(l) states that the EPA cannot approve a SIP revision if that revision would interfere with any applicable requirement regarding attainment, reasonable further progress (RFP) or any requirement established in the CAA. The revisions do not interfere with any applicable requirement. To the contrary, they enhance the current SIP by providing for technical and compliance assistance for small businesses. IV. Final Action Pursuant to sections 110 and 507 of the Act, EPA is approving through a direct final action, revisions to the New Mexico SIP that were submitted on November 5, 1992 and November 16, 1992. We evaluated the state’s submittals and determined that they meet the applicable requirements of the CAA section 507(a). Also, in accordance with CAA section 110(l), the proposed revisions will not interfere with attainment of the NAAQS, reasonable further progress, or any other applicable requirement of the CAA. Finally, this approval is in accordance with 40 CFR 56.6(b) and our SIP consistency guidelines. These revisions do not apply to Indian lands over which the State or the AQCB lacks jurisdiction. EPA is publishing this rule without prior proposal because we view these as non-controversial amendments and anticipate no adverse comments. However, in the proposed rules section of this Federal Register publication, we are publishing a separate document that will serve as the proposal to approve the SIP revision if relevant adverse comments are received. This rule will be effective on May 9, 2016 without further notice unless we receive relevant adverse comments by April 11, 2016. If we receive relevant adverse comments, we will publish a timely withdrawal of this direct final rulemaking in the Federal Register informing the public that the direct final rule will not take effect. We will address all public comments in a subsequent final rule based on the proposed rule. We will not institute a second comment period on this action. Any parties interested in commenting must do so now. Please note that if we receive adverse comment on an amendment, paragraph, or section of this rule and if that provision may be severed from the remainder of the rule, we may adopt as final those provisions of the rule that are not the subject of an adverse comment. PO 00000 Frm 00026 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under the CAA, the Administrator is required to approve a SIP submission that complies with the provisions of the Act and applicable federal regulations. 42 U.S.C. 7410(k); 40 CFR 52.02(a). Thus, in reviewing SIP submissions, EPA’s role is to approve state choices, provided that they meet the criteria of the CAA. Accordingly, this action merely approves state law as meeting Federal requirements and does not impose additional requirements beyond those imposed by state law. For that reason, this action: • Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Orders 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and 13563 (76 FR 3821, January 21, 2011); • Does not impose an information collection burden under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.); • Is certified as not having a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.); • Does not contain any unfunded mandate or significantly or uniquely affect small governments, as described in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–4); • Does not have federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); • Is not an economically significant regulatory action based on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997); • Is not a significant regulatory action subject to Executive Order 13211 (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001); • Is not subject to requirements of section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272 note) because application of those requirements would be inconsistent with the CAA; and • Does not provide EPA with the discretionary authority to address, as appropriate, disproportionate human health or environmental effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). In addition, the SIP is not approved to apply on any Indian reservation land or in any other area where EPA or an Indian tribe has demonstrated that a tribe has jurisdiction. In those areas of Indian country, the rule does not have tribal implications as specified by Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249, E:\FR\FM\10MRR1.SGM 10MRR1 12599 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 47 / Thursday, March 10, 2016 / Rules and Regulations November 9, 2000), nor will it impose substantial direct costs on tribal governments or preempt tribal law. The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the United States. EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. A major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. This action is not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). Under section 307(b)(1) of the CAA, petitions for judicial review of this action must be filed in the United States Court of Appeals for the appropriate circuit by May 9, 2016. Filing a petition for reconsideration by the Administrator of this final rule does not affect the finality of this rule for the purposes of judicial review nor does it extend the time within which a petition for judicial review may be filed, and shall not postpone the effectiveness of such rule or action. This action may not be challenged later in proceedings to enforce its requirements. (See section 307(b)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxides, Ozone, Particulate matter, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: February 24, 2016. Ron Curry, Regional Administrator, Region 6. 40 CFR part 52 is amended as follows: PART 52—APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS 1. The authority citation for part 52 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. Subpart GG—New Mexico 2. In § 52.1620(e), the second table in paragraph (e), entitled ‘‘EPA-Approved Nonregulatory Provisions and QuasiRegulatory Measures in the New Mexico SIP’’ is amended by adding two new entries at the end of the table to read as follows: ■ § 52.1620 * Identification of plan. * * (e) * * * * * EPA-APPROVED NONREGULATORY PROVISIONS AND QUASI-REGULATORY MEASURES IN THE NEW MEXICO SIP Applicable geographic of nonattainment area Name of SIP Revision * * * Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Program. Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Program. * Statewide, excluding Bernalillo County. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County. State submittal/ effective date * 11/05/1992 11/16/1992 CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE [FR Doc. 2016–05162 Filed 3–9–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P 45 CFR Parts 1201, 2505, 2507, and 2508 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES RIN 3045–AA64 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Change of Address for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) 42 CFR Part 435 AGENCY: Eligibility in the States, District of Columbia, the Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa SUMMARY: jstallworth on DSK7TPTVN1PROD with RULES In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 430 to 481, revised as of October 1, 2015, on page 161, in § 435.301, in paragraph (b)(2)(iii), remove the term ‘‘435.330.320’’ and add the term ‘‘435.320’’ in its place. [FR Doc. 2016–05484 Filed 3–9–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505–01–D VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:38 Mar 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is updating its regulations to reflect a change of address. CNCS headquarters moved to 250 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20525, effective January 25, 2016. DATES: This rule is effective March 10, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Phyllis Green, Executive Assistant, Office of General Counsel, at 202–606– 6709 or email to pgreen@cns.gov. Individuals who use a PO 00000 Frm 00027 Fmt 4700 * 3/10/2016, [Insert Federal Register Citation]. 3/10/2016, [Insert Federal Register Citation]. Explanation * telecommunications device for the deaf (TTY–TDD) may call 1–800–833–3722 between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Corporation for National and Community Service. ACTION: Final rule. CFR Correction EPA approval date Sfmt 4700 The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Social Innovation Fund, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the President’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information, visit www.nationalservice.gov. On January 25, 2016, CNCS headquarters relocated to 250 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20525. This rule updates CNCS’s physical and internet address where it is referenced in CNCS regulations. E:\FR\FM\10MRR1.SGM 10MRR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 47 (Thursday, March 10, 2016)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 12595-12599]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-05162]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 52

[EPA-R06-OAR-2014-0642; FRL-9943-43-Region 6]


Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; 
New Mexico; and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County; Revisions To Establish 
Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance 
Assistance Programs

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Direct final rule.

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SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is approving 
revisions to the New Mexico State Implementation Plan (SIP) for both 
the State and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County. These revisions establish 
Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance 
Assistance Programs. The EPA is approving these revisions pursuant to 
section 110 and section 507(a) of the Clean Air Act (CAA).

DATES: This rule is effective on May 9, 2016 without further notice 
unless EPA receives relevant adverse comments by April 11, 2016. If EPA 
receives such comments, EPA will publish a timely withdrawal in the 
Federal Register informing the public that the rule will not take 
effect.

ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket No. EPA-R06-OAR-
2014-0642, at http://www.regulations.gov or via email to 
walser.john@epa.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting 
comments. Once submitted, comments cannot be edited or removed from 
Regulations.gov. The EPA may publish any comment received to its public 
docket. Do not submit electronically any information you consider to be 
Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose 
disclosure is restricted by statute. Multimedia submissions (audio, 
video, etc.) must be accompanied by a written comment. The written 
comment is considered the official comment and should include 
discussion of all points you wish to make. The EPA will generally not 
consider comments or comment contents located outside of the primary 
submission (i.e. on the web, cloud, or other file sharing system). For 
additional submission methods, please contact John Walser, 214-665-
7128, walser.john@epa.gov. For the full EPA public comment policy, 
information about CBI or multimedia submissions, and general guidance 
on making effective comments, please visit http://www2.epa.gov/dockets/commenting-epa-dockets.
    Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the 
www.regulations.gov index and in hard copy at EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross 
Avenue, Suite 700, Dallas, Texas. While all documents in the docket are 
listed in the index, some information may be publicly available only at 
the hard copy location (e.g., copyrighted material), and some may not 
be publicly available at either location (e.g., CBI).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. John Walser (6PD-L), (214) 665-
7128, walser.john@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Throughout this document, ``we,'' ``us,'' 
and ``our'' means EPA.

[[Page 12596]]

Table of Contents

I. Background
    A. What is a SIP?
    B. Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP)
II. Overview of the November 5 and November 16, 1992 State 
Submittals
    A. New Mexico
    B. Albuquerque
    C. General
III. Plan Requirements and Our Evaluation
    A. Small Business Assistance Program
    B. Ombudsman
    C. Compliance Assistance Panel (CAP)
    D. Eligibility
    E. Section 110(l)
IV. Final Action
V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

I. Background

A. What is a SIP?

    Section 110 of the CAA requires states to develop air pollution 
regulations and control strategies to ensure that air quality meets the 
National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) established by EPA. The 
NAAQS are established under section 109 of the CAA and currently 
address six criteria pollutants: Carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, 
ozone, lead, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide. A SIP is a set of 
air pollution regulations, control strategies, other means or 
techniques, and technical analyses developed by the state, to ensure 
that air quality in the state meets the NAAQS. It is required by 
section 110 and other provisions of the CAA. A SIP protects air quality 
primarily by addressing air pollution at its point of origin. SIPs can 
be extensive, containing state regulations or other enforceable 
documents, and supporting information such as city and county 
ordinances, monitoring networks, and modeling demonstrations. Each 
state must submit any SIP revision to EPA for approval and 
incorporation into the federally-enforceable SIP.
    The New Mexico SIP includes a variety of control strategies, 
including the regulations that outline general provisions applicable to 
and implemented by the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Air Quality 
Control Board (AQCB).

B. Small Business Assistance Program

    Implementation of the provisions of the CAA, as amended in 1990, 
requires regulation of many small businesses so that areas may attain 
and maintain the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) and 
reduce the emissions of air toxics. Small businesses frequently lack 
the technical expertise and financial resources necessary to evaluate 
state regulations and to determine the appropriate mechanisms for 
compliance. Congress anticipated the impact of these requirements on 
small businesses and, accordingly, required in CAA section 507 that 
each state submit a SIP revision with plans for establishing a Small 
Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance 
Assistance Program (Program). A key Program requirement outlined in CAA 
section 507(a), is the establishment of a Small Business Assistance 
Program (SBAP) to provide technical and compliance assistance to small 
businesses. In January 1992, the EPA issued ``Guidelines for the 
Implementation of Section 507 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments,'' 
in order to delineate the Federal and State roles in meeting the new 
statutory provisions, and as a tool to provide further guidance to 
states on submitting acceptable SIP revisions. That guidance described 
the SBAP as the ``core'' of a state's Program, because the SBAP is, 
``where the actual assistance to small businesses occurs.'' \1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ U.S. EPA, ``Guidelines for the Implementation of Section 507 
of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments'' (January 1992) at vii.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

II. Overview of the November 5 and November 16, 1992 State Submittals

A. New Mexico

    On November 5, 1992, the Governor of New Mexico submitted revisions 
to the New Mexico SIP to establish the Program. The submittal was 
adopted by the Environmental Improvement Board (EIB) on October 9, 
1992, consistent with the public notice requirements of CAA section 
110(l). The revisions established a Program for the State of New 
Mexico, excluding Albuquerque/Bernalillo County.
    The November 5, 1992 revisions to the SIP were in the form of a 
narrative commitment for full implementation of the Program by November 
15, 1994 and a commitment to coincide with the effective date of the 
State's operating permit program. The Ombudsman (Director of Strategic 
Initiatives and Special Projects) is located in the Office of the NMED 
Secretary and was appointed before November 15, 1994, to represent the 
interests of small businesses, as they relate to the implementation of 
Section 507(a)(3) of the CAA.
    In addition to designating a State Ombudsman to satisfy CAA section 
507(a)(3), the State submitted its plans for the creation of a state 
SBAP. The State explained that the technical component of the SBAP 
would consist of state technical experts who would respond to requests 
for assistance from small businesses. The state explained that these 
technical staff would be located in the Air Quality Bureau's Planning 
Section, and would respond to permitting and compliance questions. As 
part of the SBAP, New Mexico's submission detailed the adequate 
mechanisms and procedures that would satisfy the remaining requirements 
of CAA section 507(a)(1)-(2), (4)-(7).

B. Albuquerque

    On November 16, 1992, The Governor of New Mexico submitted 
revisions to the New Mexico SIP for Albuquerque/Bernalillo County. The 
submittal was adopted by the Air Quality Control Board on October 7, 
1992, consistent with the public notice requirements of CAA section 
110(l). The revisions establish the Small Business Stationary Source 
Technical and Environmental Compliance Program for Albuquerque/
Bernalillo County.
    The November 16, 1992 revisions to the SIP were in the form of a 
narrative commitment for full implementation of the SBAP by November 
15, 1994 and a commitment to coincide with the effective date of the 
State's operating permit program. The Small Business Ombudsman is in 
the office of the Albuquerque Environmental Health Director (AEHD). The 
establishment of a SBAP for providing technical and compliance 
assistance to small businesses was committed to be in the AEHD Air 
Pollution Control Division's Planning Section to give small businesses 
correct technical, permitting and compliance information for all 
applicable CAA requirements.

C. General

    In an August 28, 2015 letter, the State of New Mexico withdrew the 
elements of the 1992 SIP pertaining to the Compliance Assistance Panel 
(CAP), a requirement of CAA section 507(e) that EPA has historically 
viewed as a required component of the Program. Since the New Mexico 
legislature created one CAP for both the State and Albuquerque/
Bernalillo County, the withdrawal, therefore, applies to both the State 
and Albuquerque/Bernalillo County.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ August 28, 2015 Letter from Ryan Flynn, Secretary, State of 
New Mexico Environment Department, to Ron Curry, Regional 
Administrator for EPA Region 6, to withdraw the CAP from the 1992 
SIP submittal.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Through an administrative oversight, these SIP revisions were not 
acted upon when submitted. EPA is now moving forward to take action on 
these revisions as part of our national SIP backlog reduction efforts.

[[Page 12597]]

III. Plan Requirements and Our Evaluation

    Section 507 of the CAA describes three broad sets of requirements: 
(1) The establishment of a Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP) to 
provide technical and compliance assistance to small businesses; (2) 
the establishment of a State Small Business Ombudsman to represent the 
interests of small business in the regulatory process; and (3) the 
creation of a Compliance Advisory Panel (CAP) ``on the State level'' to 
determine and report on the overall effectiveness of the SBAP.

A. Small Business Assistance Program

    The overarching purpose of establishing an SBAP is to provide 
technical and compliance assistance to small businesses. As interpreted 
by EPA, CAA section 507(a) sets forth six requirements which must be 
met by the State in order to have an approvable SBAP.\3\ The first SBAP 
requirement is for the State to establish adequate mechanisms for 
developing, collecting and coordinating information concerning 
compliance methods and technologies for small business stationary 
sources, and programs to encourage lawful cooperation among such 
sources and other persons to further compliance with the CAA.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ Notably, section 507(a) sets forth seven requirements, in 
subsections (1)-(7). The third of these, section 507(a)(3), requires 
the establishment of an Ombudsman Office--a key Program element. The 
Ombudsman requirement of section 507(a)(3) is discussed in the next 
section.
    \4\ See CAA section 507(a)(1).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The second SBAP requirement is that the State establish adequate 
mechanisms for assisting small business stationary sources with 
pollution prevention and accidental release detection and prevention, 
including providing information concerning alternative technologies, 
process changes, products and methods of operation that help reduce air 
pollution.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ See id. section 507(a)(2).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The third SBAP requirement is to develop a compliance and technical 
assistance program for small business stationary sources which assists 
small businesses in determining applicable requirements and in 
receiving permits under the Act in a timely and efficient manner.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \6\ See id. section 507(a)(4).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The fourth SBAP requirement is to develop adequate mechanisms to 
assure that small business stationary sources receive notice of their 
rights under the CAA in such manner and form as to assure reasonably 
adequate time for such sources to evaluate compliance methods or final 
regulation or standards issued under the Act.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ See id. section 507(a)(5).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The fifth SBAP requirement is to develop adequate mechanisms for 
informing small business stationary sources of their obligation under 
the CAA, including mechanisms for referring such sources to qualified 
auditors or, at the option of the State, for providing audits of 
operations of such sources to determine compliance with the CAA.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \8\ See id. section 507(a)(6).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The sixth SBAP requirement is to develop procedures for 
consideration of requests from a small business stationary source for 
modification of: (A) Any work practice or technological method of 
compliance; or (B) the schedule of milestones for implementing such 
work practice or method of compliance preceding any applicable 
compliance date based on the technological and financial capability of 
any such small business stationary source.\9\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \9\ See id. section 507(a)(7).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The SIP narratives for both the State and Albuquerque/Bernalillo 
County discuss how their respective SBAPs meet the above requirements, 
and include further information about how each entity expects to 
implement and maintain their Programs. Further explanation of our 
analysis of the adequacy of the submissions with respect to the SBAP 
requirements can be found in the TSD for this action.

B. Ombudsman

    Section 507(a) also requires states to establish a State Small 
Business Ombudsman to represent the interests of small businesses in 
the regulatory process. CAA section 507(a)(3) requires the designation 
of a State office to serve as the Ombudsman for small business 
stationary sources. The State has met this requirement by appointing an 
Ombudsman in the Office of the NMED Secretary in 1992. Albuquerque/
Bernalillo County met this requirement by committing to appoint an 
Ombudsman in the Office of the Albuquerque Environmental Health 
Department before the November 15, 1994 statutory deadline.

C. Compliance Advisory Panel (CAP)

    In addition to the SBAP and Ombudsman, CAA section 507 envisions 
the creation of a Compliance Advisory Panel (CAP) ``on the State 
level'' to, among other things, evaluate and report on the overall 
effectiveness of the SBAP.\10\ Congress narrowly prescribed the 
membership of the CAP, including which state officials would be 
responsible for appointing members representing various interests.\11\ 
At the time of the submittal in 1992, the New Mexico program included a 
statewide CAP that met these stringent requirements, and which New 
Mexico believed was a required Program element because of EPA's 1992 
Program Guidance. Since that time, however, and after having a CAP in 
place for over 10 years, the State did not continue to operate a CAP. 
As mentioned previously, the State withdrew the portions of its SIP 
submission regarding the CAP in a letter dated August 28, 2015, a copy 
of which may be found in the docket for this action.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \10\ See id. section 507(e)(1).
    \11\ See id. section 507(e)(2).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Although EPA has historically viewed the CAP as a necessary 
component of a Program, the Agency no longer believes that to be the 
case. In CAA section 507(a), Congress directed that EPA ``shall 
approve'' a Program if it meets the criteria outlined in section 
507(a)(1)-(7). The requirement for the creation of a CAP, located in 
section 507(e), is not one of those criteria. This distinguishes the 
CAP from the requirements to designate a state office to serve as 
Ombudsman or to establish an SBAP, which are criteria for Program 
approval in CAA section 507(a). Although a State may submit a CAP for 
inclusion as a component of its Program--and indeed, EPA still believes 
that CAPs serve an important role in the continued operational success 
of a Program--Congress, in locating the CAP requirement in section 
507(e), envisioned that the requirement to create a CAP would be 
severable from the Program requirements outlined in section 507(a). 
Accordingly, New Mexico's withdrawal of the CAP portion of its SIP 
submission does not prevent EPA from acting on the remainder of the 
submission. EPA believes that New Mexico, including Albuquerque/
Bernalillo County, continues to operate a robust SBAP providing the 
required services to eligible small businesses.
    Before taking an action that, as here, differs from past guidance 
or practice, EPA's internal practices direct Regional Offices to follow 
a SIP consistency process to ensure consistency in across regional 
actions. The SIP consistency process was established in 1995 as part of 
the delegation to Regional Administrators of SIPs and SIP revision 
approval/disapprovals actions.\12\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \12\ See Memorandum from William L. Wehrum, Acting Assistant 
Administrator, to Air Division Directors, Regions I-X (September 7, 
2005) (outlining the process). A copy of that memorandum is included 
in the docket.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 12598]]

    Pursuant to 40 CFR 56.6(b) and the SIP consistency guidelines, EPA 
Region 6 followed this process. Pursuant to the SIP consistency 
process, EPA Region 6 consulted with all other EPA regional offices, 
the Office of Air and Radiation, and the Office of General Counsel. 
Region 6 received no objections to this shift in approach.
    EPA is approving the New Mexico and Albuquerque Small Business 
Assistance Programs as revised with the withdrawal of the element 
relating to the CAP. Approval in the SIP will support state and local 
efforts to maintain their respective Programs.

D. Eligibility

    While not a required Program element, it is also important that the 
SIP establishes criteria and procedures for determining the eligibility 
of a source to receive assistance under the Program. Section 507(c)(1) 
of the CAA defines the term ``small business stationary source'' as a 
stationary source that:
    (a) Is owned or operated by a person who employs 100 or fewer 
individuals;
    (b) Is a small business concern as defined in the Small Business 
Act;
    (c) Is not a major stationary source;
    (d) Does not emit 50 tons per year (tpy) or more of any regulated 
pollutant; and
    (e) Emits less than 75 tpy of all regulated pollutants.
    The State of New Mexico has established a mechanism for 
ascertaining the eligibility of a source to receive assistance under 
the Program, including an evaluation of a source's eligibility using 
the criteria in section 507(c)(1) of the CAA. This mechanism is 
described in the state's narrative SIP revision.
    The State has also provided for exclusion from the small business 
stationary source definition, after consultation with the EPA and the 
Small Business Administration Administrator and after providing notice 
and opportunity for public hearing, of any category or subcategory of 
sources that the State determines to have sufficient technical and 
financial capabilities to meet the requirements of the CAA.

E. Section 110(l)

    Section 110(l) of the Act provides that a SIP revision must be 
adopted by a State after reasonable notice and public hearing. The 
submitted revisions address the City of Albuquerque/Bernalillo County 
and the State of New Mexico's Small Business Assistance Programs, as 
discussed in Section II of this preamble. Additionally, CAA section 
110(l) states that the EPA cannot approve a SIP revision if that 
revision would interfere with any applicable requirement regarding 
attainment, reasonable further progress (RFP) or any requirement 
established in the CAA. The revisions do not interfere with any 
applicable requirement. To the contrary, they enhance the current SIP 
by providing for technical and compliance assistance for small 
businesses.

IV. Final Action

    Pursuant to sections 110 and 507 of the Act, EPA is approving 
through a direct final action, revisions to the New Mexico SIP that 
were submitted on November 5, 1992 and November 16, 1992. We evaluated 
the state's submittals and determined that they meet the applicable 
requirements of the CAA section 507(a). Also, in accordance with CAA 
section 110(l), the proposed revisions will not interfere with 
attainment of the NAAQS, reasonable further progress, or any other 
applicable requirement of the CAA. Finally, this approval is in 
accordance with 40 CFR 56.6(b) and our SIP consistency guidelines. 
These revisions do not apply to Indian lands over which the State or 
the AQCB lacks jurisdiction.
    EPA is publishing this rule without prior proposal because we view 
these as non-controversial amendments and anticipate no adverse 
comments. However, in the proposed rules section of this Federal 
Register publication, we are publishing a separate document that will 
serve as the proposal to approve the SIP revision if relevant adverse 
comments are received. This rule will be effective on May 9, 2016 
without further notice unless we receive relevant adverse comments by 
April 11, 2016. If we receive relevant adverse comments, we will 
publish a timely withdrawal of this direct final rulemaking in the 
Federal Register informing the public that the direct final rule will 
not take effect. We will address all public comments in a subsequent 
final rule based on the proposed rule. We will not institute a second 
comment period on this action. Any parties interested in commenting 
must do so now. Please note that if we receive adverse comment on an 
amendment, paragraph, or section of this rule and if that provision may 
be severed from the remainder of the rule, we may adopt as final those 
provisions of the rule that are not the subject of an adverse comment.

V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

    Under the CAA, the Administrator is required to approve a SIP 
submission that complies with the provisions of the Act and applicable 
federal regulations. 42 U.S.C. 7410(k); 40 CFR 52.02(a). Thus, in 
reviewing SIP submissions, EPA's role is to approve state choices, 
provided that they meet the criteria of the CAA. Accordingly, this 
action merely approves state law as meeting Federal requirements and 
does not impose additional requirements beyond those imposed by state 
law. For that reason, this action:
     Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' subject to 
review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Orders 
12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and 13563 (76 FR 3821, January 21, 
2011);
     Does not impose an information collection burden under the 
provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.);
     Is certified as not having a significant economic impact 
on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory 
Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.);
     Does not contain any unfunded mandate or significantly or 
uniquely affect small governments, as described in the Unfunded 
Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-4);
     Does not have federalism implications as specified in 
Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999);
     Is not an economically significant regulatory action based 
on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 
19885, April 23, 1997);
     Is not a significant regulatory action subject to 
Executive Order 13211 (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001);
     Is not subject to requirements of section 12(d) of the 
National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272 
note) because application of those requirements would be inconsistent 
with the CAA; and
     Does not provide EPA with the discretionary authority to 
address, as appropriate, disproportionate human health or environmental 
effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under 
Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994).
    In addition, the SIP is not approved to apply on any Indian 
reservation land or in any other area where EPA or an Indian tribe has 
demonstrated that a tribe has jurisdiction. In those areas of Indian 
country, the rule does not have tribal implications as specified by 
Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249,

[[Page 12599]]

November 9, 2000), nor will it impose substantial direct costs on 
tribal governments or preempt tribal law.
    The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by the 
Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally 
provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating 
the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, 
to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the 
United States. EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other 
required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of 
Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior 
to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. A major rule cannot 
take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal 
Register. This action is not a ``major rule'' as defined by 5 U.S.C. 
804(2).
    Under section 307(b)(1) of the CAA, petitions for judicial review 
of this action must be filed in the United States Court of Appeals for 
the appropriate circuit by May 9, 2016. Filing a petition for 
reconsideration by the Administrator of this final rule does not affect 
the finality of this rule for the purposes of judicial review nor does 
it extend the time within which a petition for judicial review may be 
filed, and shall not postpone the effectiveness of such rule or action. 
This action may not be challenged later in proceedings to enforce its 
requirements. (See section 307(b)(2)).

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52

    Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by 
reference, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxides, Ozone, 
Particulate matter, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile 
organic compounds.

    Dated: February 24, 2016.
Ron Curry,
Regional Administrator, Region 6.

    40 CFR part 52 is amended as follows:

PART 52--APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS

0
1. The authority citation for part 52 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.

Subpart GG--New Mexico

0
2. In Sec.  52.1620(e), the second table in paragraph (e), entitled 
``EPA-Approved Nonregulatory Provisions and Quasi-Regulatory Measures 
in the New Mexico SIP'' is amended by adding two new entries at the end 
of the table to read as follows:


Sec.  52.1620  Identification of plan.

* * * * *
    (e) * * *

            EPA-Approved Nonregulatory Provisions and Quasi-Regulatory Measures in the New Mexico SIP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                       Applicable           State
      Name of SIP Revision           geographic of       submittal/     EPA approval date        Explanation
                                   nonattainment area  effective date
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Small Business Stationary Source  Statewide,               11/05/1992  3/10/2016, [Insert   ....................
 Technical and Environmental       excluding                            Federal Register
 Compliance Assistance Program.    Bernalillo County.                   Citation].
Small Business Stationary Source  Albuquerque/             11/16/1992  3/10/2016, [Insert   ....................
 Technical and Environmental       Bernalillo County.                   Federal Register
 Compliance Assistance Program.                                         Citation].
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[FR Doc. 2016-05162 Filed 3-9-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 6560-50-P